Title:
WEALTH DEVELOPMENT GAME
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A board game is configured for learning and practicing principles of wealth development. The board game broadly includes, among other things, a game board, game tokens for tracking player movement during the game, activity cards that players draw in response to landing on board spaces, and a worksheet for tracking various financial metrics used for playing the game and for determining the winner. Each of the board spaces are associated with one or more wealth-building activity categories and direct the players to follow instructions that correspond with the respective categories. The worksheet includes sections for tracking financial metrics such as the player's income, expenses, assets, liabilities, and net worth.



Inventors:
Delacruz-newlan, Francisco (Silverdale, WA, US)
Burford, Christopher (Shreveport, LA, US)
Langemeier, Loral (Navato, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/752128
Publication Date:
11/27/2008
Filing Date:
05/22/2007
Assignee:
Langemeier, Loral (Navato, CA, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F3/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MENDIRATTA, VISHU K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HOVEY WILLIAMS LLP (10801 Mastin Blvd., Suite 1000, Overland Park, KS, 66210, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A board game for playing a wealth development game, with an object of the game being to maximize net worth, the board game comprising: a game board presenting path indicia that define a plurality of paths to be followed during the game; a plurality of game pieces configured to be positioned on the game board to play the game, each of said plurality of paths including a plurality of discrete activity spaces for receiving the game pieces, a plurality of cards arranged in multiple activity card sets, wherein each of the cards presents activity indicia designating a wealth activity that affects net worth, each of said activity spaces being associated with a corresponding one of the activity card sets, wherein landing one of the plurality of game pieces on one of the activity spaces directs selection of a card from the corresponding activity card set; and a fillable financial worksheet including a plurality of sections, with each section including worksheet indicia that designates a corresponding variable financial metric to be tracked in the section during the game, wherein the financial metrics are used to calculate net worth, at least one of said financial metrics varying at least in part according to the activity indicia encountered as a result of the card selection during the game.

2. The board game as claimed in claim 1, wherein corresponding ones of said plurality of sections present financial metrics selected from the group consisting of: income, expenses, assets, liabilities, and combinations thereof.

3. The board game as claimed in claim 1, said worksheet indicia including forecast indicia that identifies a forecast value operable to impact the future value of the financial metric.

4. The board game as claimed in claim 1, said plurality of paths comprising at least six non-overlapping paths, with each of the non-overlapping paths having a corresponding activity category, said wealth activity corresponding to the activity category.

5. The board game as claimed in claim 4, each of the six non-overlapping paths having category indicia different from the other paths.

6. The board game as claimed in claim 4, each of the six non-overlapping paths being triangular in shape and arranged adjacent to one another so that the paths cooperatively form a hexagonal outer perimeter.

7. The board game as claimed in claim 4, each of said non-overlapping paths including an option space associated with all of the activity card sets.

8. The board game as claimed in claim 7, said plurality of activity spaces and said option space forming a plurality of spaces, about half of the plurality of spaces of each of the non-overlapping paths having category indicia that identify the wealth activity corresponding to the activity category of the path.

9. The board game as claimed in claim 8, each of said non-overlapping paths presenting about 18 of said plurality of spaces.

10. The board game as claimed in claim 4, each of the six-non-overlapping paths starting and ending at a common space.

11. The board game as claimed in claim 1; and faux money that serves as cash for each of the players.

12. The board game as claimed in claim 1; and a calculator operable to calculate values for recording on the worksheet.

13. The board game as claimed in claim 1; and a timer for limiting the length of a particular game.

14. The board game as claimed in claim 1; and an accessory for use in playing the game, said accessory being selected from the group consisting of: a rule book, dice, pencil, storage container, and combinations thereof.

15. A method of playing a wealth development game, with an object of the game being to maximize net worth, the method comprising the steps of: (a) having a player move a game piece along a game path that includes a plurality of activity spaces; (b) upon the player landing on one of the activity spaces, having the player select a card from a respective one of multiple card decks, wherein each of the cards presents wealth activity indicia; (c) providing the player with a financial worksheet for tracking variable financial metrics which are affected by the wealth activity indicia of the selected card; (d) varying at least one of the financial metrics on the financial worksheet as directed by the wealth activity indicia of the selected card; and (e) calculating net worth of the player based on the plurality of financial metrics.

16. The method as claimed in claim 15, step (a) including the step of selecting the game path from a plurality of game paths to follow.

17. The method as claimed in claim 16, step (a) including the step of moving the game piece along another game path, with each path being associated with a corresponding wealth activity category.

18. The method as claimed in claim 17, step (a) including the step of moving the game piece entirely through one of the paths before moving to another one of the paths.

19. The method as claimed in claim 17; and (f) moving the game piece from the game path onto a common space.

20. The method as claimed in claim 19; and (g) selecting the another game path by moving from the common space onto the another game path.

21. The method as claimed in claim 17, wherein the wealth activity categories are selected from the group consisting of: setting up entities, managing debt, managing an asset-purchase account, forecasting of financial metrics, managing incoming cash flow, purchasing assets, and combinations thereof.

22. The method as claimed in claim 15, wherein the game path includes a plurality of option spaces; and (f) upon the player landing on one of the option spaces, allowing the player to select a card from any one of the card decks.

23. The method as claimed in claim 15; and (f) prior to steps (a)-(d), setting the player's financial metrics at initial values.

24. The method as claimed in claim 23, wherein the game is played by multiple players and step (f) involves providing all of the players with the same initial financial metric values.

25. The method as claimed in claim 23, said financial metrics being selected from the group consisting of: income, expenses, assets, liabilities, and combinations thereof.

26. The method as claimed in claim 15, wherein the wealth activity indicia presents instructions selected from the group consisting of: changing the amount of income, changing the amount of expenses, changing the amount of assets, changing the amount of liabilities, creating a legal entity, changing a non-monetary financial metric, changing the player's number of future turns, and combinations thereof.

27. The method as claimed in claim 15, said financial metrics being selected from the group consisting of: income, expenses, assets, liabilities, and combinations thereof.

28. The method as claimed in claim 27, step (e) being performed when the game piece reaches an end of the game path.

29. The method as claimed in claim 28, step (e) including the step of calculating the income and expenses.

30. The method as claimed in claim 29, step (e) including the step of determining the assets and liabilities, step (e) including the step of subtracting liabilities from assets to determine net worth.

31. The method as claimed in claim 15, wherein the wealth activity indicia presents instructions for varying the financial metrics, at least one of said financial metrics being operable to prevent certain instructions from becoming effective.

32. The method as claimed in claim 15, at least one of the financial metrics being operable as a multiplier in determining another one of the financial metrics.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to board games. More specifically, embodiments of the present invention concern a board game for learning and practicing wealth-building principles.

2. Discussion of Prior Art

Board games are well known in the prior art and are configured to be used for a variety of purposes. For example, most prior art board games are configured primarily for entertainment purposes. While having entertainment value, conventional games test the players' memorization, analytical, or creative skills in a general sense. It is also known in the art for board games to include a financial aspect or a financial objective. For example, some prior art games require players to use a predetermined amount of faux money during the course of the game. Other prior art games identify the winner of the game as the player who acquires the most money during the game.

Prior art board games are problematic and suffer from various undesirable limitations. In particular, prior art board games that have an object of acquiring the most money fail to present a realistic environment for learning and practicing wealth-building principles. For instance, the interdependencies that normally occur in real life between accounting activities and other activities that impact finances, such as continuing education or leadership roles, are not present in prior art games. Instead, the prior art games generally operate so that any financial aspects are overly simplified. Prior art board games also fail to test players' ability to manage the non-accounting aspects of building wealth and to provide feedback on strategies used for building wealth.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides a board game that does not suffer from the problems and limitations of the prior art board games set forth above. A first aspect of the present invention concerns a board game for playing a wealth development game, with an object of the game being to maximize net worth. The board game broadly includes a game board, a plurality of game pieces, a plurality of cards, and a fillable financial worksheet. The game board presents path indicia that define a plurality of paths to be followed during the game. The plurality of game pieces are configured to be positioned on the game board to play the game. Each of the plurality of paths includes a plurality of discrete activity spaces for receiving the game pieces. The plurality of cards are arranged in multiple activity card sets, wherein each of the cards presents activity indicia designating a wealth activity that affects net worth. Each of the activity spaces is associated with a corresponding one of the activity card sets, wherein landing one of the plurality of game pieces on one of the activity spaces directs selection of a card from the corresponding activity card set. The fillable financial worksheet includes a plurality of sections, with each section including worksheet indicia that designates a corresponding variable financial metric to be tracked in the section during the game, wherein the financial metrics are used to calculate net worth. At least one of the financial metrics varies at least in part according to the activity indicia encountered as a result of the card selection during the game.

A second aspect of the present invention concerns a method of playing a wealth development game, with an object of the game being to maximize net worth. The method broadly includes the steps of having a player move a game piece along a game path that includes a plurality of activity spaces; upon the player landing on one of the activity spaces, having the player select a card from a respective one of multiple card decks, wherein each of the cards presents wealth activity indicia; providing the player with a financial worksheet for tracking variable financial metrics which are affected by the wealth activity indicia of the selected card; varying at least one of the financial metrics on the financial worksheet as directed by the wealth activity indicia of the selected card; and calculating net worth of the player based on the plurality of financial metrics.

Other aspects and advantages of the present invention will be apparent from the following detailed description of the preferred embodiments and the accompanying drawing figures.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING FIGURES

Preferred embodiments of the invention are described in detail below with reference to the attached drawing figures, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a fragmentary plan view of a wealth development board game constructed in accordance with a preferred embodiment of the present invention, showing a game board for playing the game;

FIG. 2 is a schematic view of the game board shown in FIG. 1 and identifying a pair of game board sections;

FIG. 2a is a fragmentary view of the game board shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, showing a left-hand one of the game board sections;

FIG. 2b is a fragmentary view of the game board shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, showing a right-hand one of the game board sections;

FIG. 3a is a perspective view of a game token that is part of the board game and is used to identify an asset, with the game token being in the shape of a small house;

FIG. 3b is a perspective view of a game token that is part of the board game and is used to identify an asset, with the game token being in the shape of a large house;

FIG. 3c is a perspective view of a game token that is part of the board game and is used to identify an asset, with the game token being in the shape of an apartment building;

FIG. 3d is a perspective view of a game token that is part of the board game and is used to identify an asset, with the game token being in the shape of a oil pump;

FIG. 3e is a perspective view of a game token that is part of the board game and is used to identify an asset, with the game token being in the shape of a gold bar

FIG. 3f is a perspective view of a game token that is part of the board game and is used to identify an asset, with the game token presenting the letters “LLC” in a three-dimensional form;

FIG. 3g is a perspective view of a game token that is part of the board game and is used to identify an asset, with the game token representing a promissory note;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a Team, Leadership, and Conditioning card set that a player draws from when the player's game piece lands on a Team, Leadership and Conditioning space on the game board;

FIG. 5 is a Challenge card set that the player draws from when the player's game piece lands on one of the Challenge spaces on the game board;

FIG. 6 is a Wealth Account card set that the player draws from when the player's game piece lands on one of the Wealth Account spaces on the game board;

FIG. 7 is a Forecasting card set that the player draws from when the player's game piece lands on one of the Forecasting spaces on the game board;

FIG. 8 is an Assets card set that the player draws from when the player's game piece lands on one of the Assets spaces on the game board;

FIG. 9 is a Debt Management card set that the player draws from when the player's game piece lands on one of the Debt Management spaces on the game board;

FIG. 10 is a Entities card set that the player draws from when the player's game piece lands on one of the Entities spaces on the game board;

FIG. 11 is a Cash Machine card set that the player draws from when the player's game piece lands on one of the Cash Machine spaces on the game board;

FIG. 12 is a fragmentary view of a bottom side of one of the cards, showing indicia in the form of a guitar, with the indicia being associated with rules that instruct the player to pass the card to another player;

FIG. 13 is a fragmentary view of a bottom side of a card, showing indicia in the form of the word “CO-OP,” with the indicia being associated with rules that permit multiple players to use the card;

FIG. 14 is a plan view of a financial worksheet of the board game, showing a front side of the worksheet including a plurality of sections that are identified by indicia, with the sections identifying and being operable to track Scenario, Player, Monthly Income, Total Income, Monthly Expenditures, Total Expenditures, Pay Day, Assets, Total Assets, Liabilities, Total Liabilities, Net Worth, Forecast data, and TLC Points;

FIG. 15a is a plan view of a faux one million dollar bill used by the players as cash;

FIG. 15b is a plan view of a faux one hundred thousand dollar bill used by the players as cash;

FIG. 15c is a plan view of a faux fifty thousand dollar bill used by the players as cash;

FIG. 15d is a plan view of a faux ten thousand dollar bill used by the players as cash;

FIG. 15e is a plan view of a faux five thousand dollar bill used by the players as cash;

FIG. 15f is a plan view of a faux one thousand dollar bill used by the players as cash;

FIG. 15g is a plan view of a faux five hundred dollar bill used by the players as cash;

FIG. 15h is a plan view of a faux one hundred dollar bill used by the players as cash;

FIG. 15i is a plan view of a faux fifty dollar bill used by the players as cash;

FIG. 16 is a perspective view of a set of three dice for use in randomly determining a number during the game;

FIG. 17 is a perspective view of a timer for predetermining an elapsed time of the game and for identifying to the players the end of the game;

FIG. 18 is a perspective view of an electronic calculator of the board game;

FIG. 19 is a perspective view of a rule book of the board game;

FIG. 20 is a perspective view of two pencils of the board game; and

FIG. 21 is a perspective view of an accessory bag of the board game, with the bag being used for holding various board game components.

The drawing figures do not limit the present invention to the specific embodiments disclosed and described herein. The drawings are not necessarily to scale, emphasis instead being placed upon clearly illustrating the principles of the preferred embodiment.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Turning initially to FIG. 1, a board game 30 is disclosed that incorporates the practice of wealth-building principles into play and includes, among other things, a game board 32. However, while the illustrated board game 30 is a physical embodiment in that the game board 32 and the other game accessories are comprised of elements that have a physical structure, it is within the ambit of the present invention where the board game 30 is either partly or entirely virtual. In other words, the principles of the present invention are applicable where the board game 30 is presented and played through the interface of a conventional computer and operates either on that computer or on another computer. For example, it is entirely within the scope of the present invention where the game board 32 is represented visually on a computer monitor and play is controlled through a keyboard, mouse, or other peripheral of the computer. Also, while aspects of the illustrated board game 30 are primarily directed to personal financial wealth building practices, it is within the ambit of the present invention where the board game 30 is directed to wealth building practices within the context of a corporation or other legal entity.

Turning to FIGS. 1, 2, 2a, and 2b, the game board 32 includes a pair of board sections 34 that are joined along a crease 36 that serves as a line of weakness and permits the board sections 34 to be folded from an unfolded condition to a folded condition (not shown) where the sections 34 are folded onto one another. However, it is also consistent with the principles of the present invention where the sections 34 are entirely separable from one another. The board sections 34 cooperatively form a hexagonal-shaped perimeter 38 of the game board 32. The illustrated game board 32 is preferably constructed of cardboard with a printed upper surface 40 that is covered by an outermost laminated layer. However, it is also within the scope of the present invention for the game board 32 to be constructed of other materials such as plastic or wood.

The printed upper surface 40 presents various indicia for conducting the game and generally includes an outer margin 42 that surrounds an inner path area 44. The outer margin 42 extends along the perimeter 38 and presents a plurality of card spaces 46,48,50,52,54,56,58,60, each of which is defined by a corresponding border and includes respective identification indicia 62 (in the form of words “Cash Machine”),64 (in the form of the word “Entities”),66 (in the form of letters “TLC”),68 (in the form of words “Debt Management”),70 (in the form of the word “Assets”),72 (in the form of the word “Challenge”),74 (in the form of the word “Forecasting”),76 (in the form of the words “Wealth Account”). The card spaces 46,48,50,52,54,56,58,60 are preferably positioned adjacent to vertices 78 formed by the outer margin 42. However, the principles of the present invention are applicable where the card spaces are positioned elsewhere, e.g., within the inner path area 44. Furthermore, the printed upper surface 40 could be alternatively configured to present only the inner path area 44 with virtually no outer margin 42.

The inner path area 44 is configured for tracking play and preferably includes game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90. Each of the game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 is formed by corresponding path indicia 92,94,96,98,100,102 so that the paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 preferably do not overlap one another. Furthermore, the game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 preferably include a plurality of discrete spaces 104 that are arranged so that the game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 each form a loop shape. The game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 are also arranged alongside one another so as to begin and end at a common space 106. More preferably, the game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 each generally present a triangular shape and cooperatively present a hexagonal form of the inner area 44.

Each of the game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 also preferably includes corresponding category indicia 108 (in the form of the words “Cash Machine”), 110 (in the form of the word “Entities”), 112 (in the form of the words “Debt Management”), 114 (in the form of the words “Assets”), 116 (in the form of the word “Forecasting”), 118 (in the form of the words “Wealth Account”). The category indicia 108,110,112,114,116,118 are spaced within and serve to uniquely identify each of the respective game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90. The category indicia 108,110,112,114,116,118 also correspond to respective identification indicia 62,64,68,70,74,76 in order to associate the paths with respective ones of the card spaces 46,48,52,54,58,60, the purpose of which will be discussed in greater detail.

As discussed, the path indicia 92,94,96,98,100,102 define discrete spaces 104 along the corresponding path. Preferably, each of the game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 includes eighteen (18) spaces 104 that are spaced somewhat uniformly along the length of the respective path. However, the principles of the present invention are equally applicable where the game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 include either a larger or smaller number of spaces. The game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 also include direction indicia 120 in the form of arrows that serve to define a direction of movement along the respective path.

More specifically the spaces 104 are further identified by shading indicia 122,124,126,128,130,132,134,136,138. Shading indicia 122,124,126,128,130,132 are associated respectively with category indicia 108,110,112,114,116,118. Shading indicia 134 are associated with identification indicia 66 and shading indicia 136 are associated with identification indicia 72. The game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 also include identification indicia 140 (in the form of the letters “TLC”) spaced within shading indicia 134 and identification indicia 142 (in the form of the word “Challenge”) spaced within shading indicia 136. The common space 106 includes identification indicia 144 in the form of words “OPTION,” “TIME OUT,” and “WEALTH ACCOUNT” spaced along an outer edge of the common space 106. The common space 106 also includes shading indicia 146.

In this manner, the game board 12 presents game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 that correspond with certain categories of wealth activities and serve to simulate steps for building wealth. As will be discussed further, players begin play by positioning their respective game pieces (not shown) in the common space 106. From the common space 106, players can choose to proceed along one of the game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90, but must remain on the selected path through one or more turns until that player returns to the common space 106.

In returning toward the common space 106, each player's game piece may either land on the common space 106 or go through the common space 106 and continue onto another path. Upon either landing or passing through the common space 106, players receive a net income, referred to in the game as “Pay Day,” and deposit a predetermined amount of money into an account, referred to as a “Wealth Account,” if they have chosen to do so. If their game piece lands on the common space 106, players can optionally call for a pause in the game, referred to as a “Time Out” and can draw a game card as will be discussed.

Again, the game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 preferably include category indicia 108,110,112,114,116,118. For each path, half of the spaces 104 preferably include the shading indicia 122,124,126,128,130,132 that corresponds to the category. These “in-category” spaces 104 are spaced along the path in alternating fashion with other spaces 104 that do not correspond with the path category. In other words, each pair of in-category spaces are separated from one another by a space 104 that does not correspond to the path category. Specifically, some of the spaces 104 that are not in-category include shading indicia 138 indicating that those spaces serve as a wild card space, referred to as an “Option” space, that allows the player to select a card from any of the game card sets as will be discussed in greater detail. Other spaces 104 that are not in-category spaces are the Challenge and TLC spaces as discussed above. The principles of the present invention are equally applicable where each of the game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 include an alternative configuration of spaces 104, e.g., where less than half or more than half of the spaces 104 are in-category spaces. Furthermore, it is within the ambit of the present invention where some of the spaces 104 include no indicia for identifying an activity and, consequently, do not direct the player to select one of the game cards.

Turning to FIGS. 4-13, the board game 10 includes activity card sets including TLC card set 146, Challenge card set 148, Wealth Account card set 150, Forecasting card set 152, Assets card set 154, Debt Management card set 156, Entities card set 158, and Cash Machine card set 160. The card sets 146,148,150,152,154,156,158,160 each include a plurality of individual cards, with the cards of each card set presenting on a front label side 162 thereof corresponding card identification indicia 164 (in the form of words “Team, Leadership, and Conditioning”), 166 (in the form of the word “Challenge”), 168 (in the form of the words “Wealth Account”),170 (in the form of the word “Forecasting”),172 (in the form of the word “Assets”),174 (in the form of the words “Debt Management”),176 (in the form of the word “Entities”),178 (in the form of the words “Cash Machine”). The cards of each card set also present on the front label side 162 corresponding abbreviation indicia 180 (in the form of letters “TLC”),182 (in the form of letters “Ch”),184 (in the form of the letter “W”),186 (in the form of the letter “F”),188 (in the form of the letter “A”),190 (in the form of the letters “DM”),192 (in the form of the letter “E”),194 (in the form of the letter “C”). The Challenge card set 148 preferably includes at least one card 196 with a back instruction side 198 that presents symbol indicia 200 in the form of a guitar (see FIG. 12). The card sets 152,154,160 preferably include at least one card 202 with a back instruction side 204 that presents identification indicia 206 in the form of the word “CO-OP.” The use of these card sets will be explained in greater detail.

Turning to FIGS. 3a-g, the board game 10 includes game tokens 208,210,212,214,216,218,220. Each of the game tokens 208,210,212,214,216,218,220 serve to identify assets that are acquired during play and include surface features and indicia to represent the asset. Game token 208 is in the shape of a small house. Game token 210 is in the shape of a large house. Game token 212 is in the shape of an apartment building. Game token 214 is in the shape of an oil pumping unit. Game token 216 is in the shape of a gold bar. Game token 218 is in the shape of the letters “LLC.” Game token 220 is in the shape of a piece of paper with indicia that recites the words “Prom. Note.” However, the principles of the present invention are applicable where the board game 10 includes other types of game tokens to represent corresponding assets.

Turning to FIG. 14, the board game 10 further includes a financial worksheet 222 for each player to track their net worth and the financial metrics that are used to play the game and calculate net worth. The worksheet 222 includes line indicia 224 that define worksheet sections including a game identification section 226, a scenario section 228, a player identification section 230, an income section 232, an expenditures section 234, a net income section 236, an assets section 238, a liabilities section 240, a net worth section 242, a forecasting section 244, and a TLC Points section 246, which include corresponding worksheet identification indicia 248,250,252,254,256,258,260,262,264,266. The worksheet 222 preferably comprises a sheet of paper 8.5″×11″ in size. The sections 226,228,230 are spaced along an upper margin of the worksheet 222 and preferably occupy about 1 inch of vertical space. The sections 232,234 are spaced below sections 226,228,230 and preferably occupy about 4 inches of vertical space. Section 236 extends substantially across the entire sheet below sections 232,234 and occupies about ¼ inch of vertical space. The sections 238,240 are spaced below section 236 and preferably occupy about 4 inches of vertical space. Sections 242,244,246 are spaced along a lower margin of the sheet and preferably occupy about 1 inch of vertical space. The game identification section 226 is configured to receive a trademark (not shown) associated with the board game 10. As will be discussed, sections 232,234,236,238,240,242,244,246 are configured to record and track values for financial metrics as part of the game. Also, the worksheet 222 preferably includes indicia (not shown) on a back side of the worksheet 222 that asks the player questions and encourages the player to formulate a wealth plan.

The indicia 248 in the illustrated embodiment serves to identify a scenario of the worksheet 222 by presenting the words “Scenario: Jed Stone” within the scenario section 228. However, the indicia 248 could include alternative words “Scenario: Allison Connor,” “Scenario: Mick and Mary Buchanan,” or “Scenario: Dee Newton” to identify other game scenarios. Preferably, these alternative scenarios each have a unique set of initial values for the financial metrics presented therein. Indicia 250 presents the word “Player:” and is spaced within the player identification section 230 to provide room for the player to write their name on the worksheet 222.

Income section 232 is preferably configured to record and track the player's income information. Indicia 252 presents uppermost heading “MONTHLY INCOME,” subheadings “Description” and “Amount,” and lowermost heading “TOTAL INCOME.” While not shown, the section 232 also includes indicia preferably including the terms “Job,” “Cash Machine Cash Flow,” “Real Estate & Businesses,” and “Prom. Notes” listed under the Description subheading.

Within the expenditures section 234, preferably reserved for expense information, indicia 254 presents the uppermost heading “MONTHLY EXPENDITURES,” subheadings “Description” and “Amount,” and lowermost heading “TOTAL EXPENDITURES.” Under the Description subheading, the section 234 also includes indicia with the terms “Taxes,” “Rent,” “Credit Cards,” “Family Loan,” “Other,” and “Wealth Account Contribution” (all not shown).

Within the net income section 236, indicia 242 presents the words “PAY DAY=INCOME−EXPENDITURES=.”

Within the assets section 238, preferably reserved for asset information, indicia 258 presents the uppermost heading “ASSETS,” subheadings “Description,” “Entity,” and “Amount,” and lowermost heading “TOTAL ASSETS.” Under the Description subheading, the section 238 also includes indicia “Cash Machine: Equip. Sales,” “Cash,” “Real Estate & Businesses,” “Prom. Notes,” and “Wealth Account” (all not shown). The Cash indicia preferably is associated with a corresponding initial amount based on the scenarios discussed above. For example, Jed Stone preferably starts with $5,000, Allison Connor starts with $6,000, the Buchanans start with $144,000, and Dee Newton starts with $270,000.

Within the liabilities section 240, preferably reserved for liability information, indicia 260 presents the uppermost heading “LIABILITIES,” subheadings “Description” and “Amount,” and lowermost heading “TOTAL LIABILITIES.” Under the Description subheading, the section also includes indicia “Credit Cards” and “Family Loan” (all not shown).

Within the net worth section 242, indicia 262 presents the words “NET WORTH=ASSETS−LIABILITIES=.” Within the forecasting section 244, indicia 264 presents the word “FORECAST” with the words “Income,” “Expense,” “Taxes,” and “Entities” being spaced to the right thereof. Within the TLC Points section 246, indicia 266 presents the words “TLC Points” with integer numerals “1” through “10” being spaced to the right thereof for tracking the player's TLC points as will be discussed. The numerals “1” through “5” are grouped with one another in a first subsection, and the numerals “6” through “10 are grouped with one another in a second subsection. As will be described in greater detail, the illustrated financial worksheet 222 is used to track various financial metrics throughout the course of play.

In playing the board game 10, the players preferably use various other game accessories. Turning to FIGS. 15a,b,c,d,e,f,g,h,i, the board game 10 includes faux bills 268,270,272,274,276,278,280,282,284 that serve as cash to be used by the players in playing the game. The illustrated bills 268,270,272,274,276,278,280,282,284 include value indicia 286,288,290,292,294,296,298,300,302.

Turning to FIGS. 16-21, other accessories include dice 304, a timer 306, a calculator 308, a rule book 310, pencils 312, and a storage bag 314 for holding the other accessories. The illustrated dice 304 preferably include three dice, with each die having six (6) sides in the usual manner. However, the principles of the present invention are applicable where another apparatus is used for generating random numbers, such as a numbered spinning wheel. The timer 306 is a conventional analog timer. The calculator 308 is a conventional electronic calculator and is operable for making calculations to update various financial metrics as discussed herein. The rule book 310 is preferably a multiple page pamphlet that explains how to play the board game 10.

Again, players preferably have the option of proceeding along one of the game paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 that are identified by category indicia 108,110,112,114,116,118. Each path includes spaces 104 that are associated with the respective category, i.e., are in-category spaces, which direct the player to select a card from the respective card set 160,158,156,154,152,150. All of the paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 also preferably include spaces 104 that are not in-category, e.g., spaces with indicia that direct the player to select a card from one of the activity card sets 146,148. All of the paths 80,82,84,86,88,90 also preferably include at least one Option space, i.e., a space 104 with shading indicia 138 that identifies that the player can select a card from any one of the activity card sets 146,148,150,152,154,156,158,160. In selecting a card, the player normally has the option of taking the action directed by the card if the requirements listed on the card are met. However, the player preferably must take the action listed when a Challenge card is drawn. As discussed below, the instructions listed on the card preferably direct the player to change one or more of the financial metrics on the worksheet 222.

In setting up the board game 10, the activity card sets 146,148,150,152,154,156,158,160 are stacked in corresponding ones of the card spaces 46,48,50,52,54,56,58,60. When players move their game pieces (not shown) so that the game piece lands on one of the spaces 104, the players are directed to select a card from a corresponding one of the card sets. The cards in the card sets all preferably include instruction indicia (not shown), as will be discussed in greater detail. In general, players are not required to act according to instruction indicia on the card, except for cards selected from the Challenge card set 148. In some instances, the instruction indicia may preclude players from following the instructions if they do not meet certain requirements.

The TLC card set 146 preferably includes cards with instruction indicia (not shown) that concern the entrepreneurial principals of Team, i.e., assembling a team of advisors, consultants, and workers, Leadership, i.e., taking on a strong leadership role, and Conditioning, i.e., maintaining a high level of entrepreneurial readiness. TLC cards can be selected by a player when the player lands on either a TLC space or on an Option space. The TLC cards preferably grant TLC points to the player who draws one of the cards and the player records that number of points in the TLC section 246 by circling the appropriate number. However, the player can follow the directions listed on a TLC card only if that player can meet the requirements listed on the card and also has the necessary money. If the player already has TLC points, then the newly awarded TLC points are added to the existing points. Each player preferably can only earn up to 10 TLC points. Preferably, the player does not lose TLC points during the course of the game by using the TLC points to meet the requirement of an activity card, with one exception to be discussed below.

The instruction indicia on each TLC card lists the number of TLC points, preferably in the form of a unit-less integer number, that the player will record for continuing play. For example, the card may recite “You receive X TLC Points,” where X equals an integer number of points that preferably ranges from zero (0) to ten (10). The instructions also require a certain investment of cash by the player in exchange for the TLC points. For example, the card may recite “Investment: $Y,” where Y is a dollar investment that preferably ranges from nothing up to $12,000. The players can only use cash to pay for TLC cards and not money deposited in the Wealth Account

Preferably, some of the TLC cards have instruction indicia different from the other cards. Generally, the instruction indicia describe an activity that the player has taken to improve their team-building, leadership, or conditioning level. Examples of indicia that describe such activities include: “Overcoming your fears, you pick up the phone & interview a few Attorneys;” “After listening to the Wealth Diva CD you make a decision to pursue your dreams;” “Reading The Millionaire Maker's Guide to Wealth Cycle Investing has given you clarity & direction in pursuit of your business goals;” “You ask a few wealthy friends about their CPA. You interview several & hire your favorite;” “You join a local commerce group & network with members;” “You take a retired executive to dinner & learn a great deal about business operations;” “You join a local rental owner's association & network with many visionary peers;” “You join a local health club. The exercise clears your mind;” “A great “find” answers your ad & you find a bookkeeper;” “After joining the Denominators (a local social club) you find your CPA;” “You post an ad in the local college accounting department & you find a bookkeeper;” “You purchase a new smart phone to stay in touch with your wealth team & your customers;” “You consistently donate to the charity of your choice;” “Also, advance to the next Option space & draw another card;” “You consistently donate to a local charity;” “Also, roll 1, 2, or 3 dice on your next turn;” “You go to a local entrepreneurs' seminar & start a mastermind group with visionary peers;” “You donate time & money to a local youth home & the kids learn what it's like to own a business;” “You sponsor a little league team & meet many new contacts;” “You return from a seminar about the power of believing in yourself,” “After listening to your complaints about not having enough time, a friend recommends an assistant;” “You purchase a software program to streamline your billing process. Your bookkeeper implements it;” “You attend a leadership course that applies to running a business;” “A retired executive assistant decides retirement is too boring for her & wants to work again;” “You personally conduct a comprehensive inventory of all your equipment & realize your time would be better spent marketing;” “You spend a lot of money on one of those get-rich-quick schemes on late night TV & learn not to do that again;” “You hire a very expensive attorney for a house purchase closing;” “You sign up & attend a Team Made Millionaire seminar & it changes your life;” “You read The Millionaire Maker & discover insight into creating the financial future of your dreams;” “Completing the Building Your Wealth Cycles CD set inspires you to make changes in your financial life;” “After watching the Real Estate GPS DVD series, you make an offer on your first rental house;” “You purchase & listen to The Expression of Your Power CD Set;” “Purchasing your last home leads to greater things because you asked lots of questions. You find a real estate broker;” “While talking to a young woman wearing a ‘Geeks Rule the World’ tee shirt, you are so impressed by her that you hire a new IT consultant;” “You see “Pixels Rule!” on a bumper sticker & start asking questions. This conversation leads you to hire a graphic designer;” “After joining a local real estate investment association, you find a group of visionary peers;” “After an Internet search & a few phone calls you hire a business broker for your next deal;” “You head-hunt a successful public relations (PR) person from an adjacent town & you find a PR specialist;” “You return from a weekend seminar on business valuations;” “You return from a weekend seminar on real estate investing;” “You return from an incredible 3-day seminar about investing your IRA in non-traditional vehicles;” “You hire the best marketing consultant in town;” “You apply the principles learned in the CD set Building, Leading & Protecting Your Business to your own business;” “You purchase the Real Estate as Leverage CD set & learn that you need to set up entities for your real estate holdings;” “You donate money to a local charity & volunteer to head up next year's fund raising campaign;” “Also, advance to the next OPTION space & draw a card,” “You attended a weekend seminar on structuring your business & a plan to get it done;” “You attend Loral's Wealth Building Workshop (The Blitz) & learn there are so many ways to maximize the potential of your personal & business finances;” “You attend Loral's Cash Machine Workshop & learn to turbo-charge your current business;” “You sign up for Wealth Acceleration Coaching & shortly realize it was the best decision of your life;” “You attend Loral's R.E.A.L. Wealth Tour & learn how to build a successful Real Estate system you learned on the street, not just in class;” “You take a month off & focus on getting your priorities in life straight;” and “You finally decide it's time to stop living at the ‘kid's table’ & attend The Big Table.;” “You receive investment ideas, meet visionary peers, & receive an enormous amount of conditioning.”

The Challenge card set 148 comprises cards with instruction indicia that generally present players with a challenge that can negatively affect net worth. The instruction indicia generally includes a description of a particular event. The instruction indicia then provides a penalty for the event. The penalty preferably is any instruction that would negatively impact net worth. For example, the penalty could be an instruction to increase the player's expenditures, to decrease income (either from a job or from a cash machine as will be discussed), to increase tax liability, to lose either asset value or income from an existing investment, to lose an asset entirely, to lose at least one turn, or to lose a TLC point. In some situations, the instruction indicia will permit the player to mitigate the loss by the use of credit acquired by a forecasting activity or because the player has created an entity that prevents any assets from being affected.

Some Challenge cards also present symbol indicia 200 in the form of a guitar, which instructs the player that the player can give the card to another player who is seated to the player's left. Preferably, the receiving player must accept the penalty unless the receiving player rolls a certain number to permit the receiving player to pass the card to yet another player. Specifically, if the receiving player rolls a 1 or 3 from a single die, the receiving player must follow the instructions. Otherwise, the card can be passed to yet another player on the receiving player's left. The card can be passed around the table until it reaches the original player, in which case the original player must follow the instructions.

Examples of instruction indicia that describe an event in connection with a particular challenge include: “A disgruntled employee is injured on the job & is suing you.;” “A tenant falls on your slippery stairs. He shows up in court with a neck brace. The rest is history.;” “A lawsuit is filed against your Cash Machine.;” “A real estate deal falls through & you lose the earnest money.;” “One of the Promissory Notes you own defaults, & they are unable to pay you back.;” “That thing you were doing at work that you thought no one would find out about . . . guess what?;” “The CPA you hire is way too aggressive with your deductions & you are audited.;” “The new exploration crew, Darryl & Associates, cannot locate any gas wells.;” “The endangered spotted toad is found on the site of an Oil rig. Oil company goes bankrupt.;” “You ‘volunteer’ to take a pay cut to help meet year-end profit targets.;” “You are audited & fined for tax evasion.;” “You are sued personally. We can't go into the details without badly embarrassing you.;” “You are PERSONALLY sued because your newly trained pit bull attacked your mother in law.;” “You are personally sued when a houseguest falls off your 2nd story deck (which has no railing).;” “You are proud of your new ski boat until you receive the bill for the first payment.;” “You are involved in ‘questionable’ business practices.;” “You bad-mouth your competitors.;” “Your boss decides he needs more vacation money so he cuts your pay.;” “Your boss' son (a natural disaster) takes over the payroll department of your job.;” “Your business is identified in a high profile lawsuit.;” “Your cash machine has the wrong tax structure.;” “Your Cash Machine grows so quickly that customer service begins to suffer.;” “You decide you need anew automobile & lease your first German sports car.;” “You decide to send your child to your city's best private school.;” “You didn't do enough research on your latest equipment purchase & get taken to the cleaners.;” “You do no tax planning at the beginning of the year.;” “You end up paying back taxes.;” “You failed to plan your taxes for next year with your CPA.;” “You get sued for not complying with local housing rules.;” “You get a divorce & the judge decides you need to pay alimony.;” “You go to the track & bet on a horse named Crooked Leg.;” “You have been found guilty of unfair housing practices.;” “You hire your brother-in-law to head up customer service.;” “Your interest free, no-money-down furniture loan is due.;” “Your IT manager joins the Peace Corps.;” “Your last audit revealed “interesting” accounting activities.;” “You lose customers because you went on a two-month vacation.;” “You never get to that book you meant to read.;” “Your new motorcycle lease is more than expected.;” “You quit your daily reading habit & stop calling your mentor.;” “You were mowing your lawn & missed an important business call.;” “While vacuuming your house, an important business call went unnoticed.;” “A tenant's injury is linked to a safety discrepancy noted by the Housing Department on last year's inspection.;” “The CPA you hire is way too conservative with your deductions & you pay far more than you should in taxes.;” “We don't have enough time for this story. Just believe us when we say you no longer want that receptionist working for you.;” “While snorkeling to clean out your pool drain, you lost track of time & missed an important business lunch.;” “You have Aunt Sally prepare your taxes. You then hire a REAL professional to clean up the mess.;” “Your bookkeeper quits right before you need to file your taxes & you have to rush to get them in on time. You miss several critical deductions.;” and “Your ex found a new lawyer. That lawyer found your business shares. Your business shares have a new home.”

Examples of instruction indicia that describe the penalty for a corresponding challenge event include: “Everyone at the table BUT you gets 1 TLC Point.;” “Everyone at the table BUT you gets an extra $10,000.00 cash right now.;” “Lose 3 turns.;” “Lose 2 turns.;” “Roll a die. If you roll a 1, hand this card to the person on your left.;” “Roll a die. If you roll a 6, pass this card to your left.;” “Your “Other” Expenditures increase $200 (unless you have forecasted your expenses).;” “Your “Other” Expenditures increase $400 (unless you have forecasted your expenses).;” “Your “Other” Expenditures increase $500 (unless you have forecasted your expenses).;” “Your “Other” Expenditures increase $1,000 (unless you have forecasted your expenses).;” “Your Cash Machine cash flow decreases $500 (unless you've forecasted your income).;” “Your Cash Machine cash flow decreases $1,000 (unless you've forecasted your income).;” “Your Cash Machine cash flow decreases $1,000 (unless you have forecasted your income).;” “Your Cash Machine cash flow decreases $500 (unless you've forecasted your income).;” “Your Job income decreases $400 (unless you've forecasted your income);” “Your Job income decreases $500 (even if you've forecasted your income).;” “Your Job income decreases $500 (even if you have forecasted your income).;” “Your Job income decreases $1,000 (unless you have forecasted your income).;” “You Lose $20,000 Cash;” “You Lose $10,000 Cash;” “You Lose 1 Turn;” “You Lose 1 TLC point.;” “You Lose 2 Turns.;” “You Lose 2 TLC points.;” “You Lose 3 TLC points.;” “You Lose 4 TLC points.;” “You must pay $20,000;” “Your Tax Expenditures increase $300 (unless you've forecasted your taxes).;” “Your Tax Expenditures increase $500 (unless you've forecasted your taxes).;” “Your Tax Expenditures go up $500 (unless you have forecasted your taxes).;” “Your Tax Expenditures go up $500 (unless you've forecasted your taxes).;” “Your Tax Expenditures go up $1,000 (unless you have forecasted your taxes).;” “Your Tax Expenditures go up $1,000 (unless you've forecasted your taxes).;” “Your Tax Expenditures increase $1,000 (unless you've forecasted your taxes).;” “Also, if your Cash Machine in not in an entity, you lose ALL of your other assets not in an entity. (You may use a Forecasted entity for your Cash Machine now.);” “ANY rental property you own NOT in an entity is now GONE. (You may use a Forecasted entity to protect ONE rental property now.);” “Everyone at the table BUT YOU loses their entire asset value & income from a SINGLE Gas investment.;” “The Income from any BUSINESS SHARES you own NOT in an entity is now GONE. (You may use a Forecasted entity to protect ONE business now.);” “The income from ALL of your rental properties NOT in an entity is GONE. (You may use a Forecasted entity to protect ONE rental property now.);” “You lose ANY Cash Machine cash flow, Business shares, Oil/Gas, & Prom. notes if they are NOT in an entity. (You may use a Forecasted entity to protect ONE asset now.);” and “You lose ALL your Cash Machine cash flow if your Cash Machine is NOT in an entity. (You may use a Forecasted entity to protect your Cash Machine now).”

The Wealth Account card set 150 comprises cards, each of which present an instruction that permits players to change a monthly contribution by the player to a wealth account, which is included as an asset. In turn, the players must make a corresponding increase to the amount of monthly expenditures. The cards also include an instruction that permits players to make a one-time deposit of cash into the wealth account. In some instances, the one-time deposit may be made in addition to the adjustment of monthly contributions. In other instances, the instructions permit only one of the two actions.

All players preferably begin the game with no money in their wealth account. Upon the selection of a wealth account card, because of landing on a corresponding wealth account space or on an option space, a player can choose to deposit money in the wealth account, either periodically or on a one-time only basis. In making a deposit of money, the player notes the deposit in the Expenditures section 234 and in the Assets section 238 next to the subheading Wealth Account. The player must also give the corresponding amount of cash to the bank. In other instances, the wealth account card may simply direct the player to add value to the Wealth Account without depositing money.

Examples of instruction indicia that describe instructions concerning changes to the wealth account include: “Change the monthly contribution to your Wealth Account. Account for this in the ‘Expenditures’ section. Then adjust your Total Expenditures & Pay Day.;” “Change the monthly contribution to your Wealth Account in the “Expenditures” section. Then change the Total Expenditures & your Pay Day.;” “Deposit any amount of cash into your Wealth Account. Indicate this in the “Asset” section.;” “The Value of your Wealth Account increases $1,000.;” “The Value of your Wealth Account increases $5,000.;” “The Value of your Wealth Account increases $10,000.;” and “Indicate this in your “Asset” section.”

The Forecasting card set 152 comprises cards, each of which present an instruction that permits players to receive credit that can be used to mitigate a challenge later in the game. In particular, the instructions may specify that the player receives a credit for forecasting future expenses, future income, future taxes, or the need for future entities. The cards also preferably present an instruction that requires the player to have one or more TLC points in order to receive the forecasting credit. Furthermore, the cards present an instruction that requires a cash investment by the player in order to receive the forecasting credit. The cards also present an instruction that directs the player to record and keep track of the credit for future use, as will be discussed further.

In using a Forecasting card, the player makes any instructed payment with cash and notes the amount in the Expenditures section 234. The player also makes a note in the corresponding subsection of the Forecasting section 244. This credit may be used later in the game to mitigate a challenge card or otherwise meet the requirements listed on another activity card. Following use of the credit, the player then erases or otherwise removes that credit from the Forecasting section 244. However, the player is not required to use the forecasting credit at any particular time.

Examples of instruction indicia that describe a forecasting event include: “Forecast Future Expenses.;” “Forecast Future Income.;” “Forecast Future Taxes;” and “You Forecast Entities needed for Future Assets.” Instruction indicia examples that describe what the player must pay in order to receive forecasting credit include: “Investment: $500;” “Investment: $1,000;” “Investment: $2,000;” “Investment: $3,000;” “Investment: $5,000;” “Requires: 1 TLC Point;” “Requires: 2 TLC Points;” “Requires: 3 TLC Points;” and “Requires: 4 TLC Points.” Instruction indicia examples that describe the credit to be received by the player include: “Place a tally mark next to “Entities” in the Forecasting section. You may place any asset into any entity at any time. Once you use this entity, remove the tally mark.;” “Place a tally mark next to “Expenses” in the Forecasting section & you are not subject to the next expense challenge. Once you overcome this challenge, remove the tally mark.;” “Place a tally mark next to “Income” in the Forecasting section & you are not subject to the next income challenge. Once you overcome this challenge, remove the tally mark.;” and “Place a tally mark next to “Taxes” in the Forecasting section & you are not subject to the next tax challenge. Once you overcome this challenge, remove the tally mark.”

The Assets card set 154 includes cards, some of which recite an asset for sale while others direct players to increase the value of assets already owned. Asset cards allow players to build wealth from cash flow provided by the asset and from asset appreciation. Generally, the player can purchase assets or receive credit for additional asset value if the player meets requirements listed on the card. Cards provided in the Assets card set 154 list assets such as apartments, duplexes, retail buildings, shares or other form of company ownership, and promissory notes. However, the principles of the present invention are applicable where other types of assets are listed. Preferably, the player that draws one of the cards has the option of purchasing the asset listed on the card.

Examples of asset descriptions on Asset cards include: “10-UNIT APARTMENTS FOR SALE;” “100-UNIT APARTMENT BUILDINGS FOR SALE;” “2 BR HOMES FOR SALE;” “2 major manufacturing plants move to your town;” “25-UNIT STRIP MALLS FOR SALE;” “3 magazines call your town the “best place to live.;” “3-UNIT RETAIL BUILDINGS FOR SALE;” “4-UNIT OFFICE BUILDINGS FOR SALE.;” “ABUNDANT OIL & GAS WELLS FOUND!;” “Account. TWO available.;” “ANY PLAYER may use this card;” “COFFEE HOUSE COMPANY SEEKS PROMISSORY NOTE INVESTORS;” “Company PAYS BACK its PROMISSORY NOTE;” “Company claims to have invented the mocha bean;” “Company has done work in Milan, Paris & Peoria ” “Company's products are suddenly in high demand;” “DUPLEXES FOR SALE;” “Erase this asset & any associated income;” “For the first time ever, you love oil & gas companies;” “GAME COMPANY SEEKS PROMISSORY NOTE INVESTORS;” “GAS DRILLING COMPANY SEEKS INVESTORS;” “Great management & let's face it, we all use it;” “Huge population influx spurs enormous appreciation;” “Huge earthquake turns your property into waterfront;” “LASER HAIR REMOVAL COMPANY SEEKS PROMISSORY NOTE INVESTORS;” “Looks like they've hit the mother load!;” “Managers experienced, but flawed business plan;” “May sell at this value by erasing the asset & income ” “OIL DRILLING CO. SEEKS INVESTORS;” “OIL & GAS COMPANIES HIT GUSHERS!;” “OIL & GAS CO. STRIKE HUGE WELLS!;” “PRIVATE FASHION COMPANY SELLS EQUITY SHARES;” “PRIVATE ELECTRONICS COMPANY SELLS EQUITY SHARES;” “PRIVATE WINE MAKING COMPANY SELLS EQUITY SHARES;” “PRIVATE CONSTRUCTION COMPANY SELLS EQUITY SHARES;” “SEVERAL DUPLEXES FOR SALE;” “TEN are available;” “The value of ALL rentals 4-UNITS OR LESS DOUBLES;” “They never drill in protected tundra lands;” “They've hired a new seismic geologist;” “Value of a SINGLE company's equity shares you own TRIPLE (NOT your stocks, Oil/Gas, IRA, or 401K);” “You may opt to sell at this value by erasing the asset, paying off the liability, & erasing the income & expenditure;” “You are paid back on any Promissory Note you own at 120% the original value;” “You drive a hybrid car, but still see the value of gas;” “You finally get a good property manager;” “You may keep these shares or sell them back at this time ONLY;” “You may opt to sell at this value by erasing the asset & erasing the income;” “You may opt to sell at this value by erasing the asset, paying off the liability, & erasing the income & expenditure;” “You're paid back on any Promissory Note you own at 120% the original value;” “You then buy your business broker a nice gift!;” and “Your town has always been great, but now everyone knows it.”

The Asset cards preferably present an instruction that requires the player to have one or more TLC points in order to purchase the asset, e.g., “Requires: 2 TLC Points.” The Asset cards also preferably present an instruction that requires the player to purchase the asset using money from the player's Wealth Account, e.g., “($1,000 increments from Wealth Account only);” “$10,000 down PER duplex from Wealth Account, TWO available;” and “$100,000 down PER building from Wealth Account.” The amount of investment preferably ranges from about $1,000 to about $800,000 per building and investment amounts can generally range up to about $5,000,000. The Asset cards present indicia that recites the amount of monthly income and expenses associated with the asset, e.g., “Income: none;” “Income: $100 per $5,000 invested (24% ROI);” “Income: $500/home Expenses: $400/home;” “Income: $500/duplex Expenses: $600/duplex;” “Income: $700 Expenses: $500;” “Income: $8,500/bldg. Expenses: $6,000/bldg.;” “Invest $1,000-$1,000,000;” “Possible Appreciation: 110-120%;” “property purchase TRIPLES;” and “property purchase increases $100/unit/month.” The income of a building can also range from about $1000 to about $55,000, while the expenses can range from about $400 to about $40,000. Income in general can range from about $100 and up and can be made dependent on the amount invested. The principles of the present invention are also applicable where the income and expenses values are higher or lower than these illustrated values. Furthermore, the indicia recites the asset value of the asset and also lists the resulting debt or liability as a result of purchasing the asset, e.g., “Asset: $40,000/home Liability: $35,000/home;” “Asset: $45,000/home Liability: $40,000/home;” “Asset: $50,000 Liability: $45,000;” “Asset: $100,000/duplex Liability: $80,000/duplex;” and “Asset: $110,000/bldg. Liability: $90,000/bldg.” The indicia also preferably identifies the Cash Flow and Return On Investment (ROI) for the asset, e.g., “Cash Flow=$0/home (0% ROI);” “Cash Flow=−$100/duplex (−12% ROI);” “Cash Flow=$200 (48% ROI);” and “Cash Flow=$400/bldg. (16% ROI).” The principles of the present invention are also applicable where the assets, liabilities, and ROI values are higher or lower than these illustrated values.

In purchasing the asset listed on the Asset card, the player preferably may only purchase the assets with money from the Wealth Account and not from cash. The cost of the asset is subtracted from the player's Wealth Account in the Asset section 238 of the worksheet 222. The player then writes a short description of the asset on a separate line in the Asset section 238, with the corresponding asset value. If the value of an existing asset increases, the value of the asset is changed in the Asset section 238. The liability amount of the asset, if any, is recorded in the Liability section 240. Any periodic income from the asset is recorded in the Income section 232. Any periodic expenses are recorded in the Expenditure section 234. Any changes to income or expenditures are later incorporated into calculations for Total Income in the Income section 232, Total Expenditures in the Expenditures section 234, and net income, i.e., Pay Day, in the Net Income section 236.

The Debt Management card set 156 includes cards, each of which present indicia that instruct the player to pay an existing debt, preferably using cash, e.g., “Using your cash, pay off the FULL amount of the debt of your choice.;” “Using your cash, pay off HALF the amount of the debt of your choice.;” “(You may NOT use your Wealth Account.);” “Erase the ENTIRE liability of the debt in the “Liability” section & the ENTIRE associated expenditure in the “Expenditure” section.;” and “Reduce your debt & expenditure by HALF in the Liability & Expenditure sections.” However, it is consistent with the principles of the present invention for the player to use other assets for payment of debt. The indicia presented by the Debt Management cards also instruct the player to reduce the amount of debt accordingly in the Liability section 240 and to reduce the amount of monthly expenditures in the Expenditures section 234.

Generally, debts may only be paid by selecting a Debt Management card. The player preferably is permitted to pay debts only by using cash and not from money deposited in the Wealth Account. As shown, Debt Management cards permit the player to pay an entire single debt or pay a portion of that debt if the player meets any listed requirements. Any payment of debt is reflected on the worksheet 222 by either erasing the debt or changing the debt accordingly in the Expenditures section 234. The player then adjusts the amount of Total Expenditures in the Expenditures section 234 and the value of Pay Day in the Net Income section 236. The player also adjusts the Liabilities section 240 by erasing or changing the amount of the debt and changing the Total Liabilities amount accordingly. The player can further update the value for Net Worth in the Net Worth section 242.

The Entities card set 158 includes cards, each of which present indicia that instructs the player to create an entity. The entity is generally a legal entity such as an LLC, S-Corp, C-Corp, or Limited Partnership, and the player may be presented with the option of selecting one of these types of entities. The indicia also instructs the player to record the entity and associate the entity with at least one asset owned by the player. The cards preferably present an instruction that requires the player to have one or more TLC points in order to form the entity. The cards also present an instruction that recites the monetary investment required to form the entity.

In using Entities cards, the player can use entities to protect assets from unexpected tax, legal, and other challenges provided that the player meets any listed requirements. Entity cards preferably may only be purchased with cash and not with money from the Wealth Account. The purchased entity is reflected on the worksheet 222 by recording the entity in the entity column of the Asset section 238, either next to an existing asset or next to a blank space for use with a later-purchased asset. The player gives cash to the bank to pay for the entity and then reduces the amount of cash listed in the Asset section 238.

Examples of instruction indicia that describe the creation of an entity include: “You create the entity of your CHOICE (LLC, S-Corp, C-Corp, or Limited Partnership) for one or more of your assets. Indicate this entity next to your asset in the ‘Assets’ section.;” “You create an S-Corp for one or more of your assets. Indicate this entity next to one of your assets in the “Assets” section.;” “You create an LLC for one or more of your assets. Indicate this entity next to one of your assets in the ‘Assets’ section.;” “You create a C-Corp for ONE of your assets. Indicate this entity next to one of your assets in the ‘Assets’ section.;” and “You create a Limited Partnership (LP) for one or more of your assets. Indicate this entity next to one of your assets in the “Assets” section.”

Examples of instruction indicia that describe what a player must pay in order to create an entity include: “Investment: $500;” “Investment: $500/S-Corp created;” “Investment: $500/LLC created;” “Investment: $500/LP created;” “Investment: $1,000;” “Investment: $1,000/LLC created;” “Investment: $1,000/entity created;” “Investment: $1,000/LP created;” “Investment: $1,000/S-Corp created;” “Investment: $1,500;” “Investment: $1,500/LLC created;” “Investment: $1,500/S-Corp created;” “Investment: $1,500/LP created;” “Investment: $2,000;38 “Investment: $2,000/entity created;” “Investment: $2,000/LP created;” “Investment: $2,000/LLC created;” “Investment: $2,000/entity created;” “Investment: $2,000/S-Corp created;” “Investment: $2,500;” “Investment: $2,500/S-Corp created;” “Investment: $2,500/.LP created;” “Investment: $2,500/.LLC created;” “Investment: $3,000/entity created;” “Investment: $4,000/entity created;” “Investment: $5,000/entity created;” “Requires: 1 TLC point;” “Requires: 2 TLC points;” “Requires: 3 TLC points;” and “Requires: 4 TLC points.”

The Cash Machine card set 160 includes cards that give the players an opportunity to purchase a business or add to an existing business for earning additional income. Preferably, all players begin the game with a Cash Machine, as indicated on the worksheet 222 (not shown), but may or may not start the game with income from that Cash Machine. Cash Machine cards preferably can only be purchased with cash and not with money deposited in the Wealth Account. The purchase of a Cash Machine card is recorded by reducing the amount of cash in the Assets section 238. Cash Machine cards generally increase income generated by the Cash Machine, which is noted in the Income section 232 of the worksheet 222. This increase in income is also reflected in the amount of Total Income in section 232 and Pay Day in section 236. Preferably, the Cash Machine includes an asset value equal to ten (10) times the periodic income of the Cash Machine. Consequently, additional income from the Cash Machine also increases the Net Worth value in the Net Worth section 242.

The Cash Machine cards present indicia that describes an activity undertaken by the player to produce additional income, e.g., “You & your mentor execute a mail campaign.;” “You buy a small company that will boost yours.;” “You create a visually appealing image & use it to boost sales.;” “You define your unique selling proposition.;” “You develop & use a powerful media message;” “You develop a new product line & revenue model again.;” “You develop a gutsy, edgy marketing campaign that works.;” “You develop a computerized revenue model.;” “You develop a clear vision for your business.;” “You develop a revenue model.;” “You discover & market to your true target market.;” “You discover your market Segment, Target, & Position (STP).;” “You emphasize your product's top benefits.;” “You entirely revamp your online order processing.;” “You execute a local PR campaign.;” “You extensively revenue model your business.;” “You find a local company with which to joint venture.;” “You form a mastermind group.;” “You go through the process of revenue modeling.;” “You joint venture with a large company.;” “You launch a major Internet marketing campaign.;” “You launch a major international marketing campaign.;” “You let several friends try your products for free.;” “You locally place flyers, display ads, & posters.;” “You look over all your books & reduce expenses.;” “You model your business after your successful mentor's.;” “You model your business after another successful business.;” “You model your business after your mentor's successful business.;” “You offer free samples of your product.;” “You partner with a huge national distributor.;” “You perform extensive tax planning & restructure.;” “You place several ads in major magazines.;” “You put out several flyers.;” “You re-brand your business.;” “You set up a joint venture with a major company.;” “You set up an informal “home party.;”” “You set up a joint venture with your mentor.;” “You speak to a local club about your product.;” “You start a joint venture with your visionary peers.;” “You streamline your order processing system.;” “You streamline all computer systems.;” “You take advantage of the “4 P's” of marketing (Product, Price, Place, & Promotion).;” “You take a CEO to lunch & re-model your business operations.;”“Your assistant forwards media leads to your PR person.;” “Your CPA finds several deductible expenses.;” “Your CPA discovers several tax benefits to your Cash Machine.;” “Your Leadership and Conditioning spur growth.;” “Your mentor lets you give a free seminar to her business group.;” “Your mentor recommends a sales course for your assistant. This opens the door for more training.;” and “With your financial team you are able to reduce expenses.”

The Cash Machine cards preferably present an instruction that requires the player to have one or more TLC points in order to form the entity, e.g., “Requires: 3 TLC points.” The cards also present an instruction that recites the monetary investment required to form the entity, e.g., “Investment: $1,000 minimum;” “Investment: $1,000-$100,000;” “(only in $2,000 increments, NO LIMIT);” and “(only in $5,000 increments).” The investment may be a fixed value or may vary according to the player's discretion. The indicia also recites the amount of monthly income associated with investment in the activity. The recited income may be calculated based on the number of TLC points held by the player or by the amount of investment selected by the player, e.g., “Your Cash Machine cash flow increases $100 for Every $1,000 you invest.;” “Your Cash Machine cash flow increases $100 MULTIPLIED by your TLC points.;” and “Your Cash Machine cash flow increases $100 MULTIPLIED by a Die Roll. Roll only 1 Die.”

Some of the activity card sets 146,148,150,152,154,156,158,160 preferably include identification indicia 206 in the form of the word “CO-OP” listed with the other instructions. The CO-OP indicia 206 indicates that the player who draws the card is permitted to share that card with another player. More particularly, the player has the option of using the card first. The player then has the option of selling the card to another player for that player to then use. Preferably, the CO-OP indicia 206 is presented by cards in the Forecasting, Assets, and Cash Machine card sets 152,154,160. However, the principles of the present invention are applicable where cards from other card sets are used by or impact multiple players. Where a player has paid for a CO-OP card and the card requires a roll of the dice, that player may roll the dice to determine the result of the card rather than use the roll cast by any player from whom the CO-OP card was purchased.

Each player may quit their job at any point during the game in order to be able to roll up to three of the dice 304. The player must then update their worksheet 222 by eliminating job income in the Income section 232 and correspondingly changing the amount of Total Income in the Income section 232 and Pay Day in the Net Income section 236. The player may later get the job back at any time but the player must then skip their next two turns. As discussed previously, the player can only roll three dice if that player has acquired ten (10) TLC points.

To begin playing the illustrated board game 30, players preferably are given one of the worksheets 222 and one of the pencils 312 to track the various financial metrics, with each of the players' worksheets 222 preferably having the same scenario. According to the scenario, players are given predetermined sums of cash as discussed previously, but are preferably not allowed to loan money from the bank at any time. The players are also each given a respective game piece (not shown), which is placed in the common space 106.

Once the timer 306 is started, the players can start playing by taking turns rolling one or more of the dice 304. Players normally roll two dice 304 at one time. However, if a player has five (5) TLC points, that player is permitted the option of either rolling one or two dice 304. Where a player has acquired ten (10) TLC points, that player is permitted to roll either one, two, or three dice 304, but that player must also quit their job, as discussed. When a player rolls doubles, i.e., two dice with the same number, or triples, i.e., three dice with the same number, they are permitted to take another turn before the next player rolls. If a card directs a player to roll the dice 304 to calculate a result, the player should roll the dice 304 again instead of using the roll that was cast for that player's turn. Where a card directs a player to roll the dice 304 and the roll will affect other players, usually only the player that drew the card may roll the dice 304.

The timer 306 is preferably set for sixty (60) minutes of elapsed time in which to play the game, but players can agree to set a time limit that is shorter or longer than sixty minutes. The game is then played as discussed above, with the timer 306 being preferably paused every fifteen (15) minutes for a periodic Time Out. During the periodic Time Out, players can make calculations on their worksheets 222 and can take actions on activity cards that have already been selected. Also, each player's worksheet 222 is audited by the other players during the periodic Time Out. For example, each player can hand their worksheet 222 to an adjacent player who can verify the amount of Total Income, Total Expenditures, and Pay Day. The auditing player can also add Total Assets and Total Liabilities to calculate the Net Worth. Players are preferably required to disclose their Net Worth to the other players during the Time Out. The timer 306 is then restarted after the Time Out and the players continue the game. The player with the highest Net Worth at each Time Out is preferably given a special designation until the next Time Out, such as “Rock Star.” A special Time Out can optionally be called by any player when one of the players lands on the Pay Day space. However, none of the players are audited by the other players when a special Time Out is called. At the end of the predetermined time, the player with the highest value of Net Worth is determined to be the winner of the game. However, it is within the ambit of the present invention to determine the winner based on other metrics.

The preferred forms of the invention described above are to be used as illustration only, and should not be utilized in a limiting sense in interpreting the scope of the present invention. Obvious modifications to the exemplary embodiments, as hereinabove set forth, could be readily made by those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit of the present invention.

The inventors hereby state their intent to rely on the Doctrine of Equivalents to determine and assess the reasonably fair scope of the present invention as pertains to any apparatus not materially departing from but outside the literal scope of the invention as set forth in the following claims.