Title:
Multi-layer web and method for making automation-compatible multipage inserts
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A multi-layer web and method for making an automation-compatible multi-layer web from a continuous web, where the multi-layer web can be separated into a plurality of inserts, such as booklets. The multi-layer web is constructed with adhesive and perforations such that it can be conveniently fed through an automated machine commonly known in the art to rapidly separate perforations and secure the resulting booklet to a printed publication.



Inventors:
Hudetz, Peter R. (Plainfield, IL, US)
Application Number:
11/732266
Publication Date:
10/02/2008
Filing Date:
04/02/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
428/43
International Classes:
B65D65/28
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
CHANG, VICTOR S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
JAS[ER W. DPCLREU;BRINKS HOFER GILSON & LIONE (NBC TOWER, SUITE 3600, P.O. BOX 10395, CHICAGO, IL, 60610, US)
Claims:
1. A high speed method for making automation-compatible, multi-page inserts comprising the steps of: providing a continuous web of paper with a longitudinal edge; forming an adhesive area adjacent the longitudinal edge; forming a multi-layer web from the continuous web such that each layer is bound by adhesive to an adjacent layer along the longitudinal adhesive area; perforating the multi-layer web along a continuous longitudinal line; perforating the multi-layer web along a plurality of latitudinal lines to define individual pages of the multi-page inserts; and configuring the multi-layer web for automated insertion of the multi-page inserts into printed publications.

2. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of forming a plurality of spaced latitudinal areas of adhesive on the continuous web such that the multi-layer web is bound together along the longitudinal adhesive area and the plurality of latitudinal adhesive areas.

3. The method of claim 1 wherein configuring the multi-layer web comprises winding the multi-layer web around a cylinder to create a roll.

4. The method of claim 1 wherein configuring the multi-layer web comprises fan folding the multi-layer web along the latitudinal perforations to create a continuous stack of inserts.

5. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of feeding the multi-layer web into a machine for automated insertion of the multi-page inserts into printed publications.

6. The method of claim 5 further comprising the step of separating the latitudinal perforations of the multi-layer web to create individual inserts.

7. The method of claim 5 further comprising the step of securing the multi-page inserts to the printed publications with an adhesive.

8. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of feeding the continuous web through a printing press before forming the adhesive area adjacent the longitudinal edge.

9. The method of claim 8 wherein desired content is printed onto the continuous web in the printing press.

10. The method of claim 2 wherein forming a plurality of spaced latitudinal adhesive areas comprises applying glue with a metering roller.

11. The method of claim 1 wherein forming the multi-layer web comprises folding the multi-layer web along at least one fold line parallel to the longitudinal edge.

12. The method of claim 11 wherein the method further comprises separating folded layers of the multi-layer web with a slitting device.

13. The method of claim 1 wherein forming a multi-layer web comprises slitting the continuous web and shifting the resulting layers onto each other.

14. The method of claim 1 wherein forming a multi-layer web comprises providing more than one continuous web initially.

15. The method of claim 1 wherein the method further comprises die cutting the continuous web to form a plurality of slots to enable adhesive to bind one layer to a non-adjacent layer through the slot.

16. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of bonding one or more layers of the multi-layer web together to form at least one thicker layer within the multi-layer web.

17. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of kiss cutting one or more layers of the multi-layer web to create a flap that can be opened to reveal content on an adjacent layer.

18. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of creating one or more removable labels by kiss cutting a first layer of the multi-layer web in an enclosed pattern, applying adhesive to one side of the multi-layer web within the enclosed pattern, applying a release coating on an adjacent second layer of the multi-layer web, and bonding the first and second layers together.

19. The method of claim 1 further comprising the step of creating one or more removable envelopes within the multi-page inserts by applying a remoistenable glue to the continuous web, applying adhesive to the continuous web and folding the web onto the adhesive such that a pocket is formed.

20. A high speed method for making automation-compatible multi-page inserts comprising the steps of: providing a continuous web with a top side, a bottom side, a top longitudinal edge, and a bottom longitudinal edge; feeding the web into a master pull roller, wherein the master pull roller controls the speed at which the web moves; applying a longitudinal area of adhesive to the paper along the top longitudinal edge such that the paper is divided into a longitudinal adhesive area and a non-adhesive area; applying a plurality of evenly spaced latitudinal areas of adhesive to the continuous web between the top longitudinal edge and the bottom longitudinal edge such that a plurality of latitudinal adhesive areas are formed and a plurality of non-adhesive areas are defined by the rectangular boundaries having edges along the longitudinal adhesive area, the bottom longitudinal edge, and the latitudinal adhesive areas; binding the continuous web of paper to itself along the longitudinal adhesive area and the plurality of latitudinal adhesive areas to create a multi-layer web; creating a longitudinal perforation by perforating the multi-layer web along a continuous longitudinal line defined parallel to the boundary between the longitudinal adhesive area and the non-adhesive areas; creating a plurality of latitudinal perforations by perforating the multi-layer web along a plurality of latitudinal lines defined adjacent each latitudinal adhesive area and extending from the top longitudinal edge to the bottom longitudinal edge such that the plurality of latitudinal adhesive areas are positioned to act as a bindings for multi-page inserts defined by the latitudinal perforations; configuring the multi-layer web for automated insertion of the multi-page inserts into printed publications.

21. A perforated, continuous multi-layered web comprising: a first continuous web with a top longitudinal edge, and a bottom longitudinal edge; a longitudinal area of adhesive along the top longitudinal edge such that the paper is divided into a longitudinal adhesive area and a non-adhesive area; at least one additional continuous web, congruent to the first continuous web, wherein each continuous web is bonded to the adjacent continuous web at the longitudinal adhesive area to create a multi-layer web; a longitudinal perforation extending through the multi-layer web along a continuous longitudinal line; and a plurality of latitudinal perforations extending through the multi-layer web along a plurality of latitudinal lines defined adjacent each latitudinal adhesive area and extending from the top longitudinal edge to the bottom longitudinal edge.

22. The product of claim 21 further comprising a plurality of evenly spaced latitudinal areas of adhesive on the first continuous web between the top longitudinal edge and the bottom longitudinal edge such that a plurality of latitudinal adhesive areas are defined, and a plurality of non-adhesive areas are defined by the rectangular boundaries having edges along the longitudinal adhesive area, the bottom longitudinal edge, and the latitudinal adhesive areas;

23. The product of claim 21 wherein the multi-layer web comprises a continuous roll of webbing wound around a cylinder.

24. The product of claim 21 wherein the multi-layer web comprises a stack of continuous webbing fan folded along the latitudinal perforations.

25. The product of claim 22 wherein the longitudinal perforation comprises a continuous longitudinal line defined parallel to the boundary between the longitudinal adhesive area and the non-adhesive areas.

26. The product of claim 22 wherein the multi-layered web further comprises desired content printed on at least one of the non-adhesive areas.

27. The product of claim 21 further comprising adhesive underneath the longitudinal adhesive area of the multi-layer web such that the individual inserts can be secured to printed publications with the adhesive.

28. The product of claim 22 wherein the latitudinal adhesive is positioned to act as a binding for a booklet formed by the multiple layers of the multi-layer web.

29. The product of claim 21 wherein one or more layers of the multi-layer web are bonded together to form a thicker layer.

30. The product of claim 22 wherein one layer of the multi-layer web includes a flap that can be opened up to reveal content on the layer below.

31. The product of claim 22 wherein the multi-layer web includes one or more removable labels comprising a first layer in an enclosed pattern having adhesive on one side within the enclosed pattern, a release coating on an adjacent second layer, and a bond between the first and the adjacent second layer.

32. The product of claim 22 wherein the multi-layer web further comprises one or more removable envelopes comprising a remoistenable glue to the web during the printing process, applying adhesive and folding such that a pocket is formed.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates, generally, to systems and methods for dynamic insertion and attachment of booklets into printed material such as periodicals and, more particularly, to a high-speed method for making convenient, automation-compatible booklet inserts for printed publications such as newspapers, magazines and the like.

BACKGROUND

In the printing industry, magazines, newspapers and other publications often have special advertising inserts that include business reply cards, coupons and the like. Advertising is a particularly effective way for companies to promote new products and revive older brands. To be effective, advertising inserts need to be attractive to the consumer, and in addition, they must also be convenient to use and access. To make such inserts worth the investment for an advertiser, the inserts must be relatively inexpensive to manufacture. An advertiser must be able to supply a large quantity to be inserted into a publication in a short amount of time.

Many printers face the problem of how to place response cards, newsnotes, Post-it® or other adhesive note products, coupons, order forms, or other promotional pieces on press-finished products without adding another off-line finishing operation. A card application machine such as the Hurletron® ElectroCard® 3G (hereinafter a “Hurletron-type machine”) is commonly known among those skilled in the art and is disclosed in U.S. Pat. No. 5,968,307 and U.S. Pat. No. 6,006,669. Such a Hurletron-type machine can apply 100,000 pieces per hour to a moving web on high-speed gravure, offset or newspaper presses. The machine places these pieces with plus or minus one eighth of an inch accuracy on a designated page of a printed publication without disrupting the printing operation or adding off-line operations. The Hurletron-type machine attaches cards, Post-it® or adhesive products, coupons, samples, etc. to a moving web at press speed. These pieces are generally only single-ply. The promotional pieces are often supplied in a continuous card stream separated by “weak links” or perforations, or they can be supplied as loose, individual pieces via a carrier web. The Hurletron-type machine has a vacuum drum which runs at press speed. It also has a register cylinder which runs at approximately one-third press speed. This causes the perforations connecting the promotional pieces to “burst” between a nip wheel and the register cylinder, releasing the pieces to a vacuum drum. When required, a thin stream of hot-melt adhesive is applied as the promotional pieces are transported to the register cylinder. From the register cylinder, the Hurletron-type machine goes on to secure the promotional piece to the printed publication at press speed.

When securing booklet inserts into printed publications, advertisers generally supply the finished, loose, individual booklet inserts to be secured to the publication. Applying such loose, individual booklet inserts can be difficult and time-consuming to align, feed into a machine, and secure.

Consequently, a need exists for advertising inserts that are attractive and convenient. In addition, a need exists for an inexpensive method to manufacture such inserts rapidly and in a way that is compatible with existing web printing presses equipped with in-line card application capabilities.

SUMMARY

In one embodiment, a high speed method for making automation-compatible, multi-page inserts includes providing a continuous web of paper with a longitudinal edge. An adhesive area is formed adjacent the longitudinal edge and a multi-layer web is formed from the continuous web such that each layer is bound by adhesive to an adjacent layer along the longitudinal adhesive area. The multi-layer web is perforated along a continuous longitudinal line and along a plurality of latitudinal lines to define individual pages of the multi-page inserts. The multi-layer web is configured for automated insertion of the multi-page inserts into printed publications.

In another embodiment, a perforated, continuous multi-layered web includes a first continuous web with a top longitudinal edge, and a bottom longitudinal edge. A longitudinal area of adhesive resides along the top longitudinal edge such that the paper is divided into a longitudinal adhesive area and a non-adhesive area. At least one additional continuous web is provided congruent to the first continuous web, where each continuous web is bonded to the adjacent continuous web at the longitudinal adhesive area to create a multi-layer web. A longitudinal perforation extends through the multi-layer web along a continuous longitudinal line. A plurality of latitudinal perforations extend through the multi-layer web along a plurality of latitudinal lines defined adjacent each latitudinal adhesive area and extending from the top longitudinal edge to the bottom longitudinal edge.

In yet another embodiment, a high speed method for making automation-compatible multi-page inserts includes providing a continuous web with a top side, a bottom side, a top longitudinal edge, and a bottom longitudinal edge. The web is fed into a master pull roller, where the master pull roller controls the speed at which the web moves. A longitudinal area of adhesive is applied to the paper along the top longitudinal edge such that the paper is divided into a longitudinal adhesive area and a non-adhesive area. A plurality of evenly spaced latitudinal areas of adhesive are applied to the continuous web between the top longitudinal edge and the bottom longitudinal edge such that a plurality of latitudinal adhesive areas are formed and a plurality of non-adhesive areas are defined by the rectangular boundaries having edges along the longitudinal adhesive area, the bottom longitudinal edge, and the latitudinal adhesive areas. The continuous web of paper is bound to itself along the longitudinal adhesive area and the plurality of latitudinal adhesive areas to create a multi-layer web. A longitudinal perforation is created by perforating the multi-layer web along a continuous longitudinal line defined parallel to the boundary between the longitudinal adhesive area and the non-adhesive areas. A plurality of latitudinal perforations are created by perforating the multi-layer web along a plurality of latitudinal lines defined adjacent each latitudinal adhesive area and extending from the top longitudinal edge to the bottom longitudinal edge such that the plurality of latitudinal adhesive areas are positioned to act as a bindings for multi-page inserts defined by the latitudinal perforations. The multi-layer web is configured for automated insertion of the multi-page inserts into printed publications.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1A is a schematic side view of the beginning processes for making booklet inserts according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 1B is a schematic side view of the beginning processes for making booklet inserts according to one embodiment of the invention with a printing press.

FIG. 1C is a schematic side view of intermediate processes for making booklet inserts according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 1D is a schematic side view of intermediate processes for making booklet inserts according to one embodiment of the invention with a die cutter.

FIG. 1E is a schematic side view of one embodiment for configuring a multi-layer web for making booklet inserts according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 1F is a schematic side view of another embodiment for configuring a multi-layer web for making booklet inserts according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a top view of a perforated, continuous multi-layer web in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view where a booklet has been detached from the web by separating the latitudinal perforations according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 4A is a perspective view where the perforated, continuous multi-layer web is fan folded and stacked according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 4B is a perspective view where the perforated, continuous multi-layer web is wound into a roll according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 5A illustrates a booklet as attached to a printed publication according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 5B illustrates a booklet as detached from a printed publication according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 6 is a top view of a perforated, continuous multi-layer web in accordance with one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a booklet that has been detached from the multi-layer web by separating the latitudinal perforations according to one embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a booklet that has been detached from the multi-layer web by separating the latitudinal perforations according to another embodiment of the invention, including a revealing flap.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a booklet that has been detached from the multi-layer web by separating the latitudinal perforations according to yet another embodiment of the invention including a label sticker.

FIG. 10 illustrates a continuous multi-layer web having slots cut into the continuous web before application of adhesive.

FIG. 11 illustrates a continuous web in which one of the layers of the multi-page insert is an envelope in accordance with another alternative embodiment.

It will be appreciated that for simplicity and clarity of illustration, machine elements illustrated in the Figures have not necessarily been drawn to scale. For example, the dimensions of some of the elements are exaggerated relative to others for clarity. Further, where considered appropriate, reference numerals have been repeated among the Figures to indicate corresponding elements.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present invention provides a high-speed method for making convenient, automation-compatible inserts for printed publications such as newspapers, magazines, or other printed media. The present invention further provides a perforated, continuous multi-layered web that can be fed into an automated machine for inserting booklets into printed publications, such as a Hurletron-type machine. Because of the continuous nature of the multi-layered web produced by the present method, it is compatible with the high-speed Hurletron-type machines, which can separate perforations and secure the resulting multi-layered booklet inserts into printed publications. Hurletron-type machines are well known in the art. Although the exemplary embodiments of the invention described below generally relate to making automation-compatible booklet inserts, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the method and product of the invention can equally be utilized and incorporated into a variety of printing methods.

Illustrated in FIGS. 1A-F is a schematic side view of processing steps in accordance with various embodiments of a process for making booklet inserts. An assembly line starts at the roll stand 10, where a roll or web of paper 7 is unwound and a continuous web of paper 11 is fed into an infeed device 20. In FIG. 1A, a second roll of paper 8 is illustrated inside the roll stand 10 to demonstrate positioning for splicing automatically when the first roll 7 expires. The continuous web of paper 11 can be fed into the infeed device 20 by itself or with a conveyor belt or carrier web if the paper cannot withstand the tension. It should be noted that while paper is used in the illustrative embodiment, one of skill in the art will appreciate that another web material may be used, such as a variety of flexible plastics or synthetic rubber compounds or the like.

In FIG. 1A, the continuous web of paper 11 is conveyed without a carrier web. The continuous web of paper 11 is defined as having a top side 2 and a bottom side 3, as well as a top longitudinal edge 16 and a bottom longitudinal edge 17. Each of the top side 2, the bottom side 3, the top longitudinal edge 16 and the bottom longitudinal edge 17 extend the entire length of the continuous web of paper 11. In another embodiment, more than one web of paper can run through the assembly line at once. In the embodiment depicted in FIG. 1A, the continuous web of paper 11 is a pre-printed roll where the advertising content 22 has already been printed onto what will become the non-adhesive area 14 of the paper.

The next step in the illustrative embodiment is for the continuous web of paper 11 to be processed by the infeed device 20. The infeed device 20 manages the amount of tension in the web, and controls amount of paper supplied to rest of line to allow for consistent feeding throughout the process. Such a device is well known to those skilled in the art. The infeed device 20 supplies the continuous web of paper 11 to the master pull roller 30.

The master pull roller 30 is generally designed to inform the rest of the servo driven line what speed to operate based on a repeat mark found on the printed, continuous web of paper 11. This device is also well known by those of skill in the art.

In another embodiment, illustrated in FIG. 1B, when the continuous web of paper 11 is not pre-printed, the roll stand 10 can feed the continuous web of paper 11 into an infeed device 20 then into a printing press 39 to print the advertising content 22 on the paper. The printing press 39 is well known in the art and the resulting printed web has its speed controlled by the printing press 39 just as it would by a master pull roller 30. It should also be noted that for local or regional advertising, ink jet technology can be implemented to customize the content printed on the continuous web. Such ink jet printing technology is commonly known by those of skill in the art. In the illustrative embodiment, the ink jet technology can be implemented at multiple locations along the line, including the location of the printing press 39 in FIG. 1B. In another embodiment, the ink jet technology can be implemented after the continuous web 11 is fed through the master pull roller 30.

As depicted in FIG. 1C, the next step in the illustrative embodiment is the application of an adhesive 41 such as a hot melt glue by the hot melt gluer 40. The hot melt gluer 40 is a device known by those skilled in the art. The adhesive 41 is later used to bond layers of paper together. The hot melt gluer 40 applies a continuous longitudinal strip of adhesive 41 through a nozzle 46. The continuous web of paper 11 is fed between the master pull roller 30 and a first plow station 50. Before the continuous web of paper 11 reaches the first plow station 50, the adhesive 41 is applied to the continuous web of paper 11 on the top side 2 near the top longitudinal edge 16 as it passes, thus creating a longitudinal adhesive area 42.

The continuous web 11 with a strip of longitudinal adhesive is next fed into the first plow station 50, which, in this embodiment, folds the continuous web 11 in half along a longitudinal line parallel with the top longitudinal edge 16 and half way between the top longitudinal edge 16 and the bottom longitudinal edge 17. It should be noted that in alternative embodiments, many variations are possible as the plow station 50 could fold the continuous web more than once and in a number of locations. Furthermore, the hot melt gluer 40 could apply more than one strip of adhesive that would eventually align with the top longitudinal edge of the insert. In addition, it should be noted that although the illustrative embodiment has two plow stations, more plow stations can be used to create inserts with more layers.

After exiting the first plow station 50, the continuous web 11 has become a multi-layer web of paper 12, which has been folded in half and the two layers are bound together along the longitudinal adhesive area 42, illustrated in FIGS. 2 and 3. Next, adhesive 43 is applied to the multi-layer web of paper 12 through another nozzle 48 from the hot melt gluer 40. The adhesive 43 is applied on the top side 2 near the top longitudinal edge 16 as it passes, thus creating another longitudinal adhesive area 42, directly on top of the previously applied longitudinal adhesive area. The longitudinal adhesives 41 and 43, and the layers of paper between them will be collectively referred to as the longitudinal adhesive area 42.

As in the first plow station 50, the second plow station 60 folds the web that enters. In this embodiment, the web entering the second plow station 60 is a two-layer web of paper with an area of exposed longitudinal adhesive on the top side 2. The second plow station 60 folds the web in half as in the first plow station 50, thus binding one two-layer web to the other two-layer web to create a four-layer web, which is referred to as a multi-layer web 12.

It should be noted that in this embodiment, the multi-layer web of paper 12 has been folded. To create a booklet-style insert the folds must be slit to enable the booklet to have loose pages. As illustrated in FIGS. 1E and 1F, the multi-layer web of paper 12 is fed into a slitting device 76, where these folds are cut off. The slitting device 76 cuts off the folded edge, for example by cutting the folded portions of the web an eighth of an inch from the folded edge. The trim waste is then evacuated. This is done with a rolling blade that slits through the paper at the folds. Such a slitting device is commonly known in the art. It should be noted that the slitting of the folded edges can take place in the illustrated location, or, for example, at a location along the assembly line immediately following the plow stations or even after the rotary die cutter 70.

In an alternative embodiment, the final inserts are booklets with a binding near the left edge 18. In order to create such a binding, a plurality of latitudinal adhesive areas must be applied to the multi-layer web. This application of latitudinal adhesive can take place within the plow stations. In the illustrative embodiment depicted in FIGS. 1C and 1D, the first plow station 50 and the second plow station 60 each have a metering roller 55 and 65, which can apply cold glue. The metering rollers are equipped with a pad that picks up glue off a metering roller and transfers the glue to the web. Metering rollers are commonly known in the art. In the illustrative embodiment, the first metering roller 55 applies a latitudinal area of adhesive perpendicular to the longitudinal adhesive area 42. The latitudinal adhesive area 44 is formed in a similar fashion to the longitudinal adhesive area 42 in that the adhesive is applied before the plow station 50 folds the layers onto each other. The result is that the continuous web of paper 11 is bound to itself at both the longitudinal adhesive area 42 and the latitudinal adhesive area 44, thus forming a two-layer web of paper.

As illustrated in FIG. 10, in one alternative embodiment, in order to eliminate one or more adhesive application steps, a plurality of longitudinal slots 99 or latitudinal slots 89 can be cut into the continuous web 11 before it enters the first plow station 50. This can be done with a die cutter 83 as illustrated in FIG. 1D. By providing the slots, one or more applications of longitudinal adhesive can be eliminated because the first application of longitudinal or latitudinal adhesive can bond a first layer, bypassing a second layer with the slot, to a third, non-adjacent layer if the adhesive area is aligned such that the adhesive goes through the slot.

As in the first plow station 50, the second plow station 60 has a metering roller 65 which again applies a latitudinal area of adhesive just before the folding process. As such, the multi-layer web of paper 12 has a plurality of evenly spaced latitudinal adhesive areas 44 which are created as the web progresses through the plow stations. The latitudinal adhesive and the layers of paper between them will be collectively referred to as the latitudinal adhesive areas 44.

In another embodiment depicted in FIG., ribbon shifters can be placed where the first and second plow stations 50 and 60 are located to accomplish the task of creating a multi-layer web of paper 12, 13 by cutting or slitting the web and shifting two or more layers upon each other instead of folding the layers upon each other. Ribbon shifters are commonly known by those of skill in the art.

In another embodiment, the hot melt gluer 40 can apply adhesive in locations such that portions of one web layer can be completely glued to another web layer to form a resulting layer of increased thickness. This can be useful for an embodiment where the desired result is to combine two pages of the final booklet insert in order to increase their thickness to seven thousandths of an inch to comply with the thickness required for the mailing of post cards, business reply mail and the like.

As depicted in FIG. 8, in yet another embodiment, a die cutter can kiss cut certain portions of the multi-layer web 12 to reveal content 98 on the adjacent layer underneath the reveal flap 97. The kiss cut would preferably take place after the first plow station 50, where a die cutter goes through a first layer of paper, but not the second layer. This technology is well known in the art. Similarly, a die cutter can kiss cut an enclosed pattern to create removable labels as depicted in FIG. 9. In one embodiment, such a label 96 can be created by kiss cutting a first layer in the desired pattern. Then adhesive can be applied to the underside of the enclosed pattern to create a sticker label 96, for example with a metering roll. On the adjacent layer, a release coating 95 must be pre-applied to enable the label 96 to release from that layer. This release coating 95 will preferably be applied in the printing process. Using a UV lamp to cure the release coating during the printing process, the cured release coating is hardened and the label 96 will not stick to the resulting cured release coating 95. Finally, the two adjacent layers are bonded together in the plow stations, thus positioning the label 96 adjacent the release coating 96.

In another embodiment illustrated in FIG. 11, a removable envelope is contemplated as one or more of the individual pages making up the perforated, continuous multi-layer web 13. In this embodiment, a remoistenable glue 87 can be applied, for example with a metering roll 55 as in the first plow station 50 or with a nozzle at the location of the first hot glue nozzle 46. The remoistenable glue 87 can also be applied as a cold glue with a metering roller during the printing process in the printing press 39. In this embodiment, side adhesive areas 85 are needed to create the pocket opening 86. The pocket is created with the application of a side adhesive with metering rollers as in the plow station in a similar fashion to the application of the latitudinal adhesive. Next, a fold is created at the bottom longitudinal edge 17, created by either the first or second plow station. This fold will leave a space for the remoistenable glue 87 to be folded over and the fold will also bond the layers along the side adhesives to make the pocket that becomes the envelope.

It should be noted that the preferred embodiment produces inserts with a maximum length of 8.5 inches and a minimum length of 3 inches. The preferred width is in the range having a maximum of 6 inches and a minimum of 3 inches. In the preferred embodiment, it should also be noted that the perforated, continuous multi-layer web 13 has a preferred maximum thickness of 0.040 inches. To conform to some of the standard equipment in the field, the preferred embodiment has a length of 5.9167 inches between each latitudinal perforation 74.

FIGS. 1E and 1F, illustrate alternative next steps in the illustrative embodiment. For clarity, FIGS. 1E and 1F illustrate alternative embodiments which can follow directly after the processes illustrated in FIG. 1C or 1D. As previously explained, the slitting device 76 can slit the folded edges off if desired. In another embodiment, the longitudinal perforation 72 can be made continuously before the multi-layer web 12 enters the die cutter in a continuous perforating device 78 by a notch wheel or perforation wheel 79. The use of continuous perforating equipment is commonly known in the art. It provides the further advantage in this embodiment by enabling one to control the strength of the longitudinal perforation 72 and the latitudinal perforations 74 independently. The multi-layer web of paper 12, illustrated exiting FIGS. 1C and 1D, is fed into the rotary die cutter 70, another device known by those skilled in the art. The die cutter 70 can impart a continuous longitudinal perforation 72 immediately below the longitudinal adhesive area 42. Alternatively, the longitudinal perforation 72 can be done entirely by the continuous perforating device 78. The rotary die cutter 70 can also impart a plurality of crosswise or latitudinal perforations 74, each of which is located just to the left of the latitudinal adhesive area 44 when viewed from the top as in FIGS. 2 and 3. These latitudinal perforations define the left edge 18 and right edge 19 of the final product illustrated in FIG. 3, the booklet insert 15. Upon exiting the rotary die cutter 70, the emerging product is a glued, perforated, continuous multi-layer web of paper 13.

From the rotary die cutter 70, the perforated, continuous multi-layer web of paper 13 goes to a fan folder 80 in the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 1C. In another embodiment, illustrated in FIG. 1D, the perforated, multi-layer web of paper 13 can go to a rewinding machine 90. Both the fan folder and the rewinding machines are devices commonly known by those of skill in the art. In the fan folded embodiment, the fan folder 80 counter folds the perforated, continuous multi-layer web of paper 13 at each latitudinal perforation 74 to create a continuous stack of booklets 82 that can be fed at a later time into a Hurletron-type machine. In another embodiment, the fan folder could fold the perforated, continuous multi-layer web of paper 13 at every second or third latitudinal perforation 74.

In the rewinding embodiment, the perforated, continuous multi-layer web of paper 13 is fed into the rewinding machine 90 where it rewinds the perforated, continuous multi-layer web of paper 13 into a wound roll 92. This wound roll 92 is another convenient delivery system which can be fed into a Hurletron-type machine at a later time. In yet another alternative embodiment, the perforated, continuous multi-layer web of paper 13 can be fed directly into a Hurletron-type machine without being stacked or wound.

FIG. 4A is a detailed illustration of a fan folded stack 82 of the perforated, continuous multi-layered web of paper 13. This is the final product of the method of the embodiment illustrated schematically in FIG. 1C.

FIG. 4B is a detailed illustration of a wound roll 92 of the perforated, continuous multi-layered web of paper 13. This is the final product of the method of the embodiment illustrated schematically in FIG. 1D.

FIG. 5A and FIG. 5B illustrate an embodiment of the invention after being run through a Hurletron-type machine and secured to a printed publication 100. In FIG. 5A, the booklet 15 is secured to the publication 100 with an adhesive applied by the Hurletron-type machine directly underneath the longitudinal adhesive area 42. Alternatively, those of skill in the art will appreciate that the booklet 15 may be secured to the publication 100 in other ways, for example applying adhesive to the entire bottom page, or with a different means such as staples. In the embodiment illustrated in FIG. 5B, the booklet 15 can be detached from the publication 100 by tearing along the longitudinal perforation 72. Thus, the detached booklet 15 can be conveniently used by consumers, while the securing means is left behind in the form of a stub consisting primarily of the longitudinal adhesive area 42.

Thus it is apparent that there has been described a method for making automation-compatible booklet inserts for printed publications that fully provides the advantages set forth above. Those skilled in the art will recognize that numerous modifications and variations can be made without departing from the spirit of the invention. For example, the perforated, continuous multi-layer web can be configured to be fan folded or wound for convenient feeding into a Hurletron-type machine. The multiple layers of the web, for example, can come from folding, shifting or starting with multiple webs. Accordingly, all such variations and modifications are within the scope of the appended claims and equivalents thereof.