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Title:
Combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator. The combination includes a furnace and an electrical generator. The furnace is gas-fired and has electrical components necessary to operate the furnace. The electrical generator is gas-powered, is electrically connected to the furnace, and activates automatically when normal electrical power to the furnace is interrupted so as to allow the electrical components of the furnace to operate when the normal electrical power to the furnace is interrupted thereby allowing the furnace to operate when the normal electrical power to the furnace is interrupted.


Inventors:
Kaiser, Stewart Ronald (Boca Raton, FL, US)
Application Number:
12/069211
Publication Date:
10/02/2008
Filing Date:
02/08/2008
Assignee:
Isaacs, Mr. Arthur
Perel, Mr. Neil
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F24H3/00
View Patent Images:
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Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Charles, Baxley Esquire E. (90 JOHN STREET, SUITE 309, NEW YORK, NY, 10038, US)
Claims:
The invention claimed is:

1. A combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator, comprising: a) a furnace; and b) an electrical generator; wherein said furnace is gas-fired; wherein said furnace has electrical components; wherein said electrical components of said furnace are necessary to operate said furnace; wherein said electrical generator is gas-powered; wherein said electrical generator is electrically connected to said furnace; and wherein said electrical generator activates automatically when normal electrical power to said furnace is interrupted so as to allow said electrical components of said furnace to operate when the normal electrical power to said furnace is interrupted thereby allowing said furnace to operate when the normal electrical power to said furnace is interrupted.

2. The combination of claim 1, wherein said electrical generator operates on same gas feed already provided for said furnace.

3. The combination of claim 1, wherein said furnace includes an automatically activated electric starter.

4. The combination of claim 1, further comprising an exhaust portion; wherein said exhaust portion includes a water-cooled manifold; wherein exhaust gas from said furnace and said electrical generator flow through said water-cooled manifold of said exhaust portion; wherein said water-cooled manifold of said exhaust portion cools the exhaust gas to form cooled exhaust gas; and wherein said water-cooled manifold of said exhaust portion releases the cooled exhaust gas though a vent pipe to thereby drastically reduce noise for use within a home.

5. The combination of claim 1, wherein said furnace includes a bright bulb; and wherein said bright bulb of said furnace automatically activates when the normal electric power to said furnace is interrupted so as to allow for automatic lighting during interruption of the normal electric power.

6. The combination of claim 1, wherein said furnace includes a receptacle outlet; and wherein said receptacle outlet of said furnace allows a homeowner to plug in an extension cord and power an appliance.

7. The combination of claim 1, wherein said furnace includes a carbon monoxide detector.

8. The combination of claim 7, wherein said furnace includes an alarm; wherein said alarm of said furnace sounds when said carbon monoxide detector of said furnace activates; and wherein said alarm of said furnace disables both said furnace and said electrical generator when said carbon monoxide detector of said furnace activates.

9. The combination of claim 4, wherein said water-cooled manifold of said exhaust portion comprises: a) a first pipe; b) a split tee; c) two small internal pipes; d) a second pipe; and e) a pair of large external pipes; wherein said split tee of said exhaust portion communicates with said first pipe of said exhaust portion; wherein said two small internal pipes of said exhaust portion communicate with said split tee of said exhaust portion; wherein said two small internal pipes of said exhaust portion separate the exhaust gas; wherein said pair of large external pipes of said exhaust portion receive said two small internal pipes of said exhaust portion; and wherein said pair of large external pipes of said exhaust portion cool the exhaust gas from said two small internal pipes of said exhaust portion.

10. The combination of claim 9, wherein said pair of external pipes of said exhaust portion run up on a 45° angle.

11. The combination of claim 9, wherein said pair of external pipes of said exhaust portion contain water chambers; wherein said pair of external pipes of said exhaust portion are connected to each other by a smaller pipe connection of said exhaust portion; and wherein said water chambers of said pair of large external pipes of said exhaust portion fill with water through a smaller pipe of said exhaust portion carrying domestic pressurized water.

12. The combination of claim 9, wherein said two small internal pipes of said exhaust portion exit said water chambers of said pair of external pipes of said exhaust portion though a pair of equal-sized reducing pipes of said exhaust portion; and wherein said pair of equal-sized reducing pipes of said exhaust portion reconnect back together at a pipe of said exhaust portion.

13. The combination of claim 11, wherein water is released through an electric water valve of said exhaust portion, through said smaller pipe of said exhaust portion, and into said water chambers of said pair of external pipes of said exhaust portion, thereby filling said water chambers of said pair of large external pipes of said exhaust portion; and wherein said electric water valve of said exhaust portion is energized upon ignition of said generator.

14. The combination of claim 13, wherein the water fills said water chambers of said pair of large external pipes of said exhaust portion from bottom up assuring equal flow and release of any trapped air.

15. The combination of claim 9, wherein the exhaust gas flowing through said two small internal pipes of said exhaust portion is cooled as it flows through said water chambers of said pair of large external pipes of said exhaust portion and then flows to said single pipe of said exhaust portion; and wherein said single pipe of said exhaust portion is connected to said vent pipe of said exhaust portion for external discharge.

16. The combination of claim 1, further comprising a heat resistant hose and clamp of said exhaust portion; and wherein said heat resistant hose and clamp of said exhaust portion reduce any chance of compromise associated with vibration.

17. The combination of claim 1 1, wherein the water carrying added heat from the exhaust gas is discharged out of said water chambers of said pair of large external pipes of said exhaust portion, through an equal-sized small pipe of said exhaust portion, and discarded to a domestic drainage system.

18. The combination of claim 4, wherein cooling the exhaust gas is adjustably sized to said generator and amount of heat exhausted from said exhaust portion.

19. The combination of claim 4, wherein said exhaust portion includes a liquid flow valve; wherein said liquid flow valve of said exhaust portion closes a circuit to an electrical circuit board and an ignition running system of said generator; and wherein said liquid flow valve of said exhaust portion automatically opens thereby breaking said electrical circuit and stopping said generator portion thereby preventing a heat over-load and damage to said combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator should water flow cease.

20. The combination of claim 15, wherein said exhaust portion includes a heat disc; wherein said heat disc of said exhaust portion is strapped to said single pipe of said exhaust portion carrying the cooled gas; and wherein said heat disc of said exhaust portion opens said electrical circuit that is in series with all other safety and starting devices thereby automatically stopping said electrical generator should temperature of the cooled gas exceed 120° Fahrenheit.

21. The combination of claim 20, wherein said exhaust portion includes another heat disc; wherein said another heat disc of said exhaust portion communicates with said water-cooled manifold of said exhaust portion; and wherein said another heat disc of said exhaust portion opens upon excessive heat and breaks said electrical circuit shutting down said electrical generator.

22. The combination of claim 20, wherein said exhaust portion includes a carbon monoxide switch; wherein said carbon monoxide switch of said exhaust portion is installed above said water-cooled manifold of said exhaust portion; and wherein said carbon monoxide switch of said exhaust portion opens said electrical circuit upon presence of carbon monoxide leaking from said combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator.

23. The combination of claim 4, wherein said exhaust portion is covered with insulation; and wherein said insulation of said exhaust portion prevents condensation from the cold flowing water.

24. The combination of claim 1, further comprising a transfer portion; and wherein said transfer portion is wired to said electrical generator to automatically switch electricity produced directly to a fuse box via a conduit.

25. The combination of claim 24, wherein said transfer portion comprises: a) an auto-switch assembly; and b) a transfer assembly; wherein said transfer assembly of said transfer portion electrically communicates with said auto-switch assembly of said transfer portion; and wherein said transfer assembly of said transfer portion electrically communicates with the fuse box.

26. The combination of claim 25, wherein said transfer assembly of said transfer portion comprises: a) a pair of watt meters; b) a locking power inlet; c) double throw switches; and d) circuit breakers; wherein said pair of watt meters of said transfer assembly of said transfer portion monitor start-up serges of said electrical generator; wherein said locking power inlet of said transfer assembly of said transfer portion receives an appliance power cord; wherein said double throw switches of said transfer assembly of said transfer portion activate circuits wired to said transfer assembly of said transfer portion; and wherein said circuit breakers of said transfer assembly of said transfer portion protect the circuits wired thereto.

27. The combination of claim 9, wherein said first pipe of said exhaust portion is made of cooper; wherein said split tee of said exhaust portion is made of cooper; wherein said two small internal pipes of said exhaust portion are made of copper; wherein said second pipe of said exhaust portion is made of copper; and wherein said pair of large external pipes of said exhaust portion are made of copper.

28. The combination of claim 19, wherein said liquid flow valve of said exhaust portion is a hermetically-sealed spinning flow device.

29. The combination of claim 4, wherein said vent pipe of said exhaust portion is made of PVC.

Description:

1. CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The instant non-provisional patent application claims priority from: provisional patent application No. 60/920,925, filed Mar. 26, 2007, for FURNACE WITH AUTOMATIC GENERATOR CAPABILITIES, and incorporated herein by reference thereto; provisional patent application No. 60/964,994, filed Aug. 16, 2007, for DOUBLE LIQUID MANIFOLD COOLING SYSTEM FOR USE AND METHODS WITHIN FURNACE WITH GENERATOR CAPABILITIES, and incorporated herein by reference thereto; provisional patent application No. 60/965,002, filed Aug. 16, 2007, for FURNACE WITH GENERATOR CAPABILITIES USING SUPER CAPACITORS AND AUTOMATIC SWITCHING TECHNIQUES, and incorporated herein by reference thereto; and provisional patent application No. 60/965,016, filed Aug. 16, 2007, for DOUBLE LIQUID MANIFOLD COOLING SYSTEM FOR USE AND METHODS WITHIN FURNACE WITH GENERATOR CAPABILITIES, and incorporated herein by reference thereto.

2. BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

A. Field of the Invention

The embodiments of the present invention relate to a gas-fired furnace, and more particularly, the embodiments of the present invention relate to a combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator.

B. Description of the Prior Art

Under normal conditions, home heating systems require the use of electricity. Even when the main source of combustion is a fossil fuel, such as oil, natural gas, or propane there is always a need for at least some electricity to power the air blower motor in a forced air system, turn the water pumps in a boiler unit, or just give power to the transformer and the igniter in a steam unit. In almost every case, the heating system requires electricity.

When the power fails, however, so does the heating system. In fact, the largest insurance claim in the United States and Canada is the direct result of frozen and busted pipes occurring during power outages in the winter months. Ice storms and severe winter winds, combined with falling leaves and frozen electrical lines, contribute to this dilemma.

When the power fails in the winter mouths, the home and homeowner are in a considerable amount of danger. Home water pipes can freeze up in hours without internal heat. The temperature within the home can rapidly fall to dangerously cold readings, placing the homeowners in peril.

Most people believe that if they heat their home with a fossil fuel, it continues to work without electricity. This is not true. People also obtain portable gasoline generators to power their lights, televisions, and refrigerators during a power outage, but cannot use them to fire up the most important appliance, their boilers.

Lighting the home's fireplace will help with isolated heating, but will do nothing for pipes inside externally exposed walls, basements, or attics.

Additionally, in the summer time, tropical storms, lightning, power blackouts due to over loaded grids, and other phenomenon cause homes to lose their electrical power. Though not as extreme conditions are apparent in the summer, the loss of television, fan, lights, refrigerator, and other appliance could be inconvenient, if not dangerous. Even during this time, finding gasoline for a generator is difficult due to the fact that when there is a loss of electricity, gas pumps do not work either. Natural gas, oil, and propane in your home, however, are in great supply. Most natural gas lines work when there is a loss of electrical power.

People who own vacation homes are especially prone to this problem; usually finding out that their power has failed too late. Their homes have sustained considerable damage, if not totally destroyed, by flooding from frozen pipes, freeze damage, or even flooding from sump pumps not operating from lack of electricity.

Installing a natural gas or propane automatic generator, which is wired to a home's breaker or fuse panel, could prevent all the above mentioned problems. Such installations, however, require extremely expensive equipment, running gas pipes outside, new electrical cables, etc., most of the time exceeding $10,000.00. The majority of homeowners will not spend that much on the remote chance of a power outage, even if it could prevent disaster.

Air-cooled fossil-fuel generators produce a substantial amount of heat during normal operation. That is why they are designed to operate outdoors where there is sufficient ambient air available to cool them and discharge their exhaust.

Attempting to operate a generator within a confined environment is met with a significant amount of mechanical challenges. Including cooling and safely discharging heat and flue gas.

Numerous innovations for combination furnaces and thermoelectric generators have been provided in the prior art, which will be described below in chronological order to show advancement in the art, and which are incorporated herein by reference thereto. Even though these innovations may be suitable for the specific individual purposes to which they address, however, they differ from the present invention in that they do not teach a combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator.

(1) U.S. Pat. No. 3,881,962 to Rubinstein.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,881,962 issued to Rubinstein on May 6, 1975 in class 136 and subclass 209 teaches a generator of the thermoelectric type, which isolates the fuel combustion area thereof from a series of thermoelectric elements or modules, and makes use of a two-phase vapor heat transfer in which there is a transfer from a liquid phase to a gaseous phase through the intervening presence of a boiler in which a fuel burner is supported. Fuel consumed in the boiler creates heat impinging upon a jacket of the boiler in which a vaporizable fluid is confined. The heated vapor thus produced flows through a series of heat exchange loops radiating from the boiler to heat the hot junctions of the thermoelectric elements. The electrical energy is produced by a potential developed between the hot and cold junctions of the elements.

(2) U.S. Pat. No. 4,520,305 to Cauchy.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,520,305 issued to Cauchy on May 28, 1985 in class 322 and subclass 2 R teaches a thermoelectric electricity generating system for connection with a heat source and a heat acceptor, respectively, by first and second elongate plates of substantially constant cross section and high heat and electrical conductivity. A plurality of flat plate-like thermoelectric members engage, and are firmly sandwiched between the first and second plates. Thin surface layers of low electrical conductivity, but high heat transfer capability across the thickness thereof, are interposed between the thermoelectric members and first and second plates. The first plate may connect with a heat source by fitting in an opening in the wall of a fuel-fired heater to thereby apply a temperature drop across the thermoelectric members and thereby generate electricity.

(3) U.S. Pat. No. 4,942,863 to Chou et al.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,942,863 issued to Chou et al. on Jul. 24, 1990 in class 126 and subclass 110 E teaches a thermoelectric generating assembly for replacement of a heat exchanger mounted in a fuel-burning heater having electricity-consuming components, which includes a thermoelectric generator for supplying the electrical power requirements of the heater components and an adaptor portion for mounting the thermoelectric generator within the heater. The assembly possesses a size and shape approximating that of the heat exchanger to be replaced, and can be mounted within the heater in a manner like that in which the heat exchanger is mounted within the heater prior to removal. The method includes the steps involved in replacing the heat exchanger with the thermoelectric generating assembly.

(4) U.S. Pat. No. 5,062,409 to Kamanaka et al.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,062,409 issued to Kamanaka et al. on Nov. 5, 1991 in class 126 and subclass 99 R teaches a hot-air furnace having a long-flame burner for combusting gas or liquid fuel, with a combustion chamber connected to the burner and having its length (l) and width (w1) in relationship of w1<1. A heat exchanger is located above the combustion chamber and has internally a gas-flow guide plate guiding combustion gas flow discharged from the combustion chamber to the heat exchanger. The heat exchanger has a width (w2) and length (l) in the relationship of w2<1. An exhaust port for exhausting the combustion gas flow is located at the front or rear of, right or left-hand side of, or on the top side above the heat exchanger. A casing has a drum integrally connecting the combustion chamber and the heat exchanger, an air flow guide and a directing plate covering the drum, a radiant heat-absorber plate outside the combustion chamber, and a blower above or below the drum. A discharge port is mounted in such a manner that the direction of discharging air flow corresponds to the up or down position of the blower.

(5) U.S. Pat. No. 5,427,086 to Brownell.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,427,086 issued to Brownell on Jun. 27, 1995 in class 126 and subclass 110 R teaches an uninterruptible gas-fired forced-hot-air furnace utilizing a thermoelectric generator in the path of the hot combusted gas to a heat exchanger. The combustion products flow through the pipes of the heat exchanger to an exhaust that may lead to the chimney or direct vent in the building in which the furnace is located. The thermoelectric generator is also in the path of the forced cold air that also goes to the heat exchanger. The cold air thus picks up heat in the process of cooling the cold junctions of the thermoelectric generator and picks up more heat in the heat exchanger from the combustion products before being ducted into the heating system. The thermoelectric generator cold junctions may be air-cooled by fins connected thereto through which the stream of air from the blower passes or the cold junctions may be cooled by liquid circulated through a liquid-to-air heat exchanger. In both cases, the air from the blower of the furnace first picks up heat from the thermoelectric generator and then from the air-cooled heat exchanger. The thermoelectric generator provides electric power that may be used to operate the motor driving the blower and also to charge a battery used when the furnace is started up. In the event that the power is interrupted, as occurs during storms or fault conditions in the public utility power distribution system, the furnace continues to run uninterruptedly.

It is apparent that numerous innovations for combination furnaces and thermoelectric generators have been provided in the prior art, which are adapted to be used. Furthermore, even though these innovations may be suitable for the specific individual purposes to which they address, however, they would not be suitable for the purposes of the embodiments of the present invention as heretofore described, namely, a combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator.

3. SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Thus, an object of the embodiments of the present invention is to provide a combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator, which avoids the disadvantages of the prior art.

Briefly stated, another object of the embodiments of the present invention is to provide a combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator. The combination includes a furnace and an electrical generator. The furnace is gas-fired and has electrical components necessary to operate the furnace. The electrical generator is gas-powered, is electrically connected to the furnace, and activates automatically when normal electrical power to the furnace is interrupted so as to allow the electrical components of the furnace to operate when the normal electrical power to the furnace is interrupted thereby allowing the furnace to operate when the normal electrical power to the furnace is interrupted.

The novel features considered characteristic of the embodiments of the present invention are set forth in the appended claims. The embodiments of the present invention themselves, however, both as to their construction and to their method of operation together with additional objects and advantages thereof will be best understood from the following description of the specific embodiments when read and understood in connection with the accompanying drawings.

4. BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The figures of the drawing are briefly described as follows:

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic perspective view of the combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator of the embodiments of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic perspective view of the generator portion and the furnace portion, with parts broken away, and identified by ARROW 2 in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic view with parts broken away of the double liquid-cooling manifold portion of the embodiments of the present invention;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged diagrammatic perspective view of a single-cooling manifold identified by ARROW 4 in FIG. 3 and in place of an air-cooled muffler system; and

FIG. 5 is an enlarged diagrammatic perspective view of the transfer portion of the embodiments of the present invention identified by ARROW 5 in FIG. 1.

5. LIST OF REFERENCE NUMERALS UTILIZED IN THE DRAWINGS

  • 10 combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator of embodiments of present invention
  • 12 generator portion
  • 14 furnace portion
  • 16 electric starter
  • 18 natural gas, propane, or oil fired generator
  • 20 battery
  • 22 water-cooled manifold
  • 24 PVC vent pipe
  • 26 bright bulb
  • 28 side of furnace portion 14
  • 30 receptacle outlet
  • 32 carbon monoxide detector
  • 34 alarm
  • 35 exhaust portion
  • 38 copper pipe
  • 40 discharge side of generator portion 12
  • 41 exhaust gas
  • 42 split copper tee
  • 44 two small internal pipes
  • 46 pair of large external pipes
  • 48 water chambers
  • 50 pipe connection
  • 52 pair of equal-sized reducing pipes
  • 54 pipe
  • 56 water
  • 58 small pipe
  • 60 electric water valve
  • 62 cooled gas
  • 66 equal-sized small pipe
  • 68 liquid flow valve
  • 70 heat disc
  • 72 another heat disc
  • 74 carbon monoxide switch
  • 76 pipe insulation
  • 78 transfer portion
  • 80 fuse box
  • 82 conduit
  • 84 auto-switch assembly
  • 86 transfer assembly
  • 88 pair of watt meters of transfer assembly 86 of transfer portion 78
  • 90 locking power inlet of transfer assembly 86 of transfer portion 78
  • 92 double throw switches of transfer assembly 86 of transfer portion 78
  • 94 circuit breakers of transfer assembly 86 of transfer portion 78

6. DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring now to the figures, in which like numerals indicate like parts, and particularly to FIG. 1, which is a diagrammatic perspective view of the combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator of the embodiments of the present invention, the combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator of the embodiments of the present invention is shown generally at 10.

The combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator 10 addresses all of the disadvantages of the prior art, including the monetary issue. At a reasonable price above the cost of conventional boilers or hot water heaters, the combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator 10 is fitted with an automatic generator portion 12 operating on the same fuel already supplied to the furnace portion 14 or hot water heater. Therefore, there is minimal labor or materials required to have alternative electrical energy upon a grid failure. The gas lines, flue pipe or chimney, and electrical lines already terminate at the location of the conventional boiler or hot water heater.

Homeowners may not pay tens of thousands of dollars for an external generator, but will most likely request it if it is reasonably priced above the price of a standard furnace if it will automatically turn-on upon detection of a power failure and protect their homes when they are or are not home. The combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator 10 prevents frozen pipes and other disasters associated with power outages.

As shown in FIG. 2, which is a diagrammatic perspective view of the generator portion and the furnace portion, with parts broken away, and identified by ARROW 2 in FIG. 1, the furnace portion 14 automatically activates an electric starter 16 in a 3500 watt natural gas, propane, or oil fired generator 18 within the furnace portion 14. The size of the generator portion 12 can vary. This is accomplished by using a small battery 20 being continually charged by home current during normal conditions.

The combustion gas of the generator portion 12 flows through a water-cooled manifold 22, drastically reducing engine noise for use within a home. Then the bi-product flumes, i.e., those from the furnace portion 14 and the generator portion 12, flowing through the water-cooled manifold 22 are cooled and released though a PVC vent pipe 24. These gases are as toxic as the flue gas from the furnace portion 14. The combustion gas is then mixed with fresh air to cool the exhaust so that it can be discharged through the same PVC vent pipe 24 as the furnace portion 14. By conditioning and cooling the combustion gas, it is possible to discharge the gas through even the low temperature PVC vent pipe 24.

The activation of the small electrical generator portion 12 transfers the available natural gas, propane, or oil to usable energy for the furnace portion 14 to operate. Although, the generator portion 12 is very small, it does not lack the electricity necessary to maintain operation of the furnace portion 14. Without any electricity, however, the results would be catastrophic.

Residual electricity from the electrical generator 12 not used to operate the furnace portion 14 could be used by the homeowner to maintain necessary appliances, such as, lights, fan, refrigerator, television, radios, medical equipment, etc. These items are usually all an individual needs to be self-sufficient during a short- or long-term power outage.

When the power fails and the generator portion 12 is automatically activated, a bright bulb 26 is energized on the side 28 of the furnace portion 14 so as to allow the homeowner to see in the basement, attic, or mechanical room. This is a safety devise designed to allow for automatic lighting during a power outage so the homeowner is not exposed to dangerous conditions while attempting to reach the furnace portion 14. Dangers like falling down basement steps or up attic stairs would be avoided during this potentially hazardous period.

A receptacle outlet 30 on the side 28 of the furnace portion 14 is energized by the electrical generator 12 so as to allow the homeowner to plug in an extension cord and power an appliance. Although, this technique is the same allotted by a gas-powered outdoor generator, the benefits of the embodiments of the present invention are many. For example, no gasoline is required, no starting an engine outside in usually harsh if not dangerous weather conditions, and an automatic start-up even when one is not present reduces the chance of carbon monoxide poisoning from gas generator flumes.

Families left at home without a person to start or run the prior art generator will benefit as well as the elderly or handicapped. Vacation homes, as well as primary residence, will benefit from the embodiments of the present invention.

A carbon monoxide detector 32 is built into the furnace portion 14, which will detect external carbon monoxide in the event of a leak and will sound an alarm 34 and disable both the furnace portion 14 and the generator portion 12. This makes the embodiments of the present invention far safer then a conventional boiler that does not have such safety devices.

Since the generator portion 12 will be used so little during the life of the furnace portion 14, no or little maintenance is needed, and could be checked when the furnace portion 14 has its normal scheduled maintenance.

As shown in FIGS. 3 and 4, which are, respectively, a diagrammatic view with parts broken away of the double liquid-cooling manifold portion of the embodiments of the present invention, and an enlarged diagrammatic perspective view of a single cooling-manifold identified by ARROW 4 in FIG. 3 and in place of an air-cooled muffler system, the exhaust portion 35 of the embodiments of the present invention includes the water-cooled manifold 22 including a copper pipe 38 connected to the discharge side 40 of the generator portion 12.

The exhaust gas 41 flows through the copper pipe 38 of the exhaust portion 35 into a split copper tee 42 of the exhaust portion 35, separating the gas 41 into two small internal pipes 44 of the exhaust portion 35. The two small internal pipes 44 of the exhaust portion 35 then enter a pair of large external pipes 46 of the exhaust portion 35, which run up on a 45° angle, and which contain water chambers 48 of the exhaust portion 35 that are connected with each other by a smaller pipe connection 50 of the exhaust portion 35.

The two small internal pipes 14 of the exhaust portion 35 then exit the water chambers 48 of the pair of large external pipes 46 of the exhaust portion 35 though a pair of equal-sized reducing pipes 52 of the exhaust portion 35. The pair of equal-sized reducing pipes 52 of the exhaust portion 35 then reconnect back together at a pipe 54 of the exhaust portion 35. The water chambers 48 of the pair of large external pipes 46 of the exhaust portion 35 fill with flowing water 56 through a smaller pipe 58 of the exhaust portion 35 carrying domestic pressurized water 56.

The water 56 is released through an electric water valve 60 of the exhaust portion 35 that is energized upon ignition of the generator portion 12. The water 56 flows through the smaller pipe 58 of the exhaust portion 35 to the water chambers 48 of the pair of large external pipes 46 of the exhaust portion 35. The cold domestic water 56 then fills the water chambers 48 of the pair of large external pipes 46 of the exhaust portion 35 from the bottom up, assuring equal flow and release of any trapped air.

The exhaust gas 41 flowing through the two small internal pipes 14 of the exhaust portion 35 is cooled as it flows through the water chambers 48 of the pair of large external pipes 46 of the exhaust portion 35. The cooled gas 62 then flows to the single copper pipe 54 of the exhaust portion 35 that is then connected to the PVC vent pipe 24 of the exhaust portion 35 for external discharge.

Further included is a heat resistant hose and clamp to reduce any chance of compromise associated with vibration.

The water 56 carrying the added heat from the exhaust gas 41 is then discharged out of the water chambers 48 of the pair of large external pipes 46 of the exhaust portion 35 through an equal-sized small pipe 66 of the exhaust portion 35 and discarded to a domestic drainage system.

This method of cooling the exhaust gas 41 is adjustably sized to the generator portion 12 and the amount of heat exhausted from the exhaust portion 35. Safety devices within the exhaust portion 35 include a liquid flow valve 68. The liquid flow valve 68 of the exhaust portion 35 is a hermetically-sealed spinning flow device that closes a circuit to an electrical circuit board and an ignition running system of the generator portion 12. Should the water flow cease, the liquid flow valve 68 of the exhaust portion 35 automatically opens, breaking the electrical circuit and stopping the generator portion 12, preventing a heat over-load and damage to the combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator 10.

In addition, a heat disc 70 of the exhaust portion 35, rated at 220°, is strapped to the single copper pipe 54 of the exhaust portion 35 carrying the cooled gas 62. Should the temperature of the cooled gas 62 exceed 120° Fahrenheit, the heat disc 70 of the exhaust portion 35 opens the electrical circuit that is in series with all other safety and starting devices. This will also automatically stop the electrical generator portion 12.

In addition, another heat disc 72 of the exhaust portion 35 is placed flour inches off the water-cooled manifold 22 of the exhaust portion 35, which too will open upon excessive heat and break the electrical circuit shutting down the generator portion 12.

In addition, a carbon monoxide switch 74 of the exhaust portion 35 is installed above the water-cooled manifold 22 of the exhaust portion 35, which also will open the electrical circuit upon presence of carbon monoxide leaking from the combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electrical generator 10. The exhaust portion 35 is covered with pipe insulation 76 to prevent any condensation from the cold flowing water 56.

As shown in FIG. 1, it is possible to wire the generator portion 12 to a transfer portion 78 to automatically switch electricity produced directly to a fuse box 80 via a conduit 82.

As shown in FIG. 5, which is an enlarged diagrammatic perspective view of the transfer portion of the embodiments of the present invention identified by ARROW 5 in FIG. 1, the transfer portion 78 comprises an auto-switch assembly 84 and a transfer assembly 86 electrically communicating with the auto-switch assembly 84 of the transfer portion 78 and with the fuse box 80.

The transfer assembly 86 of the transfer portion 78 comprises a pair of watt meters 88, a locking power inlet 90, double throw switches 92, and circuit breakers 94. The pair of watt meters 88 of the transfer assembly 86 of the transfer portion 78 monitor start-up serges. The locking power inlet 90 of the transfer assembly 86 of the transfer portion 78 receives an appliance power cord. The double throw switches 92 of the transfer assembly 86 of the transfer portion 78 activate circuits wired to the transfer assembly 86 of the transfer portion 78. The circuit breakers 94 of the transfer assembly 86 of the transfer portion 78 protect the circuits wired thereto.

It will be understood that each of the elements described above or two or more together may also find a useful application in other types of constructions differing from the types described above.

While the embodiments of the present invention have been illustrated and described as embodied in a combination gas-fired furnace and gas-powered electric generator, however, they are not limited to the details shown, since it will be understood that various omissions, modifications, substitutions, and changes in the forms and details of the embodiments of the present invention illustrated and their operation can be made by those skilled in the art without departing in any way from the spirit of the embodiments of the present invention.

Without further analysis the foregoing will so fully reveal the gist of the embodiments of the present invention that others can by applying current knowledge readily adapt them for various applications without omitting features that from the standpoint of prior art fairly constitute characteristics of the generic or specific aspects of the embodiments of the present invention.