Title:
Method of producing pillows for sleep
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A method for choosing a pillow for an individual based on matching the characteristics of an occlusion with characteristics, including height, material, size, hardness and shape, of the pillow and a pillow selected by the method.



Inventors:
Kenmochi, Shoe (Tokyo, JP)
Application Number:
12/157341
Publication Date:
10/09/2008
Filing Date:
06/10/2008
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
128/898
International Classes:
A47G9/10
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
KELLEHER, WILLIAM J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
STRADLEY RONON STEVENS & YOUNG, LLP (30 VALLEY STREAM PARKWAY, GREAT VALLEY CORPORATE CENTER, MALVERN, PA, 19355-1481, US)
Claims:
1. A method for choosing a pillow for an individual comprising: observing an occlusion unique to the individual; noting characteristics of the occlusion; matching the characteristics of the occlusion with characteristics of the pillow, the pillow characteristics being at least one of height, material, size, hardness and shape; obtaining the pillow with matching characteristics.

2. The method of claim 1 further comprising: determining how a head of the individual was supported during a first 90 days following birth.

3. The method of claim 2 wherein the determining comprises: recording where pressure was applied at a head and neck of the individual; and documenting how the individual was put to sleep.

4. The method of claim 1 further comprising: determining which fulcrum areas of the individual contact the pillow;

5. The method of claim 4 further comprising: creating a teeth model of the occlusion of an individual; and creating a diagram of the fulcrum areas that exist on skin of a head and neck and in a back portion of shoulders.

6. The method of claim 4 wherein the matching comprises: comparing the occlusions and fulcrum areas with those on a chart; and selecting the pillow associated with the occlusions and fulcrum areas.

7. The method of claim 1 wherein the observing comprises: studying at least one of a vertical overlap of upper anterior teeth, vertical overlap of lower anterior teeth, horizontal overlap of upper anterior teeth, horizontal overlap of lower anterior teeth, size of teeth, length of upper anterior teeth, shape of molars, state of teeth, size and shape of upper teeth arch, overlap of molars, angle of anterior teeth, and existence of insufficient tooth/teeth.

8. The method of claim 1 further comprising: considering at least one of whether the individual experiences nose problems and a shape and properties of an existing pillow the individual currently uses for sleeping and an area where the individual makes contact with the existing pillow.

9. The method of claim 1 further comprising: monitoring at least one of a tongue and a head while the individual is at least one of asleep and awake.

10. A method for choosing a pillow for an individual comprising: observing occlusions of the individual; determining which fulcrum areas of the individual contact the pillow; and selecting a pillow based on the occlusions and fulcrum areas.

11. The method of claim 10 further comprising: determining how a head of the individual was supported during a first 90 days following birth.

12. The method of claim 11 wherein the determining comprises: recording where pressure was applied at a head and neck of the individual; and documenting how the individual was put to sleep.

13. The method of claim 10 wherein the observing comprises: creating a teeth model of the occlusion of an individual; and creating a diagram of the fulcrum areas that exist on skin of a head and neck and in a back portion of shoulders.

14. The method of claim 10 wherein the selecting comprises: comparing the occlusions and fulcrum areas with those on a chart; and choosing the pillow associated with the occlusions and fulcrum areas.

15. The method of claim 10 wherein the observing comprises: studying at least one of a vertical overlap of upper anterior teeth, vertical overlap of lower anterior teeth, horizontal overlap of upper anterior teeth, horizontal overlap of lower anterior teeth, size of teeth, length of upper anterior teeth, shape of molars, state of teeth, size and shape of upper teeth arch, overlap of molars, angle of anterior teeth, and existence of insufficient tooth/teeth.

16. The method of claim 10 wherein the choosing comprises: selecting the pillow according to height, material, size, hardness and shape.

17. The method of claim 10 further comprising: studying a reaction of the individual to application of directional pressure to the fulcrum areas.

18. The method of claim 10 further comprising: monitoring at least one of a tongue and a head while the individual is at least one of asleep and awake.

19. The method of claim 10 further comprising: considering at least one of whether the individual experiences nose problems and a shape and properties of an existing pillow the individual currently uses for sleeping and an area where the individual makes contact with the existing pillow.

20. A pillow selected from a method comprising: observing occlusions of the individual; determining which fulcrum areas of the individual contact the pillow; choosing a pillow based on the occlusions and fulcrum areas and characteristics of the pillow, the characteristics being at least one of height, material, size, hardness and shape.

Description:

REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present invention is a continuation application of U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/362,369, titled “Method of Producing ‘One’s Pillows' with Characteristics for a Restful and Restorative Sleep is Based on Scientific Basis of Observing Human Occlusion,” filed on May 22, 2006, the contents of which are incorporated in this application by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The invention relates to producing pillows for a restful sleep, and in particular, to choosing pillows based on human characteristics.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The occlusion, which is the normal spatial relation of the teeth when the jaws are closed, of human beings varies widely among individuals. Studies on development of occlusion have been made over long periods of time by numerous researchers. On one hand, it is believed that the prevailing opinion is that the occlusion of each individual is the result of several factors such as heredity, evolution, and sudden changes in diet. On the other hand, it is believed that the development of occlusions particular to an individual is the result of an artificial phenomenon arising from one being forced to sleep in the form of repose of the head and neck by one's parents during the first 90 day period immediately following birth.

Each individual uses pillows with different characteristics, which include height, hardness, material, size and shape, because each individual has a unique neck form, customs, and preferences. Selecting a pillow is often based on these unique factors. As a result, many people have trouble selecting a pillow. Therefore, it is desirable to provide a method of selecting a pillow that can be used for a restful and restorative sleep.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

One aspect of the invention provides a method for choosing a pillow for an individual, including observing an occlusion unique to the individual; noting characteristics of the occlusion; matching the characteristics of the occlusion with characteristics of the pillow, where the pillow characteristics include height, material, size, hardness and/or shape; and obtaining the pillow with matching characteristics.

Another aspect of the invention provides a method for choosing a pillow for an individual, including observing occlusions of the individual; determining which fulcrum areas of the individual contact the pillow; and selecting a pillow based on the occlusions and fulcrum areas.

Yet another aspect of the invention provides a pillow selected from a method including observing occlusions of the individual; determining which fulcrum areas of the individual contact the pillow; and choosing a pillow based on the occlusions and fulcrum areas and characteristics of the pillow, where the characteristics include height, material, size, hardness and/or shape.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIGS. 1-1 to 1-8 are anatomical diagrams of back views of the fulcrums areas, sleeping postures and forms of “contact stabilization of the tongue;”

FIGS. 2-1 to 2-5 are anatomical diagrams of sleeping postures;

FIG. 3-1 to 3-6 anatomical diagrams of sleeping postures;

FIGS. 4-1 to 4-4 are anatomical diagrams of back and side views of the fulcrum areas, teeth, and sleeping postures;

FIGS. 5-1 and 5-2 are anatomical diagrams of a back and side partial view of a right side of a head, respectively;

FIGS. 6-1 and 6-2 are anatomical diagrams of a back and side partial view of a right side of a head, respectively;

FIGS. 7-1 and 7-2 are anatomical diagrams of a back view of a head and a partial side view of a head, respectively;

FIGS. 8-1 to 8-3 are anatomical diagrams of back views of the fulcrum areas, teeth, and sleeping postures;

FIGS. 9-1 to 9-4 are anatomical diagrams of side views of the fulcrum areas, teeth, and sleeping postures;

FIG. 10 is an anatomical diagram of teeth, side view of a fulcrum area, and sleeping postures;

FIGS. 11-1 and 11-2 are anatomical diagrams of side views of the fulcrum areas, teeth, and sleeping postures;

FIGS. 12-1 to 12-6 are anatomical diagrams of teeth, back and side views of the fulcrum areas and sleeping postures;

FIGS. 13-1 to 13-4 are anatomical diagrams of side views of the fulcrum areas, teeth, and sleeping postures;

FIGS. 14-1 to 14-6 are anatomical diagrams of back views of the fulcrum areas, teeth, and sleeping postures;

FIGS. 15-1 to 15-10 are anatomical diagrams of back views of the fulcrums areas, sleeping postures and forms of “contact stabilization of the tongue;”

FIGS. 16-1 to 16-3 are anatomical diagrams of top, back and side and partial side views of a head;

FIGS. 17-1 and 17-2 are anatomical diagrams of top, back and side and partial side views of a head; and

FIGS. 18-1 and 18-2 are anatomical diagrams of partial back and side views of a head of Subject A.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Pillow selection for restful and restorative sleep may be identified accurately by observing one's occlusion. By knowing the individual's occlusion, a pillow with the proper characteristics may be made so that the individual may have a restful and restorative sleep. Through studying an individual during sleeping time, the area of contact and stabilization with the pillow may be analyzed. A diagram may then be created to show the unique area where contact with pressure is made with the pillow and the individual may use the diagram to compare it with a set of diagrams that indicate the pillow selection.

In one embodiment of the invention, the method comprises the following steps.

1. Create the teeth model of the occlusion of the individual.
Prepare two diagrams: (1) the 15 different fulcrum areas that exist, resembling a mosaic pattern, on the skin of the head and neck and in the back portion of the shoulders and (2) the figure (FIG. 16) that classifies the fulcrum area positioned at the side of the neck into 16 portions.
2. Prepare the figures (FIG. 1 to FIG. 17) that show the relationship between “the appearance of one's unique occlusion” and “the growth” with using one's own pillow that gives a restful and restorative sleep and analyze “one's contact band stabilization area with the pillow,” the area where the individual constantly contacts the pillow with directional pressure.
3. Prepare the diagrams that redraw the results of analysis in (2) into those prepared in (1) (the 15 kinds of fulcrum areas and the figure (FIG. 16) that classifies the fulcrum area positioned at the side of the neck into 16 portions).
4. Prepare “one's contact and stabilization area with the pillow,” one's individual basic data of analysis. Elucidate accurately each item of the pillow characteristics (height, material, size, hardness and shape) by comparing the above-mentioned figures (FIG. 1 to FIG. 17).
5. Prepare results that are obtained in (4) and produce a pillow with characteristics for a restful and restorative sleep.

FIG. 1 shows the relationships between fulcrum areas, properties of the pillow and the forms of “contact stabilization of the tongue,” or occlusions of the teeth. For the occlusions, a side view of the upper/lower central incisor is shown. The fulcrum areas include the back and top portion of the head 12, on the back and below the top portion of the head 13, above the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 14, at the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 15, right above the vertebrae cervicales VII 11, and the central portion of the neck 16. The occlusions of the front teeth include normal occlusion, vertical and horizontal overlap of the upper anterior teeth, slant of the upper and lower anterior teeth and the upper central incisors twist, and outer portion protrusion toward the lips. The occlusions of the anterior teeth include reversed occlusion, vertical and horizontal overlap of the lower anterior teeth, and slant of upper and lower anterior teeth.

The development of occlusion peculiar to an individual is basically the result of an artificial phenomenon arising from one being forced to sleep in the form of repose of the head and neck by one's parents during the first 90 day period immediately following birth. One's occlusion is a growth record reflecting one's repose of the head and neck during sleep.

One's repose of the head and neck while sleeping is a unique characteristic to each individual that is controlled by one's natural instinctive genes (conditions). There is a cause-and-effect relation between the growth under one's repose of the head and neck and the appearance of the formation of an occlusion that reflects one's repose of the head and neck during sleep. One's repose of the head and neck during sleep is dependent on how one's head was supported, or how one was put to sleep, and conditions in breathing pattern during breast feeding. It is a postnatal form and nature that are made within the first 90 days after birth.

There is a cause-and-effect relation between one's pillow, one's repose of the head and neck during sleep, and one's occlusion. There is a cause-and-effect relation between the development of an occlusion particular to an individual and the growth of using one's pillow with characteristics that can provide a restful and restorative sleep.

The differences that can be noticed in the characteristics of one's pillow are basically the result of an artificial phenomenon arising from infant care during the first 90 day period immediately following birth. One's repose is dependent on how one's head was supported, and how one was put to sleep and conditions in breathing pattern during breast feeding, i.e., the part of the infant's head and neck pressure that was applied while sleeping.

The origin of the specific area where one constantly contacts and stabilizes with one's pillow during sleep is based upon how one's head was supported during breast feeding within the first 90 days after birth, how much pressure was applied to one's head and neck pressure, what kind of the pressure it was, or how one was put to sleep.

One's pillow should be used to satisfy physiological factors (conditions) that control the appearance of one's repose of the head and neck during sleep. One's pillow is not only a device that produces repose of the head and neck during sleep, but also a device that forms one's occlusion during an individual's growth stage. After the growth stage, it becomes the other device that maintains the position-relationship of one's fully developed occlusion.

The occlusion is composed of the following 10 anatomical factors that cause variations:

1. Vertical overlap of the upper (or lower) anterior teeth
2. Horizontal overlap of the upper (or lower) anterior teeth
3. Size of teeth
4. Length of upper anterior teeth
5. Shape of molars
6. State of teeth
7. Size and shape of upper teeth arch
8. Overlap of the molars
9. Angle of anterior teeth
10. Existence of insufficient tooth/teeth

The term “repose of the head and neck during sleep” used herein is a general term for “repose of the head and neck that can be observed externally (R-HN)” and “repose of the masticatory system that cannot be observed externally (R-MS).” The reason for this is the existence of two parts—the head unit where the cranium and vertebrae cervicales must both be at rest and the masticatory system where the mandible, tongue, and os hyoideum all have to be at rest.

The (R-HN) of an individual first happens unconsciously through an “act of contact and stabilization.” This act is where each individual tries to stabilize the head and neck (which at times may include the back shoulder portion) by contacting specific areas with the pillow (one's pillow with properties that enable one to obtain restful and restorative sleep), or direct contact with a mattresses or the floor at a specific angle. The contact areas are different among every individual, and the height, size, firmness, material and shape of the pillow differ accordingly.

The (R-MS) of an individual first happens unconsciously through an “act of contact and stabilization of the tongue.” It is a unique act by each individual that happens uniquely at the jaw position, influenced by gravity, and is dependent upon the aforementioned (R-HN). This act consists of lightly pressing the tongue continuously to the palate, the upper anterior teeth, moving to the lower anterior teeth, and to the upper chin portion to stabilize and position the mandible, os hyoideum and the tongue itself. During this act, an amoebae-like liquid forms at the side and central front portion of the tongue, excluding the tip portion, and the tongue is positioned between the upper and lower teeth. Although this act can be observed while asleep and also when one is awake, because the two are fundamentally different, the “act of contact and stabilization of the tongue” refers only to when one is asleep. However, when one sleeps after drinking alcohol, or when one is extremely fatigued, one may temporarily stabilize by opening the mouth wide and pressing only the tip of the tongue continuously and lightly to the lower anterior teeth.

There are external factors that cause differences in repose of head and neck during sleep. For (R-HN), they include:

1. Sleeping positions one can take, e.g. facing up, down, or sideways
2. The presence of acts which cause a 3-dimensional angle, including twisting of the backbone, twisting of the neck, bending the head sideways, and bending the head forward (or backward)
3. 3-dimensional position of the head
4. Where one sleeps (either bed or mattress)
5. Usage of s pillow, including if one uses a pillow, the number of pillows, and its height, size, firmness, material and shape
6. Area of contact with the pillow, including where one unconsciously stabilizes the head and neck, at times including portions of the shoulder during sleep.
For (R-MS), they include:
1. Contact and Stabilization of the Tongue, Including 3 Different Forms that are Based on One's Breathing Pattern

a. Type RT-BN: This type is where one positions part of the tongue covered with amoebae-like liquid between the spaces formed by the upper and lower teeth. This is confirmed among those who constantly breathe through the nose with their mouth closed during sleep.

b. Type RT-BM: This type is where one slightly places the tongue between the large molars, and uses that space as a respiratory tract. The thickness of the tongue that enters the space between the anterior teeth is very thick. This is applicable to those who constantly breathe with their mouths open during sleep.

c. Type RT-BN&BM: This type is where one forms a narrow cylinder with the tongue using the central and back portions (excluding the surrounding portion) and uses that hollow space as a respiratory tract. In this case, the amount of tongue that enters the space of the upper and lower anterior teeth is larger than with type RT-BN, and vertical fissure can be found in the central part of the tongue. This is applicable to those who breathe through the mouth and nose while sleeping.

2. “3-Dimensional Position of the Jaw” Under (R-HN). There are 3 Different Types at this position:

a. Type where ligaments support the jaw only, and the jaws can move freely. This is seen among those who do not make any contact of the jaw while asleep.

b. Type where pressure is applied to the jaw by the pillow, and the influence of gravity is limited. This is confirmed among those who sleep with the jaw contacting the pillow (with the exception of the contacting the chin).

c. Type where the jaw either moves outwardly toward the molars (either to the left or right side). This is confirmed among those who sleep sideways or facing downwards, or among those who stabilize the left and/or right side of the jaw including the chin, by strongly pressing against the pillow.

The contact and stabilization area varies widely among individuals, and can be perceived by the map-like pattern that appears on the skin (epidermis). There could be many of these map-like patterns due to unique sleeping patterns by individual. For instance, one could have five sleeping patterns consisting of one sleeping pattern facing up, two facing the left side, and two facing right side. Another person may have eight. Hence, the contact and stabilization area varies among individuals depending on where one has acquired it. However, repose cannot be achieved by just making contact with the pillow. It is a unique area that requires pressure that is within one's tolerance pressure level, and direction of the pressure varies depending on the location. For this reason, one cannot achieve repose if the contact is not within one's tolerance pressure level, and must not exceed or fall below one's tolerance level. In most cases, the map-like pattern, with its physiological significance, is composed of fulcrum area(s) and assisting fulcrum area(s), where the fulcrum area “requires strong pressure in a given direction” and the assisting fulcrum area “requires weak pressure in a given direction.” There are also cases where only the fulcrum area(s) exists. Since the position and number of this map-like pattern varies among individuals, there are cases where one's fulcrum area is another's assisting fulcrum area, or for some, contact in this area may be unnecessary (FIG. 2 and FIG. 3). In addition, the number of fulcrum areas is unique. However, one factor consistent among all is the direction of pressure necessary.

FIG. 2 shows diagrams of one's “contact and stabilization area with the pillow” from 3 views that is described with a map-like pattern, the schematic of one's “contact and stabilization area with the pillow,” and one's characteristics of a pillow. FIG. 2-1 shows the sleeping posture for people who have a primary fulcrum area where the fulcrum areas are positioned immediately above the vertebrae cervicales VII and on the back and below the top portion of the head (or fulcrum area positioned on the back and top portion of the head) and use pillow 56 that is low or extremely low, and soft. FIG. 2-2 shows the sleeping posture for people who have a fulcrum area positioned on the back and top portion of the head as a primary fulcrum area and do not use pillows, or use pillow 57 that is extremely low and soft. (However, for those whose rear of the head is flat, these people use a pillow that is extremely low and only the upper portion is extremely firm.)

FIG. 2-3 shows the sleeping posture for people who have a fulcrum area positioned on the back and below the top portion of the head as a primary fulcrum area and use a pillow 58 that is extremely low or low, and soft (at times, these people do not use pillows). FIG. 24 shows the sleeping posture for people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the protuberantia occipitalis ext. as a primary fulcrum area and use a pillow 59 that is relatively high, relatively hard, and made of firm materials. FIG. 2-5 shows the sleeping posture for people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the protuberantia occipitalis ext. as a primary fulcrum area and use a pillow 60 that is high or extremely high, relatively hard (or hard), and made of firm materials.

FIG. 3 shows a diagrams of one's “contact and stabilization area with the pillow” that is described with a map-like pattern, the schematic of one's “contact and stabilization area with the pillow,” and one's the characteristics of pillow. FIG. 3-1 shows the sleeping posture for people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the central part of the neck and a fulcrum area positioned on the back and below the top portion of the head as primary fulcrum areas and use a pillow 67 that is extremely low or low, and soft (These people use the pillow where the pillow is high at the center part of the neck). FIG. 3-2 shows the sleeping posture for people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the central part of the neck and a fulcrum area positioned right above the protuberantia occipitalis ext. as primary fulcrum areas and use a pillow 68 that is relatively high, relatively hard, and made of firm materials (These people use the pillow where the pillow is high at the center part of the neck).

FIG. 3-3 shows the sleeping posture for people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the central part of the neck and a fulcrum area positioned at the protuberantia occipitalis ext. as primary fulcrum areas and use a pillow 69 that is high or extremely high, relatively hard (or hard), and made of firm materials (These people use the pillow where the pillow is high at the center part of the neck). FIG. 34 shows the sleeping posture for people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the side part of the base of the neck and a fulcrum area positioned at the side of the neck as primary fulcrum areas (The indication is for those who have fulcrum area positioned at the protuberantia occipitalis ext. in addition to fulcrum areas mentioned above) and use a pillow 70 that is high or extremely high, relatively hard (or hard), and made of firm materials (These people use the pillow where they place the pillow on the upper portion of the shoulders, and apply directional strong pressure to the side portion of the base of the neck).

FIG. 3-5 shows the sleeping posture for people who have a fulcrum area positioned in the back portion of the shoulders as the primary fulcrum area (The indication is for those who have fulcrum area positioned on the back and below the top portion of the head and fulcrum area positioned at the jaw in addition to fulcrum area mentioned above) and use a pillow 71 that is relatively high or high, relatively soft, and large pillows (These people especially use several pillows). FIG. 3-6 shows the sleeping posture for people who have a fulcrum area positioned immediately above the vertebrae cervicales VII and a fulcrum area positioned in the back portion of the shoulders as primary fulcrum areas (The indication is for those who have fulcrum area positioned on the back and top portion of the head in addition to fulcrum areas mentioned above) and do not use pillows, and sleep where their head extends from the mattress 72, making the head contact the floor (For these people, the mattress and the floor becomes a large pillow).

Repose of the head and neck (R-HN) while sleeping is a unique characteristic to each individual that is controlled by one's natural instinctive genes. In order to achieve and maintain one's unique (R-HN), a natural instinctive gene exists to control external genes that cause variances in the repose of the head and neck. This natural gene is unique among individuals and is a natural condition as follows:

1. While sleeping, the area where one makes contact with the pillow is always limited to the specific contact area for that individual. This occurs unconsciously.
2. While sleeping, the pressure applied to each portion of this area must be within one's tolerance pressure level (cannot be too weak or too strong) and in the right direction for that specific area.

It is controlling to constantly maintain one's (R-MS) based on the complex relation of two natural genes. The first natural gene is the natural condition that is unique to each individual that maintain one's (R-HN). The reason for including this condition is because this act of tongue contact to achieve repose occurs at the jaw position that is determined by one's (R-HN) and is affected by gravity. The other natural gene is based on the following two natural conditions: breathing patterns during sleep must be specific to each individual and the shape of the tongue when making contact to achieve repose must be the shape that fits one's breathing pattern. RT-BN Type constantly breathes through the nose. RT-BM Type constantly breathes through the mouth. RT-BN&BM Type breathes through the nose and mouth.

A triangular relationship occurs between the repose of the head and neck during sleep, one's occlusion, and one's pillow. There is an overlap between the upper (lower) anterior teeth (the vertical overlap and the horizontal overlap), the slant of the upper (lower) anterior teeth, and the upper central incisors twist, and where the outer portions protrude toward the lips. On the condition of the breathing method during sleep, there is a relationship between the people who have a fulcrum area that is positioned at any of the following: on the back and top portion of the head, on the back and below the top portion of the head, above the protuberantia occipitalis ext., at the protuberantia occipitalis ext., and right above the vertebrae cervicales VII, the occlusions of the anterior teeth (normal occlusion, vertical and horizontal overlap of the upper and lower anterior teeth, the slant of the upper and lower anterior teeth and the upper central incisors twist, and where the outer portion protrudes toward the lips) and the characteristics of the pillow (FIG. 1).

On the condition of the breathing method during sleep, there is a relationship between the people who have a fulcrum area that is positioned at the central portion of the neck and fulcrum area that is positioned at any of the following—on the back and top portion of the head, on the back and below the top portion of the head, above the protuberantia occipitalis ext., at the protuberantia occipitalis ext. and right above the vertebrae cervicales VII, the occlusions of the anterior teeth (reversed occlusion, vertical and horizontal overlap of the upper and lower anterior teeth, slant of the upper and lower anterior teeth and the upper central incisors twist, and where the outer portions protrude toward the lips) and the characteristics of a pillow.

FIG. 1-1 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned immediately above the vertebrae cervicales VII 11 as primary fulcrum area. For reference, there are the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 9 and vertebrae cervicales VII 10. However, when the fulcrum area is located at the right side, including the central portion, then the right anterior teeth will have an edge-to-edge bite (vertical upper and lower teeth) 25 for type RT-BN people. The left side is similar to the right side. For type RT-BM, there is an extreme open bite and vertical upper anterior teeth 33, where open bite means occlusion where there is a space in the upper and lower front teeth, or between the molars when one closes its teeth. Therefore, everybody can observe moving of the tongue from gaps. For type RT-BN&BM people, either (1) the upper anterior teeth have an edge-to-edge bite with an inner part 40, but there is a gap between the upper and lower teeth at the outer part of the tooth, vertical upper and lower anterior teeth and the upper central incisors where the outer part of the tooth twists toward the lips or (2) there is a weak open bite and vertical upper and lower anterior teeth 44.

The pillow 17 for the person of FIG. 1-1 is extremely low (about 1 cm) or low (2 cm to 3 cm) and soft enough for the shape to be easily modified (depending on the material, extremely small). These people often use pillows where the central part of the neck does not contact the pillow or will not make the pillow contact this portion.

FIG. 1-2 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned on the back and top portion of the head 12 as primary fulcrum area. These people must not have a fulcrum area that is positioned immediately above the vertebrae cervicales VII. The teeth have an extremely shallow vertical overlap (vertical upper and lower teeth and normal occlusion) 26 for type RT-BN people.

The pillow 18 for the person of FIG. 1-2 is extremely low, soft, and at times, this person does not need pillow. However, those whose upper rear head portion is an unusual flat shape should use an extremely hard pillow. Often, these people use pillows where the central part of the neck does not contact the pillow or will not make the pillow contact this portion.

FIG. 1-3 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned on the back and below the top portion of the head 13 as primary fulcrum area. These people must not have a fulcrum area positioned immediately above the vertebrae cervicales VII.

For type RT-BN people, the teeth 27 have a shallow vertical overlap (vertical upper and lower teeth, and normal occlusion). For type RT-BM people, the teeth 34 have a horizontal overlap of the anterior teeth or the area covering the front teeth toward the molars where there is a wide space, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips, vertical lower overlap and shallow vertical overlap. Type RT-BN&BM people have either (1) teeth 41 with a horizontal overlap that contacts at the inner part of the tooth, but there is a gap between the upper and lower teeth at the outer part of the tooth, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips, vertical lower anterior teeth, shallow vertical overlap and upper central incisors, where the outer part of the tooth twists toward the lips or (2) teeth 45 with a horizontal overlap of the front teeth where there is a narrow space, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips, vertical lower anterior teeth and shallow vertical overlap.

The pillow 19 for the people of FIG. 1-3 is low or extremely low, and is soft (at times, do not need a pillow). These people often use pillows where the central part of the neck does not contact the pillow or will not make the pillow contact this portion.

FIG. 1-4 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned above the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 15 as a primary fulcrum area. For type RT-BN people, the teeth 28 have a relatively deep vertical overlap (vertical upper and lower teeth, and normal occlusion). For type RT-BM people, the teeth 35 have a horizontal overlap of the anterior teeth or the area covering the anterior teeth toward the molars, where there is a wide space, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips, vertical lower overlap and relatively deep vertical overlap.

Type RT-BN&BM people have either (1) teeth 42 that have a horizontal overlap that contacts at the inner part of the tooth, but there is a gap between the upper and lower teeth at the outer part of the tooth, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips, vertical lower anterior teeth, relatively deep vertical overlap and upper central incisors, where the outer part of the tooth twists toward the lips or (2) teeth 46 that have a horizontal overlap of the front teeth where there is a narrow space, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips, relatively deep vertical overlap and vertical lower anterior teeth.

The pillow 20 for people of FIG. 14 is relatively high (about 8 cm), relatively hard, and made of firm materials. Often, these people use pillows where the central part of the neck does not contact the pillow or will not make the pillow contact this portion.

FIG. 1-5 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 15 as a primary fulcrum area. For type RT-BN people, the teeth 29 have an extremely deep vertical overlap (vertical upper and lower teeth, and normal occlusion). For type RT-BM people, the teeth 36 have a horizontal overlap of the anterior teeth or the area covering the anterior teeth toward the molars where there is a wide space, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips, vertical lower overlap and extremely deep vertical overlap.

Type RT-BN&BM people have either (1) teeth 43 that have a horizontal overlap that contacts at the inner part of the tooth, but there is a gap between the upper and lower teeth at the outer part of the tooth, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips, vertical lower anterior teeth, extremely deep vertical overlap and upper central incisors, where the outer part of the tooth twists toward the lips or (2) teeth 47 that have a horizontal overlap of the front teeth where there is a narrow space, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips and extremely deep.

The pillow 21 for people of FIG. 1-5 is high (about 10 cm) or extremely high (more than 10 cm), relatively hard, and relatively short in length. These people often use pillows where the central part of the neck does not contact the pillow or will not make the pillow contact this portion.

Regarding FIGS. 1-1 to 1-5, for those who breathe through the nose while sleeping (type RT-BN) and whose fulcrum area excludes the central part of the neck, these people have a normal occlusion (the normal vertical overlap). However, the degrees of the vertical overlap of the upper and lower anterior teeth differ depending on the fulcrum area.

For those who constantly breathe through the mouth while sleeping (type RT-BM) and whose fulcrum area excludes the central part of the neck, these people have a normal occlusion (the normal vertical overlap). These people have a horizontal overlap of the front teeth and/or the area covering the front teeth toward the molars, where there is a wide space and the upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips. The degrees of the vertical overlap differ depending on the fulcrum area.

For those who breathe through the mouth and nose while sleeping (type RT-BN&BM) and whose fulcrum areas exclude the central part of the neck, these people have a normal occlusion (the normal vertical overlap). However, the degrees of the vertical overlap of the upper and lower anterior teeth differ depending on fulcrum area. Also, when those people have had nose problems, those people have the following forms of the occlusion. For those who have had nose problems up until around 7 years old, they have upper central incisors where the outer part of the teeth twists toward the lips. The inner portions of these teeth contact, but the outer portions do not contact. For those who have had nose problems after the age of 8 years old, they have upper anterior teeth that have a narrow space between the upper and lower anterior teeth.

FIG. 1-6 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the central part of the neck 16 and on the back and below the top portion of the head 13 as primary fulcrum areas. However, when the fulcrum area is located at the right (or left) side, the right (or left) anterior teeth will be cross bite (reversed occlusion). The left side is similar to the right side. These people must not have a fulcrum area positioned immediately above the vertebrae cervicales VII.

For type RT-BN people, the teeth 30 have a shallow vertical overlap (vertical upper and lower teeth and reversed occlusion). For type RT-BM people, teeth 37 have a horizontal overlap of the anterior teeth or the area covering the anterior teeth toward the molars where there is a wide space between upper and lower teeth, shallow vertical overlap, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips, vertical lower overlap and reversed occlusion.

The pillow 22 for people of FIG. 1-6 is low or extremely low, and is soft. Often, these people use a pillow that is high where it contacts the central part of the neck or will not make the pillow contact this portion.

FIG. 1-7 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the central part of the neck 16 and a fulcrum area located above the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 14 as primary fulcrum areas. However, when the fulcrum area is located at the right (or left) side, the right (or left) anterior teeth will be cross bite (reversed occlusion). The left side is similar to the right side.

For type RT-BN people, the teeth 31 have a relatively shallow vertical overlap (vertical upper and lower teeth, and reversed occlusion). For type RT-BM people, teeth 38 have a horizontal overlap of the anterior teeth or the area covering the anterior teeth toward the molars where there is a wide space, relatively deep vertical overlap, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips, vertical lower overlap and reversed occlusion.

The pillow 23 for people of FIG. 1-7 is relatively high, relatively hard, and made of firm materials. Often, these people use a pillow that is high where it contacts the central part of the neck or will not make the pillow contact this portion.

FIG. 1-8 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the central part of the neck 16 and at the protuberantia occipitalis 15 ext. as primary fulcrum areas. However, when the fulcrum area is located at the right (or left) side, the right (or left) anterior teeth will be cross bite (reversed occlusion). The left side is similar to the right side.

For type RT-BN people, the teeth 32 have an extremely deep vertical overlap (vertical upper and lower teeth, and reversed occlusion). For type RT-BM people, the teeth 39 have a horizontal overlap of the anterior teeth or the area covering the anterior teeth toward the molars where there is a wide space, extremely deep vertical overlap, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips, vertical lower overlap and reversed occlusion.

The pillow 24 for people of FIG. 1-8 is high or extremely high, relatively hard, and length is relatively short. These people often use a pillow that is high where it contacts the central part of the neck or will not make the pillow contact this portion.

Regarding FIGS. 1-6 to 1-8, for those who constantly breathe through the nose while sleeping (type RT-BN) and whose fulcrum areas include the central part of the neck, these people have the reversed occlusion. However, these people who have this fulcrum area at the side portion of right side (or left side) possess the cross bite at the portion of the right (or left) anterior tooth or at the 2 portions of the right (or left) anterior teeth. The degrees of the vertical overlap differ depending on the fulcrum area.

For those who constantly breathe through the mouth during sleep (type RT-BM) and whose fulcrum areas include the central part of the neck 16, these people have the reversed occlusion. These people have a horizontal overlap of the front teeth and/or the area covering the front teeth toward the molars where there is a wide space and the upper anterior teeth that slants toward the lips. The degrees of the vertical overlap differ depending on the fulcrum area.

As shown in FIG. 4, there is a relationship between the size of the teeth and the characteristics of a pillow. When the fulcrum areas are both at the right side and the left side of the neck and are viewed as one unit, there is a relationship between the width of the right and left fulcrum areas, the distribution conditions of large and small teeth, and the characteristics of pillow. For reference, the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 9 and vertebrae cervicales VII 10 are indicated.

As shown in FIG. 4-1, the people who have the fulcrum areas 73 both at the right side and at the left side of the neck all over the area (in black) and all extremely small teeth 74 have a pillow 75 that can apply strong directional pressure all over the area within the fulcrum areas 73 (pillow that is extremely mobile or where the shape is easily changeable).

As shown in FIG. 4-2, the people who do not have the fulcrum areas 73 (not in black) and all extremely large teeth 76 have a pillow 77 that can not apply strong directional pressure to the fulcrum areas 73 (pillow that is immobile and hard or where the shape is easily changeable).

As shown in FIG. 4-3, the people who have the fulcrum areas 73 (the left and right) in some portions (some black) and many large teeth (few small teeth) 78 have a pillow 80 that provides strong directional pressure to few portions within these fulcrum areas 73 (pillow that is relatively immobile or is difficult to change shape: these people apply strong directional pressure by placing their hand(s) or finger(s) or arm on top of the pillow).

As shown in FIG. 4-3, the people who have these fulcrum areas 73 (the left and right) in relatively wide area and many small teeth (few large teeth) 79 have a pillow 80 that can apply strong directional pressure many portions within these fulcrum areas 73 (pillow that is made of relatively mobile material or where the shape is relatively changeable).

As shown in FIG. 4-4, the people who have the fulcrum areas 73 positioned at the left and right side of the neck in a relatively large area (black colored areas) and many small teeth and few of large teeth 81 have a pillow 82 that is made of relatively immobile materials or relatively unchangeable materials and can apply strong directional pressure in a relatively large area of this fulcrum area.

There is a correlation between 8 specific portions within the right (or the left) fulcrum area that at the side of the neck and the size of the upper and lower right (or the left) specific teeth of the same name. FIG. 5 shows when the fulcrum area is positioned at the right (or left) side of the neck is divided into 8 parts. The diagrams of FIG. 5 show a correlation between the width of the right specific portion within the right (or left) fulcrum area positioned at the side of the neck and the size of the upper and lower right (or the left) specific teeth. When the fulcrum area is positioned at the right (or left) side of neck is divided into 8 parts. For those who have specific portion within the fulcrum area positioned at the right (or left) of neck all over the area, the right (or left) lower, upper specific teeth of the same side are extremely small. They use a pillow which can directly or indirectly apply strong directional pressure all over the area of specific portion within this fulcrum area. A pillow that can indirectly apply strong directional pressure is defined as one that can be used with the hand(s) or arm placed on the pillow, and that can apply pressure all over area of specific portion by the hand(s), or finger(s), or arm.

There is a relationship between a specific portion within the right (or the left) fulcrum area at the side of the neck, the size of the upper and lower right (or the left) specific teeth of the same name, and the characteristics of pillow as follows:

As shown in FIG. 5-1, the people who have a specific portion all over the area within this right (or the left) fulcrum area possess the lower, upper right (or the left) specific teeth of the same name that are extremely small. These people use a pillow that directly or indirectly provides strong directional pressure all over the area of this specific portion within this fulcrum area. A pillows that indirectly provides strong directional pressure is defined as a pillow that one use with the hand(s) or arm(s) placed on the pillow.

As shown in FIG. 5-2, the people who do not have a specific portion within this right (or the left) fulcrum area possess the lower, upper right (or the left) specific teeth of the same name that are extremely large. These people use a pillow that does not provide strong directional pressure at this specific portion. In both FIGS. 5-1 and 5-2, portion 83 relates to the size of the upper and lower right central incisors (case of milk teeth, the right milk central incisors), portion 84 elates to the size of the upper and lower right second incisors (case of milk teeth, the right milk second incisors), and portion 85 relates to the size of the upper and lower right canines (case of milk teeth, the right milk canines).

Portion 86 relates to the size of the upper and lower right first small molars (case of milk teeth, the right milk first molars), portion 87 relates to the size of the upper and lower right second small molars (case of milk teeth, the right milk second molars), and portion 88 relates to the size of the upper and lower right first large molars. Portion 89 relates to the size of the upper and lower right second large molars and portion 90 to the size of the upper and lower right third large molars.

For those who do not have a specific portion within the fulcrum area positioned at the right side (or left) of the neck, the right (or left) upper and lower specific teeth of the same side are extremely large, they use a pillow that cannot apply strong directional pressure to the specific portion, or do not use a pillow at all.

There is a correlation between 16 specific portions within the right or the left fulcrum area at the side of the neck and the size of the right or the left specific tooth (FIG. 6-1 and FIG. 6-2, respectively). Also, when the right (or the left) fulcrum area at the side of the neck is classified into 16 portions, there is a relationship between the width of the specific portion within the right (or the left) fulcrum area at the side of the neck, the size of the right (or left) specific tooth, and characteristics of pillow.

Specifically, FIG. 6 shows when the fulcrum area at the right side (or left) of the neck is divided into 16 parts and a correlation between the width of specific area at the right (or left) side, and the size of right (or left) specific tooth. In FIG. 6, portion 91 relates to the size of the upper right central incisor (in the case of milk tooth, the right milk central incisor), portion 92 relates to the size of the lower right central incisor (in the case of milk tooth, the right milk central incisor), and portion relates to the size of the upper right second incisor (in the case of milk tooth, the right milk second incisor).

Portion 94 relates to the size of the lower right second incisor (in the case of milk tooth, the right milk second incisor), portion 95 relates to the size of the upper right canine (in the case of milk tooth, the right milk canine), portion 96 relates to the size of the lower right canine (in the case of milk tooth, the right milk canine), and portion 97 relates to the size of the upper right first small molar (in the case of milk tooth, the right milk first molar). Portion 98 relates to the size of the lower right first small molar (in the case of milk tooth, the right milk first molar), portion relates to the size of the upper right second small molar (in the case of milk tooth, the right milk second molar), portion 100 relates to the size of the lower right second small molar (in the case of milk tooth, the right milk second molar), and portion 101 relates to the size of the upper right first large molar.

Portion 102 relates to the size of the lower right first large molar, portion 103 relates to the size of the upper right second large molar, and portion 104 relates to the size of the lower right second large molar. Portion 105 relates to the size of the upper right third large molar and portion 106 relates to the size of the lower right third large molar.

The people who have specific portions all over the area within the right (or the left) fulcrum area at the side of the neck and possess the right (or the left) specific tooth that is extremely small use a pillow that directly or indirectly applies strong directional pressure all over the area of the specific portion within this fulcrum area. A pillow that indirectly provides strong directional pressure is defined as a pillow that one uses with the hand(s) or arm(s) placed on the pillow. A pillow that indirectly can apply strong directional pressure is defined as a pillow that can be used with the hand(s) or arm(s) placed on the pillow.

The people who have specific portions in a relatively large area within the right (or the left) fulcrum area at the side of the neck and possess the right (or the left) specific tooth that is relatively small use a pillow that directly or indirectly can apply strong directional pressure in a relatively large area of specific portion within this fulcrum area. People who have specific portions in a relatively small area within the right (or the left) fulcrum area at the side of the neck and possess the right (or the left) specific tooth that is relatively large use a pillow that directly or indirectly can apply strong directional pressure in a relatively small area of specific portion within this fulcrum area. People who do not have specific portions within the right (or the left) fulcrum area at the side of the neck and possess the right (or the left) specific tooth that is extremely large use a pillow that directly or indirectly can not apply strong directional pressure in the specific portions within this fulcrum area or do not use pillows.

The anatomical position of 8 portions within a fulcrum area located at the side of the neck is described from the relationship between the 8 specific portions and bone structure of the head and neck (or the muscles). FIGS. 7-1 and 7-2 show the anatomical position (symmetry) of the 8 portions that are within a fulcrum area positioned at the side of the neck. Portion 107 relates to the size of the upper and lower right central incisors (in the case of milk teeth, the right milk central incisor), where the positions are as follows: the top portion of the side is along linea nuchae inf 107a from the foramina mastoidea 107b at the rear-top of proc. mastoideus 107c to the top of squama occipitalis 107d; the bottom portion of the side is located from the rear-bottom of proc. mastoideus 107c to the bottom of squama occipitalis 107d; the front of the vertical portion is located at the side-bottom of vertebrae cervicales I 107e to foramina mastoidea 107b; and the rear of the vertical portion is located at the side-middle of vertebrae cervicales I 107e to squama occipitalis 107d.

Portion 108 relates to the size of the upper and lower right second incisors (in the case of milk teeth, the right milk second incisor) and is positioned at side of musculus trapezius 108a from squama occipitalis 107d passing next to vertebrae cervicales I 107e up to side-bottom of vertebrae cervicales IV 108b. Portion 109 relates to the size of the upper and lower right canines (in the case of milk teeth, the right milk canines) and is positioned at outer side of musculus trapezius 108a and side of vertebrae cervicales V 109a.

Portion 110 relates to the size of the upper and lower right first small molars (in the case of milk teeth, the right milk first molars) and is positioned toward the throat, beginning at the side-top of vertebrae cervicales VI 110a passing through the middle of vertebrae cervicales VI 110a side portion, moving upwards to the bottom of proc. mastoideus 107c. Portion 111 relates to the size of the upper and lower right second small molars (in the case of milk teeth, the right milk second molars) and is positioned toward the throat, from the side-top of vertebrae cervicales I 107e passing the rear bottom and up to the top of proc. mastoideus 107c.

Portion 112 relates to the size of the upper and lower right first large molars where is positioned slightly toward the throat, at the side of vertebrae cervicales IV 108b to foramina mastoidea 107b. This portion is also surrounded by portions 107, 108, 113, 110 and 111. Portion 113 relates to the size of the upper and lower right second large molars where is positioned slightly toward the throat, from the side-bottom of vertebrae cervicales IV 108b to side-top of vertebrae cervicales VI 110a. This portion is also surrounded by portions 108, 109, 110 and 112. Portion 114 relates to the size of the upper and lower right third large molars where is positioned toward the throat, from the side-top of vertebrae cervicales VI 110a to side-bottom of vertebrae cervicales VII 114a.

There is a relationship between the fulcrum area positioned at the upper part of the neck, the length of the upper anterior teeth, and the pillow (FIG. 8). FIG. 8 shows the relationship between the wideness of the fulcrum area above the protuberantia occipitalis ext., and the length of the upper anterior teeth and the characteristics of a pillow. For reference, the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 9 and vertebrae cervicales VII 10 are indicated.

As shown in FIG. 8-1, people who have a fulcrum area below the protuberantia occipitalis ext. to the upper part of the neck 115 all over the area, as indicated in black, and possess upper anterior teeth 116 that are extremely short use a pillow 117 with a shape that can apply strong directional pressure in all portions of this fulcrum area. As shown in FIG. 8-2, people who have a fulcrum area below the protuberantia occipitalis ext. to the upper part of the neck 115 in a relatively large area, as indicated in black, and possess upper anterior teeth 118 that are relatively short use a pillow 119 with a shape that can apply strong directional pressure in a relatively large area within this fulcrum area. As shown in FIG. 8-3, people who do not have a fulcrum area below the protuberantia occipitalis ext. to the upper part of the neck 115 and possess upper anterior teeth 120 that are extremely long use a pillow 121 with a shape that do not can apply strong directional pressure in this fulcrum area.

There is a relationship between the fulcrum area positioned at the jaw, shape of molars, and characteristics of pillow. FIG. 9 shows the relationship between the wideness of the fulcrum area positioned at the jaw and the shape (degrees of sharpness) of molars and the characteristic of a pillow.

As shown in FIG. 9-1, people who have a fulcrum area at the jaw 122 all over the area (including the front part of the cheek bone), as indicated in black, on both sides and possess extremely pointed molars 123 use a pillow 124 that can apply strong directional pressure in a extremely large area within this fulcrum. The pillow 124 is made of easily mobile materials or easily changeable materials.

As shown in FIG. 9-2, people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the jaw 122 in a relatively large area (excluding the front part of the cheek bone), as indicated in black, on both sides and possess pointed molars 125 that are sharp use a pillow 126 that can apply strong directional pressure in a large area within this fulcrum. The pillow 126 is made of easily mobile materials or easily changeable materials.

As shown in FIG. 9-3, people who have fulcrum area positioned at the jaw 122 (excluding the front portion of the cheek bone) in a small area, as indicated in black, and possess relatively flat (at the biting surface) molars 127 use a pillow 128 that can apply strong directional pressure in this fulcrum. The pillow 128 is made of relatively immobile materials or relatively unchangeable materials.

As shown in FIG. 94, people who do not have fulcrum area positioned at the jaw 122, or who have on one side this fulcrum area and possess extremely flat molars (gently sloping at the biting surface) use a pillow 130 that can not apply strong directional pressure in this fulcrum. The pillow 130 is made of substantially immobile materials or substantially unchangeable materials.

There is a relationship between the state of the teeth (e.g., the upper canines protrude from the teeth arch), fulcrum area positioned at the side portion of the head, and a pillow that is immobile and which the outer portion is high. FIG. 10 shows the relationship between the wideness of the fulcrum area positioned at the side of the head 132 and the conditions of teeth (the teeth arch where upper canines protrude 131) and the characteristics of a pillow 133 and 134. The pillow 133 becomes slowly high to the outer portions and becomes extremely stable when person make angle of the neck into about 55 degrees. The pillow 134 becomes strongly high at the outer portions, and that is immobile and becomes extremely stable when person make angle of the neck into about 100 degrees. However, it requires a condition that one does not possess the portion that relates the size of the upper anterior teeth and canines within the fulcrum area at the side of the neck, or one possesses the portion in a small area.

There is a relationship between the fulcrum area positioned at the upper side of the head, the upper teeth arch size, and the characteristics of the pillow. Also, there is a relationship between the fulcrum area positioned at the side of the neck (or head), the upper teeth arch size, and the characteristics of pillow. FIG. 11 shows the relationship between the fulcrum area above the side portion of the head 135 and the size of upper teeth arch, and the characteristics of a pillow, and the relationship between the fulcrum area at the side of the neck, and the size of the upper teeth arch, and the characteristics of a pillow.

As shown in FIG. 11-1, those who have the fulcrum area above the side portion of the head 135 all over the area and an upper teeth arch 136 that is extremely large use a pillow 137 that is immobile, low or extremely low. (They must not have fulcrum area positioned at the side of the neck.) The pillow 137 becomes extremely stable when person make angle of the neck into 0 degrees. As shown in FIG. 11-2, those who have the fulcrum area at the side of the neck 73 all over the area and an upper teeth arch 138 that is extremely small use a pillow 139 that is made easily mobile materials, or changeable materials. However, in this case, it requires a condition that one does not possess a fulcrum area above the side portion of the head.

There is a relationship between the upper teeth arch shape, fulcrum areas (on the back and top portion of the head, on the back and below the top portion of the head, at the upper portion of the protuberantia occipitalis ext., at the protuberantia occipitalis ext., and at the upper rear portion of the ear and at the side of the base of the neck) in specific form and the characteristics of pillow. FIG. 12 shows the relationship between the fulcrum area in the back portion of the shoulders, the lower, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips and the characteristics of a pillow, the relationship between the width of the fulcrum area in the back portion of the shoulders, the degrees of the lower, upper front teeth that slant toward the lips and the characteristics of a pillow, the relationship between the fulcrum area at the side part of the base of the neck, the lower, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the tongue and the characteristic of a pillow, and the relationship between the width of the fulcrum area at the side part of the base of the neck, the degrees of slant of the lower, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the tongue and the characteristics of a pillow when the breathing method during sleep is constantly through the nose. However, the upper teeth arch shape at the molars portion may differ depending on if one has a fulcrum area on the back and top portion of the head, on the back and below the top portion of the head, at the upper portion of the protuberantia occipitalis ext., or at the protuberantia occipitalis ext. and on its form.

As shown in FIG. 12-1, people who have an upper teeth arch shape 140 that is a horse-shoe possess any fulcrum area that is positioned at the back of the head (on the back and top portion of the head 12, on the back and below the top portion of the head 13, at the upper portion of the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 14, at the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 15), as indicated in black, use a pillow 141 where the central part is indented. In addition, people who have a flat upper rear portion of the head use a pillow 142 that is flat and extremely firm. These pillows 141 and 142 are the most stable when one has a neck angle of 0 degrees. For reference, the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 9 and vertebrae cervicales VII 10 are indicated.

As shown in FIG. 12-2, people who have an upper teeth arch shape 143 that is parabolic possess a fulcrum area positioned at the back of the head (on the back and top portion of the head 12, on the back and below the top portion of the head 13, at the upper portion of the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 14, at the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 15), as indicated in black, use a pillow 144 that excludes the central part. These people use a pillow 144 that is flat. This pillow 144 becomes the most stable when one has a neck angle of about 15 degrees.

As shown in FIG. 12-3, people who have an upper teeth arch shape 145 that is long and narrow possess a fulcrum area at the upper rear portion of the ear 146, as indicated in black. These people use a pillow where the outer portion is not high. This pillow 147 becomes most stable when one has a neck angle of about 30 degrees.

As shown in FIG. 124, people who have an upper teeth arch shape 148 that is narrow and widens at the molars possess a fulcrum area at the side of the head 132 (above the ear), as indicated in black. These people use a pillow 133 where the outer portion is high. This pillow 133 becomes most stable when has a neck angle of about 55 degrees.

As shown in FIG. 12-5, people who have the upper teeth arch shape 149 where the anterior teeth portion is narrow and widens strongly at the molars possess a fulcrum area at the side of the head 132 (covering a wide area above the ear excluding toward the temple), as indicated in black. These people use a pillow with an outer portion that is strongly high.

As shown in FIG. 12-6, people who have the upper teeth arch shape 150 where the anterior teeth (incisors) are flat and a fulcrum area that is positioned at the side of the base of the neck 151, as indicated in black, use a pillow 70 that allows one to embrace the pillow 70 by placing the pillow 70 between the shoulders and neck.

There is a relationship between a fulcrum area that is positioned at the side of the chin, overlap of molars and characteristics of pillow. As shown in FIG. 13-1, people who do not have a fulcrum area at the side 152 of the chin possess normal overlap of the molars 153 (the upper molars overlap the lower molars) use a pillow 154 or 156 that does not contact this fulcrum area. FIG. 13 shows the relationship between the details of a fulcrum area at the side of the chin, the overlap of the molars, and the characteristics of a pillow.

As shown in FIG. 13-2, people who have fulcrum area at the side of the chin 152 on the right side, as indicated in black, possess a cross bite 156 on the left side. These people use a soft pillow 157 that is easily changeable or relatively changeable.

As shown in FIG. 13-3, people who have a fulcrum area at the side of the chin 152 on the left side, as indicated in black, possess a cross bite 158 on the right side. These people use soft pillow 159 that is easily changeable or relatively changeable.

As shown in FIG. 13-4, people who have a fulcrum area at the side of the chin 152 on both sides (the right side and the left side), as indicated in black, possess a cross bite 160 on both sides (the right side and the left side). These people use a soft pillow 157 and 159 that is easily changeable or relatively changeable.

FIG. 14 shows when the upper and lower anterior teeth that slant to the lips or the tongue, the upper anterior teeth of the overlap (the vertical overlap and the horizontal overlap), and the upper and lower central incisors which the outer portions protrude toward the lips at a condition of breathing during sleep constantly through the nose.

As shown in FIG. 14-1, there is a, relationship between people who have a fulcrum area that is positioned in the back of the shoulders 161, as indicated in black, upper and lower anterior teeth 162 that slant toward the lips, and a large pillow 71 (in many cases, these people use many pillows). Also, there is a relationship between people who have a fulcrum area that is positioned at the side part of the base of the neck 51, the upper and lower anterior teeth 167 that slant toward the tongue, and the pillow that can be embraced by inserting the pillow between the shoulder and the neck.

FIG. 14 also shows a condition of breathing during sleep constantly through the nose and where another condition “wideness of fulcrum area” is added to people who have a fulcrum area positioned in the back portion of the shoulders or at the side part of the base of the neck. There is a relationship between the wideness of fulcrum area positioned in the back of the shoulders, the “degree” of slant of the upper and lower anterior teeth that slant toward the lips, and the characteristics of the pillow. Also, there is a relationship between the wideness of the fulcrum area positioned at the side part of the base of the neck, the “degree” of slant of the upper and lower front teeth that slant toward the tongue, and the characteristics of the pillow.

As shown in FIG. 14-2, people who have a fulcrum area in the back portion of the shoulders 161 all over the area, as indicated in black, possess the upper and lower anterior teeth 163 that slant extremely toward the lips. These people use a pillow 164 (in most cases, several pillows) that is large and contacts the shoulders to reach the lower portion.

As shown in FIG. 14-3, people who have a fulcrum area positioned in the back portion of the shoulders 161 in narrow area, as indicated in black, possess the upper and lower anterior teeth 165 that slant weakly toward the lips. These people use a pillow 165 (in most cases, several pillows.) that is large and contacts the upper back portion of the shoulders.

As shown in FIG. 144, people who have a fulcrum area position at the side part of the base of the neck 51, the lower and upper anterior teeth 167 that slant toward the tongue use a pillow 170 that can insert between the shoulder and neck. They can embrace the pillow 170.

As shown in FIG. 14-5, people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the base of the side of the neck 51 all over the area, as indicated in black, possess the upper and lower anterior teeth 169 that slant extremely toward the tongue. These people use a pillow 170 that everyone can embrace in a wide area by inserting the pillow 170 between the neck and shoulders.

As shown in FIG. 14-6, people who have a fulcrum area is positioned at the base of the side of the neck 51 in a narrow area, as indicated in black, possess the upper and lower anterior teeth 171 that slant extremely toward the tongue. These people use a pillow 172 that can be embraced in a narrow area by inserting the pillow 172 between the neck and shoulders.

FIG. 15 shows that on condition of breathing during sleep, there is a relationship between a fulcrum area positioned in the back portion of the shoulders and fulcrum area (on the back and top portion of the head, on the back and below the top portion of the head, above the protuberantia occipitalis ext., at the protuberantia occipitalis ext. and right above the vertebrae cervicales VII), the occlusions of the anterior teeth (normal occlusion, the vertical overlap of the upper anterior teeth, the horizontal overlap of the upper anterior teeth, the upper and lower anterior teeth that slant toward the lips and the upper central incisors where the outer edge twist and protrude toward the lips), and the characteristics of the pillow.

There is also a relationship between a fulcrum area positioned at the side portion of the base of the neck and fulcrum area at any of the following locations—on the back and top portion of the head, on the back and below the top portion of the head, above the protuberantia occipitalis ext., at the protuberantia occipitalis ext. and right above the vertebrae cervicales VII, the occlusions of front teeth (normal, vertical overlap of the upper anterior teeth, horizontal overlap of the upper anterior teeth, upper and lower anterior teeth that are slant toward the tongue, and upper central incisors where the outer edge of the tooth twist and protrude toward the lips), and the characteristics of the pillow.

FIG. 15-1 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned in the back portion of the shoulders 161 and a fulcrum area positioned immediately above the vertebrae cervicales VII 11 as primary fulcrum areas. For type RT-BN people, the upper and lower anterior teeth 192 slant toward the lips and form an edge-to-edge bite. For type RT-BN&BM people, either (1) the upper and lower anterior teeth 204 slant toward the lips, the upper central incisors where the outer part of the tooth twist toward the lips, and contact at the inner part of the tooth, where there is a gap between the upper and lower teeth at the outer part of the tooth or (2) the upper anterior teeth 206 slant toward the lips, the upper central incisors where the outer part of the tooth twist toward the lips, and contact at the inner part of the tooth, where there is narrow gap between the upper and lower teeth at the outer part of the tooth, and the vertical overlap that is relatively deep.

The person of FIG. 15-1 does not use pillows, and sleep where their head extends from the mattress 183, making the head contacts the floor (for these people, the mattress and the floor are a giant pillow).

FIG. 15-2 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned in the back portion of the shoulders 161 and a fulcrum area positioned on the back and top portion of the head 12 as primary fulcrum areas. However, it requires a condition where these people do not have fulcrum area positioned right above the vertebrae cervicales VII.

For type RT-BN people, the upper and lower anterior teeth 193 slant toward the lips and the vertical overlap is extremely shallow. The person of FIG. 15-2 uses a pillow 184 that is extremely large, relatively high, and extremely soft (in most cases, these people use several pillows).

FIG. 15-3 shows diagrams for people who have fulcrum area positioned in the back portion of the shoulders 161 and a fulcrum area positioned on the back and below the top portion of the head 13 as primary fulcrum areas. However, it requires a condition where these people do not have fulcrum area positioned right above the vertebrae cervicales VII.

The upper and lower anterior teeth 194 slant toward the lips and the vertical overlap is shallow for type RT-BN people. For type RT-BN&BM people, either (1) the upper and lower anterior teeth 205 slant toward the lips, the upper central incisors where the outer part of the tooth twist toward the lips, and contact at the inner part of the tooth, where there is narrow gap between the upper and lower teeth at the outer part of the tooth, and the vertical overlap is shallow or (2) the upper and lower anterior teeth 209 slant toward the lips, the horizontal overlap of the anterior teeth has a narrow space, and the vertical overlap is shallow.

The person of FIG. 15-3 uses a pillow 185 that is extremely large, relatively high, and soft (in most cases, these people use several pillows).

FIG. 15-4 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned in the back portion of the shoulders 161 and a fulcrum area positioned right above the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 14 and the back portion of the head as primary fulcrum areas. The upper and lower anterior teeth 195 slant toward the lips and the vertical overlap is relatively deep for type RT-BN people. For type RT-BM people, the upper and lower anterior teeth 201 slant toward the lips, horizontally overlap where there is a wide space and the vertical overlap is relatively deep.

For type RT-BN&BM people, either (1) the upper and lower anterior teeth 206 slant toward the lips, the upper central incisors where the outer part of the tooth twist toward the lips, and contact at the inner part of the tooth, where there is narrow gap between the upper and lower teeth at the outer part of the tooth, and the vertical overlap is shallow or (2) the upper and lower anterior teeth 210 slant toward the lips, horizontally overlap with narrow a space and the vertical overlap is relatively deep.

The person of FIG. 15-4 uses a pillow 186 that is large, high, relatively soft (in most cases, these people use several pillows).

FIG. 15-5 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned in the back portion of the shoulders 161 and a fulcrum area positioned at the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 15 as primary fulcrum areas. For type RT-BN people, the upper and lower anterior teeth 196 slant toward the lips and the vertical overlap is extremely deep. For type RT-BM people, the upper and lower anterior teeth 202 slant toward the lips, horizontally overlap where there is a wide space and the vertical overlap is extremely deep.

The person of FIG. 15-5 uses a pillow 187 that is large, extremely high, relatively hard, and length is relatively short (in most cases, these people use several pillows). Regarding FIGS. 15-1 to 15-5, for those who constantly breathe through the nose during sleep, there is a relationship between the fulcrum area in the back portion of the shoulders 161 and the fulcrum area just above the vertebrae cervicales VII 11, and the lower, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips. However, the degrees of the vertical overlap of the anterior teeth differ depending on the location of the fulcrum area as mentioned above.

In addition, for those who constantly breathe through the mouth during sleep, there is a relationship between the fulcrum area in the back portion of the shoulders 161 and the fulcrum area just above the vertebrae cervicales VII 11, and the lower, the formation the occlusion (upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips and the horizontal overlap that is wide space). However, the degrees of the vertical overlap of the anterior teeth differ depending on the location of the fulcrum area as mentioned above.

For those who breathe through the nose and mouth during sleep, there is a relationship between the fulcrum area in the back portion of the shoulders 161 and the fulcrum area just above the vertebrae cervicales VII 11, and the lower, the formation the occlusion (upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips and the horizontal overlap that is narrow space). When a person has had nose problems, they have the following occlusion. For those who have had nose problems up until around 7 years old, the occlusion is the upper central incisors where the outer part of the teeth twists toward the lips. For those who have had nose problems after the age of 8 years old, the occlusion is the upper anterior teeth that slant toward the lips and the weak open bite. However, the degrees of the vertical overlap of the anterior teeth differ depending on the location of the fulcrum area as mentioned above.

FIG. 15-6 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the side part of the base of the neck 51 and a fulcrum area positioned right above the vertebrae cervicales VII 11 as primary fulcrum areas.

FIG. 15-7 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the side part of the base of the neck 51 and fulcrum areas positioned on the back and top portion of the head 12 and on the back and below the top portion of the head 13 as primary fulcrum areas. However, it requires a condition where these people do not have fulcrum area positioned right above the vertebrae cervicales VII.

For type RT-BN people, the upper and lower anterior teeth 197 slant toward the tongue and the vertical overlap is extremely shallow. The people use pillow 188 that allows one to embrace, placing the pillow between the shoulders and neck. The pillow 188 is extremely low and soft.

FIG. 15-8 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the side part of the base of the neck 51 and a fulcrum area positioned on the back and below the top portion of the head 13 as primary fulcrum areas. For type RT-BN people, the upper and lower anterior teeth 198 slant toward the tongue and the vertical overlap is shallow. The pillow 189 used allows one to embrace, placing the pillow between the shoulders and neck. The pillow 189 is low or extremely low, and soft.

FIG. 15-9 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the side part of the base of the neck 51 and a fulcrum area positioned right above the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 14 and the back portion of the head as primary fulcrum areas. For RT-BN people, the upper and lower anterior teeth 199 slant toward the tongue and the vertical overlap is relatively deep.

For type RT-BN&BM people, either (1) the lower anterior teeth 207 slant toward the tongue, are vertical lower anterior teeth, the upper central incisors where the outer part of the tooth twist toward the lips, and contact at the inner part of the tooth, where there is narrow gap between the upper and lower teeth at the outer part of the tooth, and the vertical overlap is relatively deep or (2) the lower anterior teeth 211 slant toward the lips, are the vertical upper anterior teeth, horizontally overlap with a narrow space and the vertical overlap is relatively deep. For people of FIG. 15-9, the pillow 190 allows one to embrace, placing the pillow between the shoulders and neck. The pillow 190 is relatively high, relatively firm, and made of firm materials.

FIG. 15-10 shows diagrams for people who have a fulcrum area positioned at the side part of the base of the neck 51 and a fulcrum area positioned at the right above the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 15 as primary fulcrum areas. For type RT-BN people, the upper and lower anterior teeth 200 slant toward the tongue and the vertical overlap is extremely deep. For type RT-BM people, the upper and lower anterior teeth 203 slant toward the tongue, are vertical upper anterior teeth, horizontally overlap where there is a wide space and the vertical overlap is extremely deep.

For type RT-BN&BM people, the lower anterior teeth 212 slant toward the lips, are vertical upper anterior teeth, horizontally overlap with a narrow space and the vertical overlap is extremely deep. The pillow 191 allows one to embrace, placing the pillow between the shoulders and neck. The pillow 191 is high or extremely high, relatively firm, and length is relatively short.

Regarding FIGS. 15-6 to 15-10, for those who constantly breathe through the nose during sleep, there is a relationship between the fulcrum area at the side part of the base of the neck 51 and at any of the rear portion of the head (on the back and top portion of the head 12, on the back and below the top portion of the head 13, above the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 14 and at the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 15) and the fulcrum area just above the vertebrae cervicales VII 11, the lower, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the tongue. However, the degrees of the vertical overlap of the anterior teeth differ depending on the location of the fulcrum area as mentioned above.

In addition, for those who constantly breathe through the mouth during sleep, there is a relationship between the fulcrum area at the side part of the base of the neck 51 and at any of the rear portion of the head (on the back and top portion of the head 12, on the back and below the top portion of the head 13, above the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 14 and at the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 15) and the fulcrum area just above the vertebrae cervicales VII 11, the lower, upper anterior teeth that slant toward the tongue. However, the degrees of the vertical overlap of the anterior teeth differ depending on the location of the fulcrum area as mentioned above.

For those who breathe through the nose and mouth during sleep, the relationship is confirmed between the fulcrum area at the side part of the base of the neck 51 and the fulcrum area just above the vertebrae cervicales VII 11, and the lower, the formation the occlusion (upper anterior teeth that slant toward the tongue and the horizontal overlap that is narrow space). When a person has had nose problems, they have following occlusion. For those who have had nose problems up until around 7 years old, the occlusion is the upper anterior teeth that is vertical, the lower anterior teeth that slant toward the tongue and the upper central incisors where the outer part of the teeth twists toward the lips. For those who have had nose problems after the age of 8 years old, the occlusion is the upper anterior teeth that is vertical, the lower anterior teeth that slant toward the tongue, the upper central incisors where the outer part of the teeth twists toward the lips and the weak open bite. However, the degrees of the vertical overlap of the anterior teeth differ depending on the location of the fulcrum area as mentioned above.

On a condition of breathing during sleep, the following relationships between the characteristics of a similar pillow, similar repose of the head and neck while sleeping and similar occlusion exist:

1. Their repose (R-HN) during sleep

(R-HN)

They all have similar “pillow contact area” map-like pattern and furthermore have similar fulcrum areas within this map-like pattern.

(R-MS)

Their jaw does not make any contact while sleeping.
2. The characteristic of their occlusion:

a. Large teeth

b. Short upper anterior teeth

c. Molars with relatively flat biting surface

d. Teeth layout is very proportioned

e. Relatively shallow vertical overlap of the upper teeth

f. Upper teeth arch with large parabolic shape

g. Normal overlap of the molars

h. Vertical anterior teeth—only for those who breathe through the nose while sleeping.

3. The occlusion for those who breathe through the nose while sleeping is very similar to the occlusion of the Aborigines before they made contact with Western civilization.
Example: For group HC (see FIG. 2), one normally uses an extremely low pillow, but at times, does not use a pillow.

There is correlation between the people who have a fulcrum area that is positioned at the side of the neck and insufficient tooth/teeth and switching the pillow to that with very different characteristics during one's growth period. There is also a correlation between switching the pillow that requires the arm or hand(s) to create the pressure necessary to one's “area of contact and stabilization with the pillow” to a pillow that does not create the necessary pressure even when using the arm or hands during one's growth period and the appearance of insufficient tooth/teeth. Using a proper pillow will aid in preventing the appearance of insufficient tooth/teeth. The following problems listed below may be prevented or at least minimized.

1. Upper Second Incisors (Insufficient Teeth)

When the pillow is switched from extremely low and relatively soft to relatively high and relatively firm (period when switch occurs: 5 years old)

2. Upper Canines (Insufficient Teeth)

When the pillow is switched from relatively high and relatively firm to relatively high and firm (period when change occurs: 6 years old)

3. Upper First Small Molar (Insufficient Tooth)

When the pillow is switched from relatively high and relatively firm to extremely low, flat, and relatively soft (period when switch occurs: 8 years old)

4. Upper Second Small Molar (Insufficient Tooth)

When the pillow is switched from relatively high and relatively firm to extremely low, flat, and relatively soft (period when switch occurs: 8 years old)
5. Upper third large molars (insufficient teeth)
When the mattress is changed from firm mattress to soft mattress (period when switch occurs: 14 years old)

6. Lower First Small Molars (Insufficient Teeth)

When the pillow is switched from relatively high and relatively firm pillow to extremely low, flat, and relatively soft pillow (period when switch occurs: 8 years old)

7. Lower Second Small Molars (Insufficient Teeth)

When the pillow is switched from relatively high and relatively firm to extremely low, flat and relatively soft pillow (period when switch occurs: 8 years old)

8. Lower Third Large Molars (Insufficient Teeth)

When the pillow is switched from relatively high and relatively firm to extremely low, flat and relatively soft pillow (period when switch occurs: 8 years old)

Function for Maintenance of Repose

Every individual develops and maintains one's own repose of the head during sleep unconsciously. Based on the vertical overlap of the upper (or lower) anterior teeth, horizontal overlap of the upper (or lower) anterior teeth, size of teeth, and length of upper anterior teeth and a biological standpoint, the reason for this is due to the fact that all living bodies possess a function for maintaining repose that reacts to one's physiological genes. This function is an inevitable reactive function that all living creatures within gravitational forces possess to acquire rest, which is a physiological need necessary to all living creatures. The purpose of this feature is to immobilize the particular functioning portions, which occurs unconsciously during sleep or by the act of maintaining repose that relies on some physical method that is based on the physiological condition that controls the emergence of repose of the head while sleep. This feature enables one to develop a form to physiologically cancel the earth's gravity to all functioning portions (during sleep) or parts of the functioning portion (during rest). However, this physiological condition is a unique condition for all living creatures excluding humans. For humans, it is a unique condition that exists by functionality. Furthermore, for humans, repose formed from this function for rest and for sleep are totally different forms. This is because for humans that stand upright, the physiological conditions differ between rest and sleep.
The existence of these reactive functions can be proven from the following facts:
1. For all living creatures, repose while sleep is a form of physiologically canceling the earth's gravitational forces. Repose cannot be attained just by defying gravitational forces.
2. For humans, each person can form repose by creating one's unique form while sleeping. This unique form to each individual physiologically cancels the earth's gravity, and this unique form is also created by each functional part of each individual. However, in nature, all living creatures, with the exception of human beings, have a common form for this certain species. Hence, for humans, it is a unique form for each individual, whereas for other living species, it is common form for this species.
3. In order for humans to maintain repose while sleep, each individual performs a “repose maintaining act” within each functional part following one's physiological condition, and must relax all motor muscles in all functional parts. There are three types with different characteristics to achieve this act.

a. Contact stabilization method, where a certain area of the functional part makes contact and is stabilized. All functional parts with the exception of the masticatory system are done in this method.

b. Tongue contact stabilization and ligament method, which uses the masticatory system.

c. Tongue contact stabilization and ligament and jaw method, which uses the masticatory system. Due to the existence of this function, almost all humans during sleep, even while they turn over in their sleep, will always develop one's (R-HN) by making contact with the pillow, changing its shape or inserting their arm under it. By doing so, one can apply directional tolerance pressure to one's map like patter area as needed.

However, for some, they can apply this pressure by making contact directly with the mattress or floors. This is because there are those who can attain tolerance pressure levels by using pillows, and those who cannot by using pillows. Also, if one happens to go on a trip and stays in a hotel where the pillow cannot satisfy one's physiological condition, then one will not be able to attain repose no matter how hard one tries. One will never be able to regain from fatigue. This is because the function to maintain repose cannot function properly and is the reason why one cannot sometimes sleep well when one changes pillows.

Operating Factors

Based on the shape of the molars and the state of the teeth, the existence of two reactive factors that form one's occlusion are:

1. Operating Factor Originating from (R-HN):

This operating factor is the fulcrum area group that can be observed as a mosaic-like pattern on the epidermis of the head and neck where at times may include the back and the shoulders (FIG. 16-1). FIG. 16 shows the 15 kinds of the fulcrum area which exists like mosaic on the skin of the head, the neck and in the back portion of the shoulders that react to strong directional pressure applied constantly within a specific fulcrum area while sleeping during the growth stage, and that the fulcrum area at the right (or left) side of the neck is divided into 16 areas that react to strong directional pressure that is applied constantly within specific fulcrum areas while sleeping during the growth stage This causes the right (or left) specific tooth (16 kinds of permanent teeth, 10 kinds of milk teeth) to become small.

The fulcrum areas excluding the side portion of the chin control the unique feature that specifically forms the specific physiological gene not related to the breathing pattern while sleeping. This formation occurs in a specific method, reacting to strong directional pressure that is applied constantly within specific fulcrum areas while sleeping during the growth stage.

However, the method of how these fulcrum areas operate differs depending on the location of fulcrum area. Also, most fulcrum areas do not have the conditions regarding functions, but some fulcrum areas have conditions, such as priority or that it must exist on both sides in order to operate. Furthermore, the degree of how these fulcrum areas operate with the physiological gene differ based on the wideness of the fulcrum area, and the details differ based on where it is located within the fulcrum area. Among these fulcrum areas, the area at the side of the neck is special (FIGS. 16-2 and 16-3).

As shown in FIG. 16-1, within these fulcrum areas, the 15 variations of individual areas that function during one's growth period to form one's occlusion are as follows.

213 (12): This fulcrum area that is positioned on the back and upper portion of the head causes the vertical overlap of the upper anterior teeth that is extremely shallow. However, nobody must have fulcrum area positioned right above the vertebrae cervicales VII. This fulcrum area that exclude the central portion causes the upper teeth arch shape that is parabolic, but this fulcrum area that include the central portion causes the upper teeth arch shape that is horseshoe. However, nobody must have fulcrum area positioned at the side portion of the head.
214(135): This fulcrum area that is positioned above the side portion of the head causes the size of the upper teeth arch that is large. However, these people who have fulcrum area that is positioned at the side of the neck, but who do not have fulcrum area that is positioned at the side of the neck in a wide area possess this size that is extremely large.
215(132): This fulcrum area that is positioned at the side portion of the head causes the upper teeth arch shape which the anterior teeth portion is narrow, and widens at the molars portion.
216(13): This fulcrum area that is positioned on the back and below the top portion of the head causes the vertical overlap of the upper anterior teeth that is shallow. The portion that exclude the central portion within this fulcrum area causes the upper teeth arch shape that is parabolic, but the portion that include the central portion within this fulcrum area causes the shape that is horseshoe. However, nobody must have fulcrum area positioned at the side portion of the head.
217(14): This fulcrum area that is positioned above the protuberantia occipitalis ext. causes the vertical overlap of the upper anterior teeth that is relatively deep. This fulcrum area that exclude the central portion causes the upper teeth arch shape that is parabolic, but the portion that include the central portion within this fulcrum area causes the shape that is horseshoe. However, nobody must have fulcrum area that is positioned at the side portion of the head.
218(73): The fulcrum area that is positioned at the side of the neck is classified into 16 kinds of portions on each side of the right and the left that causes 16 teeth to become small. The specific portion causes the specific tooth to become small on each side of the right and the left. (FIGS. 16-2 and 16-3). Also, this fulcrum area causes the upper teeth arch shape to become small.
219(15): This fulcrum area that is positioned at the protuberantia occipitalis ext. causes the vertical overlap of the upper anterior teeth to be extremely deep. The portion that exclude the central portion within this fulcrum area causes the upper teeth arch shape that is parabolic, but the portion that include the central portion within this fulcrum area causes the shape that is horse-shoe. However, nobody must have fulcrum area that is positioned at the side of the head.
220(115): This fulcrum area that is positioned at the upper portion of the neck causes the upper anterior teeth to become short. However, these people who have this fulcrum area in a wide area possess the upper anterior teeth that are extremely short, but who have fulcrum area in a narrow area possess the upper anterior teeth that are longer. These people who do not have this fulcrum area possess the upper anterior teeth that are extremely long.
221(16): This fulcrum area that is positioned at the central portion of the neck causes reversed occlusion. However, these people who have this fulcrum area at the right (or left) side possess the reversed occlusion of the right (left) anterior tooth or two of the right (left) anterior teeth.
222(11): This fulcrum area that is positioned immediately above the vertebrae cervicales VII causes the edge-to-edge bite. However, these people who have this fulcrum area at the side portion of right side (or left) possess the edge-to-edge bite at the portion of the right (or left) anterior tooth or at the two portions of the right (or left) anterior teeth.
223(151): This fulcrum area that is positioned at the side portion of the base of the neck causes the upper and lower anterior teeth slant toward the tongue. This fulcrum area causes the upper teeth arch shape where the anterior teeth portion is flat.
224(161): This fulcrum area that is positioned in the back portion of the shoulders causes the upper and lower anterior teeth slant toward the lips.
225(122): This fulcrum area that is positioned at the jaw causes the molars that are pointed. However, everyone must have this fulcrum area positioned on both sides. The people who have this fulcrum area in a wide area possess extremely pointed molars, but those who have this fulcrum area in a narrow area possess flat molars.
226(152): This fulcrum area that is positioned at the side of the chin causes cross bite. However, the people who have this fulcrum area on the right (or left) side possess the one side (the right side or the left side) of a cross bite, but those who have this fulcrum area on both sides (the right side and the left side) possess a cross bite on both sides.
227(146): This fulcrum area that is positioned at the upper rear portion of the ear causes the upper teeth arch shape that is long and narrow. However, nobody must have fulcrum area that is positioned at the side portion of the head.

The portion that overlaps between the fulcrum areas 218(73) and 220 (115) requires different directional pressure (the reason why is because this portion is easily changeable).

As shown in FIGS. 16-2 and 16-3, the fulcrum area at the right (or left) side of the neck is divided into 16 areas that react to strong directional pressure that is applied constantly within specific fulcrum areas while sleeping during the growth stage, which causes the right (or left) specific tooth (16 kinds of permanent teeth, 10 kinds of milk teeth) to become small and the specific right (or left) portion (16 portions for permanent teeth, 10 portions for milk teeth) (from the rear right side view). For reference, the protuberantia occipitalis ext. 9 and vertebrae cervicales VII 10 are indicated. These 16 areas, where the black colored areas relate to the size of the lower tooth and the white colored areas relate to the size of the upper tooth, include:

228(91): This portion causes the upper right central incisor (in the case of a milk tooth, the right milk central incisor) to become small.
229(92): This portion causes the lower right central incisor (in the case of a milk tooth, the right milk central incisor) to become small.
230(93): This portion causes the upper right second incisor (in the case of a milk tooth, the right milk second incisor) to become small.
231(94): This portion causes the lower right second incisor (in the case of a milk tooth, the right milk second incisor) to become small.
232(95): This portion causes the upper right canine (in the case of a milk tooth, the right milk canine) to become small.
233(96): This portion causes the lower right canine (in the case of a milk tooth, the right milk canine) to become small.
234(97): This portion causes the upper right first small molar (in the case of a milk tooth, the right milk first molar) to become small.
235(98): This portion causes the lower right first small molar (in the case of a milk tooth, the right milk first molar) to become small.
236(99): This portion causes the upper right second small molar (in the case of a milk tooth, the right milk second molar) to become small.
237(100): This portion causes the lower right second small molar (in the case of a milk tooth, the right milk second molar) to become small.
238(101): This portion causes the upper right first large molar to become small.
239(102): This portion causes the lower right first large molar to become small.
240(103): This portion causes the upper right second large molar to become small.
240(104): This portion causes the lower right second large molar to become small.
242(105): This portion causes the upper right third large molar to become small.
243(106): This portion causes the lower right third large molar to become small.

Also, the direction of pressure required within each fulcrum area is location specific (FIG. 17). FIG. 17 shows “the specific strong directional pressure unique to the portion” that is necessary at the 14 fulcrum areas (except the side of the neck) and “the specific strong directional pressure unique to the position” that is necessary for the specific portion of the fulcrum area at the side of the neck divided into 8 portions.

As shown in FIG. 17-1, the 14 fulcrum areas (except the side of the neck) include:

244. The strong directional pressure that is necessary to the central part of the fulcrum area located on the back and upper portion of the head, is a pressure that is exerted toward the center of the mouth (or nose), but the pressure necessary for the side part of this fulcrum area is pressure that is exerted toward the side of the mouth (or nose).
245: The strong directional pressure that is necessary to the upper part of the fulcrum area located above the side portion of the head is a pressure that is exerted toward the side of the mouth, but the pressure necessary for lower side of this fulcrum area is pressure that is exerted toward the side of the nose.
246: The strong directional pressure that is necessary to the portion close to the forehead of the fulcrum area located at the side portion of the head, is a pressure that is exerted toward the ear of the opposite side, but the pressure necessary for upper side of the ear is pressure that is exerted toward the side of the nose.
247: The strong directional pressure that is necessary the fulcrum area located on the back and below the top portion of the head is a pressure that is exerted toward forehead.
248: The strong directional pressure that is necessary to the central part of the fulcrum area located above the protuberantia occipitalis ext. is a pressure that is exerted toward the nose, but the pressure necessary for side portion of this area is pressure that is exerted toward the cheekbones.
249: The strong directional pressure that is necessary to the central part of the fulcrum area that is located at the protuberantia occipitalis ext., is a pressure that is exerted toward the center of the top of the head, but the pressure necessary to the side portion of this fulcrum area is pressure that is exerted toward the opposite top of the head.
250: The strong directional pressure that is necessary to the central part of the fulcrum area that is located at the upper portion of the neck, is a pressure that is exerted toward the mouth, but the pressure necessary to the side portion of this fulcrum area is pressure that is exerted toward the cheek of the same side.
251: The strong directional pressure that is necessary to the central part of the fulcrum area that is located at the central part of the neck, is a pressure that is exerted toward the upper part center portion of the throat, but the pressure necessary to the side portion of this fulcrum area is pressure that is exerted toward the side portion of the upper part center portion of the throat of the same side.
252: The strong directional pressure that is necessary to the central part of the fulcrum area that is located immediately above the vertebrae cervicales VII, is a pressure that is exerted toward the center of the chest, but the pressure necessary to the side portion of this fulcrum area is pressure that is exerted toward the side portion of the chest.
253: The strong directional pressure that is necessary for the fulcrum area that is located at the side of the base of the neck is pressure that is exerted toward the side of the chest.
254. The strong directional pressure that is necessary for the fulcrum area that is located in the back portion of the shoulders is pressure that is exerted toward the collar bone or lower part of the collar bone.
255: The strong directional pressure that is necessary to the bottom part of the fulcrum area at the jaw, is a pressure that is exerted toward the opposite molars, but the pressure necessary to the cheek bone portion of this fulcrum area is pressure that is exerted toward the opposite ear's rear side.
256: The strong directional pressure that is necessary for the fulcrum area that is located at the side of the chin is pressure that is exerted toward the molars of the opposite side molars.
257: The strong directional pressure that is necessary for the fulcrum area that is located at the upper rear portion of the ear is pressure that is exerted toward the opposite forehead.

Each individual has different quantity and forms of these fulcrum areas in unique locations. This is why one's occlusion is very unique among each individual. However, the only period where this fulcrum area group functions as an operating factor is during one's growth period.

As shown in FIG. 17-2, the 8 portions include:

258: The strong directional pressure that is necessary for the fulcrum area that makes the upper and lower middle incisors small is pressure that is exerted toward the opposite eye.
259: The strong directional pressure that is necessary for the fulcrum area that makes the upper and lower side incisors small is pressure that is exerted toward the opposite forehead.
260: The strong directional pressure that is necessary for the fulcrum area that makes the upper and lower canine small is pressure that is exerted toward the side of the moth of the opposite side.
261: The strong directional pressure that is necessary for the fulcrum area that makes the upper and lower first small molars small is pressure that is exerted toward the eye of the same side.
262: The strong directional pressure that is necessary for the fulcrum area that makes the upper and lower second small molars small is pressure that is exerted toward the area between the eye and nose of the same side.
263: The strong directional pressure that is necessary for the fulcrum area that makes the upper and lower first large molars small is pressure that is exerted toward the lower part of the eye of the same side.
264: The strong directional pressure that is necessary for the fulcrum area that makes the upper and lower second large molars small is pressure that is exerted toward the upper part of the eye of the same side.
265: The strong directional pressure that is necessary for the fulcrum area that makes the upper and lower third large molars small is pressure that is exerted toward the nose of the same side.
2. Operating Factor Originating from (R-MS):

This operating factor is the strong directional pressure occurring at the contact portion of the tongue during contact and stabilization of the tongue. This occurs during one's growth period. The contact and stabilization of the tongue during this growth period develops constant weak directional pressure between the tongue's specific area and the contact portion. However, this weak pressure is not the main operating factor that causes uniqueness in one's occlusion. This pressure is unique to every individual, and the place where it develops and the number of times it develops differs from one person to another. Not only that, this pressure is developed in three different ways, and each method and direction is different. However, this pressure, once past one's growth period, becomes a weak pressure similar to the surrounding pressure, and does not function anymore as an operating factor.

a. Strong Pressure Caused by Fulcrum Area

This pressure develops from the pressure of the tongue's specific portion, but is not developed constantly. It is a very special pressure that is formed during the “contact and stabilization of the tongue”. Not only that, the position and direction of this pressure differs depending on the fulcrum area as follows.

For fulcrum areas that control the degree of vertical overlap of the front teeth, this pressure is formed between the central front portion of the tongue, where it is in an amoeba state, and the upper and lower anterior teeth biting edge, and operates in an up/down direction. This pressure develops in all individuals, and forms vertical occlusions of the front teeth. The strength of this pressure differs slightly depending on where one's fulcrum area is positioned. When this pressure is relatively strong, one's vertical overlap of the front teeth is deep. However, when this pressure is strong, the vertical overlap is shallow.

For fulcrum areas that are positioned at the side part of the base of the neck, this pressure is formed between the inner portions of the tongue as mentioned above and the root portion of the upper and lower anterior teeth, and operates toward the lips. This pressure is developed by those whose fulcrum area is positioned at the portion and causes the upper and lower anterior teeth to slant toward the tongue.

For fulcrum areas that are positioned at the back portion of the shoulder, this pressure is formed at the upper and lower anterior biting edge portion and the inner portions of the tongue as mentioned above, and operates toward the lips. This pressure is developed by those who have this fulcrum area and causes the upper and lower anterior teeth to slant toward the lips.

For fulcrum areas that are positioned at the central part of the neck, this pressure is formed at the inner portions of the tongue as mentioned above and the area between the central part of the lower anterior teeth toward the chin, and operates toward the lips. This pressure causes reversed occlusions, and develops by those whose fulcrum area is positioned at this area.

b. Strong Pressure Caused by Differences in Breathing Method while Sleeping

This pressure is formed at the central part of the tongue and specific parts of the front teeth, and operates in a specific direction. However, the place where this pressure develops and the direction where this pressure operates is different and is determined by the formation of one's fulcrum area and one's “contact and stabilization of the tongue.” During sleep, for type RT-BM people who constantly breathe through the mouth, this pressure is developed by their thick tongue. However, the thicker the tongue, the stronger the pressure is developed. For this reason, this pressure for some people develops as extremely strong pressure close to the lips and pushes the upper anterior teeth biting edge portion outwards. For some people, it develops as extremely strong pressure that pushes the upper anterior teeth biting edge portion upwards, or as extremely strong pressure that pushes both the upper anterior teeth biting edge portion and occlusion surface of the small molars upward. These pressures cause extreme open bite and wide horizontal overlap.

For type RT-BN&BM people who repeat nose and mouth breathing during sleep, this pressure develops between the cylinder-shaped tongue portion and specific parts of the front teeth. This pressure, depending on the person, operates in an upward direction at the upper anterior biting edge portion. For some, it pushes the outer edge portions of the upper central incisors toward the lips, and for others, it pushes the upper anterior teeth biting edge portion toward the lips. These pressures cause narrow horizontal overlap, weak open bite, and specific occlusion of the upper anterior teeth. However, for type RT-BN people who breathe through the nose while sleeping, this type of pressure does not develop.

c. Strong Pressure Caused by the Tongue's Weight

This pressure develops mainly between the rear portion of the tongue that has expanded due to the earth's gravity and the molars, where it widens the teeth arch. This pressure is unique to every individual, and the place where it develops and the number of times it develops differs from one person to another. The difference is due to the relationship between the earth's gravitational forces and the three-dimensional position of the jaw formed from one's “contact stabilization area with the pillow.”

One's occlusion is determined by one's breathing patterns during sleep and one's fulcrum areas that exist in the area of contact with the pillow. It is formed during one's growth period by the following methods.

1. Vertical Overlap of the Upper Anterior Teeth, Reversed Occlusion, the Upper and Lower Anterior Teeth Slanting Toward the Lips and the Upper and Lower Anterior Teeth Slanting Toward the Tongue

While sleeping during one's growth period, the epidermis of the area located at the specific area recognizes one's fulcrum area form when pressure is applied and transmits this information to the living body, reacting to strong directional pressure constantly applied by the pillow, mattress or hand (arm). Based on this information, the living body begins to form the tongue, which performs a physical stabilization act physiological property in a shape that exerts strong pressure in specific area of the tongue. This tongue reflects one's fulcrum area.

The tongue that is formed in this manner exerts pressure during “stabilization by contact”. This pressure forms the tongue into an anatomical form mentioned above and also reflects one's fulcrum areas in the specific area.

2. Teeth Size, Length of Upper Anterior Teeth, and Shape of Molars

During one's growth period, the epidermis of the fulcrum areas at the specific area transmits this information to the living body in a similar method as (1) above. The living body transmits this information to the embryo of the teeth at its growth stage. These anatomical factors are formed based this fulcrum area information unique to each individual.

3. Upper Anterior Teeth Arch Size

During one's growth period, the epidermis of the fulcrum area that determines the size of the upper anterior teeth arch transmits this information to the living body in a similar method as (1) above. The living body forms upper anterior teeth arch size based on one's fulcrum area information.

4. Upper Teeth Arch Shape

This anatomical factor is formed by the act of contact and stabilization of the tongue that is strongly affected by the earth's gravity. During sleep, each person, due to a repose function peculiar to individuals, unconsciously stabilizes portions of the head with items which satisfy one's physiological conditions, such as the pillow, in a three dimensional angle. Thus, all individuals are forced to constantly sleep in one's unique sleeping form. Depending on the individual, when sleeping in one's unique sleeping form, along with the pillow, one constantly uses the hand or part of the arm. During this, within one's mouth, contact and stabilization of the tongue occurs within one's third-dimensional position of the jaw and constantly develops weak directional pressure where the tongue makes contact. However, this act during one's growth period constantly forms strong directional pressure at the expanded portion of the tongue affected by the earth's gravity or the expanded and shrunk portions of the contact of the tongue portion. This act is unique among individuals.

These pressures act upon the tongue where it makes contact and forms various formations to this anatomical factor. The basic anatomical factor comprises the following 5 forms. In the case of a horse-shoe shaped arch, for those whose fulcrum area is positioned at the portion of the back of the head, including the central part, when they sleep facing up, they will sleep in a position where they are facing straight forward. Those who fall under this type do not twist their neck when sleeping. This sleeping position causes the tongue that is making contact and stabilization to shrink and causes the rear portion of the tongue to expand. This portion that has expanded causes strong pressure and causes this formation.

In the case of a parabolic shaped arch, for those whose fulcrum area is positioned excluding the central portion of the back of the head, when they sleep facing up, they will always sleep with their spine and chin slightly twisted to either side and with their neck slightly twisted. This sleeping position causes a portion of the tongue to drop and sink, therefore causing the rear portion of the tongue to further expand, more than mentioned above. This portion that has expanded causes strong pressure and causes this formation.

In the case of a teeth arch where it is narrow at the front portion and widens at the molars, for those whose fulcrum area is positioned at the side portion of the head, they constantly tend to sleep sideways, making strong contact at the portion above the ears with the pillow. This sleeping position causes the tongue to expand toward the rear molars and become narrow at the front teeth portion. Pressure that is formed at various portions of the tongue causes this formation.

In the case of a teeth arch where it is narrow at the front portion and widens strongly at the molars, for those whose fulcrum area is positioned at the side portion of the head above the ears spreading to the forehead, they tend to sleep sideways, constantly making strong contact of the temple rather than the upper ear portion with the pillow. Furthermore, the body is angled inwards. This sleeping position causes the tongue to strongly expand toward the molars and become narrow at the front teeth portion. Pressure that is formed at various portions of the tongue causes this formation.

In the case of a teeth arch that is flat at the upper 4 incisors, for those whose fulcrum area is positioned at the base portion of the neck, they constantly tend to sleep twisting their neck to the left (or right) when facing upwards. Sleeping in this form causes the tongue to drop toward the left (or right) at the front anterior teeth, making the central tongue portion thin where it contacts the central part of the front anterior teeth. The tongue expands where it makes contact with the canine. Pressure that is formed at various portions of the tongue causes this formation.

5. State of Teeth

In the case of an upper anterior teeth arch shape where the upper canine protrudes from the upper arch, this occlusion occurs for those who have a fulcrum area that is related to the inverse relationship between teeth size and the upper anterior teeth arch shape. When one's fulcrum area is positioned at the side portion of the head, the upper teeth arch shape is narrow at the front and widens at the molars. However, in the case of those who fall under this type and their fulcrum area is not positioned at the side of the neck, their teeth size is large. As a result, the last canine that protrudes does not have enough room, and causes the canine to protrude from the arch.

6. Cross Bite—Irregular Overlap of Molars

This occlusion occurs to those who sleep by constantly contacting the side portion of the chin with the pillow. In this sleeping form, one constantly makes the side portion of the chin make contact with the pillow causes the jaw to move in the opposite direction (outwards). Under this condition, when the molars are growing out, the overlap of molars is determined by the jaw that has moved outwards. As a result, the overlap of the molars that has moved outwards is in reverse relationship than normal condition. However, for those who have a cross bite on both the left and right side, this occlusion occurs for those who constantly sleep on the right side, constantly making the right portion of the chin contact the pillow. When they sleep on the left side, the left side portion of the chin is constantly making contact with the pillow.

7. Wide Horizontal Overlap of Upper (Lower) Anterior Teeth and Extreme Open Bite

These occlusions are formed by the “contact and stabilization of the tongue” under type RT-BM when one breathes through the mouth when sleeping. However, their tongue is thick.

When type RT-BM of the “act of stabilization of the tongue” occurs around the age of 7 when the upper anterior teeth is growing out, a strong pressure develops at the central portion of the tongue that makes contact with the upper anterior teeth. This directional pressure is determined and affected by the fulcrum area that determines one's vertical overlap. For this reason, for those whose fulcrum area is positioned right above the vertebrae cervicales VII, this pressure becomes strong pressure that pushes the upper anterior teeth upwards. For those whose fulcrum area is positioned in other specific fulcrum areas, this pressure becomes strong pressure that pushes the upper anterior teeth outwards.

As a result, for those who have a fulcrum area right above the vertebrae cervicales VII, this directional pressure causes wide gaps in the upper and lower teeth, and causes extreme open bite. On the other hand, for those who have a fulcrum area positioned in other specific fulcrum areas, this directional pressure moves the upper anterior teeth outward, and at the same time, causes wide gaps in the upper and lower teeth and causes wide horizontal overlap of upper anterior teeth.

8. The Outer Edges of the Upper Central Incisors Twisting Toward the Lips

This occlusion is formed by those who repeatedly breathe through the nose and mouth while sleeping and also by contact by stabilization of the tongue around the age of 7 years old. However, these people perform this act as type RT-BN&BM.

Around the age of 7 years old, although the upper centric incisors have grown out, the roots of the teeth are still in the development stage, and also, it is a period where the teeth next to them do not still exist. For this reason, when the act of stabilization of the tongue occurs as type RT-BN&BM, a strong pressure develops that pushes the distal portion of the upper centric incisor toward the lips. The cylinder shape tongue causes this. This directional pressure causes the medial portion of the upper central incisor to twist toward the lips and causes this occlusion. This occlusion allows one to breathe through the mouth.

9. Narrow Horizontal Overlap of the Upper Incisors and Weak Open Bite

This occlusion is formed by those who repeatedly breathe through the nose and mouth while sleeping who has developed nose infections around the age of 9 years old, and also by contact and stabilization of the tongue by type RT-BN&BM that has started around the age of 9 years old. After the age of 9 years old, the centric incisors and the teeth next to them have already grown, and the root of the teeth have already developed, or are almost developed. For this reason, when the stabilization of the tongue is done by type RT-BN&BM, a strong pressure that constantly pushes the upper 4 incisors toward the lips develops. This is caused by the cylinder shape tongue.

This pressure enables one to form a respiratory tract. Also, since this act is dependent on the fulcrum area that determines one's vertical overlap, for those whose fulcrum area is located directly above the vertebrae cervicales VII, this strong pressure pushes the upper incisors upward.

As a result, for those who have a fulcrum area related to the edge-to-edge bite, this strong directional pressure forms small gaps between the upper and lower teeth and causes weak open bite. On the other hand, for those who have a fulcrum area that determines the degree of vertical overlap in other specific areas, this directional pressure causes narrow gaps between the upper and lower teeth and causes the upper anterior teeth with narrow horizontal overlap. This occlusion is also a form to allow breathing through the mouth.

10. The Upper Incisors Slanting Toward the Lips

This occlusion is formed by those who repeatedly breathe through the nose and mouth while sleeping, and also by contact and stabilization of the tongue by type RT-BN&BM and type RT-BM who constantly breathe through the mouth. When contact and stabilization of the tongue by type RT-BN&BM or type RT-BM occurs, a strong pressure develops that pushes the upper anterior teeth biting edge constantly outwards. This is caused by the cylinder shape tongue or by the surface of a thick tongue. This pressure causes the upper anterior teeth to slant toward the lips and causes this occlusion shape. This also happens to type RT-BM.

However, for those whose fulcrum area is located at the side of the base of the neck, it causes the upper anterior teeth to slant toward the tongue. Even if a pressure that causes the upper anterior teeth to slant toward the lips, this pressure is lightened, or canceled out. For those whose fulcrum area is located directly above the vertebrae cervicales VII, the pressure caused by the cylinder-shaped tongue or by the thick tongue pushes the upper anterior teeth biting edge upwards. For this reason, these people do not have occlusion where the front upper anterior teeth slant toward the lips.

11. Insufficient Teeth

The growth of an embryo of the teeth is dependent on at least one of three fulcrum areas, where it is unique among individuals during one's growth period while sleeping. It is maintained by unconsciously applying strong pressure constantly to portions of the fulcrum area below the protuberantia occipitalis ext. to the upper part of the neck, fulcrum area at the side of the neck, and fulcrum area at the jaw. (See FIG. 16) This pressure is specific to this portion. The direction of the pressure required differs between fulcrum areas. However, among these three fulcrum areas, the direction of pressure is extremely different within the fulcrum area positioned at the side of the neck. For this reason, insufficient teeth occurs to those whose fulcrum area is located at the side portion of the neck, covering a wide area at this portion. They were previously are forced to use pillows that could not be shaped or that did not reach the fulcrum area.

It is physically impossible for these people to exert all of the directional pressure (in different directions) necessary at this area (which is unique to individuals) even with the hands and arms. This causes a phenomenon where pressure lacks within this unique specific area.

The embryo of the (specific tooth) teeth constantly requires pressure at specific portions of this fulcrum area until the tooth grows during the growth stage of the individual. As a result, the embryo of the specific tooth loses its direction of growth and stops developing, and the teeth are never formed (occurrence of insufficient tooth/teeth).

The variation of insufficient teeth that occurs among these people varies depending on the portion where pressure was lacking at the fulcrum area. When insufficient teeth occurs to these people, it will be impossible to apply pressure to the specific portions even when they change the shape and form of the pillow, as if they never had this portion within their fulcrum area. For example, for those whose upper left canine is missing, it is impossible to apply pressure to the portion within the right fulcrum area that is positioned at the side of the neck that causes the upper canine to be small.

Origin of Natural Instinctive Genes

The natural gene, R-HN, originates from one acquiring various forms of care during the first 90 days after birth. The care induced by parents or one who nurses a child, such as holding the infant's head while breast feeding and how the infant was put to sleep, is done in various methods and forms. When one compares the physiological genes (one's stabilization area by contacting the pillow with the fulcrum area within this portion and the assisting fulcrum area necessary for one's pressure level) that control one's (R-HN), one's area of contact with the pillow, and the fulcrum area that exists within this area with directional pressure applied to specific areas of the head and neck, including the back shoulder portion during the first 90 days after birth by their parents, both are identical. The pressure applied by the parents could be to various portions of the infant's head and neck always at the same place while breastfeeding. This pressure is applied when holding the infant with the arm or hand. This pressure also varies in strength and direction. The pressure could also be applied at specific areas of the infant's head and/or neck always at the same place when putting the infant to sleep. This pressure develops when the head makes contact with the pillow (or folded towels) and this pressure varies in strength and direction. The pressure could also be applied at the shoulder back portion when the infant is put to sleep wearing clothes of relatively thick material.

The origin of the R-MS breathing method comes from one's experience with nose problems during one's growth period and at least one of the following:

1. For those who constantly breathe through the nose: This breathing pattern occurs among those who did not experience nose problems during one's growth period.
2. Those who constantly breathe through the mouth since they were born. Immediately after about one week after birth until they have been through the breast-feeding period, they have experienced convulsive fit frequently. This type has difficulties in breathing through the nose during sleep. Also, in the case of this type, either parent has had contagious nose infection.
3. Those who breathe through the nose and mouth: For this type of people, they have experienced nose problems between three years old and nine years old. For this reason, they frequently experience stuffy nose symptoms when they go to sleep or in early morning up until now. They have not experienced convulsive fit during breastfeeding period.
Character Peculiar to Homo sapiens

The repose of the head and neck while sleeping for humans is an effect caused by the parents during the first 90 days after birth, where the first week is very important. All mammal infants except humans can walk or grab their mother or can move immediately within one week after birth. For human infants, it is impossible since they cannot move their neck freely or even sit with their head in place until the first 90 days. This is a characteristic peculiar to humans.

Almost all mammal infants during their fetus stage grow in a zero gravitational environment in the amniotic fluid. They feel the atmospheric pressure that exists within the amniotic fluid and the very minimal earth's vertical direction gravity. Due to this, they are born with species-specific motor skills that physiologically cancel the earth's gravity. This is a species-specific repose form. All living animals require this motor skill that reacts with the earth's gravity. However for human infants, although they can be active in the amniotic fluid during the fetus stage, they are born in a state where they do not have any repose form to physiologically cancel the earth's gravitational forces.

Infants are extremely sensitive to pressure and react to strong directional pressure applied to the fulcrum areas at the head and neck that at times include the back shoulder portion. Parents induce this pressure during child raising. Infants begin to form repose in various functional parts during sleep during this period. The first function is the repose of the head and neck during sleep, which determines the repose of the whole body. It is necessary to achieve motor skills of the head and neck at level position, but for humans, this requires 90 days to develop due to the characteristic of humans. For this reason, the repose of the head and neck, once set, is set for one's whole lifetime and cannot be changed. It is one's unique characteristic.

Furthermore, if different parents raise their child differently, then one's repose is also totally unique. If the child is raised in a common racial/ethnic method, then one's repose is ethnic specific. However, even within ethnic specific repose forms, there are subtle differences in the size of the parents hands/arms or the strength of the hands/arms when hold their child.

The development of (R-HN) may be summarized as follows:

Stage 1 (Beginning phase): Immediately after birth—It is mandatory for human infants to adapt to the earth's gravity due to the reasons above.

Stage 2 (Formation phase): Approx. 1 week after birth—If the parents during this period put the baby to sleep facing downwards, then the baby must be held in this position or else they will start and continue crying until they are held in this position. Also, if the parents have put the baby to sleep facing sideways, the baby will start and continue crying if they do not hold the baby sideways.

Stage 3 (Development phase): Approx. 90 days after birth—Infants are able to hold objects and sit by supporting their head during this phase.

For (R-MS), how one acquires one's breathing method while sleeping and the three different “stabilization by tongue contact” may be summarized as follows:

Stage 1 (Beginning phase): Immediately after birth—All infants breathe through the nose and are type RT-BN.

Stage 2 (Formation phase): Approx. 1 week after birth—Infants usually breathe through the nose (type RT-BN). However, if the infant has been infected with nose problems during this period, they breathe through the mouth (type RT-BM).

Stage 3 (Development phase): Approx. 90 days after birth—All infants develop one's mouth or nose breathing method while sleep during this period (type RT-BN) where they constantly breathe through the nose, and type RT-BM if they breathe through the mouth.

Stage 4 (Emergency evacuation): After 90 days after birth—For infants who have nose problems during this period, they repeat mouth and nose breathing while asleep. This form is type RT-BN when they breathe through the nose, but type RT-BN&BM when they breathe the mouth.

Analysis

It can be analyzed that an individual's repose of the head and neck while sleeping is a unique form that is regulated by natural genes. This analysis means one is forced to sleep in the form of repose of the head and neck during sleeping. One's occlusion is the record of one's growth reflecting the form of repose of the head and neck during sleep because one's repose of the head and neck while sleeping is one's unique form that is controlled by natural genes and there is a cause and effect between growth while sleeping under one's unique repose of the head and neck during sleep and occlusion that reflects one's unique repose of the head and neck during sleep.

The origin of natural instinctive genes that control one's repose function of the head and neck during sleep can be analyzed based on “the origin of natural instinctive genes” and “characteristic peculiar to humans.” Two natural instinctive genes control (R-HN) to be one's unique (R-HN). One's contact with the pillow area during sleep should always be within the limited area of one's “contact and stabilization with the pillow (fulcrum areas and assisting fulcrum areas).”

This natural instinctive gene originates from actions that were taken in a daily manner by one's parents (or those who looked after them) during the first 90 days after birth, where the first week is the most important period. These actions include:

1. Area at the head and neck—(a) the act of supporting the infant's head with the mother's hand or arm during breast-feeding; (b) the act of making the infant's head and neck portion contact the mattress or pillow during sleep; and (c) the act of placing the arm under the infant's neck as a replacement for the pillow.
2. Area at the back portion of the shoulders—The act of putting the infant to sleep, where the infant was wearing clothes made of thick material.
3. Fulcrum area—The area where strong pressure was applied during the act mentioned above by one's parent (or those who looked after the infant).
4. Assisting fulcrum area—The area where weak pressure was applied during the act mentioned above by one's parent (or those who looked after the infant).

The natural instinctive genes, where the pressure that one applies must be directional pressure specific to the originating area within one's pressure capacity level, also originates from actions that were taken in a daily manner by one's parents (or those who looked after them) during the period mentioned above. These actions include:

1. Strong pressure required at the fulcrum area—(a) Area at the head and neck, where constant application of strong pressure at the same position with portions of the hand (all portions of the finger or fingertips, side or bottom part of the palm), or specific area of the arm, is required; and (b) area at the back portion of the shoulders, where strong pressure develops at this area due to putting the infant to sleep when the infant was wearing clothes made of thick material.
2. Weak pressure required at the assisting fulcrum area—(a) Area at the head and neck, where constant application of weak pressure at the same position with portion of the hand that does not develop strong pressure, is required; and (b) area at the back portion of the shoulders, where weak pressure development at certain portions of this area are due to putting the infant to sleep when the infant was wearing clothes made of thick material.
3. Directional pressure specific to the originating area—(a) the origin of this pressure, where the direction of the pressure that developed through the acts mentioned above by the mother; and (b) the pressure developed by the acts mentioned above becomes directional pressure specific to the originating area because all the acts mentioned above cause pressure that moves in a certain direction at each specific area of the infant's head and neck, or back portions of the shoulder.
4. One's unique pressure capacity level—(a) Unique size, thickness, and shape of hands and arms; (b) the difference of hardness of the bed (or mattress); and (c) the difference in thickness of clothes that the infant wears.

One's breathing method during sleep depends on the experience that one has had with nose problems from birth up until 9 years old. One's shape of the tongue during “contact and stabilization of the tongue” is determined by the living body adapting the tongue to one's breathing pattern during sleep. This occurs during the tongue's development stage and also to maintain breathing passage.

Type RT-BN people are those who have not experienced a nose infection since birth up until now. They breathe through the nose during sleep. Type RT-BM people are those who have been infected with a nose infection between the period immediately after birth up until 90 days after birth. Due to this infection, one breathes through the mouth to maintain breathing passage since one has problems breathing through the nose.

Type RT-BN&BM are those who have been infected with nose problems during the period between 90 days after birth to 9 years old. They breathe through the mouth since they have problems breathing through the nose when going to sleep or in the morning.

Based on the clarification of the existence of operating factors and the mechanism that forms one's unique occlusion, the direct cause of one's unique occlusion may be completely different among each individual. The two pressures on the individual are caused by one being forced to sleep in one's unique repose of the head and neck during sleep under certain breathing methods. The first pressure is the “strong directional pressure within one's unique pressure tolerance level,” which is applied by “factors that cause pressure.” These factors include the hands, arms, and/or pillows, which all are different among each individual. All humans exert this pressure unintentionally while sleeping during one's growth period.

The other pressure is the strong directional pressure that develops between one's unique “specific area of the specific teeth” and one's unique “specific area of the tongue.” All humans develop this pressure when “the contact and stabilization act of the tongue” is performed while sleeping during one's growth period. However, the direction of these pressures and the degree of strength are completely unique and completely different among individuals.

From the clarification of function of maintaining repose while sleep, which is a phenomenon peculiar to all humans, and “the neck that does not immediately sit up until 3 months after birth (90 days),” which is a human trait, the underlying reason that causes one's unique occlusion is that all humans posses an antenatal form where the “neck does not immediately sit up until 3 months after birth.” This is based on the fundamental condition of the existence of the earth's gravity.

Individuals have special control systems that cause variations in one's occlusion. System 1 is where infants are forced to be born without any repose functioning with the earth's gravity. This is true to all mankind.

System 2 is where the formation of repose of the head (R-HN) during sleep begins immediately after birth in the following manner. The mother (or one who looks after the infant) develops and/or applies strong directional pressure or weak pressure to certain parts of the specific area of the infants head and neck when breastfeeding the infant or when putting the infant to sleep. At the same time, the formation of “contact and stabilization of the tongue” by the jaw's repose (R-MS) during sleep occurs. This takes place at a 3-dimensional position of the jaw, and based on the breathing pattern during sleep, develops in the following manner. In the case of infants who constantly breathe through the nose while sleeping, the formation becomes type RT-BN because one's repose function prioritizes the living body's life sustaining function of breathing through the nose as the air passage. In the case of infants who have experienced nose problems and constantly breathe through the mouth, the formation begins to become type RT-BM, allowing maintenance of the air passage because one's repose function prioritizes the living body's defensive function. In the case of infants who constantly breathe through the mouth during sleep because they have had nose infections within 90 days after birth, the formation changes so that it forms as type RT-BM due to the same reasons mentioned above. The earlier the infant experiences nose problems, the thicker the tongue becomes.

When the formation of (R-HN) and (R-MS) begins, formation of the repose system in other functioning areas begins immediately by the pressure that is applied by mothers (or others who look after the infant) when putting the infant to sleep (facing up, sideways, or facing down) and by the thickness of the clothes the infant wears. Although it takes an extremely long period of 90 days for humans to complete one's formation of repose function during sleep, this form is immediately determined within the first 1 week after birth.

System 3 is where after 3 months from birth, the formation of the infant's (R-HN) and (R-MS) is completed by the human characteristic. As a result, the infant, due to the human's repose function, is forced to record the strong and weak directional pressures applied to the specific areas of the head and neck by the mother (or those who have looked after the infant). Hence, the infant is forced to constantly apply similar pressure to one's specific areas (one's unique contact and stabilization with the pillow) when sleeping. During this, infants who constantly breathe through the nose while sleeping perform “contact and stabilization of the tongue” by type RT-BN. But if the infant has experienced nose infection during the first 90 days after birth, the infant begins to constantly breathe through the mouth, and is forced to perform this by type RT-BM. However, if the infant was constantly breathing through the nose while sleeping and has experienced a nose infection 3 months after birth, the infant begins to breathe through the nose and mouth while sleeping, and the infant, as a protective function of the living body, will be forced to perform this by type RT-BN&BM, an emergency evacuation type. This person will be forced to perform “contact and stabilization of the tongue” by type RT-BN&BM. However, this transition period takes place up until 10 years old only.

At the same time (R-HN) and (R-MS) formation is completed, the repose during sleep is formed and is adaptable to (R-HN) by means of human characteristic of maintaining repose and by means of living body function that promotes directional growth. This is based primarily on a sleeping form determined by mothers or those who look after the infant. As a result, the infant has recorded this pressure applied by the mother (or those who looked after the infant) and is forced to sleep by applying similar pressure to specific areas of each function part of the head and neck. After the (R-HN) form is completed, the infant's neck begins to sit, and the infant begins to form one's unique (R-HN) and (R-MS) by one's unique repose function that is determined by one repose while relaxing.

System 4 is where after 3 months from birth, the infant, under the condition of the breathing method during sleep, is forced to constantly apply strong or weak directional pressure to parts of one's contact area with the pillow. The directional pressure was determined within the first 90 days after birth by one's mother (or those who have looked after the infant). The infant does this by itself during growth. The repose during sleep of other functioning parts is applicable to (R-HN). As a result, one's unique occlusion that can be regarded as part of one's bone structure is formed by reflecting one's unique (R-HN) and (R-MS) under the condition of the breathing method during sleep.

The occlusion of those who breathe through the nose while sleeping is formed by reflecting one's unique (R-HN), which is the repose formed by one's unique “contact and stabilization area with the pillow” and one's unique (R-MS), which, in this case, is one's unique type RT-BN. These unique forms are derived from the contact and stabilization of the tongue and peculiar feature of humans where occlusion is formed by reacting to the strong directional pressure that is constantly applied to specific areas of the head and neck, and occasionally, to the back portion of the shoulder (see FIG. 14) up until 18 years old (the period of when the wisdom teeth are coming out.

On the other hand, the occlusion of those who constantly breathe through the mouth while sleeping, or for those who breathe through the mouth and nose, is formed by reflecting one's unique (R-HN), which is the repose formed by one's unique “contact and stabilization with the pillow” and one's unique (R-MS), which, in this case, is one's unique type RT-BM or type RT-BN&BM. These unique forms are derived in the same manner as those who constantly breathe through the nose while sleeping as explained above up until 18 years old, given that they have had nose infections and based on the form where they can breathe through the mouth while sleeping. At the same time, all bone structure (excluding occlusion) and repose while relaxing is formed up until the age of around 18 years old, based on one's unique (R-HN) and (R-MS) from the pressure that has been applied by mothers (or those who look after the infant) in the first 90 days after birth. The strong directional pressure necessary is created at one's specific area by one's pillow.

However, in the case of those children whose pillow was changed from a certain period during one's growth stage, where they cannot apply or create pressure required at the fulcrum area located at the side of the neck, insufficient teeth occurs to a specific tooth. From this time on, one's pillow is changed so that it no longer has the properties to create pressure to the growth of teeth embryo of the specific teeth at certain portions of the fulcrum area at the side of the neck. During the growth period, if one who can only sleep facing down for a short period of time was forced to sleep facing down due to the pillow not fitting right, one's growth of the bones will oppose the natural directional growth of the living body, and normal growth will be disrupted. As a result, these people will feel strong pain mainly at the knee joints during the growth period because the living body resists this pressure occurring from the opposing position.

As discussed above, one's occlusion, with conditions in breathing patterns, is the record of one's growth reflecting one's repose of the head and neck that originated from artificial phenomenon that is incurred by one's parents. This phenomenon is related to the way the parents have breast feed and put the infant to sleep during the first 90 days of which the first week is the most important period. Hence, it is greatly influenced by one's parents or whoever takes care of them after birth.

Also, the variations between one's pillow properties and one's usage of a pillow are basically an artificial phenomenon induced by the childcare done by parents during the first 90 days after birth. From the repose of the head and neck, it can be analyzed that one's pillow with properties for restful and restorative sleep can satisfy one's physiological factor.

It can also be analyzed that one's pillow is a device that controls one's repose of the head and neck during sleep and one's pillow during growth stage is a device that forms one's occlusion. Further, it can be analyzed that one's teeth position and its degrees of slant are constantly maintained so that the teeth will not move vertically or slant toward the tongue by the “contact and stabilization by the tongue” during one's sleep after growth stage.

It has been found that the act of contact and stabilization by the tongue during one's sleep after growth stage constantly applies weak pressure to the 2 surfaces, including all of the upper and lower teeth occlusion surface and tongue surface. The contact and stabilization is done under one's (R-HN) that was developed by one's pillow during one's sleep after growth stage.

It can be analyzed that one's pillow after one's growth period is a device that maintains the position relationship of one's fully developed occlusion and that there is a cause and effect between one's pillow, one's repose of the head and neck during sleep, and one's occlusion. Therefore, the properties of the pillow for restful and restorative sleep to an individual can be accurately identified in the following methods and order.

1. Observe the subject's occlusion in detail.
2. Compare this result with the shape of the molars and the diagram in FIG. 14 that shows the relationship between operating factors and fulcrum area, and analyze all of the fulcrum areas and their positions of the subject's contact with the pillow areas. When it is impossible to observe the original teeth shape, such as for people with artificial teeth or due to insufficient teeth, it is possible to identify the position and shape of their fulcrum area as indicated above. At the same time, the assisting fulcrum areas can be identified, although this area is not so significant.
3. From this analysis result, create an illustration (only the fulcrum areas) of the subject's area of contact and stabilization with the pillow.
4. With this illustration, from the shape of the molars, analyze the properties of one's pillow that creates strong directional pressure necessary for each of the subject's fulcrum area.
5. Lastly, make an overall judgment of the pillow with the properties where the subject is able to sleep comfortably.

The variations between the properties of one's pillow that allows restful and restorative sleep and the usage of pillows is basically an artificial phenomenon arising from childcare by parents during the first 90 days after birth, where the first week is the most important. Variations also are dependent upon insufficient teeth.

There is a cause and effect between pillow that allows restful and restorative sleep to an individual, the repose of the head and neck, and one's unique occlusion. What this means is that it is basically possible to clearly identify the properties of one's pillow that allows restful and restorative sleep by observing one's occlusion and analyzing the physiological factors. The term “basically” is used because for some, they may have lost many teeth, or may have many artificial teeth that are different in shape from the original teeth, or may have lost all of their teeth.

When one selects one's pillow, or is planning to have one made, the characteristics of the pillow must be one's device that satisfies one's physiological genes that control one's repose of the head and neck during one's sleep.

The method of the invention includes the following:

1. Observation of occlusion (create models).
2. Interviews of how one sleep and direct observation.
3. Observation of one's reaction when directional pressure is applied to the head/neck portion, including the back shoulder. The subject's head and neck is under repose state.
4. Determine if one has or has not experienced nose problems.
5. Confirm shape and properties of the pillow one uses for sleeping and area one makes contact with the pillow.
6. Observation of tongue while asleep and awake.
7. Observation of the head.

From the four fulcrum areas (fulcrum area group at the rear of the head, fulcrum area at the side of the base of the neck, fulcrum area group at the rear side of the shoulder, and fulcrum area at the center of the neck), the existence of peculiar pressure exerted by the tongue is clarified from the analysis results of the following. First, among the fulcrum area mentioned above, the formation of a physiological factor of among those who have common specific fulcrum area, even if the sleeping posture is different, the posture is influenced by the common specific area common among these people. Second, within the mouth during one's sleep, by the contact and stabilization act of the tongue, the tongue exerts continuous pressure where it makes contact. This pressure during one's growth period enables growth of the jawbone's, and as the jawbones are developed, it also allows the tongue to develop, and both continue to grow in this process, which is continued.

The formation (occlusion formation) of the specific physiological gene that is influenced by the specific fulcrum area mentioned above is caused by the strong directional pressure voluntarily exerted by the tongue's “contact and stabilization act” during one's growth period. During one's sleep in growth period, when the contact and stabilization act of the tongue is occurring, there is continuous strong directional pressure exerted at the specific portion of the tongue.

The analysis of 16 specific portions that cause the specific tooth to become small within the fulcrum area located at the side of the neck that cause 16 various tooth to become small may be done as follows.

1. Select the specific tooth.
2. For those whose specific teeth are small, investigate the shape of fulcrum area located at the side portion of the neck and select those with few specific small teeth. However, if the subject has other small teeth then investigate and analyze these teeth also.
3. Determine if there is a commonality between the positions of the fulcrum areas that these subjects have.
4. Compare the right and left results of these teeth. Further analyze the left and right area shape. Analyze these data and determine its position.
5. Continue investigation with all 16 specific teeth.
6. Identify the position and shape of the “16 specific portions that cause the teeth to become small” and develop schematic diagram based on these data.
7. In order to confirm accuracy of schematic diagram developed above and to further develop an accurate schematic diagram, perform an analysis of the form of the fulcrum area that is positioned at the side of the neck for those with insufficient teeth in the following manner.
8. Select a subject where specific teeth are missing (insufficient tooth/teeth).
9. Apply pressure with the fingertip to various portions of the fulcrum area at the side of the neck and mark areas in the schematic diagram where the subject felt the pressure was uncomfortable. Perform this for all 16 various teeth.
10. Revise the schematic diagram of this fulcrum area.

The reason for investigating those with insufficient teeth is because these people extremely resist pressure that is applied to specific portions of this fulcrum area. If the insufficient tooth is the upper right canine, then this person dislikes pressure applied to the specific portion positioned within the fulcrum area positioned at the right side portion of the neck that makes the upper canines small (See FIGS. 16-2 and 16-3). If the insufficient teeth are at the lower central incisors, then this person dislikes pressure applied to the specific portion positioned within the fulcrum area positioned at the right side portion of the neck, which makes the lower middle incisors small (the same is applies to the left side).

An accurate systematic diagram of the 32 specific fulcrum areas that makes 32 specific teeth small that is located within the fulcrum area located at the side of the neck has been completed. However, the accurate system diagram of the 20 specific fulcrum area that causes the 20 primary specific teeth to be small is clarified through the cause and effect of large specific teeth (of the primary teeth) that causes large permanent teeth that grows in the same area.

The following summarizes one example of the method of choosing a pillow.

1. Create the teeth model of the occlusion of the experimenters. Prepare the 15 kinds of fulcrum area which exists like a mosaic pattern on the skin of the head and neck, and in the back portion of the shoulders and makes difference in the specific formation of occlusion that reacts to strong directional pressure, constantly applied while sleeping in the growth period. Prepare the figure (FIG. 16) that classifies the fulcrum area positioned at the side of the neck into 16 portions.
2. Make the diagrams (FIGS. 1 to 17) that confirm the relationship between “the appearance of one's unique occlusion” and “the growth” with using one's own pillow that gives a restful and restorative sleep. Analyze “one's contact band stabilization area with the pillow”—the area where one constantly contacts with the pillow by feeling the strong directional pressure by each fulcrum area as one unit.
At this time, make the formation of subject' head into materials of reference.

a. From the degrees of the subject's vertical overlap of the upper (or lower) anterior teeth, clarify which of these fulcrum areas the subject possesses, the fulcrum areas that is positioned in the rear portion of the head in the upper part of the rear head, in the lower part of the upper-rear head, above and at the protuberantia occipitalis ext., or the fulcrum area that is positioned immediately above the vertebrae cervicales VII.

b. From the relationship of the subject's overlap of anterior teeth (normal occlusion, or reversed occlusion), clarify subject's information about the fulcrum area that is positioned at the central portion of the neck.

c. From the size of the subject's teeth (an image of the whole and each tooth), clarify the subject's information about the fulcrum area that is positioned at the side of the neck.

d. From the length of the subject's upper anterior teeth, clarify the subject's information about the fulcrum area that is positioned at the upper portion of the neck.

e. From the subject's teeth arch where the upper canine that protrudes from the arch, clarify the subject's information about the fulcrum area that is positioned at the side of the head and the neck.

f. From the size of subject's size of upper teeth arch, clarify the subject's information about the fulcrum area that is positioned above the side portion of the head and at the side of the neck.

g. From the shape of the subject's upper teeth arch, clarify the subject's information about the fulcrum areas group that is positioned at the rear portion of the head (at the upper rear portion of the head, at the lower part of the upper rear of the head, above and at the protuberantia occipitalis ext.), and the fulcrum area that is positioned at the upper rear portion of the ear, at the side portion of the head, and at the side portion of the base of the neck.

h. From the subject's overlap of molars, clarify the subject's information about the fulcrum area that is positioned at the side of the chin.

i. From the subject's shape of molars (degrees of sharpness), clarify the subject's information about the fulcrum area that is positioned at the jaw.

j. From the subject's slant of lips-tongue of the upper and lower anterior teeth, clarify about the fulcrum area that is positioned in the back portion of the shoulders and at the side portion of the base of the neck.

k. From insufficient tooth/teeth, clarify the subject's detailed information about the fulcrum area that is positioned at the side of the neck.

(If he has insufficient tooth/teeth, he cannot apply pressure to the specific portion that corresponds to the insufficient tooth or teeth with specific name within the fulcrum area at the side of the neck which is divided into 16 portions. The specific portion corresponds to the insufficient tooth/teeth of specific name.)
3. Redraw the materials of the subject that are obtained in (2) on FIG. 16 that is prepared in (1). Create diagrams of individual subject's “area which contacts and stabilizes to the pillow by the strong pressure.” If the subject's head is transformed, the unusual shape must be recorded on these diagrams. However, in case of an infant who has not grown all of the teeth yet, or in case of adults who have lost many or all natural teeth or have many artificial teeth, when one can not clarify their “area which contacts and stabilizes to the pillow by directional strong pressure,” it is possible to create the subject's peculiar diagrams in the following way.

a. Let a subject sit on a chair in a relaxed posture, and clasp his hands on the head or the head and neck. Then let a subject lie down, and perform the same act by the various postures.

b. Confirm in what port of the head or neck the subject applies strong pressure by act in (a), and redraw it on FIG. 16.

c. Using the details obtained in (b) as reference materials, apply strong directional pressure to the subject's 15 various fulcrum area at the head/neck portion and behind the shoulders with whole or part (finger, palm, or lower palm) of the hand. Observe the reaction of the subject, and mark where the subject felt comfortable with a colored pen onto FIG. 16. The areas where the subject felt comfortable are the fulcrum areas, and the areas where he felt uncomfortable are not fulcrum areas, but assisting fulcrum areas. In case of growing children, their response is evident.

d. Ask if the subject has ever had a stinging feeling at the hand(s) or arm(s) when he woke up in the morning. In case of yes, ask his conditions. Because it means that the subject must always insert his hand(s) or arm(s) between the head and neck, and the pillow. In case of a subject who inserts his hand(s) or arm(s) between the head and neck and the pillow, and who directly applies directional strong pressure during sleep, redraw the conditions on FIG. 16. Also, investigate whether the rear part of the subject's head has been transformed or not. If transformed, record the conditions on FIG. 16.

4. Using the data gathered in (3) regarding the subject's unique “area contact with strong pressure is made with a pillow” as a fundamental material, compare this with the previous diagrams (FIGS. 1 to 17). Follow the explanations of each finger, and accurately clarify the characteristics of one's pillow (height. material, size, hardness and shape) that allows one to sleep comfortable.

a. Height: The height of a pillow will be clarified from the following information of the subject's fulcrum area

i. Fulcrum area at the rear portion of the head (upper rear portion of the head, lower part of the upper rear of the head, above and at the protuberantia occipitalis ext.) (See FIGS. 1 and 16)

ii. Fulcrum area immediately above the vertebrae cervicales VII (See FIGS. 1 and 16)

iii. Fulcrum area at the upper side portion of the head

iv. Fulcrum area in the back portion of the shoulders (See FIGS. 15 and 16)

b. Materials: The material of a pillow will be clarified from the following information of the subject's fulcrum area.

i. Fulcrum area at the side of the neck (See FIGS. 4 to 7, 16 and 17)

ii. Fulcrum area at the side portion of the base of the neck (See FIGS. 12, 14, 15 and 16)

iii. Fulcrum area at the side part of the chin (See FIGS. 13 and 16)

iv. Fulcrum area at the jaw (See FIGS. 9 and 16)

v. Fulcrum area at the upper side portion of the head (See FIGS. 11 and 16)

c. Size: The size of a pillow will be clarified from the following information of the subject's fulcrum area.

i. Fulcrum area in the back portion of the shoulders (See FIGS. 14 to 16)

ii. Overall figure of subject's unique “area of the pillow where strong pressure contacts” (See FIGS. 2 and 3)

d. Hardness: The hardness of a pillow will be clarified from the following information of the subject's fulcrum area at the rear of the head and the subject's form of the head.

i. Fulcrum area at the rear portion of the head (upper rear portion of the head, lower part of the upper rear of the head, above and at the protuberantia occipitalis ext.) (See FIGS. 1 and 16)

ii. Fulcrum area immediately above the vertebrae cervicales VII (See FIGS. 1 and 16)

iii. Fulcrum area at the side of the neck (See FIGS. 4 to 7, 16 and 17)

e. Shape: The shape of a pillow will be clarified from the following information of the subject's fulcrum area.

i. Fulcrum area at the rear portion of the head (upper rear portion of the head, lower part of the upper rear of the head, above and at the protuberantia occipitalis ext.) (See FIGS. 1 and 16)

ii. Fulcrum area immediately above the vertebrae cervicales VII (See FIGS. 1 and 16)

iii. Fulcrum area at the central portion of the neck (See FIGS. 1 and 16)

iv. Fulcrum area at the side of the neck (See FIGS. 4 to 7, 16 and 17)

v. Fulcrum area at the upper part of the neck (See FIG. 8)

vi. Fulcrum area at the side of the head (See FIGS. 10, 11 and 16)

vii. Fulcrum area at the upper rear portion of the ear (See FIGS. 12 and 16)

viii. Fulcrum area in the back portion of the shoulders (See FIGS. 14 to 16)

ix. Fulcrum area at the side of the base of the neck (See FIGS. 12, 14, 15 and 16)

5. Use the results of (4) as judgment materials to manufacture one's proper pillow with scientific grounds that everyone can have a restful and comfortable sleep.

The following examples are presented to illustrate the invention. These examples are intended to aid those skilled in the art in understanding the present invention. The present invention is, however, in no way limited thereby.

EXAMPLE 1

Choosing a Pillow for a Subject

Reference Data:

I. Subject A's characteristics of occlusion

1. Vertical overlap of upper front teeth—extremely shallow (however, the right incisors and canine are edge-to-edge bite)

2. Horizontal overlap of upper front teeth—none

3. The size of teeth—large or relatively large (however, the left and right upper and lower canine are small, and the left and right lower central incisors and lower second large molars are relatively small)

    • a. Upper right canine 7.0 mm>upper left canine 6.6 mm
    • b. Lower right central incisor 5.1 mm<lower left central incisor 5.6 mm
    • c. Lower right second large molar 10.8 mm×10.5 mm<lower left second large molar 11.4 mm×10.6 mm

4. Length of upper front teeth—extremely long

5. Shape of molars—biting surface is extremely flat

6. Teeth arrangement—proportioned

7. Size of upper teeth arch and its shape—relatively large and horse-shoe shape

8. Overlap of molars—normal

9. Overlap of front teeth—normal

10. Slant of front teeth toward the lips/tongue—both upper and lower teeth is vertical

II. Form of head of Subject A

1. The part of fulcrum area at the upper part of the rear of the head—flat in the large part

2. The area of fulcrum area at the upper part of the side of the head (left and right)-flat in the relatively large part

Objective 1: To create a teeth model of unique occlusion of the Subject A and prepare fulcrum area diagram that shows 15 fulcrum areas
Fulcrum areas exist at the head and neck portion and at the rear of the shoulder. Subject A's unique occlusion is due to strong constant directional pressure applied during the growth period. FIG. 16 shows the fulcrum area divided into 16 areas.
Objective 2: To analyze Subject A's unique area where contact with strong pressure is made on a pillow.
1. From the vertical overlap of upper front teeth and upper teeth arch shape of Subject A, it can be concluded that, of his fulcrum areas at the rear portion of the head (upper rear portion of the head, lower part of the upper rear of the head, above and at the protuberantia occipitalis ext.) and above the vertebrae cervicales VII:

a. Fulcrum area at the top portion of his rear head (central portion is included)

b. Fulcrum area just above the vertebrae cervicales VII (right side)

2. From the Subject A's horizontal overlap of the upper front teeth and degrees of slant of the front teeth toward the tongue and lips, it can be concluded that Subject A breathes constantly through the nose during sleep and performs “contact and stabilization acts of the tongue” under Type RT-BN.
3. From the size and characteristics of Subject A's teeth, the following may be concluded:

a. From the Subject A's teeth size (large teeth are many and small teeth are few), he has a fulcrum area at the side of the neck in a narrow range and puts his fingers between the pillow and the head and neck.

b. From Subject A's size of the upper and lower canines in the right and left sides, it may be concluded that Subject A puts the fingers in a wide part within the fulcrum area located at the right side of the neck. This area causes the upper and lower right canines to become small. Subject A also puts his fingers in a wide area at the left side of the neck, which causes the upper and lower left canine to become small. (See FIGS. 16-2 and 16-3). It may also be concluded that the size of the right and left areas for Subject A is different. Data shows that the upper right canine (7.0 mm) is larger than the upper left canine (6.6 mm) and the lower right canine (6.3 mm) is larger than the lower left canine (6.0 mm). The wideness of area that causes the upper right canine to be small is narrower than the area that causes the upper left canine small. The area that causes the lower right canine to become small is narrow than that which causes lower left canine small.

c. From Subject A's size of the lower left and right central incisors, it may be concluded that Subject A puts the fingers in a relatively wide area within the fulcrum area located at the left and right side of the neck which causes the lower central incisors to become small. The difference of the size of the lower right central incisor (5.6 mm) and that of the lower left central incisor (5.1 mm) shows that the size of the part to make the lower right central incisor is smaller than the left, on the both sides.

d. From Subject A's size of the lower second large molars, on the right and sides, it may be concluded the Subject A puts the fingers in a relatively wide area within the fulcrum area located at the right side of the neck, which causes the lower right second molar to be small and the left side of the neck that causes the left lower second large molar to become small, on the right and left sides. The size is different in the in the right and left areas. The data shows that the lower second large molar in the right (10.8 mm×10.5 mm) is smaller than that in the left (11.4 mm×10.6 mm). The wideness of area that causes the lower right second large molar to be small is wider than that which causes the lower left second molar small.

e. From Subject A's length of upper anterior teeth, it means that he does not have a fulcrum area located at the upper part of the neck.

f. From Subject A's shape of molars, it concluded that there is no fulcrum area located at the jaw.

g. From Subject A's condition of the teeth proportion and shape of upper teeth arch, there is no fulcrum area located at the side of the head.

h. From Subject A's shape of upper teeth arch, there is no fulcrum area located at the upper rear portion of the ear and from this arch shape, it may be concluded that Subject A sleeps facing up and forward.

i. From Subject A's size of the upper teeth arch, there is a fulcrum area at the upper side part of the head in a relatively wide area.

j. From Subject A's overlap of molars, there is no fulcrum area located at the side of the chin.

k. From Subject A's overlap of front teeth of Subject A, there is no fulcrum area located at the center of the neck.

l. From Subject A's degree of slant to the tongue or lips of the front teeth, there is no fulcrum area in the back of the shoulders and at the side part of the base of the neck.

Objective 3: To redraw the analysis results and the shape of his skull on FIG. 16 prepared in with a different colored pen (FIG. 18: FIG. 18 shows the unique Subject A's “area where the contact with strong pressure is made with a pillow” of that redrawn from FIG. 16 (the black colored areas). The diagrams of the fulcrum area at the side of the neck divided into 16 portions should be used, but since diagrams are drawn in black and white, for convenience purposes, the diagrams of fulcrum area at the side of the neck divided into 8 portions is used. Most people create strong directional pressure by using one's unique pillows with unique properties necessary for restful sleep). FIG. 18-1 shows the unique “area of the pillow where strong pressure contacts” of Subject A at the left and right “fulcrum area at the neck”. This is an overall view 270. One normally uses the fulcrum area diagram of the neck divided into 16 portions, but for convenience purposes so that it would be easier to recognize the positions and wideness of the area even in black and white color, the unique “area of the pillow where strong pressure contacts” of Subject A, the fulcrum area diagram of the neck that is divided into 8 portions is used. FIG. 18-2 shows the 16 portions of the unique “area of the pillow where strong pressure contacts” of Subject A at the left and right “fulcrum area at the neck”. This is an overall view 271. One normally uses the fulcrum area diagram of the neck divided into 16 portions, but for convenience purposes so that it would be easier to recognize the positions and wideness of the area even in black and white color, the unique “area of the pillow where strong pressure contacts” of Subject A, the fulcrum area diagram of the neck that is divided into 8 portions is used.
Objective 4: From the figure of Subject A's proper “area of the pillow in which strong directional pressure contacts and stabilize” created in Objective 3, to make a pillow for a restful and restorative sleep. The method is as follows.

1. Height of Pillow

From Subject A's “fulcrum area located at the upper part of the rear head and at the upper part of the side of the head,” the pillow is used in an extremely low position.

2. Material of Pillow

Since Subject A does not have a fulcrum area at the side of the base-neck, and at the side of the chin and at the jaw, it is necessary for to use an immobile pillow made of unchangeable materials.

3. Size of Pillow

a. Based on Subject A's “area which contacts a pillow with a strong pressure,” a relatively small pillow may be used. Also, Subject A may sleep facing up and facing side, but cannot sleep facing down.

b. Since there is no fulcrum area at the back of shoulders, the vertical width of the pillow is from the fulcrum area at the upper portion of the rear of the head to immediately above the vertebrae cervicales VII.

c. Since Subject A puts fingers at the fulcrum area of the side neck, the width of the pillow should be wide enough for to put a hand on the pillow.

4. Hardness of Pillow

a. Based on Subject A's fulcrum area at the upper portion of the rear head and the shape of the skull, it may be concluded that Subject A uses a pillow on which it is extremely difficult for Subject A to lay the rear of the head.

b. Since Subject A puts fingers at the fulcrum area of the side—neck, the pillow must be hard enough for him not to be painful to the hands.

5. Shape of Pillow

a. From the form of the fulcrum area located at the side of the neck, the shape of Subject A's pillow should be of a shape for him to be able to put his fingers under the pillow. However, when Subject A gets his hands disordered, the pillow should have a finger-shaped cloth to put his fingers. This finger-shaped cloth bag must be the same shape as the individual's fingers (length, thickness and form).

b. Since Subject A does not have a fulcrum area at the center of the neck, the pillow must be of a shape so as not to contact the central portion of the neck.

c. Since Subject A has a fulcrum area on the right side just above the vertebrae cervicales VII only, the pillow must be of a shape for to put fingers in it.

Objective 5: Pillow Construction

1. Whole Size

a. The vertical length is from the fulcrum area at the upper part of his rear head to the vertebrae cervicales VII.

b. The width is enough to put hands on it.

2. Characteristic of the Rear Portion of the Head

a. This portion is extremely low (around 1 cm).

b. This portion is of extremely hard material.

c. This portion is made of ropes about 1 cm in diameter glued together and covered with a towel.
3. The Nature of this Portion of the Neck

a. Though the form of this portion is bulged, it does not contact the neck portion. This portion is a form to put fingers at the side of the neck, when the hand is placed at the outer portion of this area. The base material is the same as used in the rear head.

b. The material of this portion should be cotton that is immobile and difficult to transform, and not painful when putting the hand on this portion.

To manufacture a pillow on the basis of the Subject A's pillow, the finger-shaped cloth bag was sewed to the pillow at the particular point where Subject A exerts strong directional pressure with the fingers. The finger-shaped bag is made to reflect the form of the finger(s) and the angle that touches the neck. The material to be put into the finger-shaped bag must also reflect the hardness of Subject A's finger.

EXAMPLE 2

Ways of Supporting the Head and Neck While Breastfeeding

EXAMPLE 2.1

In the case of those who belong to group HC (see FIG. 2) that sleep while making strong contact stabilization by contacting below the top portion of the head and the upper portion of the neck with the pillow: Mothers testified that they have been placing their arm below the protuberantia occipitalis ext. to the upper portion of the neck while breastfeeding. They have laid thin towels under the head so that strong pressure will be formed below the top portion of the head. They have also occasionally moved the infant's head to the left and right so that deformations would not occur at the back portion of the head.

EXAMPLE 2.2

In the case of those who have edge-to-edge bite (see FIG. 1-1), where “strong directional pressure” is required at the fulcrum area right above the vertebrae cervicales VII: Mothers testified that they have constantly placed their lower palm at this area while breastfeeding.

EXAMPLE 2.3

In the case of those who have the fulcrum area at the temple where a “strong directional pressure” is required (see FIG. 12o-5): Mothers testified that they have been holding the baby at the temple, passing the back portion of the head, and to the other temple side or to the side portion opposite of the protuberantia occipitalis ext. while breastfeeding, completely wrapping the baby's head.

EXAMPLE 3

Relationship of when Infant was Born and Clothing

In the case of those who fall under group NP-NB (see FIG. 3) where the fulcrum area is in the back portion of the shoulder, and required tolerance pressure level: Mothers testified that since the baby was born during the winter season, they have put the baby to sleep with the baby wearing clothes with the relatively thick materials that causes strong pressure at the back shoulder portion. Pillow was not used, and the baby slept facing upward. The baby was put to sleep in this manner from birth up until the warm months.

EXAMPLE 4

Different Ways of Holding the Baby

In the case of those who have reversed occlusion (see FIG. 1-6, 1-7, and 1-8), where “strong directional pressure” is required at the fulcrum area of the central part of the neck, parents testified that they have regularly put the baby to sleep by placing their arm under the baby's neck as a pillow.

EXAMPLE 5

“Contact and Stabilization Area with the Pillow” and Strong Directional Pressure Required for Each Fulcrum Area

EXAMPLE 5.1

Subjects were placed in a seated position. Experimenter, using all of the hand or parts (fingers, palm, or lower portion of the palm), applied strong directional pressure on the subject's specific area located at the head, the neck, and the back shoulder portion. Experimenter collected data based on subject's reaction to the pressure applied to 3 areas—where the subject felt uncomfortable (area where no contact is made with the pillow), where the subject felt comfortable (fulcrum area), where the subject didn't feel anything particular (assisting fulcrum area). Experimenter drew 3-dimensional figures (rear, top, and side views) based on these data. Further more, Experimenter added arrows to designate direction of pressure. The subjects confirmed the validity of the diagram.

EXAMPLE 5.2

Towels and pillows were given to the subjects so that they could simulate their sleeping position. Experimenter, with his fingers, confirmed the area where the subjects made strong contact or weak contact with the pillow. During this, experimenter observed if and where the subjects touched the head with their hand or arm. Since most subjects did this unconsciously, experimenter asked if the subject felt any stinging sensation at the hands or arms when they woke up in the morning. For those who answered “yes,” it was concluded that this subject must always make their hand or arm make contact with the head. Experimenter made the subject perform this act to confirm where the subject feels comfortable by having subject contact certain portions of the head. During this time, the area where the hand or arm made contact was also the fulcrum area. Based on this data, Experimenter further revised the contact with pillow diagram mentioned earlier. The subject were further asked to confirm the validity of this diagram.

EXAMPLE 5.3

Experimenter removed the towel and pillow and asked the subject to take a sleeping position with their hands crossed behind the head (for some, it was the rear portion toward the neck). During this time, Experimenter asked the subject to identify which portions of the hand or arms that they developed strong pressure, at which area of the head, and from which direction. Experimenter gathered these data because this act is done mainly when one leans against an object to maintain repose of the head and neck and when one performs exercise to strengthen the stomach muscles while maintaining repose of the head and neck. In addition, this act is primarily done unconsciously by all individuals using both arms to temporarily maintain repose of the head and neck and arms (contact and stabilization act). This act is always done by taking one's unique form at one's unique specific area at the head and neck. For this reason, the specific area of the head and neck where this act is done and the form that occurs at this position is unique between each individual. Not only is it unique between each individual, even for the same person, it differs depending on the position one takes. Furthermore, the number of forms differs between individuals. This is because the form is controlled by one's instinctive genes (that controls one's repose of the head and neck during sleep) and the earth's gravity. While this act is taking place, all individuals form this unique form at one's specific area of one's head, and with their hands or arms, apply strong directional pressure to certain sections of the fulcrum area group at one's head and neck. The details of the form of this act and pressure are completely different among individuals, which is also true of one's “area of contact with the pillow.”

The subjects were in a seated position and performed the same act. Experimenter gathered this data. Experimenter compared the data and developed an accurate figure. Experimenter developed a final diagram by comparing this diagram and the previous diagram.

EXPERIMENT 6

Relationship between Anatomical Factors and Fulcrum Area Positioned at Specific Areas

Data for those whose contact area with the pillow is very small and vertical overlap of the upper anterior teeth is extremely shallow and those that are not was selected. Subjects were separated into two groups, where one group had very shallow upper anterior vertical overlap and the other group did not. Experimenter confirmed which group had a fulcrum area located at the top rear portion of the head. Experimenter re-confirmed the results. Experimenter confirmed which group placed their hands on the rear upper portion of the head and where the strong pressure was applied. As a result, it was confirmed that for those with extremely shallow vertical overlap of the upper anterior teeth, they applied strong directional pressure at the upper part of the rear of the head.

By using an elimination method based on the cause and effect confirmed between the vertical overlap of the upper anterior teeth and the fulcrum area at the upper part of the rear of the head as analysis method, the cause and effect between other physiological genes and the direction of one's strong directional pressure necessary for specific fulcrum area was confirmed. As a result, the relationship between the specific physiological genes and specific fulcrum areas was confirmed (See FIG. 1 and FIGS. 4 through 17).

EXAMPLE 7

Origin of “Natural Instinctive Genes”

The subjects included 102 Japanese subjects and their mother. Also, 20 children above 6 years old in their growth period and their mothers or both parents were added. The investigation involved research of the mothers regarding the nursing method of the infant during the first 90 days after birth by the mother or others, and also any nose infections by the child during this period. Based on observation, it was concluded that that the head and neck is the first function that is established among all function during one's repose during sleep is based on the analysis results of the following two observations.

First, for those whose fulcrum area was located at the outer portion of the center of the forehead, at the front part of the head (upper portion of the center of the forehead), or at the lower jaw (including the chin), they could sleep facing down. However, for those who did not, they could not sleep facing down. However, for those whose fulcrum area was located at the outer portion of the center of the forehead and front part of the head (upper portion of the center of the forehead), it was simply fulcrum area without any function. Second, for those whose fulcrum area was at the rear of the head where it includes the central portion, these people always turned their neck and body together when they confirmed traffic when crossing the street. They slept facing up, constantly facing the front, and had a horseshoe-shaped upper teeth arch.

From these two observations, it could be analyzed that the repose mechanism during sleep (excluding the head and neck portion) is reflective and developed from the repose of the head and neck during sleep. The head and neck is the first repose that is developed among the function of repose of the head and neck during sleep.

While the invention has been described in detail and with reference to specific embodiments thereof, it will be apparent to one skilled in the art that various changes and modifications can be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope thereof. Thus, it is intended that the invention covers the modifications and variations of this invention provided they come within the scope of the appended claims and their equivalents.