Title:
Glass for Consuming and Tasting Drinks
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A glass for consuming and tasting drinks, such as beer, has a plurality of raised ribs (14) inside it, extending from the bottom (15) to the opening (6) of the glass (1) and evenly distributed radially or with a helical or spiral path; a glass (1) having such ribs (14), if held at an angle of substantially 45° during filling and rotated during and after filling, allows the drink to be subjected to a whirling movement, resulting in the partial elimination of carbon dioxide and enhancement of the organoleptic attributes of the beer.



Inventors:
Stecca, Luigi (Costa Di Rovigo(Rovigo), IT)
Application Number:
11/628775
Publication Date:
11/27/2008
Filing Date:
08/05/2004
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
215/387
International Classes:
A47G19/22; B65D83/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
THOMAS, KAREEN KAY
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Harbin King & Klima (500 Ninth Street SE, Washington, DC, 20003, US)
Claims:
1. A glass for consuming and tasting drinks, characterised in that the glass (1) has at least one raised rib (14) inside it.

2. The glass according to claim 1, characterised in that the glass (1) has a plurality of raised ribs (14) inside it.

3. The glass according to claim 2, characterised in that the ribs (14) extend from the bottom (15) towards the opening (6) of the glass (1) and are evenly distributed.

4. The glass according to claim 2 or 3, characterised in that the ribs (14) extend radially from the bottom (15) towards the opening of the glass (1).

5. The glass according to claim 2 or 3, characterised in that the ribs (14) extend with a helical or spiral path from the bottom (15) to the opening (6) of the glass (1).

6. The glass according to claim 5, characterised in that the ribs (14) are distributed in a first and a second set with opposite paths.

7. The glass according to any of the foregoing claims from 1 to 6, characterised in that the ribs (14) have at least one sharp edge in cross-section.

8. The glass according to claim 7, characterised in that the ribs (14) have a triangular or polygonal shape in cross-section.

9. The glass according to any of the foregoing claims from 1 to 6, characterised in that the ribs (14) have a rounded shape in cross-section.

10. The glass according to any of the foregoing claims from 1 to 9, characterised in that the size of the ribs (14) is substantially between 0.5 and 3.5 mm.

11. A method for eliminating excess carbon dioxide and for oxygenation of drinks using a glass (1) according to any of the foregoing claims from 1 to 10, characterised in that it comprises the step of making the glass (1) rotate during and/or after filling, allowing the ribs (14) to generate whirling and/or turbulent motions of the drink, resulting in the partial elimination of carbon dioxide and enhancement of the organoleptic attributes of the drink.

12. The method according to claim 11, characterised in that it includes a step of positioning the glass (1) at an angle during filling and rotation, allowing the ribs (14) to generate a whirling turbulent movement designed to promote the elimination of carbon dioxide.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to a glass for consuming and tasting drinks, in particular alcoholic drinks with or without carbon dioxide, for example, wine and beer.

In the case of wine, as is known, it is appropriate that consumption of such a drink is preceded by a mechanical treatment, rotating and/or oscillating the glass, to allow the liquid to absorb a certain quantity of air and as a result of oxygen.

This oxygen absorption enhances particular qualities of the wine such as its aromas and flavours.

This treatment, as well as the above-mentioned oxygenation, in some cases is also intended to reduce the level of carbon dioxide, whose presence, if at an excessive level, can cause unwanted and harmful effects in alcoholic drinks.

Firstly, it increases the human body's capacity for absorption of alcoholic products, constituting an effective vehicle for alcohol.

Secondly, the gas has properties which anaesthetise the taste buds and so cancel out the consumer's capacity for taste.

BACKGROUND ART

As is known, the above-mentioned treatment consists of predetermined pouring out techniques and, as indicated above, an operation for rotation and oscillation of the glasses during and after filling.

However, such techniques do not allow either oxygenation able to suitably enhance the aromas and flavours, or an appreciable reduction in the level of carbon dioxide.

As is known, in the case of beer, carbon dioxide is spontaneously produced during fermentation. More carbon dioxide is then added artificially at the moment of bottling, to allow the product to be preserved for longer.

Therefore, it is evident that in the case of beer, the need to reduce the level of carbon dioxide dissolved in the drink is even stronger and more predominant than with wine.

In conclusion, for both wine and beer there is a strong need to achieve good oxygenation together with the need to reduce the level of excess carbon dioxide contained in the drinks, so as to obtain the beneficial effects described above, that is to say, limitation of the human body's capacity to absorb alcoholic products and enhancement of the aromas and flavours of the drinks.

DISCLOSURE OF THE INVENTION

The aim of the present invention is, therefore, to overcome the above-mentioned disadvantages by providing a glass with the characteristics described in the first claim herein.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The technical characteristics of the invention, with reference to the above aims, are clearly described in the claims below and its advantages are apparent from the detailed description which follows, with reference to the accompanying drawings which illustrate a preferred embodiment of the invention provided merely by way of example without restricting the scope of the inventive concept, and in which:

FIGS. 1 to 3 and 5 to 9 are perspective front views of several embodiments of the glass made in accordance with the present invention;

FIG. 4 is a plan view of the glass illustrated in FIG. 1;

FIGS. 10 to 13 are enlarged perspective views of four alternative embodiments of a detail of the tankards illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 9.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

With reference to the accompanying drawings, the numeral 1 denotes generically a glass or tankard for consuming and tasting drinks such as wine and beer.

In particular FIGS. 1 to 5 illustrate, respectively labelled 2, 3, 4 and 5, conical column glasses with a wide opening 6 in particular used for tasting beer, whilst FIGS. 6 to 9 illustrate, respectively labelled 7, 8, 9 and 10, goblet-shaped glasses, that is to say having the shape of a spherical cup and with a stem 11 and a base 12.

According to the present invention the internal surface 13 of the glasses 1 has a plurality of raised ribs 14, evenly distributed and extending from the bottom 15 towards the opening 6 of the glasses 1.

In the glass 2, illustrated in FIGS. 1 and 4, said ribs 14 are substantially parallel with one another, whilst in the glasses 3 and 4 the ribs 14 extend from the bottom 15 towards the opening 6 of the glass 1 with a helical or spiral path, respectively clockwise and anti-clockwise.

In the glass 5 illustrated in FIG. 5 the ribs 14 are distributed in a first and a second set with opposite helical or spiral paths.

The glass 7 in FIG. 6 has, on the internal surface 13 of the respective cup, a plurality of ribs 14 extending radially from the bottom 15 towards the opening 6.

In the glasses 8 and 9 the ribs 14 extend from the bottom 15 towards the opening 6 of the glass 1 with a helical or spiral path, respectively anti-clockwise and clockwise.

Finally, in the glass 10 in FIG. 9 the ribs 14 are distributed in a first and a second set with opposite helical or spiral paths.

As illustrated in particular in FIGS. 10 and 12, the ribs 14 in cross-section have a rounded shape and differing thicknesses.

In FIGS. 11 and 13 the ribs 14 in cross-section respectively have a sharp-edged triangular shape and a polygonal shape forming two sharp edges.

In practice, in cross-section the size of the ribs 14 is between 0.5 and 3.5 mm.

In operation, in the case of beer, using any of the glasses 1 illustrated, while filling, the consumer holds the glass 1 at an angle so that the flow of liquid is diverted by the ribs 14 with a whirling motion, which conveys the carbon dioxide upwards.

At the same time and at the end of filling, the consumer makes the glass perform a series of rotations so as to generate, again thanks to the ribs 14, a turbulent movement of the beer which causes the elimination of excess carbon dioxide. However, this rotary movement does not alter the properties of the beer and instead enhances its aromatic qualities and flavours.

If the consumer is right- or left-handed, it may be a good idea to choose the appropriate glass 1 amongst those illustrated in FIGS. 2, 3, 7 and 8, or in FIGS. 5 and 9 for right- and left-handed people.

In the case of wine, in particular using a glass 1 illustrated in one of the Figures from 6 to 9, once the cup has been filled, the consumer makes the glass 1 perform rotary movements so that the respective ribs 14 cause a turbulent movement with the aim of making a certain quantity of air and consequently oxygen absorbable in the liquid.

Said oxygen absorption enhances particular qualities of the wine, such as its aromas and flavours.

Said oxygenation therefore allows the organoleptic attributes of the wine to be enhanced and partial elimination of the carbon dioxide contained in it, which also helps to enhance the perfumes.

Finally, it should be noticed that a further effect of the shape of the glasses 1 with said ribs 14, is, also in the case of wine, a slight reduction in the level of alcohol, since part of the alcohol tends to be liberated from the drink as a result of its whirling motion. Moreover, the movement of the wine in a glass 1 made in accordance with the present invention generates pleasant musical notes.

The invention described is suitable for evident industrial applications. It may also be subject to numerous modifications and variations without thereby departing from the scope of the inventive concept. Moreover, all details may be substituted with technically equivalent elements, for example it is obvious that the glasses 1 may be made with any shape and of any material.