Title:
COMPACT INTERNAL WINDOW AIR CONDITIONER
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner (CIWAC) whose casing is adapted to be supported inside the room on the internal windowsill of a horizontally-sliding-pane window. In its installed state, the CIWAC does not interfere with the operation of the sliding windowpane. Further, the CIWAC comprises flexible sliding seals, which sealingly contact the sliding windowpane to reduce the cross-leakage of room-air and outside air. Height-adjustable pedestals are provided to further support the CIWAC from the floor. An electronic noise cancellation system is also provided to reduce the noise generated by the CIWAC during its operation. The CIWAC is relatively inexpensive to manufacture and does not need a wall-opening or modifications to the window for installation. Therefore, the CIWAC can be easily installed or uninstalled.



Inventors:
D'souza, Melanius (San Dimas, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/112411
Publication Date:
02/05/2009
Filing Date:
04/22/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F25D23/12
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
JONES, MELVIN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MELANIUS D'SOUZA (1718 AVENIDA ENTRADA, SAN DIMAS, CA, 91773-4314, US)
Claims:
1. 1-20. (canceled)

21. A Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner (CIWAC) for installation on the internal windowsill of a horizontally-sliding-pane window, the CIWAC comprising a casing and a closed-circuit vapor-compression refrigeration system located within the casing, the casing having a narrow face-width and an elongated face-height, the aspect ratio “H/W” of face-height “H” to face-width “W” being greater than 3.5, the face-width dimension “W” being 10 inches or less, an indoors-facing wall of the casing having openings for circulation of the room air through the evaporator coil, an outdoors-facing wall of the casing having openings for circulation of the outside air through the condenser coil, further characterized in that the casing is adapted to be mounted totally inside the room on the inside windowsill of the horizontally-sliding-pane window without protruding through the window-frame or wall, the lower end of the casing having a means to engage the inside lower-sill of the window-frame, the casing being supported by the inside lower-sill of the window-frame.

22. The Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner of claim 21, wherein the means to engage the inside lower-sill of the window-frame is an inside corner in the lower wall of the casing.

23. The Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner of claim 21, further characterized in that the casing of the Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner does not interfere with the opening or closing of the sliding windowpane of the horizontally-sliding-pane window.

24. The Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner of claim 23, further comprising flexible air-seals on the casing, the flexible air-seals slidingly contacting the inside surface of the windowpane of the horizontally-sliding-pane window.

25. The Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner of claim 23, further comprising flexible air-seals which are installed on the inside surface of the windowpane of the horizontally-sliding-pane window, the flexible air-seals slidingly contacting the rear panel of the casing of the Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner.

26. The Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner of claim 23, further comprising a pedestal for supporting the Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner's casing from the floor.

27. The Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner of claim 26, wherein the pedestal is height-adjustable.

28. The Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner of claim 21, further comprising a fastener for attaching the Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner's casing to an inside wall surface of the room.

29. The Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner of claim 27, further comprising a fastener for attaching the Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner's casing to an inside wall surface of the room.

30. The Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner of claim 21, characterized in that, the intake and outlet openings for the cooling air for the refrigerant condenser coil flows are both located on the rear panel of the casing of the Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner.

31. The Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner of claim 21, characterized in that condensed water is collected from the evaporator coil and used to cool the refrigerant condenser coil.

32. The Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner of claim 31 wherein the condensed water is sprayed on the refrigerant condenser coil.

33. The Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner of claim 21, further comprising a refrigerant flow reversing means to enable the operation of the Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner as a heat-pump.

34. The Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner of claim 21, further comprising an electronic noise cancellation system for reducing the noise generated during the operation of the Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This patent application claims priority from U.S. provisional patent application No. 60/565,242 filed on Apr. 23, 2004.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to air-conditioners and more particularly to window-mounted air-conditioners. The present invention can also be used with window-mounted heat-pumps and de-humidifiers.

Commercially available window air-conditioners (WACs) are generally designed for use with vertically-sliding windows. As an example, the commercially available Samsung™ Model No. AW0505M WAC is quite representative of the design of such WACs. However, modern homes and apartment buildings are increasingly being fitted with horizontal sliding windows. Most commercially available WACs are designed for vertically-sliding windows, such as single-hung or double-hung windows. Therefore, they are relatively wider compared to their height or depth. Further, a major portion of their casing has to be located outside the room for the circulation of the outside air over their condenser coils. Therefore, commercially available WACs cannot easily be fitted in modern horizontal sliding windows without major modifications to the window. Further, a window, which is modified for the installation of a WAC, generally cannot be easily opened for cross-ventilation with outside air if required. Yet further, the modified window cannot be closed if required for personal safety. Thereby the safety of the room's occupant and possessions is greatly reduced by such an installation. Yet further, a WAC thus installed may be stolen because it can be accessed from outside the room.

For the above reasons and to avoid modification to the horizontal sliding window and to maintain the full operability of the horizontal-sliding window, the WAC is alternately installed in an opening in the wall. The provision of the opening in the wall greatly increases the labor and cost for installing the WAC. In many cases, the cost of installation of the WAC may exceed the purchase price of the WAC, which can be as low as $60 per unit. If the room's occupant is a renter, he/she may not be allowed to make modifications to the window or the wall to install the WAC. Thus it is almost impossible for such occupants to install a WAC to achieve a more comfortable living environment.

Portable air-conditioners, for example, the Maytag™ 9,000 BTU Portable Air Conditioner, are marketed to meet the requirements of such users. The portable air-conditioners are refrigeration units on rolling casters, which use a flexible air hose for evacuating the rejected heat as warm air. The free end of the flexible hose can be mounted on an open window for expelling the warm air to the outside environment. However, these portable air-conditioners are relatively expensive. For example, the Maytag™ 9000 BTU Portable Air Conditioner currently sells for $499 per unit. Thus, portable air conditioners are not a viable solution for most potential users of WACs.

There have be no commercial attempts to market a WAC which easily fits a horizontal sliding window, is relatively inexpensive, is easy to install, is compact, can be easily relocated, and maintains the full operability of the window.

The WAC of the present invention attempts to provide all these user-friendly features.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In one aspect of the present invention, a Compact Internal Window Air Conditioner (CIWAC) whose casing is adapted to be mounted on the inside windowsill of a horizontally-sliding-pane window is disclosed.

In another aspect of the present invention, a CIWAC whose casing is adapted to be mounted totally inside the room on the inside windowsill of a horizontally-sliding-pane window is disclosed.

In another aspect of the present invention, a CIWAC whose casing is adapted to be mounted on the inside windowsill of a horizontally-sliding-pane window without interference to the operation of the horizontally-sliding-windowpane is disclosed.

In another aspect of the present invention, a CIWAC whose casing is adapted to be mounted on the inside windowsill of a horizontally-sliding-pane window is disclosed. In this embodiment, the CIWAC further comprises flexible air-seals, which slidingly contact the inside surface of the windowpane of the horizontally-sliding-pane window.

In another aspect of the present invention, a CIWAC whose casing is adapted to be mounted on the inside windowsill of a horizontally-sliding-pane window is disclosed. In this embodiment, the CIWAC further comprises flexible air seals, which are installed on the inside surface of the windowpane of the horizontally-sliding-pane window and slidingly contact the rear panel of the casing of the AC.

In another aspect of the present invention, a CIWAC whose casing is adapted to be mounted on the inside windowsill of a horizontally-sliding-pane window is disclosed. In this embodiment, the CIWAC further comprises pedestal means for supporting the CIWAC's casing from the floor.

In another aspect of the present invention, a CIWAC whose casing is adapted to be mounted on the inside windowsill of a horizontally-sliding-pane window is disclosed. In this embodiment, the CIWAC further comprises height-adjustable pedestal means for supporting the CIWAC's casing from the floor.

In another aspect of the present invention, a CIWAC whose casing is adapted to be mounted on the inside windowsill of a horizontally-sliding-pane window is disclosed. In this embodiment, the CIWAC further comprises attachment means for attaching the CIWAC's casing to an inside wall surface of the room.

In another aspect of the present invention, a CIWAC whose casing is adapted to be mounted on the inside windowsill of a horizontally-sliding-pane window is disclosed. In this embodiment, the CIWAC is configured for flow of the cooling air for the refrigerant condenser coil through the rear panel of the casing of the CIWAC.

In another aspect of the present invention, a CIWAC whose casing is adapted to be mounted on the inside windowsill of a horizontally-sliding-pane window is disclosed. In this embodiment, the CIWAC is configured such that condensed water is collected from the evaporator coil and used to cool the refrigerant condenser coil.

In another aspect of the present invention, a CIWAC whose casing is adapted to be mounted on the inside windowsill of a horizontally-sliding-pane window is disclosed. In this embodiment, the CIWAC is configured such that condensed water is collected from the evaporator coil and used to cool the refrigerant condenser coil by being sprayed on the refrigerant condenser coil.

In another aspect of the present invention, a CIWAC whose casing is adapted to be mounted on the inside windowsill of a horizontally-sliding-pane window is disclosed. In this embodiment, the CIWAC is configured such that the casing has a width “W” where “W” is less than or equal to “X” and “W” is greater than “(X−1)” where “X” is an integer denoting 6 to 24 inches.

In another aspect of the present invention, a CIWAC whose casing is adapted to be mounted on the inside windowsill of a horizontally-sliding-pane window is disclosed. In this embodiment, the CIWAC further comprises a refrigerant flow reversing means to enable the operation of the CIWAC as a heat-pump.

In another aspect of the present invention, a CIWAC whose casing is adapted to be mounted on the inside windowsill of a horizontally-sliding-pane window is disclosed. In this embodiment, the CIWAC further comprises an electronic noise cancellation system for reducing the noise generated during the operation of the CIWAC.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is an installed isometric representation of the Compact Internal WAC (CIWAC) of the present invention showing its installation within a horizontal-sliding-pane window. As used herein, the term “pane” means the frame containing the glass, which slides within the wall-attached outer-frame of the window.

FIG. 2A is a representation of the front panel of the CIWAC, the front panel being located facing the inside of the room.

FIG. 2B is a representation of the rear panel of the CIWAC, the rear panel being located facing the outside of the window of the room.

FIG. 2C is a sectional side-elevational representation of the CIWAC of FIG. 1 showing the internal arrangement of its main components.

FIG. 3 is an exploded isometric representation of CIWAC 10 of FIG. 1 showing the internal arrangement of its main components. For purposes of clarity, side panels 20r and 20l are not shown in this figure.

FIG. 4 is a process flow representation of the CIWAC of FIG. 1 during its operation as an air-conditioner.

FIG. 5A is a process flow representation of the heat-pump embodiment of the CIWAC of FIG. 1 during its operation as a room-air cooler.

FIG. 5B is a process flow representation of the heat-pump embodiment of the CIWAC of FIG. 1 during its operation as a room-air heater.

FIG. 6 is a process flow representation of the CIWAC of FIG. 1, which incorporates an electronic noise cancellation system for reduction of noise generated by the CIWAC during its operation.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Referring to FIGS. 1, 2A, 2B, 2C, and 3, CIWAC 10 of the present invention is adapted to be mounted on the inside lower windowsill 70s of a conventional horizontal-sliding-pane window 70.

CIWAC 10 is configured as a rectangular box-shaped casing 20 having a width dimension “W”, a height “H”, a depth “D” and a notched corner 20c at its lower rear end. Width dimension “W” could vary between 24 and 6 inches depending on the cooling capacity of CIWAC 10 as well as other later-discussed considerations. As shown in forthcoming examples, height “H” and depth “D” could vary depending on width “W” and the cooling capacity of CIWAC 10.

Casing 20 comprises a front panel 20f, a rear panel 20z, a right side panel 20r, a left side panel 201, a top panel 20t, a bottom panel 20b, a notched corner top panel 20x, and a notched corner rear panel 20y. Dimensionally, the height of 20f equals the sum of the heights of 20z and 20y, or as shown in FIG. 2C, “H=H1+H2”. Dimensionally, the depth of 20t equals the sum of the depths of 20b and 20x or as shown in FIG. 2C, “D=D1+D2”. The corner 20c is dimensionally engineered for casing 20 to be seated on the ledge 701 created by lower windowsill 70s and the room wall surface 70w adjacent to windowsill 70s.

Casing 20 can be made of steel or rigid polyurethane or rigid plastic or any other suitable material of construction that is used for conventional WACs. Further panels 20f, 20z, 20r, 20l, 20t, 20b, 20x, and 20y can be individual pieces that are fastened by conventional means such as screws to form casing 20. Alternatively, two or more of panels 20f, 20z, 20r, 20l, 20t, 20b, 20x, and 20y can be integrally combined to reduce the manufacturing complexity of CIWAC 10; the combined pieces can then be fastened by conventional means such as screws to form casing 20. Yet further, any or all of the panels can be insulated, internally or externally, for noise or heat-loss reduction purposes.

Front panel 20f has a warm room-air return grill 26i and a cooled room-air expelling grill 26o which is located below grill 26i. These grills can be stamp-cut into front panel 20f or they can be removable grills that are mounted into suitable openings cut into front panel 20f. As is customary with Window Air-Conditioners (WACs), an air-filter (not shown) can be provided in grill 26i to remove particulate matter that may be present in the room air, which is represented by air streamline 32 in FIG. 2C.

Rear panel 20z has an outside-air intake opening 22i and a warmed outside-air exhaust opening 22o which is located above 22i. Openings 22i and 22o are stamp-cut into rear panel 20z. Removable grills and air-filters can also be provided in openings 22i and 22o for particulate removal and safety purposes. Thus outside air, which is represented by air streamline 42 in FIG. 2C, is circulated through casing 20.

The internal volume of casing 20 is divided into a plurality of relatively gas-tight internal sub-volumes 24z, 24y, 24x, 24u, 24v, and 24w by internal partitions 24, 28a, 28b, and 28g and blower air-outlet profile plates 29a and 29b. Internal partitions 24, 28a, 28b, and 28g and profile plates 29a and 29b are located generally perpendicularly to side-panels 20r and 20l and have width dimensions generally equal to the internal width dimension between 20r and 20l. The edges of internal partitions 24, 28a, 28b, and 28g and profile plates 29a and 29b can be welded or otherwise attached to the internal surfaces of side-panels 20r and 20l. Alternatively, fluid separating means such as packings, gaskets, caulking, etc. can be provided between the cutting edges of internal partitions 24, 28a, 28b, and 28g and profile plates 29a and 29b and the internal surfaces of side-panels 20r and 20l to reduce air cross-leakage between sub-volumes 24z, 24y, 24x, 24u, 24v, and 24w.

Partition 24 has bends or folds, which give it an approximately Z-shaped longitudinal cross-section. These folds divide partition 24 into sections 24a, 24b, 24c, 24d, 24e, and 24f. An opening 24p is provided in section 24b for mounting electrical motor 40m of blower 40 (described later herein). A similar opening 24q is provided in section 24d for mounting electrical motor 30m of blower 30 (described later herein). Motors 40m and 30m are attached to panel sections 24b and 24d by screws or other suitable fasteners (not shown). Openings 29h and 29i are provided in profile plates 29a and 29b respectively for penetratingly locating air-flow outlets 40o and 30o of blowers (described later herein) 40 and 30 respectively.

Evaporator coil 30c is located within sub-volume 24u. Conventionally, evaporator coil 30c is configured as a bank of finned tubes. However, other heat-exchanger configurations such as plate-heat-exchangers can also be used without departing from the spirit of the invention. Evaporator coil 30c has an air-side flow face that is generally rectangular and which generally conforms dimensionally to grill 26i. Also located in sub-volume 24u is the impeller section 30b of room-air circulation blower 30. Circulation blower 30 is a centrifugal type of blower whose air-flow inlet 30i is in fluid communication with sub-volume 24u. The air-flow outlet 30o of blower 30 is in fluid communication with sub-volume 24v which, in turn, is in fluid communication with room-air outlet grill 26o in front panel 20f. While blower 30 is shown and described as a centrifugal type of blower, it will be obvious that other air-movement devices such as fans could also be used without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Located under evaporator coil 30c is condensed water collection pan 30d, which collects any condensed moisture that may drip from evaporator coil 30c during operation of CIWAC 10.

Condenser coil 40c is located within sub-volume 24x. Conventionally condenser coil 40c is also configured as a bank of finned tubes. However other heat-exchanger configurations, such as plate-heat-exchangers can also be used. Condenser coil 40c has an air-side flow face that is generally rectangular and which generally conforms dimensionally to flow opening 22i in rear panel 20z. Also located in sub-volume 24x is the impeller section 40b of outside-air circulation blower 40. Circulation blower 40 is a centrifugal type of blower whose air-flow inlet 40i is in fluid communication with sub-volume 24x. The air-flow outlet 40o of impeller section 40b is in fluid communication with sub-volume 24y which, in turn, is in fluid communication with outside-air outlet opening 22o in rear panel 20z.

To provide a compact arrangement, electrical motor 30m, which rotates the rotor of blower 30, is located in sub-volume 24x. An opening 24q in partition section 24d enables motor 30m to be installed in this location. Similarly, electrical motor 40m, which rotates the rotor of blower 40, is located in sub-volume 24z. An opening 24p in partition section 24b enables motor 40m to be installed in this location.

A standard air-conditioner compressor unit 50 and a condensed water removal pump 30p are located within sub-volume 24w. As described herein, compressor unit 50 includes the impeller 50i and motor 50m which rotates impeller 50i to compress the refrigerant fluid in compressor unit 50. The refrigerant fluid flows into impeller 50i through a fluid inlet connector 50p and flows out of impeller 50i through a fluid outlet connector 50q. Condensed water drain line 30m, which is penetratingly routed through profile plate 29b and partition sections 28b and 28g, connects condensed water drain pan 30d to the water inlet connector of condensed water pump 30p. Condensed water removal line 30n is penetratingly routed through partition section 24f and connects water outlet connector of condensed water pump 30p to condensed water sprayer 30s which is located above condenser coil 40c. Condensed water sprayer 30s has spray orifices 30h, which spray the condensed water over condenser coil 40c to provide additional cooling of the refrigerant within condenser coil 40c by sensible cooling and evaporation. The un-evaporated condensed water is entrained by the warmed outside air 42w (described later) and thereby removed from CIWAC 10.

Standard electrical controls (not shown) for controlling the operation of a WAC can also be located within sub-volume 24w or in any other suitable location within casing 20. These controls include, as a minimum, electrical circuits for starting and stopping of electrical motors 30m, 40m, and 50m and will be obvious to one of ordinary skill in the art. Additionally, thermocouples, thermostats, timers, and other refinements can also be provided to further enhance the operating features of CIWAC 10. All such refinements will be obvious to one of ordinary skill in the art.

Refrigerant flow conduits 50a, 50b, 50c, and 50d (shown in FIG. 4) provide the closed loop for the flow of refrigerant between compressor impeller 50i, condenser coil 40c, gas expansion device 50v (described later herein), and evaporator coil 30c.

In the following description, the refrigeration loop of FIGS. 3 and 4 operates in a simple closed-circuit, vapor-compression cycle wherein compressor impeller 50i circulates gaseous high-pressure or 2-phase refrigerant 52r (shown in FIG. 4) through condenser coil 40c and condensed or low-pressure refrigerant 52t (shown in FIG. 4) through evaporator coil 30c. Details of the closed-circuit, vapor-compression cycle are given in standard engineering textbooks such as Mechanical Engineers Handbook, 8th Edition, Chapter 19, pages 19-6 to 19-9, which are incorporated herein by reference.

Following the standard operation of an air-conditioner, operation of blower 30 induces warm room air 32w over evaporator coil 30c to produce cooled dehumidified room air 32c which is expelled back into the room by blower 30. Warm room air 32w may also lose some moisture that is condensed in evaporator coil 30c and is collected in condensed water collection pan 30d as described in FIG. 3.

Similarly, operation of blower 40 induces outside air 42c over condenser coil 40c to produce warmed outside air 42w which is expelled back to the outside environment by blower 40.

Referring now to FIG. 4, compressor impeller 50i circulates the refrigerant in a closed loop between condenser coil 40c, fluid expansion device 50v, and evaporator coil 30c by fluid conduits 50b, 50c, 50d and 50a. Flow conduit 50b connects fluid outlet 50q of compressor impeller 50i to the refrigerant inlet connector of condenser coil 40c. Flow conduit 50c connects the refrigerant outlet connector of condenser coil 40c to the fluid inlet connector of fluid expansion device 50v. Flow conduit 50d connects the fluid outlet connector of fluid expansion device 50v to the refrigerant inlet connector of evaporator coil 30c. Finally, flow conduit 50a connects the refrigerant outlet connector of evaporator coil 30c to fluid inlet 50p of compressor impeller 50i to complete the refrigerant flow loop.

The refrigerant is compressed by compressor impeller 50i to a relatively hot, high-pressure refrigerant 52r which then passes through the coils of condenser coil 40c wherein it is condensed to high-pressure, liquid or two-phase refrigerant 52s. High-pressure liquefied refrigerant 52s is then passed through fluid expansion device 50v wherein its pressure is reduced. Fluid expansion device 50v can be a valve, an orifice, or any other fluid pressure reducing device. The reduction of pressure causes the temperature of liquefied refrigerant 52s to drop and the refrigerant leaves expansion device 50v as highly cooled liquefied refrigerant 52t. Highly cooled liquefied refrigerant 52t then passes through the coil of evaporator 30c wherein it absorbs heat from warm room air 32w and undergoes a phase change into low-pressure gasified refrigerant 52u. During this heat-exchange process, warm room air 32w is cooled to cooled room air 32c. Low-pressure gasified refrigerant 52u is then returned to impeller 50i of compressor unit 50 and leaves impeller 50i as high pressure refrigerant 52r to repeat the above-described refrigeration cycle.

It will be obvious to persons skilled in the art that CIWAC 10 could also function as a heat pump, denoted in FIGS. 5A and 5B by reference number 10′, by the incorporation of a fluid flow reversing device (FFRD) 50r. FFRD 50r can be a 4-port valve or other such flow-reversing device, which is well-known to practitioners of the art. FIG. 5A shows the operation of CIWAC 10′ as an air-conditioner for the cooling of a room while FIG. 5B shows the operation of CIWAC 10′ as a heater for the heating of a room. The design and construction of heat-pumps is well known to practitioners of the art and is described in Mechanical Engineers Handbook, 8th Edition, Chapter 12, FIG. 23, Page 12-107, which is incorporated by reference herein.

In FIGS. 5A and 5B, refrigerant flow conduits 50a and 50b are now connected to two ports of FFRD 50r instead of to fluid inlet 50p and fluid outlet 50q of compressor impeller 50i as shown in FIG. 4. The remaining two ports of FFRD 50r are connected to additional refrigerant flow conduits 50e and 50f. Flow conduit 50e is connected to fluid inlet 50p of compressor impeller 50i. Flow conduit 50f is connected to fluid outlet 50q of compressor impeller 50i. As shown in FIG. 5A, during its operation as an air-conditioner, FFRD 50r directs low-pressure refrigerant 52u from conduit 50a to conduit 50e and high-pressure refrigerant 52r from conduit 50f to conduit 50b. This operation of CIWAC 10′ follows the operation of CIWAC 10 as a room air-conditioner as shown in FIG. 4. Further, as shown in FIG. 5B, during operation of CIWAC 10′ as a room heater, FFRD 50r directs high-pressure refrigerant 52r from conduit 50f to conduit 50a and low-pressure refrigerant 52u from conduit 50b to conduit 50e, thereby reversing the direction of flow of the refrigerant in the refrigerant loop. Therefore, condensation of warm high pressure refrigerant 52r occurs in coil 30c and evaporation of cold liquefied refrigerant 52t occurs in coil 40c resulting in the warming of room air 32w.

The use of CIWAC 10′ as a heat-pump is claimed herein as falling within the scope of the present invention.

As shown in FIG. 1, casing 20 of CIWAC 10 is designed to not interfere with the fully closed position of window 70 thereby enabling the full closure of sliding windowpane 72s for additional personal safety. This feature also minimizes the possibility of theft of CIWAC 10 as it can be located entirely inside the room and is not accessible from the outside when the window is fully closed and locked.

To achieve these means, casing 20 is fitted with standard latching/locking means 62, such as a clasp, latch, hook, or other such fastener to engage sliding windowpane 72s of a standard horizontal-sliding-pane window 70. As an example, latching means 62 of FIG. 1 comprises a horizontally sliding member 62s that is free to slide within holding brackets 62b which are attached to side panel 201 of casing 20. In a first engaging position, sliding member 62s engages a depression within a channel shaped mating member 62c which is attached to sliding windowpane 72s, thus locking windowpane 72s in a partially open position for the operation of CIWAC 10. In a second retracted position, sliding member 62s disengages the depression within mating member 62c to allow sliding windowpane 72s to be slid to a fully closed or fully open position. Thus the installation of CIWAC 10 of the present invention in window 70 does not interfere with the operation of sliding windowsill 72s, which can be fully or partially opened and closed as desired. The narrow width of CIWAC 10 of the present invention may further discourage burglars from trying to gain entry into the room by removing the WAC.

CIWAC 10 of the present invention can be attached to an inner wall surface, for example, the surface of the lower windowsill 70s and/or the surface of the inside wall 70w of the room, by standard fastening means 60c which could include brackets and screws or other such fasteners. Thus, there is no necessity to cut out an opening in the wall to install CIWAC 10 as may be necessary for conventional WACs. This feature provides for the relatively easy and damage-free installation of CIWAC 10. This installation feature is especially advantageous to a renter who may be liable for causing damage to the premises.

A vertical flexible sliding air-seal 64, which can be attached either to sliding windowsill 72s or to casing 20, reduces the leakage of outside warm air into the cooled room. Vertical flexible sliding seal 64 can be provided with an adhesive surface for attachment either to sliding windowsill 72s or to casing 20. As shown in FIG. 1, vertical sliding seal 64 comprises an adhesive-backed base 64b which is stuck to rear panel 20z of casing 20. A flexible sealing strip 64w, which is attached to base 64b, slidingly contacts the internal windowpane surface of sliding windowpane 72s to create a relatively air-tight sliding seal there-between. Sealing strip 64w can be configured as a flexible wiper blade (similar to an automobile windshield wiper-blade) or a flexible brush strip (similar to that used in rotating doors). As an alternative to the previously described sliding seal arrangement, it will be obvious that adhesive-backed base 64b could instead be attached to windowpane 72s and sealing strip 64w could instead contact rear panel 20z.

A dimensionally adjustable profile plate 60x is provided to close off the unobstructed portion of the window opening that is not covered by rear panel 20z of casing 20. Profile plate 60x can be made of an easily-cut Styrofoam or plastic sheet to facilitating fitting into windows of differing dimensions. Profile plate 60x reduces the leakage of outside warm air into the cooled room. Profile plate 60x is attached to casing 20 and right windowsill 70r and top windowsill 70t by suitable fastening means such as screw-on brackets 60y and/or stick-on brackets 60u.

Height-adjustable support pedestals 66 help support CIWAC 10 from the floor. As shown in FIG. 1, each pedestal 66 comprises an exterior steel-tube 66y with feet 66b, an interior telescoping steel-tube 66x which slides within exterior tube 66y, and a locking screw 66s to lock interior tube 66x at the required height within exterior tube 66y. Yet other materials of construction, for example, rigid plastics, and configurations of height-adjustable pedestals will be obvious to one of skill in the art.

To reduce manufacturing costs, conventional WACs can easily be modified to the CIWACs of the present invention. For example, a Samsung™ WAC, model AW0505M has overall external dimensions of 16.75 inches wide×12.25 inches high×13.5 inches deep. The manufacturer states that this model has a cooling capacity of 5,200 BTUH and is suitable for cooling a 10-ft×15-ft room. The evaporator coil has face-area dimensions of approximately 15 inches wide×9 inches high and is approximately 1.5 inches deep. The condenser coil has face-area dimensions of approximately 16 inches wide×12 inches high and is approximately 1.5 inches deep. The compressor dimensions are approximately 4 inches diameter×11 inches high. Changing the evaporator coil face-area to 8 inches wide×17 inches high while maintaining the 1.5 inches depth provides equal face and heat transfer area to maintain the same cooling capacity. Similarly, changing the condenser coil face-area to 8 inches wide×24 inches high while maintaining the 1.5 inches depth provides equal face and heat transfer area to maintain the same cooling capacity. Alternately, the evaporator coil face-area can be 6 inches wide×22.7 inches high and the condenser coil face-area can be 6 inches wide×32 inches high for an equivalent cooling capacity.

As another example, a Whirlpool™ model ACQ158XR has approximate overall external dimensions of 25 inches wide×16 inches high. The manufacturer states that this model has a cooling capacity of 15,000 BTUH. The evaporator coil has face-area dimensions of approximately 24 inches wide×13 inches high. The condenser coil has face-area dimensions of approximately 24 inches wide×15 inches high. Changing the evaporator coil face-area to 18 inches wide×18 inches high while maintaining the same coil-depth provides equal face and heat transfer area to maintain the same cooling capacity. Similarly, changing the condenser coil face-area to 18 inches wide×20 inches high while maintaining the same coil-depth provides equal face and heat transfer area to maintain the same cooling capacity. Thus the existing cooling capacity can be maintained within the new user-friendly configuration with little engineering effort or additional cost. It will be obvious that different dimensions will apply for other different cooling capacities of WACs. Depending on the cooling capacity of CIWAC 10 and the required physical configuration, it is contemplated that the width of CIWAC 10 could therefore vary between 6 to 24 inches.

Other refinements to the above design could be incorporated to improve the operational characteristics and aesthetics of CIWAC 10. For example, as shown in FIG. 6, an electronic noise cancellation system (ENCS) 80 can be provided with CIWAC 10 to reduce audible noise 10n generated by CIWAC 10 during its operation. Electronic noise cancellation systems are well known in the electronics art. ENCS 80 comprises a microphone 82 or other such audio-input device for inputting audible noise 10n generated by CIWAC 10 to ENCS 80. Microphone 82 generates an electrical wave-form 82s which is inputted by connecting wires 82w to an electronics circuit 84 for generating an opposite phase electrical wave-form 84s. Electronics circuit 84 outputs opposite phase electrical wave-form 84s through connecting wires 84w to electrical speaker 86 or other such noise-generation device. Speaker 86 generates opposite phase noise 80n to reduce audible noise 10n that is generated by CIWAC 10. It will be obvious that other configurations of noise cancellation systems could also be used to produce the same noise reduction results. It will be quite obvious that ENCS 80 could be used with any WAC regardless of its physical configuration. Thus, the use of ENCS 80 with other WAC designs, besides CIWAC 10 described herein, is considered to fall within the scope of the present invention.

It should also be apparent to those skilled in the art that modifications may be made to the embodiment described above without departing from the spirit or scope of the invention. For example, the dimensions given in relation to the preferred embodiment are preferments only and could easily be varied to suit different wall and windowsill thicknesses and different capacity air-conditioners. Further, casing 20 could also be box-shaped without notch 20c to fit taller windows. Yet further, fastening means 60c may take many different forms from those shown herein. While blower 30 and 40 are shown operated with individual blower motors 30m and 40m respectively, a single blower motor which rotates both blowers 30 and 40 can also be used without departing from the spirit of the invention.

Whilst none of the electrical connections are shown, clearly the CIWAC may incorporate appropriate switches, one or more thermocouples, and one or more thermostats to control its operation. All of these variations and modifications are considered to fall within the scope of the present invention. Accordingly, it is intended that the invention be limited only by the spirit and scope of the following claims.