Title:
Putting stroke trainer and method of use
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A golf putting training device and method of use for developing a planing stroke. The device includes a rail that provides tactile feedback and may include a curved base and/or a putting line indicator that provides visual feedback. By training with the device, first with the both the visual feedback and then with the visual feedback alone, the user can develop a proper planing putting stroke.



Inventors:
Tischler, Edward Anthony (Sunnyvale, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/796713
Publication Date:
10/30/2008
Filing Date:
04/30/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/409
International Classes:
A63B69/36
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
LEGESSE, NINI F
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
NADER ELZIQ (#107B 929 E. El Camino Real, Sunnyvale, CA, 94087, US)
Claims:
1. A golf putting training device comprising: A base, wherein said base is configured to a attach to a playing surface; and, Vertical supports attached to said base; and, A main rail extending between said vertical supports.

2. The golf putting training device in claim 1, further comprising: A putting line indicator means, wherein said putting line indicator means is attached to said base.

3. The golf putting training device in claim 1, wherein the main rail is a stimpmeter.

4. The golf putting training device in claim 1, further comprising: A visual indicator means configured to show the correct path that a golf club head should travel in a correct planing stroke.

5. The golf putting training device in claim 1, where the main rail is removably attached to the vertical supports.

6. A method of use for a golf putting training device comprising the steps of: First, placing a club shaft along a main rail, and; Second, putting a ball while keeping the club shaft in contact with the main rail, and; Third, repeating the Second and Third steps, as needed to produce a proper planing putting stroke.

7. A method of use for a golf putting training device comprising the steps of: First, Configuring a visual indicator means to be properly aligned with a correct planing putting stroke, and; Second, placing a club shaft along a main rail, and; Third, putting a ball while keeping the club shaft in contact with the main rail and observing the visual indicator means, and; Fourth, repeating the Second and Third steps, as needed to produce a proper planing putting stroke with the use of the main rail; and; Fifth, removing the main rail while retaining the visual indicator means, and; Sixth, putting the ball while observing the visual indicator means, and; Seventh, repeating the Sixth step as needed to produce a proper planing putting stroke without the use of the main rail.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Putting is an essential skill to develop in order to be successful in the game of Golf. In order to putt well, one must develop an accurate and consistent putting stroke. Golf training professionals have found that using a planing stroke is one method of achieving the accuracy and consistency required. A planing stroke is one in which the putter traverses a plane as a correct stroke is performed.

The present invention relates to a golf putting training device that trains the user to develop such a planing stroke. The device achieves this effect through a combination of tactile and visual cues that reinforce the correct putting motion during repeated practice.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is, in perspective view, one preferred embodiment of the putting stroke trainer according to the present invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

The device includes a base 101, two vertical supports 102, and a main rail 103. The base 101 firmly attaches the ground or the putting surface. The vertical supports 102 attach to the base 101 at either end and are perpendicular to the putting surface and the base. The main rail 103 is an elongated cross-member that extends between the two vertical supports 102 and is attached to them at either end. The main rail 103 can have any shape, but in the preferred embodiment it is straight along its length and has a curved or rounded cross section. The main rail 103 may also have a marker 104 which serves as a reference for the user of the device as to where to place their putter in the starting position. The starting position is also known as the “address”. The base 101 may also have a marker 105 that is vertically aligned with marker 104 in order to indicate to the user where they should place the golf ball.

The device may further includes a putting line indicator 106 attached to the base 101. The putting line indicator may be any means for visually indicating the correct path that the ball should travel between the ball's starting point and the target. In the preferred embodiment the putting line indicator is a spread-beam laser. Furthermore, the putting line indicator can be used as a visual reference when using the device. A user may take note of how the club head travels in relation to the putting line indicator when the main rail is being employed. When training without the main rail employed, the user will be able to refer to the putting line indicator as reminder of how the club head should travel when putting correctly.

In some configurations the base, or some other fixed object of a consistent shape, may be used as a visual indicator 107 to remind the user how the club head travels during a correct stroke. In one embodiment the visual indicator is curved piece of metal or plastic attached to the base. In some configurations the putting line indicator 106 can be used as the visual indicator.

In some configurations that main rail may also be used as a stimpmeter. A stimpmeter is an instrument used to measure the speed of a playing surface by applying a known force to the ball and measuring the distance traveled. In some stimpmeters, the know force is applied by using a grooved rail of a known length placed at a known angle to the ground. A ball placed in the grove of such a rail will be acted upon by a defined gravitational force and thus will be rolling at known speed when it reaches the bottom of the rail.

The device also has a characteristic method of use. First the user aligns the device with a golf hole. If the device has a putting line indicator 106, this can be used to help correctly align the device with the hole. The user places a golf ball in front of the device and aligned with the marker 105. Then the use places his club on the main rail 103 and aligns the club with marker 104. The user then putts the ball towards the hole while keeping the club shaft in contact with the main rail 103. During the putt, the user should take note of how the club head moves in relation to the visual indicator 107. The user should repeat the preceding steps until they are able to consistently produce a proper planing putting stroke. The main rail can then be placed aside and the stroke may be practiced without the devices help.

In some configurations, the main rail 103 is removably attached so that the visual indicator 107 and the putting line indicator 106 may stay in place. In those configurations the user may train without the main rail 103 while retaining the visual indicator 107 and the putting line indicator 106 to assist in producing a proper putting stroke. The user my then train their putting stroke in this configuration until they are able to produce a proper planing putting stroke without the assistance of the device.