Title:
METHOD OF TRAINING A GOLFER TO IMPROVE HIS OR HER PUTTING SKILLS AND A DEVICE USED FOR SUCH TRAINING
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A method of training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills and a device used for such training. The abstract of the disclosure is submitted herewith as required by 37 C.F.R. §1.72(b). As stated in 37 C.F.R. §1.72(b): A brief abstract of the technical disclosure in the specification must commence on a separate sheet, preferably following the claims, under the heading “Abstract of the Disclosure.” The purpose of the abstract is to enable the Patent and Trademark Office and the public generally to determine quickly from a cursory inspection the nature and gist of the technical disclosure. The abstract shall not be used for interpreting the scope of the claims. Therefore, any statements made relating to the abstract are not intended to limit the claims in any manner and should not be interpreted as limiting the claims in any manner.



Inventors:
Kinney, Philip C. (Murrysville, PA, US)
Application Number:
12/014265
Publication Date:
11/20/2008
Filing Date:
01/15/2008
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B69/36
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
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20060189416Soccer (or association football) goalkeeping gameAugust, 2006Nelson
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20080039241Bunt masterFebruary, 2008Pope
20020165047Football reaction training deviceNovember, 2002Nunnely et al.
20010004019Golf ball mark repair toolJune, 2001Wakefield
20020094890Adjustable basketball apparatusJuly, 2002White et al.
20070049424SmashballMarch, 2007Hernandez-ramil et al.
20100075773Sporting Article With Adjustable Weight ConfigurationMarch, 2010Casati Jr.
20020068649Golf ball having a dimple combination patternJune, 2002Thomas III
20050197201Rotating and axially moving putter gripSeptember, 2005Schoeninger



Primary Examiner:
LEGESSE, NINI F
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
NILS H. LJUNGMAN & ASSOCIATES (P. O. BOX 130, GREENSBURG, PA, 15601-0130, US)
Claims:
1. 1-14. (canceled)

15. A method of using a practice device for training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills, said practice device comprising: a vertical anchoring bar being configured to be inserted into a ground surface; a support bar being connected to and held by said vertical anchoring bar in a horizontal position perpendicular to said vertical anchoring bar; an elongated alignment bar being connected to and held by said support bar in a horizontal position perpendicular to said support bar; said support bar comprising a first end being connected to said vertical anchoring bar, and a second end being connected to said alignment bar; a mounting bracket being disposed on top of said alignment bar; a laser device being held in said mounting bracket; said laser device being configured and disposed to project a light beam in a direction parallel to the length dimension of said alignment bar to assist a golfer in aligning said alignment bar with an aim line determined by the golfer to be sufficient for putting a golf ball into a hole; said support bar and said alignment bar being configured to provide a golfer with a reference in which to orient his putter face parallel to said support bar and perpendicular to said alignment bar; said alignment bar comprising a first end and a second end opposite said first end; said first end of said alignment bar comprising a guide spot disposed on the top surface thereof and being configured to be viewed by a golfer as a reference and aiming point under which the golfer may direct a golf ball to cause the golf ball to initially follow an aim line determined by the golfer to be sufficient for putting the golf ball into a hole; said alignment bar being configured to provide said golfer with a reference in which to strike said golf ball to follow a path under and along said alignment bar, and thus initially along an aim line determined by the golfer to be sufficient for putting a golf ball into a hole; and said spot or said indicating dot being configured to aid a golfer in imagining said spot or indicating dot upon putting a golf ball without the use of said practice device, said method comprising the steps of: determining an aim line sufficient for putting a golf ball into a hole; inserting said vertical anchoring bar into the ground with said alignment bar approximately aligned with the aim line; placing a golf ball under said alignment bar and slightly ahead of said support bar in the direction of travel of the putt; finally adjusting the alignment of said alignment bar to precisely align said alignment bar and said laser beam with the aim line; holding a putter such that the putter head is immediately adjacent the golf ball and under said alignment bar, and the putter face is oriented parallel to said support bar and perpendicular to said alignment bar, and thus perpendicular to the aim line; focusing on said guide spot and substantially simultaneously executing a putting stroke to strike the golf ball to move the golf ball under said guide spot and initially along the aim line; and repeating the putting stroke while focusing on said guide spot until the golfer can successfully putt the golf ball into the hole without utilizing the practice device.

16. The method of using a practice device for training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills according to claim 15, wherein said vertical anchoring bar is rotatable to permit adjustment of the position of said support bar and said alignment bar, and said step of adjusting the alignment of said alignment bar comprises rotating said vertical anchoring bar.

17. The method of using a practice device for training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills according to claim 16, wherein said practice device is in combination with a laser target being configured to be positioned a distance from said practice device and having a rough finish to reflect the laser beam to permit the user to more easily view and align the laser beam, and thus the alignment bar, with an aim line determined by the golfer to be sufficient for putting a golf ball into a hole, said method further comprises: placing said laser target several feet away from said practice device and along the aim line; and adjusting the alignment of said alignment bar and said laser device until the laser beam strikes and visibly appears on said laser target.

18. A practice device for training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills, said practice device comprising: a vertical anchoring bar being configured to be vertically oriented with respect to a ground surface; a support bar being connected to and held by said vertical anchoring bar in a horizontal position perpendicular to said vertical anchoring bar; an elongated alignment bar being connected to and held by said support bar in a horizontal position perpendicular to said support bar; said support bar comprising a first end being connected to said vertical anchoring bar, and a second end being connected to said alignment bar; said support bar and said alignment bar being configured to provide a golfer with a reference in which to orient his putter face parallel to said support bar and perpendicular to said alignment bar; said alignment bar comprising a first end and a second end opposite said first end; said first end of said alignment bar comprising a guide spot disposed on the top surface thereof and being configured to be viewed by a golfer as a reference and aiming point under which the golfer may direct a golf ball to cause the golf ball to initially follow an aim line determined by the golfer to be sufficient for putting the golf ball into a hole; said alignment bar being configured to provide said golfer with a reference in which to strike said golf ball to follow a path under and along said alignment bar, and thus initially along an aim line determined by the golfer to be sufficient for putting a golf ball into a hole; and said spot or said indicating dot being configured to aid a golfer in imagining said spot or indicating dot upon putting a golf ball without the use of said practice device.

19. The practice device for training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills according to claim 18, said practice device further comprising: a mounting bracket being disposed on top of said alignment bar; a laser device being held in said mounting bracket; and said laser device being configured and disposed to project a light beam in a direction parallel to the length dimension of said alignment bar to assist a golfer in aligning said alignment bar with an aim line determined by the golfer to be sufficient for putting a golf ball into a hole.

20. The practice device for training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills according to claim 19, wherein said vertical anchoring bar is rotatable to permit adjustment of the position of said support bar and said alignment bar, and is configured to be inserted into a ground surface.

21. The practice device for training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills according to claim 20, further comprising a counterweight being configured to receive and hold said vertical anchoring bar in a vertical position to permit use of said practice device on a surface in which said vertical anchoring bar cannot be inserted.

22. The practice device for training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills according to claim 21, in combination with a laser target being configured to be positioned a distance from said practice device and having a rough finish to reflect the laser beam to permit the user to more easily view and align the laser beam, and thus the alignment bar, with an aim line determined by the golfer to be sufficient for putting a golf ball into a hole.

23. A method of using a practice device for training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills, said practice device comprising: a vertical anchoring bar being configured to be vertically oriented with respect to a ground surface; a support bar being connected to and held by said vertical anchoring bar in a horizontal position perpendicular to said vertical anchoring bar; an elongated alignment bar being connected to and held by said support bar in a horizontal position perpendicular to said support bar; said support bar comprising a first end being connected to said vertical anchoring bar, and a second end being connected to said alignment bar; said support bar and said alignment bar being configured to provide a golfer with a reference in which to orient his putter face parallel to said support bar and perpendicular to said alignment bar; said alignment bar comprising a first end and a second end opposite said first end; said first end of said alignment bar comprising a guide spot disposed on the top surface thereof and being configured to be viewed by a golfer as a reference and aiming point under which the golfer may direct a golf ball to cause the golf ball to initially follow an aim line determined by the golfer to be sufficient for putting the golf ball into a hole; said alignment bar being configured to provide said golfer with a reference in which to strike said golf ball to follow a path under and along said alignment bar, and thus initially along an aim line determined by the golfer to be sufficient for putting a golf ball into a hole; and said spot or said indicating dot being configured to aid a golfer in imagining said spot or indicating dot upon putting a golf ball without the use of said practice device, said method comprising the steps of: determining an aim line sufficient for putting a golf ball into a hole; vertically orienting said vertical anchoring bar with respect to the ground with said alignment bar approximately aligned with the aim line; placing a golf ball under said alignment bar and slightly ahead of said support bar in the direction of travel of the putt; finally adjusting the alignment of said alignment bar to precisely align said alignment bar with the aim line; holding a putter such that the putter head is immediately adjacent the golf ball and under said alignment bar, and the putter face is oriented substantially parallel to said support bar and substantially perpendicular to said alignment bar, and thus substantially perpendicular to the aim line; focusing on said guide spot and substantially simultaneously executing a putting stroke to strike the golf ball to move the golf ball under said guide spot and initially along the aim line; and repeating the putting stroke while focusing on said guide spot until the golfer can successfully putt the golf ball into the hole without utilizing the practice device.

24. The method of using a practice device for training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills according to claim 23, wherein said vertical anchoring bar is rotatable to permit adjustment of the position of said support bar and said alignment bar, and said step of adjusting the alignment of said alignment bar comprises rotating said vertical anchoring bar.

25. The method of using a practice device for training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills according to claim 24, wherein said practice device further comprises: a mounting bracket being disposed on top of said alignment bar; a laser device being held in said mounting bracket; and said laser device being configured and disposed to project a light beam in a direction parallel to the length dimension of said alignment bar to assist a golfer in aligning said alignment bar with an aim line determined by the golfer to be sufficient for putting a golf ball into a hole, and said step of adjusting the alignment of said alignment bar further comprises aligning the laser beam with the aim line.

26. The method of using a practice device for training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills according to claim 25, wherein said practice device is in combination with a laser target being configured to be positioned a distance from said practice device and having a rough finish to reflect the laser beam to permit the user to more easily view and align the laser beam, and thus the alignment bar, with an aim line determined by the golfer to be sufficient for putting a golf ball into a hole, said method further comprises: placing said laser target several feet away from said practice device and along the aim line; and adjusting the alignment of said alignment bar and said laser device until the laser beam strikes and visibly appears on said laser target.

27. The method of using a practice device for training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills according to claim 26, wherein said practice device further comprises a counterweight being configured to receive and hold said vertical anchoring bar in a vertical position to permit use of said practice device on a ground surface, and said step of vertically orienting said vertical anchoring bar with respect to the ground comprises placing said counterweight on a ground surface and inserting said vertical anchoring bar into said counterweight.

28. The method of using a practice device for training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills according to claim 26, wherein said vertical anchoring bar is configured to be inserted into a ground surface, and said step of vertically orienting said vertical anchoring bar with respect to the ground comprises inserting said vertical anchoring bar into said ground surface.

Description:

This application relates to method of training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills and a device used for such training.

One of the most important strokes used while playing golf is the putt. Since most golfers have to putt on every hole, putting is a substantial part of a golfer's game. The putt is a stroke usually taken on an area of the golf course called a green. The player must essentially determine what line or direction he must putt or stroke his ball to get it into the hole in the least number of tries.

As in most sports, a player needs and uses eye/hand coordination to play the game properly. In baseball, a player looks at the ball and not the bat when attempting to hit the ball. In bowling, a player looks at a spot or the pins when rolling the ball. In basketball, the shooter looks at the basket while making a shot.

With the golf putt, the putter should essentially look at a spot to roll his or her ball over to accurately start it on his or her intended line to the hole. One of the best professional golfers, Dave Stockton, advocates hitting over a spot while putting.

When a golfer aims at a target, the player depends on eye/hand coordination. However, just as many people have a dominant side of the body, meaning right or left hand, leg, or foot, so do they have a dominant eye. A dominant eye is the one which generally provides a person with information used to aim at a target. The dominant eye may not be the eye with the better vision, nor does it necessarily correspond to the dominant hand or foot. This dominant eye will most likely reveal itself to a person when he or she has to aim at a target. A person may experience difficulties in maintaining consistency in hitting a target, such as in putting a golf ball, as a result of the dominant eye misinterpreting the position of his or her target.

The majority of the population is right-eye dominant, which in the case of golf means that a player probably sees the hole to the right of its true location. This miscalculation occurs because the right-eye dominant player will most likely be situated in such a manner as to place their right eye too far inside the ball and the target line. In other words the right eye is positioned farthest from the hole and may not be positioned properly to allow for a completely accurate view of the hole. As a result, the player's view of the hole may be somewhat inaccurate or even distorted, and a player may end up putting too far to the right of the intended target. Thus a player may end up missing the putt because of the miscalculation.

There are some existing devices which are intended to aid in correcting or improving a golfer's putting game of even some other part of a golfer's game. Lasers are currently used on some devices designed to improve putting. One existing device has a laser attachment that fits on the putter itself. This does not work because the laser moves while the user is making his stroke. The movement of the laser does not allow for an accurate and/or stable focal point. Another device is built into a putter on the face. This device is only good until the ball is placed in front of it, then the line disappears. In other words, the ball blocks and intercepts the path of the laser.

Some other existing devices have similar components to the device described in the present application, which also include a post in the ground, a support bar and alignment bar. However, these devices are primarily designed to be used for a full swing and not for a putt. Additionally, these devices do not have a spot to putt over and/or a laser.

The above-discussed embodiments of the present invention will be described further hereinbelow. When the word “invention” or “embodiment of the invention” is used in this specification, the word “invention” or “embodiment of the invention” includes “inventions” or “embodiments of the invention”, that is the plural of “invention” or “embodiment of the invention”. By stating “invention” or “embodiment of the invention”, the Applicant does not in any way admit that the present application does not include more than one patentably and non-obviously distinct invention, and maintains that this application may include more than one patentably and non-obviously distinct invention. The Applicant hereby asserts that the disclosure of this application may include more than one invention, and, in the event that there is more than one invention, that these inventions may be patentable and non-obvious one with respect to the other.

The invention is explained in greater detail below with reference to the accompanying drawings.

FIG. 1 shows schematically the main components of one possible embodiment example of a training device used to help a golfer improve his or her putting skills;

FIG. 2 is a simplified functional illustration of one possible path of a golf ball as it relates to the device described in the present application; and

FIG. 3 shows an additional possible variation of the components shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 1 shows schematically the main components of one possible embodiment example of a training device used to help a golfer improve his or her putting skills, specifically a rotatable, portable, simple, alignment device used primarily as a putting trainer comprised of a vertical anchoring bar A, support bar B. Clamping knob C, alignment bar D, spot or indicating dot E, a shortened golf tee F, laser guide J, mounting bracket for laser K, and a counterweight 1. First place the device into the green and put a ball under the alignment bar D just in front of the support bar B. The golfer looks from behind the ball toward the hole to determine where he wants to hit the ball to get it into the hole. This is called the “break”. This is determined by many factors: contour of the green, speed of the green and various other factors contribute to the break.

FIG. 2 shows upon determining the break he must now locate the “aim” line. His is a line that is perpendicular to the break line at the instant the putter hits the ball. In some situations where the break is extreme, the ball starts to curve away from the aim line so quickly that it looks as if its not at all perpendicular to the aim line. It is critical that the golfer starts his ball on the aim line and not the break line.

Once the aim line is determined, he adjusts the device to match this aim line. He may use the laser J, or just sight over the alignment bar D. He places his putter face so that it is parallel to the support bar B, (the support bar B is a reference to get his putter face perpendicular to his intended line which is the alignment bar D and strokes the ball under the spot E, while never taking his eye off of the spot E.

By repetition of this stroke, the player is training his eye/hand coordination so that he can repeat this same stroke during the actual game. While playing the actual game, he visualizes the spot he has trained his eyes to look at and his hands to propel the ball over, as if it where superimposed on the top of the green. He may use some reference point somewhere on the green, such as a blade of grass, a bare spot, or some other reference point.

FIG. 3 shows at least one possible embodiment of the present application. The laser is fully functional indoors without the target L. Use of the target may be required outdoors because the light of the laser is too faint to se over distance of 5 or 6 feet when the sky is clear and sunny.

The target L is set at a distance determined by the length of putt and the amount of aim line break. This is set at the discretion of the user. The target has a rough finish so that the reflected laser beam is somewhat dispersed when it hits the target. The use of the laser increases the accuracy of the device.

In addition to FIGS. 1-3, the 12 photographic images submitted herewith show the main components of at least one possible embodiment example of a training device used to help a golfer improve his or her putting skills.

One feature or aspect of an embodiment is believed at the time of the filing of this patent application to possibly reside broadly in a practice device to improve putting technique by use of a repetitive motion to instill eye/hand coordination.

Another feature or aspect of an embodiment is believed at the time of the filing of this patent application to possibly reside broadly in a method of training a golfer to improve his or her putting skills, wherein by watching or looking at the dot/spot E on the alignment bar during the down or forward stroke of the putt, the hands will react to propel the ball under, and hence along the desired start line of ball travel.

Yet another feature or aspect of an embodiment is believed at the time of the filing of this patent application to possibly reside broadly in the device, wherein an alignment bar B is used to establish perpendicular alignment with the ball path or intended line.

Still another feature or aspect of an embodiment is believed at the time of the filing of this patent application to possibly reside broadly in the device, wherein the device is used to instill proper aim line as opposed to the break line.

A further feature or aspect of an embodiment is believed at the time of the filing of this patent application to possibly reside broadly in the device, wherein the device can be used indoors by the use of the counter weight 1.

Another feature or aspect of an embodiment is believed at the time of the filing of this patent application to possibly reside broadly in the device, wherein a right of left handed player can it.

Yet another feature or aspect of an embodiment is believed at the time of the filing of this patent application to possibly reside broadly in the device, wherein the device can be easily assembled or disassembled.

Still another feature or aspect of an embodiment is believed at the time of the filing of this patent application to possibly reside broadly in the device, wherein the device is light weight and small enough to carry in a pocket.

A further feature or aspect of an embodiment is believed at the time of the filing of this patent application to possibly reside broadly in the device, wherein the device can be used with almost all styles of putter heads.

Another feature or aspect of an embodiment is believed at the time of the filing of this patent application to possibly reside broadly in the device, wherein the device is easily adjusted for aim direction.

Yet another feature or aspect of an embodiment is believed at the time of the filing of this patent application to possibly reside broadly in the device, wherein the use of a tee F makes placement of the ball under the alignment bar rapid and simple.

Another feature or aspect of an embodiment is believed at the time of the filing of this patent application to possibly reside broadly in the device, wherein the use of a laser to aid in alignment.

The components disclosed in the various publications, disclosed or incorporated by reference herein, may possibly be used in possible embodiments of the present invention, as well as equivalents thereof.

The purpose of the statements about the technical field is generally to enable the Patent and Trademark Office and the public to determine quickly, from a cursory inspection, the nature of this patent application. The description of the technical field is believed, at the time of the filing of this patent application, to adequately describe the technical field of this patent application. However, the description of the technical field may not be completely applicable to the claims as originally filed in this patent application, as amended during prosecution of this patent application, and as ultimately allowed in any patent issuing from this patent application. Therefore, any statements made relating to the technical field are not intended to limit the claims in any manner and should not be interpreted as limiting the claims in any manner.

Some examples of lasers that may possibly be utilized or adapted for use in at least one possible embodiment may possibly be found in the following U.S. patents: U.S. Pat. No. 5,754,582, entitled “Laser Level”; U.S. Pat. No. 6,782,034, entitled “Laser Plumbing and Leveling Instrument Which Adjusting Height of Horizontal Line”; and U.S. Pat. No. 7,116,697, entitled “Laser Level”.

The appended drawings in their entirety, including all dimensions, proportions and/or shapes in at least one embodiment of the invention, are accurate and are hereby included by reference into this specification.

Some examples of lasers that may possibly be utilized or adapted for use in at least one possible embodiment are as follows: BDL300s 360° Auto Laser Level, BDL 400S CROSSHAIR 90° Auto Leveling Laser, BDL310S Projected Cross Fire Auto Level Laser, BDL170 Bullseye Auto Leveling Laser with ANGLEPRO, and BDL180 Bullseye Auto-Leveling Laser with Swiveling Head, all manufactured by Black & Decker, located at 101 Schilling Road, Hunt Valley, Md., 21031, U.S.A.

The background information is believed, at the time of the filing of this patent application, to adequately provide background information for this patent application. However, the background information may not be completely applicable to the claims as originally filed in this patent application, as amended during prosecution of this patent application, and as ultimately allowed in any patent issuing from this patent application. Therefore, any statements made relating to the background information are not intended to limit the claims in any manner and should not be interpreted as limiting the claims in any manner.

Some examples of line lasers that may possibly be utilized or adapted for use in at least one possible embodiment are as follows: LM54 Multi-Laser Cross Level with Plumb, GizmoLite Series Laser Cross Level, ILM Series Laser Cross Level, and ILMXL Series Laser Cross Level, all manufactured by CST/berger, located at 255 West Fleming Street, Watseka, Ill., 60970, U.S.A.

All, or substantially all, of the components and methods of the various embodiments may be used with at least one embodiment or all of the embodiments, if more than one embodiment is described herein.

The purpose of the statements about the object or objects is generally to enable the Patent and Trademark Office and the public to determine quickly, from a cursory inspection, the nature of this patent application. The description of the object or objects is believed, at the time of the filing of this patent application, to adequately describe the object or objects of this patent application. However, the description of the object or objects may not be completely applicable to the claims as originally filed in this patent application, as amended during prosecution of this patent application, and as ultimately allowed in any patent issuing from this patent application. Therefore, any statements made relating to the object or objects are not intended to limit the claims in any manner and should not be interpreted as limiting the claims in any manner.

Some examples of dot lasers that may possibly be utilized or adapted for use in at least one possible embodiment are as follows: MP5 5-Beam Self-Leveling Laser and MP3 3-Beam Self-Leveling Laser, both manufactured by CST/berger, located at 255 West Fleming Street, Watseka, Ill., 60970, U.S.A.

All of the patents, patent applications and publications recited herein, and in the Declaration attached hereto, are hereby incorporated by reference as if set forth in their entirety herein.

The summary is believed, at the time of the filing of this patent application, to adequately summarize this patent application. However, portions or all of the information contained in the summary may not be completely applicable to the claims as originally filed in this patent application, as amended during prosecution of this patent application, and as ultimately allowed in any patent issuing from this patent application. Therefore, any statements made relating to the summary are not intended to limit the claims in any manner and should not be interpreted as limiting the claims in any manner.

It will be understood that the examples of patents, published patent applications, and other documents which are included in this application and which are referred to in paragraphs which state “Some examples of . . . which may possibly be used in at least one possible embodiment of the present application . . . ” may possibly not be used or useable in any one or more embodiments of the application.

The sentence immediately above relates to patents, published patent applications and other documents either incorporated by reference or not incorporated by reference.

The description of the embodiment or embodiments is believed, at the time of the filing of this patent application, to adequately describe the embodiment or embodiments of this patent application. However, portions of the description of the embodiment or embodiments may not be completely applicable to the claims as originally filed in this patent application, as amended during prosecution of this patent application, and as ultimately allowed in any patent issuing from this patent application. Therefore, any statements made relating to the embodiment or embodiments are not intended to limit the claims in any manner and should not be interpreted as limiting the claims in any manner.

The details in the patents, patent applications and publications may be considered to be incorporable, at applicant's option, into the claims during prosecution as further limitations in the claims to patentably distinguish any amended claims from any applied prior art.

The purpose of the title of this patent application is generally to enable the Patent and Trademark Office and the public to determine quickly, from a cursory inspection, the nature of this patent application. The title is believed, at the time of the filing of this patent application, to adequately reflect the general nature of this patent application. However, the title may not be completely applicable to the technical field, the object or objects, the summary, the description of the embodiment or embodiments, and the claims as originally filed in this patent application, as amended during prosecution of this patent application, and as ultimately allowed in any patent issuing from this patent application. Therefore, the title is not intended to limit the claims in any manner and should not be interpreted as limiting the claims in any manner.

The abstract of the disclosure is submitted herewith as required by 37 C.F.R. §1.72(b). As stated in 37 C.F.R. §1.72(b):

    • A brief abstract of the technical disclosure in the specification must commence on a separate sheet, preferably following the claims, under the heading “Abstract of the Disclosure.” The purpose of the abstract is to enable the Patent and Trademark Office and the public generally to determine quickly from a cursory inspection the nature and gist of the technical disclosure. The abstract shall not be used for interpreting the scope of the claims.
      Therefore, any statements made relating to the abstract are not intended to limit the claims in any manner and should not be interpreted as limiting the claims in any manner.

The embodiments of the invention described herein above in the context of the preferred embodiments are not to be taken as limiting the embodiments of the invention to all of the provided details thereof, since modifications and variations thereof may be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the embodiments of the invention.