Title:
Cold Weather Garment
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
In one example embodiment of the present invention, the user carries a backpack, which holds the cape inside, until the user requires the cold weather garment. To use the cold weather garment, the user removes the cape from the bag, places the user's feet in the bag and wraps the cape around the user's body. In other embodiments, the cape may be designed to wrap about the users body and at least a portion of the users legs.



Inventors:
Panek, Ron (Chisago City, MN, US)
Application Number:
11/738873
Publication Date:
09/04/2008
Filing Date:
04/23/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
2/69.5, 2/88, 2/243.1, 224/576
International Classes:
A41D5/00; A41D1/00; A41D3/08; A41D13/08; A41D15/04; A41D27/00; A45C15/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
QUINN, RICHALE LEE
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MERCHANT & GOULD PC (P.O. BOX 2903, MINNEAPOLIS, MN, 55402-0903, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A method, comprising: providing a bag defining a cavity and an opening granting access to the cavity, the bag including a cape stored within the cavity of the bag; removing the cape from the cavity of the bag; placing an individual's feet and a portion of the individual's legs in the cavity of the bag; and sitting down and wrapping the cape around the individual's body.

2. A method of using a cold weather garment, the method comprising: providing a backpack defining a cavity and a top portion defining an opening to the cavity, the backpack including a flap, and the backpack including a cape storable within the cavity of the backpack, the cape being wing shaped such that the cape tapers from a first length of the cape, at least a portion of which is coupled to the backpack, to a second length that is a free end of the cape, the first length being greater than the second length; removing the cape from the cavity of the backpack; placing an individual's feet and a portion of the individual's legs in the cavity of the backpack; wrapping the cape around the individual's body; and covering the individual's thighs using the flap when the individual is sitting.

3. The method of claim 2, further comprising fastening fasteners on the cape when the cape is wrapped around the individual's body.

4. The method of claim 2, further comprising placing the individual's hands into a hand warmer that is coupled to the flap.

5. The method of claim 2, further comprising fastening a belt that extends around the individual's torso, the belt being coupled to the cape.

6. The method of claim 2, further comprising detaching the cape from the backpack.

7. The method of claim 2, further comprising: uncovering the individual's thighs; unwrapping the cape from around the individual's body; removing the individual's feet and legs from the cavity of the backpack; and placing the cape into the cavity of the backpack.

8. A method of using a cold weather garment, the method comprising: providing a backpack defining a cavity and a top portion defining an opening to the cavity, the backpack including a flap having a hand warmer, and the backpack including a cape storable within the cavity of the backpack, the cape being wing shaped such that the cape tapers from a first length of the cape, at least a portion of which is coupled to the backpack, to a second length that is a free end of the cape, the first length being greater than the second length, and the cape including fasteners and a belt; removing the cape from the cavity of the backpack; placing the individual's feet and a portion of the individual's legs in the cavity of the backpack; wrapping the cape around the individual's body; fastening the fasteners on the cape and the belt; covering the individual's thighs using the flap when the individual is sitting; and placing the individual's hands into the hand warmer.

9. The method of claim 8, further comprising detaching the cape from the backpack.

10. The method of claim 8, further comprising: removing the individual's hands from the hand warmer; uncovering the individual's thighs; unfastening the fasteners on the cape and the belt; unwrapping the cape from the individual's body; removing the individual's feet and the individual's legs from the cavity of the backpack; and placing the cape into the cavity of the backpack.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

This disclosure pertains to a cold weather garment and method of using said cold weather garment.

BACKGROUND

There are many cold weather activities, especially those involving long periods of inactivity, which require the use of a warm garment. Many of these activities only require the warm garment at particular times during the activity. For example, the garment may not be needed while traveling to and from the activity but is needed during the activity.

Deer hunting, ice fishing or watching sporting events are some examples of activities where a warm garment is not needed while traveling to and from the hunting spot, ice fishing spot or sporting event, but is needed during the activity. For example, staying warm is not a problem while walking to and from the hunting or fishing spot because the physical activity of walking keeps the person warm. But when the person reaches the desired fishing or hunting location they may sit still and become cold without the proper gear. Additionally, a person may begin to perspire while walking to and from hunting or fishing spots, especially if they are wearing a warm garment.

Then, while sitting still waiting for fish to bite or a deer to pass by, a person may become cold because of the cold temperature and inactivity. Furthermore, they may become cold more quickly if they are damp from perspiring. This situation can be exacerbated by wind drafting into seams or openings in typical garments, such as jackets, for example. Jackets allow cold wind to penetrate the interior of the jacket through the bottom, the neck, and sleeves. Wind entering the interior of the jacket, especially in combination with perspiration, greatly reduces the garment's ability to keep a person warm in cold environments.

SUMMARY

In one example embodiment of the present disclosure, a cold weather garment is disclosed, which includes a bag made to receive a user's feet and a cape for wrapping around the user while in a sitting position. The bag has at least one strap for carrying the bag. Capes made according to the principles of the present disclosure can be made in any number of shapes and sizes and can be made of various materials or combinations of materials. For example, in one embodiment the cape may be constructed of a weatherproof material. In yet another embodiment, the cape may be constructed of a quiet material or both a quiet and weatherproof material. The cape, along with the bag, could also be reversible such that different sides serve different functions.

In another example embodiment, the bag has shoulder straps, so the user can carry the bag like a backpack. The user carries the backpack, which has the cape inside, until the user requires the cold weather garment. To use the cold weather garment, the user removes the cape from the bag, places the user's feet in the bag and wraps the cape around the user's body. In some embodiments, a portion of the cape can also wrap around a portion of the bag and the user's legs.

In yet another aspect of an example embodiment, the bag could include a flap for closing the bag when the bag is being transported or stored. When the bag is being used, the cape is removed from the bag. Again, the user places his feet in the bag, but in this example embodiment, the user takes the flap and places it over his lap and then wraps the cape about the user's body to stay warm.

In yet another aspect of an example embodiment, the cold weather garment could include a backpack having a cape connected to the backpack such that the cape fits inside of the backpack and the backpack can be closed when not in use. When the user needs the garment to stay warm, the user removes the cape from the backpack, places his feet inside the bag and wraps the cape around the user's body. In this example embodiment, the cape could include a hood to receive the user's head and fasteners on the cape to keep the cape wrapped about the user's body.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a front perspective view of one example embodiment showing a cold weather garment constructed according to the principles of this disclosure being used.

FIG. 2 is a side perspective view of the embodiment of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a side view of one example embodiment of the cold weather garment constructed according to the principles of this disclosure in its storage and transportation mode.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the example embodiment shown in FIGS. 1-3 constructed according to the principles of this disclosure.

FIG. 4(a) is a cross section of the bag shown in FIGS. 1-4.

FIG. 4(b) is a cross section of the cape shown in FIGS. 1-4.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of another example embodiment of a cold weather garment constructed according to the principles of this disclosure.

FIG. 6 is an example of a cape portion of an example embodiment of the cold weather garment constructed according to the principles of this disclosure.

FIG. 7 is another cape portion of an example embodiment of a cold weather garment constructed according to the principles of this disclosure.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

With reference now to the various drawing figures in which identical elements are numbered identically throughout, example embodiments incorporating the principles of the present disclosure will now be provided.

FIGS. 1-7 represent example embodiments made according to the principles of the present disclosure. The example embodiments illustrated in FIGS. 1-7 are only some of the many configurations that can be built according to this disclosure.

In the example embodiment shown in FIGS. 1-4, the cold weather garment 113 generally comprises a bag 215, and a cape 100. The user sits down placing his feet in the bag 215 and wraps the cape 100 around the user's body. The cape 100, as shown in the example embodiment in FIG. 1, wraps around the user and covers the top portion 210 of the bag 215. Alternatively, the cape 100 can be designed to cover the user's body and only a portion or none of the top portion 210 of the bag 215. The cape 100 may also include a hood 101 having hood flaps 103, which secure over a portion of the user's face to help trap body heat and prevent wind from entering the cold weather garment 113.

The bag 215 includes at least one strap 212, and preferable two straps 212 for carrying the bag 215. The bag 215 in the example embodiment shown in FIG. 1 includes a flap 203. The flap 203 can be used to close the bag 215 when the cape 100 is being carried within the bag 215 as shown in FIG. 3. The flap 203 can also be used to cover the user's thighs when the user's feet are positioned in the cavity 211 of the bag 215 as shown in FIG. 1 and 2. The flap 203 may also include a hand warmer 204 for placing a user's hands into.

FIG. 2 is a side view of the example embodiment shown in FIG. 1 made according to the principles of the present disclosure. FIG. 2 shows a user in a sitting position with his feet and a portion of his legs in the bag 215 and the cape 100 wrapped around the user. The cape 100 includes a hood 101 having concave sides 102 and hood flaps 103. Bag 215 includes a flap 203, the flap 203 having a hand warmer 204. The flap 203 covers the user's thighs and the user can place his hands in the hand warmer 204 attached to the flap 203. The cape 100 is wrapped around the user's body to keep the user warm. In the example embodiment shown in FIG. 2, the cape 100 is attached to the bag 215 at the top portion 210 of the back side 206, such that the user sits on a portion of the cape 110 that is connected to the bag 215.

FIG. 3 is a side view of the example embodiment shown in FIGS. 1, 2 and 4 in the storage and carrying configuration. In this configuration, the cape 100 is placed in the cavity 211 of the bag 215 and the flap 203 is placed over the opening to the cavity 211. The flap 203 includes a hand warmer 204 on the outside of the flap 203. The flap 203 includes at least one flap connector 213, which connects to at least one bag connector 214 to keep the flap 203 secured over the cavity's 211 opening. Alternatively, the bag 215 could have a drawstring that closes the top portion 210 of the bag 215 to preclude at least partial access to the cavity 211.

The bag 215, in this example embodiment, includes straps 212 such that the bag can be worn on the user's back. The bag could also have only one strap to carry the bag. In this alternative configuration, the user could strap the bag across his back using only one strap, or the user could carry the bag, using the one strap, at his side with the strap over one of his shoulders. Alternatively, the strap could be designed to strap the bag across the user's waist.

Referring now to FIG. 4, which illustrates in further detail the example embodiment of FIGS. 1-3. FIG. 4 shows a bag 215 having a cape 100 made for keeping a person warm in cold temperatures.

The bag 215 has a front 205, a backside 206 a first side 207, a second side 208 and a bottom 209. The bag 215 has a height 200, a width 201, and a depth 202. In certain embodiments, the height 200 can range from approximately 10 inches to approximately 36 inches, the width 201 can range from approximately 10 inches to approximately 50 inches, and the depth 202 can range from approximately 10 inches to approximately 24 inches. Generally, the bag 215 is designed to receive the user's feet while wearing shoes or boots. Alternatively, the bag 215 could be designed to receive a user's feet without shoes or boots. The bag 215 could also have at least one of the front 205, the back 206, the first side 207 and the second side 208 include an elastic material to keep the bag 215 secured about at least a portion of a user's legs and to help prevent air from entering the cavity 211 while the user's feet are within the bag 215. Alternatively, an embodiment made according to the present disclosure could include a drawstring assembly to tighten the bag around the user's legs to help prevent air from entering the cavity while the user's feet are within the bag.

The bag 215 could take on a variety of shapes including a rectangle as shown in FIG. 4, or the bag could be circular in shape, half-circular in shape (see bag 415 illustrated in FIG. 5), or any other shape that could define a cavity 211 made to receive a user's feet. The bag could also be configured to the contours of a user's feet, such that little extra space is provided after the user's feet are placed within the bag. The bag 215 could also be reversible. For example, the bag 215 could have one side made of orange or orange camouflage material and the reverse side, i.e. when the bag 215 is turned inside out, could be made of green camouflage material or any other material having various colors, patterns or designs.

The bag 215 as depicted in FIG. 4 includes a flap 203, having a hand warmer 204 connected to the flap 203. The hand warmer 204 could be permanently attached to the flap 203, or alternatively, the hand warmer could be detachably secured to the flap 203. The flap 203 also includes two connector elements 213, which connect to corresponding connector elements 214 attached to the bag 215 such that when connector elements 213 and 214 are connected, the flap 203 covers the opening to the cavity 211. The flap 203 could be connected to the front side 205 at the top portion 210 of the bag 215. Alternatively, the flap 203 could be connected to any portion of the bag 215 such that it can cover the opening of the bag 215 and, when in use, cover the user's thighs.

The bag 215 also includes straps 212 for carrying the bag about a person's shoulders. The straps 212 can be adjustable such that they can accommodate a variety of different sized persons. The straps 212 can be made out of any suitable material strong enough to support the contents of the bag about the user's shoulders. The straps 212 may also be padded for comfort. The straps 212 could be connected to the front side 205 of the bag 215 or any other operable position on the bag 215.

The bag 215 may be made out of one material and one layer or a variety of materials and a variety of layers or any combination of layers and materials. The bag 215, for example, could have an outer protective layer 216, a middle insulating layer 217, and an inner layer 218 as shown in FIG. 4(a). Alternatively, the bag 215 may be made of just one suitable material. The outer portion 216 of the bag 215, for example, may be made out of nylon, rubber, Gore-Tex® fabric from W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc., WindStopper® fabric also from W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc., fleece, wool or any of a variety of suitable materials used by those of skill in the art.

The bag 215 may have an insulation layer 217 as shown in FIG. 4(a). The insulation layer 217, for example, could be made of compressed polyester, wool, down, or any other suitable insulating material known to those of skill in the art. The bag 215 may also have an inner layer 218. The inner layer 218, for example, may be made of wool, fleece, cotton or any of a variety of suitable materials known to those of skill in the art.

In one embodiment, the bag could be made of a weatherproof material. Alternatively, the bag or a portion or layer of the bag could be water resistant, waterproof, wind resistant or windproof or any sensible combination thereof. Alternatively, the bag could be designed such that it has one layer that it is more water resistant than another. The bag could also be designed such that it has one layer that it is more wind resistant than another. The bag could also be designed such that it has one layer that it is more weatherproof than another.

As described, the bag 215 could be made out of any suitable material, or combination thereof, depending upon the bag's purpose or use. For example, if the bag 215 was to be made for hunting purposes, the material could be a durable, waterproof and windproof material and also a quiet material so animals do not hear the bag 215 when it is moved or objects brush against it. The bottom of the bag 209 and at least a portion of the first side 207, second side 208, back side 206, and front side 205, could be made of a waterproof material such that when the bag 215 is on the ground and the user's feet are placed inside the bag 215, the user's feet will remain dry.

FIG. 4 also illustrates one example embodiment of a cape built in accordance with the principles of the present disclosure. The cape 100, as shown in the example embodiment of FIG. 4, could include a variety of features such as cape fasteners 108, cape connectors 109, a belt loop 107 and a belt 106. The cape fasteners 108 and the cape connectors 109 work in conjunction to fasten the cape 100 around a user and hold it in place. The cape 100 could also include a belt loop 107 and a belt 106 for holding a portion of the cape about a user's torso. The belt loop 107 and belt 106 may be configured such that it works with or as a safety belt for use in a tree stand. A safety belt is a device that prevents a user from falling while in an elevated location, such as a tree stand. In this configuration, the belt 106 could be attached to or part of a safety belt connected to a tree to keep a user from falling out of the tree stand. Alternatively, the cape could have vertical straps that would hold a portion of the cape on the user's back and shoulders. Or the cape could have both vertical straps and a belt.

The cape 100 could also include a hood 101. The hood 101 could have concave edges 102 and hood flaps 103. The concave edges 102 help not to block a person's peripheral vision. The hood flaps 103 are designed such that they cover the user's neck and in some embodiments, a portion of a user's face. The hood flaps 103 can be fastened into place using buttons, snaps, Velcro, or any other suitable connecting mechanism. The flaps 103 are designed to at least partially keep the wind from entering the interior of the cold weather garment 113. The portion of the flaps 103 that contact the face could be made of a soft comfortable material so as not to irritate the user's skin. The exterior of the flaps 103 could be made of a windproof and waterproof material to guard a user from the elements. Generally, the flaps 103 could be made of any suitable material or combination of materials known to those of skill in the art.

The cape 100, like the bag 215, could also be reversible. For example, the cape 100 could have one side made of orange or orange camouflage material and the reverse side could be made of green camouflage material. The cape 100 could also have any number of designs printed on it or be made of material having different designs. As described above, the cape could be made at least partially of a material having a camouflage pattern. The cape 100 could also have a sports team emblem on it or made of the team's colors.

In the example embodiment shown in FIG. 4, the cape 100 is connected to the bag 215 using a cape connector 109 at about the cape mid-section 110 on to the backside 206 of the bag 215. The cape connector 109 could be buttons, snaps, a zipper, or any other suitable device for connecting two pieces together. Alternatively, the cape 100 could also be integral to the bag 215, such that the bag 215 and the cape 100 are one piece. The cape 100 could also be detached from the bag 215 and the cold weather garment 113 would still be constructed according to the principles of the present disclosure.

Alternatively, the cape 100 could be attached to the bag 215 at any operable place on the bag 215, as the embodiment shown in the figures are merely example embodiments. The cape 100 could be attached along at least a perimeter of the bag 215, for example, along a portion of the top portion 210 of the bag 215. Such a design could aid in wrapping the user and preventing heat from escaping the interior of the cold weather garment 113 during use. The cape 100 could also be designed such that the user sits on a portion of the cape 100 or the bag 215 where the cape 100 connects to the bag 215. A pad could also be positioned such that a user sits on the pad when using the cold weather garment 113. The pad could be integral to the bag or the cape or a portion of both, or the pad could be detachably connected to the cape or bag.

Like the bag 215, the cape 100 could be made of one layer or a variety of layers and materials. The cape 100 may be made of various layers of material such as, an outer protective layer 114, a middle insulating layer 115 and an inner layer 116 as shown in FIG. 4(b). Alternatively, the cape 100 may be made of just one suitable material. The outer protective layer 114 of the cape 100, for example, may be made out of nylon, rubber, Gore-Tex® fabric from W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc., WindStopper® fabric also from W. L. Gore & Associates, Inc., fleece, wool or any of a variety of suitable materials used by those of skill in the art.

In one embodiment, the cape or a portion or layer of the cape could be made of a weatherproof material. Alternatively, the cape or a portion or layer of the cape could be water resistant, waterproof, wind resistant or windproof or any sensible combination thereof. Alternatively, the outer protective layer could be designed such that it is more water resistant that the insulation layer or inner layer. The outer protective layer could also be designed such that it is more wind resistant that the insulation layer or inner layer. The outer protective layer could also be designed such that it is more weatherproof that the insulation layer or inner layer. The cape, as described above, could be made of a breathable material. The cape could also be treated with a durable water repellant polymer or any other chemical suitable for weatherproofing purposes.

The cape 100 may have an insulation layer. The middle insulation layer, for example, could be made of compressed polyester, wool, down, or any other suitable insulating material known to those of skill in the art. The cape could be designed such that it has one layer that is more insulated than another. The inner layer of the cape 100, for example, may be made of wool, fleece, cotton or any of a variety of suitable material known to those of skill in the art. The materials used to construct the cape can be selected by those of skill in the art depending on the purpose or purposes of the cold weather garment 113.

In other embodiments, the cape could be designed such that it has one layer that it is more water resistant than another. The bag could also be designed such that it has one layer that it is more wind resistant than another. The bag could also be designed such that it has one layer that it is more weatherproof than another.

The cold weather garment 113 could also have different capes for different uses and temperatures. For example, the different capes could have various amounts of insulation, be made of different materials, or have different designs depending on the intended purpose. Thus, different capes could be interchangeable with the bag 215. Cold weather garments built according to the principles of the present invention could be sold as kits, including the bag and the cape, or the bag and the cape could be sold separately.

In the example embodiment illustrated in FIG. 4, the cape 100 is wing shaped. Wing-shaped as used herein means any shape having two sides that protrude outward at least a distance such that a user can wrap the cape 100, which at least partially overlaps itself, around the user. Thus a rectangle would have a mid-section and two square wings protruding therefrom. A circle would also have a mid-section formed at a diameter, and the two half circles would make the wings protruding out from the diameter line. Alternatively, the cape could be constructed in any shape such that it wraps around the user. Thus, the cape could be a variety of shapes, for example, the cape could be approximately rectangular, approximately diamond shaped or approximately trapezoidal in shape. Additionally, the cape could be concave such that it cups around the user and facilitates wrapping the user.

The cape 100, as illustrated in example embodiment of FIG. 4, has a first length 111 and a second length 112. In one embodiment, the second length 112 could be longer than the first length 111. The second length 112 could be approximately 1.5 times longer than the first length 111. The second length 112 could also be approximately 2 times longer than the first length 111. Alternatively, the second length 112 could be approximately the same length as the first length 111.

Alternatively, the cape 100 could have a first length 111 that ranges from approximately 12 inches to approximately 62 inches, and a second length 112 that ranges from approximately 30 inches to approximately 120 inches. The cape 100 could also have a first length 111 that ranges from approximately 24 inches to approximately 52 inches, and a second length 112 that ranges from approximately 48 inches to approximately 72 inches. In yet another embodiment, the first length 111 of the cape could be approximately 42 inches in length and the second length 112 of the cape 100 could be approximately 96 inches in length. As discussed above, the cape 100 can be designed such that it fits into the cavity 211 of the bag 215. The cape 100 could also be designed such that it wraps around the user's body and at least a portion of the bag 215 when the user's feet and a portion of their legs are placed inside the bag 215.

When a person wishes to use the cold weather garment 113 as illustrated in FIGS. 1-4, the user removes the cape 100 from the cavity 211 of the bag 215, places the user's feet in the cavity 211, places the flap 203 on the user's thighs while the user is in a sitting position, and wraps the cape 100 around the user. The user can place his head in the hood 101 and also fasten the cape fasteners 108 to the cape connectors 109 so that the cape 100 remains around the user.

When a user wishes to store or transport the cold weather garment 113, as illustrated in FIGS. 1-4, the user removes the cape 100 from around the user, stands up, removes his feet from the bag 215 and stuffs the cape 100 in the cavity 211, closes the bag 215 and can then use the straps 212 to carry the bag 215.

FIG. 5 illustrates another example embodiment constructed according to the principles of the present disclosure. FIG. 5 illustrates a bag 415 and a cape 300. The cape 300, in this embodiment resembles a poncho. The cape 300 has a cape mid section 310 and a cape connector 309. The cape 300 also has a hood 301. The hood 301 has concave edges 302. The bag 415 as illustrated in FIG. 5 also has straps 412, a flap 403, a hand warmer 404 and flap connectors 413.

FIGS. 6 and 7 show alternative example embodiments of the cape. FIG. 6 illustrates a cape 500 having a hood 501, hood flaps 503 and a cape connector 509. The cape 500 illustrated in FIG. 6 is approximately rectangular in shape. FIG. 7 illustrates another example embodiment of a cape 600 constructed according to the principles of the present disclosure. The cape 600 has a cape connector 609 and a hood 601. The hood 601 has concave edges 602. Alternatively, the cape 600 could be constructed without a hood. FIG. 7 also illustrates a cape 600 having arm sleeves 605. Alternatively, the cape 600 could be sleeveless.

The above specification, examples and data provide a complete description of the manufacture and use of an embodiment the invention. Since many embodiments of the invention can be made without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention, the invention resides in the claims hereinafter appended.





 
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