Title:
HEAVY DUTY BAG FOR USE WITH A SEAT BACK
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A heavy duty bag is for use with a back rest of seat. The back rest is connected to, and supported by, a pair of support posts. The bag includes an enclosure, a top, a sleeve, and a strap. The enclosure forms an interior volume for receiving a load. The top is connected to a top edge of the back of the enclosure. The latching mechanism is coupled to the top and to the enclosure for maintaining the top in a closed position. The sleeve is attached to a top of the back of the enclosure and forms a cavity for receiving the back rest of the seat. The strap is connected to the back of the enclosure, and in use, is positioned vertically around the back rest, at least partially underneath the sleeve, and securely tightened around the back rest.



Inventors:
Swogger, Jason (Las Vegas, NV, US)
Application Number:
12/108606
Publication Date:
11/13/2008
Filing Date:
04/24/2008
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47C7/62
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
LANDOLFI, JR., STEVEN M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
HOWARD & HOWARD ATTORNEYS, P.C. (THE PINEHURST OFFICE CENTER, SUITE #101, 39400 WOODWARD AVENUE, BLOOMFIELD HILLS, MI, 48304-5151, US)
Claims:
1. A heavy duty bag for use with a back rest of seat, the back rest having a front surface and a back surface, the front surface for providing a cushioned area for supporting the back of a rider, the back rest being connected to, and being supported by, a pair of support posts, comprising: an enclosure having a front, a back and two sides, the enclosure having an opening and forming an interior volume for receiving a load; a top connected to a top edge of the back of the enclosure and extending over the opening and at least partially over the front of the enclosure; a latching mechanism coupled to the top and to the enclosure for maintaining the top in a closed position; a sleeve attached to a top of the back of the enclosure and extending at least partially the back of the enclosure, the sleeve and back of the enclosure forming a cavity for receiving the back rest of the seat; a strap connected to the back of the enclosure, the strap, in use, being positioned vertically around the back rest, at least partially underneath the sleeve, and securely tightened around the back rest.

2. A heavy duty bag, as set forth in claim 1, further comprising first and second strap loops, each strap loop have first and second ends securely fastened to the back of the enclosure, forming an opening, the first strap loops being positioned one above the other with the openings being aligned, the strap being slidably inserted within the openings of the loops.

3. A heavy duty bag, as set forth in claim 2, the strap having first and second ends and including a clasp with pin fastened to the first end of the strap, the second end having a series of holes located therein, the clasp for receiving the second end of the strap and insertion in of the pin within one of the holes.

4. A heavy duty bag, as set forth in claim 1, wherein the enclosure is made of leather.

5. A heavy duty bag, as set forth in claim 1, wherein each side of the enclosure extend upward, forming flaps, which may be folded inward, covering, at least partially, the opening.

6. A heavy duty bag, as set forth in claim 1, therein the sides of the enclosure are made with a unitary piece of material, the front and back are made with separate pieces of material, the sides, the front and back are sewn together forming the enclosure.

7. A heavy duty bag, as set forth in claim 1, wherein the sleeve is made from neoprene.

8. A heavy duty bag, as set forth in claim 1, wherein the sleeve is made from leather.

9. A heavy duty bag, as set forth in claim 1, wherein the sleeve is sewn to the back of the enclosure.

10. A heavy duty bag, as set forth in claim 1, wherein the latching mechanism includes two spaced apart latches, each latch includes a first strap connected to the top of the enclosure, a second strap connected to the front of the enclosure, and a releasable coupler for connecting the first and second straps.

11. A heavy duty bag, as set forth in claim 10, where the releasable coupler includes a clip having a female connecter connected to one of the first and second straps and a male connecter connected to an other of the first and second straps.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/916,595, filed on May 8, 2007, which is hereby incorporated by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to a bag, and more particularly, to a heavy-duty bag which can be securely fastened over a seat back, such as the seat back of a motorcycle.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

It is known to secure bags for holding articles to the back surface of seat backs, such as automobile seats or motorcycle seats. However, the prior art bags are typically used for holding relatively light weight objects and might not be suitable for holding heavier objects, such as a gas can containing gasoline.

Two such bags designed to be removable connected to seat backs are shown in U.S. Design Pat. 308,916 issued Jul. 3, 1990 to Calvin A. Dinham (hereinafter the '916 patent) and U.S. Pat. No. 5,405,068 issued Apr. 11, 1995 to Terry Lovett (hereinafter the '068 patent).

The '916 patent discloses a tote bag for use over a seat back. The tote bag includes a sleeve attached to the back of the bag which slips over the seat back. A Velcro strap is attached to the bottom of the back which adjustably engages with a counter-part piece at the lower end of an opposite side of the sleeve.

There are at least two problems with this approach when it comes to use with a heavy object. First, the Velcro strap may not be strong enough to securely fasten the bag to the seat back because of the weight object being held. For example, gasoline may have a density around 46 pounds for cubic foot. Second, since the Velcro strap is attached to the bottom of the sleeve and the bottom of the bag (on the opposite side), even if the Velcro strap was strong enough, the system would have to rely on the strength of the material of the sleeve to securely fasten the bag, and contents therein, to the seat back.

Similar problems are faced with use of the motorcycle bag disclosed in the '068 patent, which includes a sleeve and a couple of straps coupled to the back of a bag. The straps, in use, are secured around two vertical posts of the seat back. This arrangement does not restrict vertical, i.e., up and down, motion of the bag which may cause the position of the bag to become unstable.

The present invention is aimed at one or more of the problems identified above.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In one aspect of the present invention, a heavy duty bag for use with a seat back, such as the seat back of a motorcycle is provided.

In one embodiment of the present invention, the heavy duty bag includes an enclosure for securing an article and a connection system for securely connecting the enclosure to a seat back. In one embodiment, the connection system includes a sleeve attached to a side of the enclosure, the sleeve and the side of the enclosure forming a cavity for receiving the seat back. The connection system also includes at least one strap having a first end and a second end, both securely connected to the side of the enclosure within the cavity. The first and second end of the strap encircling the seat back, in use, and being releasably connected.

In another aspect of the present invention, a heavy duty bag for use with a back rest of seat, is provided. The back rest is connected to, and supported by, a pair of support posts. The bag includes an enclosure, a top, a sleeve, and a strap. The enclosure forms an interior volume for receiving a load. The top is connected to a top edge of the back of the enclosure. The latching mechanism is coupled to the top and to the enclosure for maintaining the top in a closed position. The sleeve is attached to a top of the back of the enclosure and forms a cavity for receiving the back rest of the seat. The strap is connected to the back of the enclosure, and in use, is positioned vertically around the back rest, at least partially underneath the sleeve, and securely tightened around the back rest.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Other advantages of the present invention will be readily appreciated as the same becomes better understood by reference to the following detailed description when considered in connection with the accompanying drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is a side view of a heavy duty bag for use with a seat back, according to an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is an isometric view of the heavy duty bag of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic back view of the heavy duty bag of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a second diagrammatic back view of the heavy duty bag of FIG. 1;

FIG. 5 is a third diagrammatic back view of the heavy duty bag of FIG. 1;

FIG. 6 is a front view of the heavy duty bag of FIG. 1; and,

FIG. 7 is a partial view of the top and front of the heavy duty bag of FIG. 1.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF INVENTION

With reference to the Figures, and in operation, the present invention provides a heavy duty seat 10 for use with a seat back 50. The seat back 50, as best shown in FIG. 1, includes a padded back rest 52 and first and second pillars 54, 56. The padded back rest 52 is fixed to the first and second pillars 54, 56.

The bag 10 includes an enclosure 12 for securing or holding one or more articles (such as gas can 30, shown in FIG. 1), a sleeve 14, and a strap 16.

In one embodiment, the enclosure 12 has a front 12A, a back 12B, two sides 12C, and a top 12D. The enclosure has an opening 12E forming an interior volume 12F for receiving a load, e.g., the gas can 30. In one embodiment, the front 12A, a back 12B, two sides 12C, and top 12D are made from leather and sewn together.

The top 12D is connected to a top edge 12G of the back 12B of the enclosure 12. In the illustrated embodiment, the top 12D extends over the opening 12E and at least partially over the front 12A of the enclosure 12.

The sleeve 14 is attached to a back surface or side of the enclosure 12 by any suitable means, such as sewing. The back surface of the enclosure 12 and the sleeve 14 form a cavity 18 for receiving the seat back. In one aspect, the sleeve 14 is made of a resilient, stretchy material, such as neoprene, but may be made from any suitable material including leather. The cavity 18 is dimensioned slightly smaller, but in the same general shape of the seat back 50, such that it has a snug-fit which fitted thereon. The sleeve 14 helps secure the bag 10 to the seat back 50 and ensures that it is positioned correctly thereon.

A latching mechanism 20 is coupled to the top 12D and to the enclosure 12 for maintaining the top 12D in a closed position (as shown in FIGS. 1, 2, and 6). In the illustrated embodiment, the latching mechanism 20 includes two spaced apart latches 20A. Each latch 20A includes a first strap 20B connected to the top 12D of the enclosure 12 and a second strap 20C connected to the front 12A of the enclosure 12. The latches 20A further includes a releasable coupler 20D connected to the straps 20A, 20B for releasably connecting the first and second straps 20A, 20B. In one embodiment, the releasable coupler 20D includes a female connecter 20E connected to one of the straps 20A, 20B and a male connecter 20F connected to an other of the straps 20A, 20B (see FIG. 7).

As shown, the spaced apart latches 20A, 20B may include an inoperable buckle 20G for aesthetic purposes. In one embodiment, one of the connectors 20E, 20F may be connected or tied to the inoperable buckle 20G.

It should be noted, however, that the latching mechanism 20 may includes other types of devices without departing from the present invention including buckles.

A strap 16 is secured to the outer surface of the back 12B of the enclosure 12. In one embodiment, the strap 16 is secured at a position on the back 12B within the cavity 18 formed by the sleeve 52. This helps ensure that the bag 10 and its contents are securely fastened to the seat back 50. The strap 16 is adjusted (in length) and, in use, encircles the back rest 50 (over the top and around the bottom edges), after which the ends are tightened around the back rest 50 and securely fastened together (see below). Using this arrangement, the enclosure 12 is able to securely hold a heavy load, such as a gas can containing gasoline, such that it is securely fastened against horizontal and vertical motions relative to the seat back.

In one embodiment, the bag 10 includes first and second strap loops 16A, 16B. Each strap loop 16A, 16B have first and second ends securely fastened to the back of the enclosure, forming an opening. The first and second ends may be fastened to the back 12B of the enclosure 12 by any suitable means, such as rivets.

One of the strap loops 16A, 16B is generally positioned above the other 16A, 16B with the openings being aligned. The strap 16 is slidably inserted within the openings of the loops 16A, 16B. The strap 16 may be securely, adjustable using a buckle 16C, but other mechanisms may also be used.

The heavy duty bag 10 of the present invention may be sized to accommodate different loads, e.g., different sized gas cans and/or different sized seats.

Obviously, many modifications and variations of the present invention are possible in light of the above teachings. The invention may be practiced otherwise than as specifically described within the scope of the appended claims.