Title:
Closable-type electronic game grid box with digital display for strategic word pattern engagement
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
My child educational board game, “Electronic Word Battle”, requires players to approach word learning, sequencing, and construction from a naval/military strategist point of view in that instead of targeting objectives in a mere hit-or-miss salvo situation, where the goal in and of itself is to reach and eliminate occupied coordinates, he/she must locate and actually identify, through the support of computerized digital displays that connect opponents and which keep track of dispersal and success or failure of attacks, the quality of the opponents' pieces (these being letters) before the other competitors capture or eliminate out of play all his/her own word patterns.



Inventors:
Benedict, Milner (Tampa, FL, US)
Application Number:
11/796710
Publication Date:
10/30/2008
Filing Date:
04/30/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F3/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MYHR, JUSTIN L
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Milner Benedict III (Apartment Number 40 - C 10610 North 30th, Tampa, FL, 33612-6359, US)
Claims:
1. In a word discovery and elimination game, the combination of three checkerboard game grid regions imprinted on a closable-type box, with the top open rectangular container and bottom open rectangular container, both of congruent dimensions, hinged together on one side so as to allow for proper opening and closing, wherein one of said checkerboard game grid regions is imprinted on the surface of the top lid, and one of said checkerboard game grid regions is imprinted underneath on the inside surface of the top lid, and wherein the third is also imprinted inside the closable-type box, but being on the surface of the bottom base, and where a red/green light indicator in the top center of the lid flashes with buzzer or chime sounds depending on success of player's move in locating letters, and wherein two or more of said game apparatus' may be linked together using USB cables for communication among closable-type game grid boxes regarding success or failure of moves during competition, and which when opened to an upright ninety degree angle, reveals a digital display device that is activated either with to be installed batteries or AC electrical adaptor, and that once the appropriate information has been entered in preparation for play, prompts the game forward in directing players on whom has done what during competition, and where the checkerboard game grid regions are utilized for competition between two or among three or more players, and where said playing fields of the checkerboard game grid regions contain individual checker squares and a perimeter of space equal to one row of checker squares of the same size and extending there from and completely surrounding all four sides of the square game grid areas, and where coordinate labels are affixed above and to the sides of said regions to accurately map all coordinates of said regions, and which includes four distinguishing identifiable sets of game pieces, each containing computer chips for registration and identification, and each being of a size capable of occupying and fitting onto a single square via magnetic backing, where one set of said game pieces represents letters of the alphabet and which are assembled into words which are placed on the bottom inside grid, and where one set of said game pieces represents red pieces which indicate no letter on called coordinates in game play and which are to be placed onto called coordinates for such game play identification, and where one set of said game pieces represents question marked pieces to indicate currently occupied called coordinate in game play whose letter in the opponents' grids is unknown and which are to be placed onto player's called coordinates for such game play identification, and where one set of said game pieces represents black pieces which are placed onto those spaces which signify coordinates within a player's own bottom game board grid region where letters had previously occupied said spaces, but which are now eliminated, and have been placed onto called coordinates for such ease of recognition during game play.

2. The combination of claim 1 and wherein competition of said game may include that number or more of linked closable-type game grid boxes whose combined network exceeds the necessary processing and memory speeds to adequately keep track of game apparatus' during competition, and when all are linked together via USB cables, may incorporate a personal computer to be hooked into the linked network, and with appropriate software, can provide the additional memory and processing speeds needed to connect multiple game apparatus' for competition.

3. A combination of claim 1 or claim 2 wherein each of said sets of game pieces are of a different color from each other.

4. A combination of claim 1 or claim 2 and wherein each of said game grid coordinate regions are identified with magnetized labels to be placed above and to the side of said grids, and wherein each sectioned unit of the label is marked with letters.

5. A combination of claim 1 or claim 2 and wherein each of said game grid coordinate regions are identified with magnetized labels to be placed above and to the side of said grids, and wherein each sectioned unit of the label is marked with numbers.

6. A combination of claim 1 or claim 2 and wherein each of said game grid coordinate regions are identified with magnetized labels to be placed above and to the side of said grids, and wherein each sectioned unit of the label is marked with objects.

7. A combination of claim 1 or claim 2 and wherein each of said game grid coordinate regions are identified with magnetized labels to be placed above and to the side of said grids, and wherein each sectioned unit of the label is marked with colors.

8. A combination of claim 1 or claim 2 and wherein each of said game grid coordinate regions are identified with magnetized labels to be placed above and to the side of said grids, and wherein each sectioned unit of the label is marked with characters or persons.

9. A combination of claim 1 or claim 2 wherein the closable-type game grid box is of a circular dimension, with all imprinted grid coordinate regions being of circular proportioned dimensions, and with all individual coordinates being circular in shape.

10. A combination of claim 9 and wherein each of said sets of game pieces are of circular dimensions to fit onto said coordinates.

11. A combination of claim 9 wherein each of said sets of game pieces are of a different color from each other.

12. A combination of claim 9 and wherein each of said game grid coordinate regions are identified with magnetized labels to be placed above and to the side of said grids, and wherein each sectioned unit of the label is marked with letters.

13. A combination of claim 9 and wherein each of said game grid coordinate regions are identified with magnetized labels to be placed above and to the side of said grids, and wherein each sectioned unit of the label is marked with numbers.

14. A combination of claim 9 and wherein each of said game grid coordinate regions are identified with magnetized labels to be placed above and to the side of said grids, and wherein each sectioned unit of the label is marked with objects.

15. A combination of claim 9 and wherein each of said game grid coordinate regions are identified with magnetized labels to be placed above and to the side of said grids, and wherein each sectioned unit of the label is marked with colors.

16. A combination of claim 9 and wherein each of said game grid coordinate regions are identified with magnetized labels to be placed above and to the side of said grids, and wherein each sectioned unit of the label is marked with characters or persons.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCED TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Closable-Type Game Grid Box for Strategic Word Pattern Engagement

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable

THE NAMES OF THE PARTIES TO A JOINT RESEARCH AGREEMENT

Not Applicable

INCORPORATION-BY-REFERENCE OF MATERIAL SUBMITTED ON A COMPACT DISC

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

(1) Field of the Invention

This invention involves a game of skill and requires a demonstration of vocabulary knowledge, logical reasoning and sequencing abilities within a semi-physical/semi-digital environment that itself enhances these during play. More specifically, the present invention concerns, but is not restricted to, the area of child educational development. Further, it is at once adaptable to any of the related Indo-European languages, and can be further adapted to the Asian languages.

The said child educational board game comprises an electronic closable-type box apparatus imprinted with grids on and within that apparatus (one on the outer lid which is visible to all contestants during play, and two on the interior, one of which is the region representing the grid upon which attack is necessitated against opponents and another upon which words are preassembled and that is the target for capture/elimination by said opponents) where the inside of each apparatus includes a digital display screen device, and where the apparatus itself operates as a concealing mechanism for words formed via magnetized lettered tile pieces, each of which contains a computer chip that allows for their individual registration and status during play within the apparatus.

The game has a key means of achieving and maintaining involvement by enabling electronic connections among two or more game grid boxes where instant feedback can be provided on digital display screens. These give information regarding each player's move in relation to opponent's, as well as provide flashing green/red lights and chime/buzzer sounds to indicate the success or failure in locating and eliminating opponent's letters off said game grids.

The game, as defined by the invented electronic apparatus, while retaining aspects of similar commercial products, is characterized by its emphasis on elimination of pre-arranged words and configurations thereabouts. This enhances the game's ability to achieve and maintain involvement in several ways: (1) through requiring strategic placement of letters onto grid coordinates in ways which will prevent or delay opponents discovering such; (2) enabling players opportunities, by means of arbitrary and calculated guesses in various play options, to determine the precise locations and identities of opponents' letters before participants capture his/her own placed word grouping patterns, and in the case of more than two players or teams, being the last with letters remaining on his/her bottom interior grid—that region of attack for the other opponent(s), and (3) by placing this entire interplay within an electronic environment where success and failure is rewarded with lights and sounds as well as by providing digital acknowledgment and on-screen game direction.

The overall objective of attempting to capture or eliminate opponent's “fleet” of words is key in lending the game itself to aspects of simulated warfare. The game can therefore be characterized in a salvo classification.

(2) Description of Related Art

Games where participants strategically place valued pieces in an electronic game grid coordinate system and try to locate and attack one another's pieces within a defined area, yielding light and sound effects for hit-or-miss attempts, are already known from the state of the art where military or naval style products, whose objective is pre-positioning pieces and targeting of opponent's units, exist. Further, there are various word forming-type games where objectives vary, but whose underlying theme is creating, strategizing toward, solving for and discovering words and their component letters. However, said games are individualized in scope and no protection exists regarding the injection of letters and words, instead of military or naval units, into an electronic game grid coordinate system where attempts are further engaged by the inclusion of digital display screens where players can get instant feedback on their efforts, as well as follow up on other opponent's attempts against prior targets in competitions involving three or more contestants.

In fact, military/naval style games of the prior art, while developing skills important for tracking dispersal of attacks over a coordinate system, engage players on mere hit-or-miss cues, limiting assessments to success:failure ratios between opponent's progress against one another's targets. Word games of the prior art, while engaging players to develop spelling abilities for accurate vocabulary usage, as well as to figure out how words are encoded into language, their meanings, and differences in relation to one another for the ultimate objective of communication, generally lack the military/naval style component.

These three key features: (1) initiating, tracking, and assessing the success or failure of targeting unknown pre-positioned objectives within a military/naval style grid coordinate-type system; (2) creating and solving for words in a puzzle-type environment where (3) digital displays provide feedback upon each attempt along with flashing green or red lights and sounding of chimes or buzzers, can be taken innovative steps further by substituting words and their respective letters for military/naval units onto an electronic coordinate grid system of a sectioned, visually hidden region. The result is an expanding of the identifiable qualities of each occupied coordinate so that, once a space is determined to be occupied, arbitrary guesses leading to more calculated judgments can be taken, thus bringing a mere salvo objective to one where vocabulary can increase the necessity for logic and sequencing skills.

Typically, where games require a level of skill from players, it must be arranged in a way that provides adequate challenge to players/teams. Even though the game board is uniform throughout, the region itself changes as players agree from competition to competition on labels for rank (row) and file (column) to map the coordinate region. These labels can be letters, numbers, colors, objects, characters or such. This therefore keeps the electronic apparatus' themselves changing and new, to an extent.

But over time, even this dynamic can become familiar, to the point of simplicity since the rules governing the word attack apply uniformly throughout the game board playing field. What adds complexity to the game is level of knowledge players bring to the game. In theory, the level of difficulty would only be limited by degree of scholarship; college graduates with complex word knowledge could increase the level of challenge. Since the rules remain somewhat straight forward, the said game can be as easy or as difficult depending on the sophistication of the players, whose talents ultimately govern the complexity of the competition itself.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is accordingly an object of the present invention to provide a game of skill which avoids the aforementioned problems of the prior art games—these being to combine salvo and word discovery into a single invention which allows increasing difficulty through player intellect as well as a change of grid identification and language type in a physical apparatus joined with an electronic/digital environment.

The object of the present invention is further to provide a closable-type electronic game grid box with digital display as presented in an apparatus which opens to a ninety degree angle from its bottom interior, enabling two or more players to connect each apparatus via wire cables for the purpose of digitally sensing and tracking attempts to locate, identify and eliminate letters of words in coordinates which are arranged on a player's bottom interior grid prior to competition, with each letter occupying individual coordinates, and, through initially arbitrary but increasingly strategic and calculating guesses, to enable a player to be the first to capture all of the opponent's letters, or in the case of having three or more players, to be the last remaining contestant with uncaptured letters on his or her game grid.

The advantages of the game which are the object of the present invention are the following:

    • The child's critical thinking skills are developed by requiring him/her to predict the correct sequence of various words on an opponent's grid from successfully targeting the individual coordinates in the opponent's region and determining the exact identities of concealed letters;
    • spelling and vocabulary skills are strengthened as these knowledge tools better enable player's odds of winning;
    • correct spelling acquisition is challenged and fostered as players critically predict what the correct letters on associated coordinates are given the apparent sequence of letters which will emerge during the course of play;
    • skills of strategy and attack are developed by determining what words and intersections of words pre-positioned in player's grid will yield the longest duration of competition while providing enough opportunity for him or her to capture all the letters of all the words in the opponent's grid;
    • logic and sequencing skills are enhanced through critically realizing what words are in fact on the opponent's grid given the patterns which emerge as letters are captured within the grid;
    • the placement of the apparatuses within an electronic/digital environment adds an element to the game that makes it modern for participants, while increasing the degree of critical thinking involved.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

The present invention is further described hereinafter with reference to the parts, their assembly and relationships, shown in the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 represents the magnetized lettered tile pieces in which computer chips are embedded;

FIG. 2 represents the magnetized black, red, and question mark tile pieces in which computer chips are embedded;

FIG. 3 represents the various top row (rank) identifying coordinate magnetized labels;

FIG. 4 represents the various side column (file) identifying coordinate magnetized labels;

FIG. 5 represents the front view of the closable-type electronic game grid box with digital display for strategic word pattern engagement;

FIG. 6 is the back view of the closable-type electronic game grid box with digital display for strategic word pattern engagement;

FIG. 7 demonstrates the opening and closing of the closable-type electronic game grid box with digital display;

FIG. 8 demonstrates the first item which appears on the digital display screen of the apparatus into which information regarding number of players must be inputted;

FIG. 9 is an enlargement of the digital display screen from FIG. 10, with player 1 being the top display, and player 2 being the bottom display;

FIG. 10 demonstrates the second item of information which must be inputted regarding actual player number;

FIG. 11 demonstrates the inputting of the third item information regarding name of player 1, which in this case is Karla;

FIG. 12 demonstrates the inputting of the third item information regarding name of player 2, which in this case is James;

FIG. 13 demonstrates the inputted name information for the left (player 1 Karla) and right (player 2 James) game apparatuses;

FIG. 14 demonstrates the inputting of the forth item of information regarding selection of top row coordinate labels for each apparatus;

FIG. 15 demonstrates the inputted selection of the forth item of information and actual placement of the top row labels on an apparatus;

FIG. 16 shows the player 1 and player 2 apparatuses with top row letter labels affixed above the grids, as well as information inputted into the digital displays;

FIG. 17 demonstrates the inputting of the fifth item of information regarding selection of side column coordinate labels for each apparatus;

FIG. 18 demonstrates the inputted selection of the fifth item of information and actual placement of the side column labels on an apparatus;

FIG. 19 shows the player 1 and player 2 apparatuses with top row letter labels and side column number labels affixed above and to the sides of the grids, as well as information inputted into the digital displays;

FIG. 20 shows the sixth item which appears on the digital displays and demonstrates placement of letters onto player 1 and player 2 bottom interior game grids;

FIG. 21 shows final pre-placements of chips onto bottom interior grids for competition play;

FIG. 21a is a more accurate display of how two player competition would be positioned;

FIG. 22 shows first items which appear on the digital screens for Player 1 (top) and Player 2 (bottom);

FIG. 23 demonstrates the placement of a “?” chip onto upper interior game grid of Player 1 apparatus;

FIG. 24 through FIG. 48 further demonstrate how players compete during play;

FIG. 36 through FIG. 43 demonstrates an option 1 for player 2;

FIG. 44 through FIG. 48 demonstrates an option 2 for Player 2;

FIG. 49 through FIG. 88 demonstrate competition with three players;

FIG. 80 illustrates re-arrangement of players when Player 1 turn is over;

FIG. 89 demonstrates how multiple apparati could be connected together using USB cables leading to a personal computer for handling the network in play.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

As can be seen from the above figures, the game comprises a box-type apparatus (FIG. 5, FIG. 6), with digital display located at the center of connection between the upper lid and lower box portion. There are rotating dials at either end of the display which can be pressed inward for information selection. The batteries are stored within the digital display mechanism.

The apparatus opens to a ninety degree angle (FIG. 7). There are two grids located on the inside of the apparatus (FIG. 5), as well as one located on the outside lid (FIG. 6) which are to be utilized during competition of three or more players.

The interior grids are intended to be visible only to an individual participant during competition.

The upper grid (FIG. 5 (e)), whose height measures a varying size of approximately between 0.1 and 40 inches (FIG. 5 (e)) and whose length measures a varying size of approximately between 0.1 and 40 inches (FIG. 5 (f)), is the region of coordinates which a particular participant uses to target opponent's letters for either capture or elimination, depending on number of players in competition.

The lower grid, whose measures of height and length are the same as those for the upper grid, is the region of coordinates onto which a particular participant places his or her own word pattern groupings, thus becoming the objective of capture or elimination by his or her opponent(s).

The individual coordinates of each grid region are square in shape, and of equal measure on each side. The sides of each coordinate, length and height, vary in size of approximately between 0.1 and 5 inches (FIGS. 5 (d) and (g) and FIGS. 6 (a) and (e)). The tile pieces for letters (FIG. 1) and black, red, and question marks (FIG. 2) measure the same dimensions as the individual coordinates on each grid region, with the obvious exception that the width of the tile pieces vary in size of approximately between 0.01 an 5 inches (FIG. 1 (c) and FIG. 2(c)).

The grids are square in shape and can vary in the exact number of columns and rows. For this application, the rank of each grid is numbered in eight square units (FIG. 5 (f) and FIG. 6 (g)) and the file is numbered in seven units (FIG. 5 (e) and FIG. 6 (f)).

The dimensions of the box itself vary in measure of approximately between 0.1 and 40 inches in height (FIGS. 5 (b) and (c) and FIG. 6 (d)) and of approximately between 0.1 and 40 inches in length (FIG. 5 (a) and FIG. 6 (b)). Additionally, the total width of the game apparatus is between 0.1 to 10 inches, with the base measuring approximately between 0.1 and 5 inches (FIG. 6 (c)) and the width of the lid, which is upright in a ninety degree angle during competition, measuring approximately between 0.1 and 5 inches (FIG. 6 (h)).

To reiterate, the coordinate grids on the outer lid, inside surface of the lid, and the interior bottom surface, are all of equal number of units and dimensions.

The top lid contains a red light, located above the upper grid. To the right of that red light is a green light. Both flash with either buzzer or chime sounds during competition, depending on success or failure in target attempts.

So as to properly identify the rank (top row) and file (side column) coordinates, magnetized labels are to be affixed above and to the sides of all actual grids. The length of the rank labels vary in measure of approximately between 0.1 to 40 inches (FIG. 3 (a)), and 0.1 to 5 inches in height (FIG. 3(b)). The height of the file labels vary in measure of approximately between 0.1 to 40 inches (FIG. 4 (b)), and 0.1 to 5 inches in length (FIG. 4 (a)). Each player must use the same rank and file labels for each grid during competition, once that information has been inputted to the computerized displays prior to play. It is permissible, however, to mix and match identifiers on the grids. Numbers and letters can be used to map the rank coordinates, while colors or objects may represent mapped file coordinates, and vice versa.

In the competition of two opponents, once each player has connected both the participating apparatuses via wire cables, and turned on each apparatus by pressing both dials on either side of the digital display inward for several seconds, several items of data must be inputted prior to play.

Each participant must first (1) enter the number of players by rotating the right dial to the appropriate designation and pressing the right dial inward once. In this case there are two players (FIG. 8). Then each participant (2) enters his or her player number, referenced here as player 1 (top digital display enlargement in FIG. 9 and left apparatus in FIG. 10) and player 2 (bottom digital display enlargement in FIG. 9 and right apparatus in FIG. 10). This is done by rotating the right dial and pressing it inward once for entering the data.

Once player number designations are inputted, each participant (3) enters his or her name. This is done by rotating either dial to the appropriate letter, one at a time, and pressing the dial inward once to input each letter. Then, once name is listed, he/she presses the dial inward twice to establish the participant's name in memory for play. FIG. 11 demonstrates the inputting of player 1's name, and

FIG. 12 demonstrates the inputting of player 2's name, with FIG. 13 showing Karla as player 1 in the left apparatus, and James as player 2 on the right apparatus. If a wrong letter is entered, the player is to press the left dial inward once to go back to the previous letter. The entire name may be deleted by pressing the left dial inward as many times as necessary.

Next, (4) both player 1 and player 2 rotate the right dial to the top row coordinate label (FIG. 14) and pressing it inward once to designate Letters. In FIG. 15, the top row letters labels is affixed above the game. FIG. 16 shows both players with the top row letters labels affixed above the two interior game grids. Both players then (5) rotate and press in their selection for the side column labels, which in FIG. 17 is the numbers. FIG. 18 demonstrates the affixment of magnetized number labels to the sides of the game grids. FIG. 19 shows mapped completion of region spatial coordinate identification with numbers to the side of each grid and letters atop the grids.

Next, (6) the digital computers request that the magnetized letter tile pieces be placed on the bottom grids. Once this is done, each participant presses the right dial inward once to begin competition play. FIG. 20 demonstrates letters being placed onto the bottom grids, with FIG. 21 showing the completed word pattern groupings.

FIG. 21a is a more accurate depiction of how the two apparatus' would be positioned for actual play.

Competition officially begins when Player 1 is requested to place “?” chip on a selected coordinate of the upper interior game grid, while player 2's digital display indicates awaiting Player 1 move (FIG. 22).

When the designated player, whose turn it is, places a “?” chip on a coordinate (FIG. 23), the computer checks to see if in fact the other player has a letter on that coordinate. If there is no letter there, then his or her digital display will indicate such, with a red light flashing and buzzer sounding on the opponent's apparatus. In this example, there is no letter on the A1 coordinate of player 2's lower interior game grid. This results in red light flashing and buzzer sounding on opponent's apparatus (FIG. 23), as further indicated on the display (FIG. 24). Player 2's display indicates that the opponent's move was unsuccessful and that it is now his turn (FIG. 24).

Player 1 replaces the “?” chip on A1 with a red chip, showing a missed target (FIG. 25).

Player 2 places a “?” chip on A2 (FIG. 27). This move is successful in identifying that the space is occupied with a letter. The opponent's apparatus flashes the green light with a chimed sound. Player 2 now has the option of either selecting a range within which he believes the letter lies, or taking a random selection of any particular letter and hoping that is the identity of the as yet unknown letter (FIG. 26). FIG. 28 demonstrates the process of selecting a range. This is done by rotating either dial first to the upper limit of the chosen domain and pressing the dial inward once for that letter, and then rotating the dial to the lower limit of the chosen domain and pressing the dial inward once onto that letter. The range within the alphabet is then selected. In our example, Player 2 selects the range “n” through “s” for the “?” chip on A2.

This range is unsuccessful as the opponent's letter on A2 is in fact an “H”. The red light of Player 1's apparatus flashes with a buzzer sound. However, Player 2 leaves the “?” chip as is since he can come back to it later. It is now Player 1's turn (FIG. 29).

Player 1 places a “?” chip on the H4 coordinate, which is in fact occupied by a letter in player 2's game grid (FIG. 30). The green light of the opponent's apparatus flashes with a chimed sound. Player 1 may now either choose a range or select a single letter at random (FIG. 31). Player 1 rotates her dial and presses twice onto the letter “P”, wherein she is successful as the H4 space is occupied by the “P” chip of her opponent's game grid (FIG. 32). The green light of player 2's apparatus flashes and chimes sound indicating Player 1's success. FIG. 33 shows that Player 2 has replaced the “P” chip, which is now transferred to the upper interior game grid of Player 1's apparatus, with a black chip, indicating a loss. Player 1 continues in her turn, with Player 2 awaiting her move (FIG. 34). Player 1 places her “?” chip on G4 (FIG. 35), which is an unsuccessful choice as player 2 has no letter on that coordinate. Red light flashes and buzzer sounds on opponent's grid, indicating an incorrect choice (FIG. 35).

Player 1 is instructed by her digital display to replace the “?” chip on G4 with a red chip (FIG. 36). She now awaits her opponent's move.

At this point Player 2 has two options: (1) he can either agree to continue pursuing the letter on prior selected A2 coordinate, or (2) he can elect not to pursue A2 and instead choose a different coordinate to target. In FIG. 36, Player 2 elects to continue on with the A2 coordinate.

Player 2 elects to pursue the A2 coordinate, at which time his digital display automatically shows the prior selected and incorrect range, “n” through “S”, which has a strike through that range (FIG. 37).

Player 2 chooses the “H” in his display (FIG. 37), and in so doing captures that letter from his opponent's game grid (FIG. 38). Green light flashes and chime sounds on player 1's game apparatus.

James replaces the “?” chip with Player 1's “H” chip, while Karla replaces the “H” with a black tile piece (FIG. 39), as requested by her digital display (FIG. 39).

Player 2 now places a “?” chip on a selected coordinate while his opponent awaits that move, as requested by their computer displays (FIG. 40).

Player 2 proceeds to place a “?” chip on the A1 coordinate of his upper interior grid (FIG. 41).

This move by player 2 is unsuccessful. Red light flashes and buzzer sounds on opponent's game apparatus (FIG. 41). He replaces the “?” chip on A1 with a red tile piece, indicating an unsuccessful attempt (FIG. 43). Player 2's display reads that it is now her turn (FIG. 42).

The competition would proceed given the initial option 1 for player 2 until one of the players looses all his/her letters first, making the other player the winner.

Option 2 for player 2 would indicate not pursuing the A2 coordinate (FIG. 44), at which time Player 2 would place a “?” chip on whichever coordinate he chooses (FIG. 45).

Player 2 places a “?” chip onto the H1 space of his upper interior grid (FIG. 46). This coordinate choice yields no opportunity. Red light flashes with buzzer on player 1's apparatus. A red chip is placed on the H1 space (FIG. 48).

It is now Player 1's turn, as indicated by her digital display (FIG. 47).

In a competition of three players, this application arranges player 1 Karla in the lower center of all figures following FIG. 49, with Player 2 James proceeding in the upper left, and Player 3 Mike proceeding in the upper right of the following figures, respectively.

Following preliminary set-up, and once all participants have assembled their word pattern groupings (FIGS. 50 and 51), each player presses the dials of his/her apparatus inward to begin competition. Player 1 always goes first, as indicated in FIG. 52.

Player 1 places a “?” chip onto the F3 space of her upper interior grid (FIG. 53). This coordinate yields opportunities to eliminate letters off both Player 2's and Player 3's grids. Unbeknownst to the players at this point in competition is that Player 2 and Player 3 have the same letters on the F3 space. Green lights flash with chime sounds on Player 2's and 3's apparatuses (FIG. 53).

Player 1 has the option now of pursuing either player 2 or player 3 on coordinate F3. She chooses to target further Player 2 (FIG. 54) at which time both red and green lights flash with sounds on Player 2's game apparatus (FIG. 55) indicating he has been targeted.

Player 1 can either select a range within the alphabet in targeting Player 2's coordinate, or choose an individual letter outright, while Player 2 and 3 are informed of player 1's decision (FIG. 56).

Player 1 selects the “A” through “G” domain, and in so doing, her digital display strikes out the letters “H” through “Z”, indicating the remaining letters in which Player 2's chip can be found (FIG. 58) The Green light of Player 2's apparatus flashes and chimes sound as affirmation to Player 1's success (FIG. 57).

Player 1 chooses the letter “A” from the domain, and in so doing captures the “A” chips from both Player 2 and Player 3 F3 spaces, as indicated by the participants' digital displays (FIG. 60). Green lights flash with chime sounds on both Player 2 and player 3 apparatuses (FIG. 59).

Players 2 and 3 remove the “A” chips from their F3 coordinates and affix them to the outer grids of their game apparatuses (FIG. 61), while affixing black chips in their place on the bottom interior grids. Player 1 removes the “?” chip and replaces it with a black chip (FIG. 61). Player 1 continues in play while Player 2 and 3 await her next move (FIG. 62).

Player 1 places a “?” chip onto the D1 space of her upper interior game grid (FIG. 63). This is an accurate target on both player 2 and player 3, resulting in green lights flashing with chimed sounds on both player's apparatuses (FIG. 63). Player 1 chooses to pursue player 2's D1 coordinate (FIG. 64), and both red and green lights flash with buzzer and chimed sounds on Player 2's apparatus (FIG. 65), indicating he has been targeted. Opponents are also informed of Player 1's decision on their digital displays as Player 1 is presented the opportunity to choose a range or specific letter on her digital display (FIG. 66).

Player 1 chooses the range of “R” through “X”, which is a correct range in which Player 2's letter can be located (FIG. 68). Green light flashes and chimes sound on Player 2's apparatus indicating success, thus far for Player 1 (FIG. 69).

Player 1 further narrows her search for the correct letter on D1 by choosing the range of “T” through “W”, which is thus far a correct domain in which the letter can be found (FIG. 70). Again, green light flashes and chime sounds on Player 2's apparatus (FIG. 71).

Player 1 chooses “U” on D1 which is correct for Player 2's D1 coordinate (FIG. 72). Green light flashes and chimes sound on Player 2's apparatus (FIG. 73). Player 2 Places the “U” chip onto the D1 space of his outer grid (FIG. 73), and replaces the space of his inner bottom grid with a black tile piece. Player 1 proceeds to Player 3's D1 (FIG. 72). Players 2 and 3 are informed of this decision on their digital displays and await her move. Player 1's digital display brings up the choice of range/letter selection for Player 3's D1 coordinate (FIG. 74). Both the red and Green lights flash with buzzer and chimed sounds on Player 3's apparatus, further showing that he has been targeted (FIG. 75).

Player 1 chooses a range of “L” through “Z” (FIG. 76). This is an incorrect range, as indicated on her and the other player's digital displays (FIG. 78). Red light flashes with buzzer sound on Player 3's apparatus (FIG. 79). It is now Player 2 James' turn. FIG. 80 shows the rearrangement of players with Player 2 now being centered, with Player 3 to the upper left and player 1 to the upper right, respectively.

Player 2 is requested to place “?” chip on selected coordinate (FIG. 81). He Places his choice on D1, whereupon Player 3's apparatus chimes with flashing green light (FIG. 82). He is now following where Player 1 left off.

Player 2's digital display screen shows “L” through “Z” letters stricken out (FIG. 83). He now may select a range within “A” through “K”, or choose a letter from within that domain. Player 2 rotates dial to select the range “C” through “F”. This is a correct move (FIG. 84), whereupon Player 3's apparatus flashes green light and sounds chimes (FIG. 84), as further indicated to all players on their digital screens (FIG. 85).

Player 2 James then selects the “D” from within that domain, which is correct, as indicated to participants on their digital displays (FIG. 87). Player 3's green light flashes with chime sounds (FIG. 86), and the “D” tile piece is affixed to his outer game grid on D1. Player 2 replaces “?” tile piece on his upper interior grid with a black chip (FIG. 88), as does Player 1 for her game apparatus.

Competition would continue until only one player has letters remaining on his/her game grid.

FIG. 89 demonstrates how multiple electronic game apparatus' could be linked together via USB cables, with a personal computer in the network. The appropriate software would be designed to keep track of who has done what during the competition. In theory, twenty or fifty game grid apparatus' could be linked together with the computer handling the appropriate memory and speed that world be required in such a competition, with the option of projecting the results onto an appropriate overhead display.