Title:
Knock down targets game apparatus and method of play
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A game device and game method of play for use in conjunction with a ball and a means for directing movement of the ball. The game device includes a number of targets, each of the targets having a target face and a target base. The target face is a flat sheet or card oriented at a 90° angle to the target base which is also a flat sheet or card. The targets may alternate between a first position with the target face upright and the target base flat and a second position with the target base upright and the target face flat. The game device further includes a tee box marker card to indicate a position from which movement of the ball may be directed, and a scorecard for tracking scores accumulated by the players during the game.



Inventors:
Palmer, Edward L. (San Antonio, TX, US)
Application Number:
11/786188
Publication Date:
10/16/2008
Filing Date:
04/11/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F41J5/14
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GRAHAM, MARK S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Kammer, Browning Pllc (7700 BROADWAY, SUITE 202, SAN ANTONIO, TX, 78209, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A game apparatus for use in conjunction with a ball and a means for directing movement of the ball, the game apparatus comprising: a plurality of targets, each of the targets comprising a target face component and a target base component, the target face component comprising a generally planar surface oriented at approximately a 90° angle to the target base component, wherein each of the targets, when placed on a planar surface may alternate between a first position with the target face component upright and the target base component flat against the planar surface, and a second position with the target base upright and the target face oriented flat against the planar surface.

2. The game apparatus of claim 1 further comprising a marker card to indicate a position from which movement of the ball may be directed.

3. The game apparatus of claim 1 wherein each of the targets further comprise scoring indicia.

4. The game apparatus of claim 3 further comprising a scorecard for tracking an accumulation of scores represented by the scoring indicia on the targets.

5. The game apparatus of claim 4 further comprising a marker card to indicate a position from which movement of the ball may be directed.

6. The game apparatus of claim 5 wherein the plurality of targets, the marker card, and the scorecard are all initially configured on a unitary sheet of material and are separable one from the other by cutting or separating on perforated lines thereon.

7. The game apparatus of claim 1 wherein the target cards each further comprise advertising indicia.

8. A game method of play comprising the steps of: providing a ball and a means for directing movement of the ball across a playing surface; providing a plurality of targets, each target positioned at varying distances from a player position on the playing surface, each of the targets capable of alternating between a first target orientation and a second struck orientation, the struck orientation resulting when the ball appropriately contacts the target; each of the players in turn directing movement of the ball towards one of the targets in an effort to change the target from a target orientation to a struck orientation; each player receiving a score based upon targets altered from a target orientation to a struck orientation; and accumulating scores for each player for a pre-determined number of turns and determining a winner based upon the accumulated scores.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to game devices and game methods of play. The present invention relates more specifically to simple, inexpensive, and compact game devices using balls and targets for scoring.

2. Description of the Related Art

There are numerous devices for practicing golf, especially at home or in a confined space. These devices, however, do not provide a very wide variety of games, and generally do not provide instant scoring feedback. Because of these limitations, players usually get bored very quickly and lose interest. This invention overcomes these limitations by providing variety and flexibility of layout, instant scoring feedback and a competitive playing environment.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The object of this invention is to provide a game device having multiple scoring targets that, when struck properly by a ball, flip backward to reveal a scoring outcome for the target.

By combining a variety of targets, both in number and size, it is possible to simulate the outcome of a sporting event, such as golf or any other sporting event played for score.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a front plan view of the sheet material components of the game apparatus of the present invention prior to separation into the individual components

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of one game target of the present invention shown configured for use on a flat playing surface.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of an arrangement of the game play elements of the present invention positioned at various distances on a flat playing surface.

FIG. 4A is a front plan view of a typical target card of the present invention in an unfolded configuration.

FIG. 4B is a reverse plan view of the typical target card shown in FIG. 4A.

FIG. 4C is a front view of the target card shown in FIG. 4A folded 90° at the crease on the card.

FIG. 4D is a side view of the target card shown in FIG. 4C again showing a 90° fold at the crease on the card.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Reference is made first to FIG. 1 for a brief description of a preferred structural configuration of the various components of the game device of the present invention, especially as configured and constructed on a sheet of cardstock or other semi-rigid, foldable, sheetlike material. In this view shown in FIG. 1, one cost effective way to manufacture the game elements of the present invention can be seen. Configured to fit on a standard letter size 8½″×1″ sheet of cardstock or the like, the five basic components of the game are shown. Game sheet 10 may be cut apart by the user or torn along perforations placed in the game sheet (cardstock) to separate the various game components.

In a first preferred embodiment of the game, three targets 12, 14, and 16; a tee box 18; and a score card 20 are shown to make up the game sheet 10. Targets 12, 14, and 16 are each configured with crease lines 22 that allow them to be folded at 90° angles as described in more detail below. Cut lines 24 (which may be perforated lines in the game sheet as mentioned above) guide the user in separating the various elements of the game from the single sheet on which they are initially provided. Tee box 18 is configured to remain a flat playing element and is used as described in more detail below. Scorecard 20 is also provided with a crease line so as to be folded and used as a score keeping mechanism in conjunction with an appropriate pen or pencil for writing in the scores on a table printed on the card.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the “flip-up” target 16 (the second target as an example) in a receiving position. That is, during the initial steps of the play of the game, the player first sees panel A (target face 30) of the receiving target. If the panel A of target 16 is properly struck, the player will then see panel D (not shown in this view) “flip up” to reveal an outcome of the successful attempt at hitting the target. An unsuccessful attempt will not reveal panel D and panel B will remain visible. The target 16 is positioned initially as shown on a floor surface 28 such as a carpet or the like.

Reference is now made to FIG. 3 for a description of the manner of arranging the elements of the game apparatus and the basic game method of play. Target cards 12, 14, and 16 are arranged as shown. In this view target 14 is the third target which represents the smallest in profile and the furthest away from the player. Target 16 is intermediate in profile and intermediate in distance from the player. The first target 12 is largest in profile and closest in distance to the player.

The player is positioned in proximity to the placement of the tee box 18 which establishes an imaginary line behind which ball 36 is initially placed. Ball 36 is struck by club head 34 held by the player as may typically be accomplished with a golf ball and a golf club. Alternate methods for directing an object such as a ball towards the targets are anticipated, again as described in more detail below.

FIG. 4A shows target card 16 (as an example) comprising a single sheet of material with a crease across the width dimension allowing panel A (target face 30) to be folded upright at a 90° angle with panel B (base top 32). Panel B serves as the top face of the base of the “flip-up” target. One or more of the panels (A, B, C, or D) may receive various indicia or text to accommodate instructions and scoring for the play of the various games and/or may include advertising and the like.

FIG. 4B shows the reverse side of target card 16 (as an example), the front side of which was shown in FIG. 4A. The crease across the width dimension allows panel C (target back 40) to be folded upright at a 270° angle from panel D (base bottom 42). Panel D serves as the bottom face of the base of the “flip-up” target and would bear indicia that would disclose to the player the particular score accomplished by flipping over this particular target. Panel C would become the panel to contact the floor surface after the target has been flipped backward, allowing a scoring outcome to be revealed on Panel D.

FIG. 4C is a front view of a “flip-up” scoring target 16 (again as a typical example) in a receiving position where panel A (target face 30) sits upright at a 90° angle from panel B (base top 32). Panel D (base bottom 42 . . . i.e., the reverse side of panel B) is the bottom most panel, sitting on the flat playing surface such as carpeting, that allows panel A to sit at a 90° angle to the playing surface.

FIG. 4D is a side view of the “flip-up” target 16 (as an example) shown in the receiving position. Panel A (target face 30) in the receiving position is seen by the player as play begins. Panel B (base top 32) is the upward facing panel of the base of the target in a receiving position when the target card is initially placed on the flat playing surface. Panel C (target back 40) is formed as the reverse side of panel A. Panel D (base bottom 42) is formed as the reverse side of panel B. In the receiving position, panel D (base bottom 42) is positioned on the flat playing surface, such as carpeting. Panels B/D form the base of the “flip-up” target in this initial receiving position.

If a “flip-up” scoring target is properly struck by a projectile such as, but not limited to, a golf ball, the “flip-up” scoring target will be knocked over. In other words, panel C will come to rest on the playing surface and panel D will “flip-up” to reveal indicia appropriate to the various games envisioned.

A variety of sports game simulations are envisioned using the “flip-up” targets. A wide variety of sizes and shapes for the “flip-up” targets are also envisioned as well as their use as single targets or in combination during play. Construction of the “flip-up” scoring target may be any material that is suitable for being folded across the width dimension so as to allow a 90° angle to be formed, creating the upright panels A/C. The game device, however, can be made from any suitable material that will form and hold a 90° angle allowing a base and an upright target face. The preferred embodiment is constructed of heavy weight paper, with printed indicia, that when scored and folded holds a 90° upright angle when the base is laid on a surface, such as carpeting.

One game embodiment provides scoring outcomes that simulate an 18 hole round of golf. A scorecard is provided for players to record their scores. Three target devices are set at varying distances from a common point from which each putt is struck (see FIG. 3). Following specific play instructions each player has an opportunity to play one hole at a time. If the first (closest) target is struck properly, it reveals a score of “Bogey” (Par +1). If the second target is struck properly the player now has a “Par”. If the third and final target is struck properly, the player scores a “Birdie” (Par −1) for the hole. After 18 holes, the player with the lowest score wins the game.

In a further embodiment, using the same multiple flip-up target concept, with different indicia, players could compete in a game of football (as an example). If the first (closest) target is struck properly, a score of 3 points (field goal) would be revealed. If the second target is struck properly, a score of 6 points (touchdown, but no point after) would be revealed. If the third target (farthest and smallest) is struck properly, a score of 7 points (touchdown+point after) would be revealed. When a player's turn is over, scores from all targets that have been struck properly (revealing a score) are added together and the player records those “points” for that turn on the scorecard. After a specified number of turns are completed, the player with the highest score wins the game.

In yet another embodiment, players could compete in an auto race (as a further example). If the first (closest and largest) target is struck properly, it would reveal a score of “10 miles”. If the second target is struck properly, it would reveal a score of “20 miles”. If the third target is struck properly, it would reveal a score of “30 miles”. At the completion of their turn, the player would add up the “miles” scored and write them on a scorecard. The game is won by the first player to reach a predetermined number of miles (300, 400, 500, etc. as an example).

A further embodiment would allow players to compete in a bowling game (again as a typical example). If the first (closest and largest) target is struck properly, a score of “5 pins” is revealed. If the second target is struck properly, a score of “3 pins” is revealed. If the third target is struck properly a score of “2 pins” is revealed, allowing a player that hits all three targets properly to score 10 pins (strike) for that turn (frame). After a specified number of turns (frames) are completed, the player with the highest pin count wins the game.

These embodiments are meant to be representative only of the games that could be played and are not meant to limit the type of materials, number of targets, size of targets, or scoring value associated with a target.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF ALTERNATE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

As indicated above a variety of additional sporting events and other activities could be emulated using the game apparatus and game method of play of the present invention. In general, appropriate indicia and appropriate rules following the basic concepts listed below would be utilized in conjunction with these various alternate embodiments.

Fishing: Target No. 1=1 pound catch, Target No. 2=3 pound catch, and Target No. 3=5 pound catch.

Basketball: Target No. 1=8 points, Target No. 2=12 points, and Target No. 3=14 points.

Hockey: Target No. 1=“breakaway”, Target No. 2=“shot on goal”, and Target No. 3=“score a goal”.

Horse Racing: First player to knock down 10 targets wins the race.

Bull Riding: Target No. 1=20 points, Target No. 2=30 points, and Target No. 3=40 points.

Baseball: Target No. 1=“one on”, Target No. 2=“one in and one on”, and Target No. 3=“home run with two runs in”.

In most games, “bonus” putts could also be included allowing extra scoring opportunities. For example, in the golf game, on par 3 holes only, if a player hits all three targets properly, scoring a “birdie” the player receives one extra putt. The third target is reset to the original receiving position. If the putt is made, the player scores a hole in one. If missed, the player receives their original “birdie” score.

A variety of specific scorecard configurations would be anticipated with each of the various sporting events or activities emulated by the present game apparatus and game method of play. Some of these scorecards would further define the number of “rounds” or turns that each player might engage in during a full game method of play. Some of the scorecards could be configured as follows:

Golf: 18 holes (similar to an actual golf scorecard).

Baseball: 9 innings (similar to a nine inning box score).

Football: 4 turns of cumulative scoring (equivalent to four quarters of a football game).

Bowling: 10 frames (similar to an actual bowling score sheet).

Auto Racing: 18 time periods (similar to the golf scorecard but would be “open ended” for the number of turns needed to reach a certain number of miles).

Bull Riding: 4 rides (similar to football scorecard with cumulative scoring).

Various modifications to the scoring values on the target cards and, therefore, to the format of the scorecards are anticipated. These variations allow for control over the rate at which points or “scoring” is accumulated and therefore allow for control over the duration of the game. The game apparatus of the present invention provides a cost effective way of producing a simple yet engaging game. Such a game apparatus and game method of play finds particular application and cost effective use in the promotional gift item industry.