Title:
Basement wall and floor system
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A basement wall and floor system includes a plurality of connected horizontally and vertically disposed panels. Each panel includes a metal C-channel defining an end thereof. Another metal C-channel defines an opposite end. A plurality of metal studs extend between the C-channels and fit between inside and outside flanges of the C-channels. A metal deck including an outwardly disposed facade and an inwardly disposed face is connected to the studs. Insulation is disposed on the facade side of the metal deck. A waterproofing material is disposed on the insulation.



Inventors:
Forner, Charles K. (Beaver, PA, US)
Scuderi, Salvatore C. (Westfield, MA, US)
Application Number:
12/011526
Publication Date:
08/07/2008
Filing Date:
01/28/2008
Assignee:
The Scuderi Group, LLC.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/169.9, 52/309.1, 52/506.08, 52/741.3
International Classes:
E04B1/74
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
QUAST, ELIZABETH A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
FILDES & OUTLAND, P.C. (20916 MACK AVENUE SUITE 2, GROSSE POINTE WOODS, MI, 48236, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A basement wall and floor system comprising: a plurality of connected horizontally and vertically disposed panels, each panel including: a metal C-channel defining an end thereof; another metal C-channel defining an opposite end; a plurality of metal studs extending between said C-channels and fitting between inside and outside flanges of said C-channels; a metal deck including an outwardly disposed facade and inwardly disposed face connected to said studs; insulation disposed on said facade side of said metal deck; and a waterproofing material disposed on said insulation.

2. The basement wall and floor system of claim 1, wherein said insulation is a polyurethane foam coating.

3. The basement wall and floor system of claim 1, wherein said waterproofing material is a polyurea coating.

4. The basement wall and floor system of claim 1, wherein said studs have an apertured web therealong.

5. The basement wall and floor system of claim 1, wherein said metal deck is corrugated and includes a plurality of raised ribs on said inwardly disposed face, said ribs being disposed against said studs and connected thereto.

6. A panel for constructing a basement wall or floor of a building, said panel comprising: a metal C-channel defining an end thereof; another metal C-channel defining an opposite end; a plurality of metal studs extending between said C-channels and fitting between inside and outside flanges of said C-channels; a metal deck including an outwardly disposed facade and inwardly disposed face connected to said studs; insulation disposed on said facade side of said metal deck; and a waterproofing material disposed on said insulation.

7. The panel of claim 6, wherein said insulation is a polyurethane foam coating.

8. The panel of claim 6, wherein said waterproofing material is a polyurea coating.

9. The panel of claim 6, wherein said studs have an apertured web therealong.

10. The panel of claim 6, wherein said metal deck is corrugated and includes a plurality of raised ribs on said inwardly disposed face, said ribs being disposed against said studs and connected thereto.

11. A basement wall for a building comprising: a footing; a panel erected on said footing, said panel including: a metal C-channel defining an end thereof; another metal C-channel defining an opposite end; a plurality of metal studs extending between said C-channels and fitting between inside and outside flanges of said C-channels; a metal deck including an outwardly disposed facade and inwardly disposed face connected to said studs; insulation disposed on said facade side of said metal deck; and a waterproofing material disposed on said insulation.

12. The basement wall of claim 11, wherein said insulation is a polyurethane foam coating.

13. The basement wall of claim 11, wherein said waterproofing material is a polyurea coating.

14. The basement wall of claim 11, wherein said studs have an apertured web therealong.

15. The basement wall of claim 11, wherein said metal deck is corrugated and includes a plurality of raised ribs on said inwardly disposed face, said ribs being disposed against said studs and connected thereto

16. The basement wall of claim 15, wherein said ribs of said metal deck are disposed generally perpendicular to said studs.

17. The basement wall of claim 11, including a waterproof boot disposed between said footing and one of said C-channels at said end of said panel.

18. The basement wall of claim 11, wherein said footing includes pre-manufactured footing forms and concrete poured between said footing forms; wherein said footing forms include an integral drainage system.

19. The basement wall of claim 11, including a sill plate disposed on said panel opposite said footing.

20. The basement wall of claim 11, wherein said apertured web of said studs provides a pathway for plumbing and electrical wiring through the basement wall.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/899,298, filed Feb. 2, 2007.

TECHNICAL FIELD

This invention relates to a basement wall system and a basement wall and floor system for a building, and more particularly to a basement wall and floor system that is highly moisture resistant, thermally efficient, durable, and capable of being quickly constructed in comparison to conventional concrete walls and floors.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Basement walls for residential buildings have generally been constructed of concrete. Typically, spaced apart vertical forms are assembled at a building site, and concrete is poured into the space defined between the forms. After the concrete has been poured, it must be allowed to set or cure for a period of several days, and often as much as two weeks or even longer. Construction of a building having a poured concrete wall must be completely suspended during the time that the concrete is curing. This delay in construction is undesirable because it can result in higher construction costs.

Another disadvantage with concrete basement walls is that they have a relatively high capacity for absorbing and conveying moisture through capillary action, and as a result, basements with concrete walls tend to be damp and clammy. A further disadvantage with concrete basement walls is that they have relatively low thermal insulating properties. As a result, basements with concrete walls tend to be relatively cool and generally uncomfortable during the winter months.

Further, after a basement wall is erected, earth is backfilled into the area between the wall and the periphery of the excavation. During the backfill process, the basement wall may be damaged by material or machinery that comes into contact with the wall.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides a basement wall system that overcomes the disadvantages of conventional concrete basement walls. The basement wall system also provides a high level of thermal insulation, waterproofing, and protection against insect damage. The basement wall system includes a plurality of connected panel sections, and the panel sections may also be used to form a basement floor system.

More particularly, a basement wall and floor system in accordance with the invention includes a plurality of connected horizontally and vertically disposed panels. Each panel includes a metal C-channel defining an end thereof. Another metal C-channel defines an opposite end. A plurality of metal studs extend between the C-channels and fit between inside and outside flanges of the C-channels. The panel also includes a metal deck including an outwardly disposed facade and an inwardly disposed face connected to the studs. Insulation is disposed on the facade side of the metal deck. A waterproofing material is disposed on the insulation.

In a specific embodiment of the basement wall and floor system, the insulation may be a polyurethane foam coating or similar. The waterproofing material may be a polyurea coating or similar. The studs may have an apertured web therealong, and the apertures in the studs may be generally triangular shaped. The metal deck may be corrugated and may include a plurality of raised ribs on the inwardly disposed face, wherein the ribs are disposed against the studs and connected thereto.

A panel for constructing a basement wall or floor of a building in accordance with the invention includes a metal C-channel defining an end thereof. Another metal C-channel defines an opposite end. A plurality of metal studs extend between the C-channels and fit between inside and outside flanges of the C-channels. The panel also includes a metal deck including an outwardly disposed facade and an inwardly disposed face connected to the studs. Insulation is disposed on the facade side of the metal deck. A waterproofing material is disposed on the insulation.

In a specific embodiment of the panel, the insulation may be a polyurethane foam coating or similar. The waterproofing material may be a polyurea coating or similar. The studs may have an apertured web therealong, and the apertures in the studs may be generally triangular shaped. The metal deck may be corrugated and may include a plurality of raised ribs on the inwardly disposed face, wherein the ribs are disposed against the studs and connected thereto.

A basement wall for a building in accordance with the invention includes a footing and a panel erected on the footing. The panel includes a metal C-channel defining an end thereof. Another metal C-channel defines an opposite end. A plurality of metal studs extend between the C-channels and fit between inside and outside flanges of the C-channels. The panel also includes a metal deck including an outwardly disposed facade and an inwardly disposed face connected to the studs. Insulation is disposed on the facade side of the metal deck. A waterproofing material is disposed on the insulation.

In a specific embodiment of the basement wall, the insulation may be a polyurethane foam coating or similar. The waterproofing material may be a polyurea coating or similar. The studs may have an apertured web therealong, and the apertures in the studs may be generally triangular shaped. The metal deck may be corrugated and may include a plurality of raised ribs on the inwardly disposed face, wherein the ribs are disposed against the studs and connected thereto. The ribs of the metal deck may be disposed generally perpendicular to the studs.

The basement wall may optionally include a waterproof boot disposed between the footing and one of the C-channels at the end of the panel. The footing may include pre-manufactured footing forms and concrete poured between the footing forms. The footing forms may include an integral drainage system. The basement wall may also include a sill plate disposed on the panel opposite the footing.

The apertured web of the studs may provide a pathway for plumbing and electrical wiring through the basement wall.

These and other features and advantages of the invention will be more fully understood from the following detailed description of the invention taken together with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

In the drawings:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a basement wall system in accordance with the invention mounted on a footing;

FIG. 2 is a side elevational view of the basement wall system of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a sectional side elevational view of the basement wall system illustrating the connection of the wall to a footing;

FIG. 4 is a partial view of a basement wall system footing including a radon gas outlet and illustrating a flow path of radon gas; and

FIG. 5 is a side elevational view of a basement wall and floor system in accordance with the invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Referring now to the drawings in detail, numeral 10 generally indicates a basement wall system in accordance with the invention. Turning first to FIGS. 1 through 3, the basement wall system 10 includes a plurality of connected panels 12. Each panel 12 includes a lower metal C-channel 14 having a horizontally disposed base portion, an outside vertically disposed flange portion, and an inside vertically disposed flange portion. The C-channel 14 defines an end of the panel 12. A plurality of vertically disposed metal studs 16 extend upwardly from the base portion of the C-channel. The lower end of each stud 16 generally fits snugly between the inside and outside flange portions of the lower C-channel 14. The studs 16 may be fixed to the C-channel 14, such as by welding. All welds may be coated, such as by spraying, with a rust inhibitor. The basement wall system 10 also includes an upper C-channel 18 having a horizontally disposed middle portion, an outside vertically disposed flange portion, and an inside vertically disposed flange portion. The upper C-channel 18 rests on top of upper ends of the studs 16 such that the upper end of each stud generally fits snugly between the inside and outside flange portions of the upper C-channel, and the studs extend between the C-channels 14, 18. The upper C-channel 18 thereby defines an end of the panel 12 opposite the lower C-channel 14.

For full basement walls, i.e., those in which most or nearly all of the basement wall is below ground level, a suitable wall depth (defined as the distance from the inside flange portion to outside flange portion of the C-channels 14, 18) may be between 6 and 8 inches. A depth of 8 inches is more preferable for larger residential buildings or buildings having 9 foot ceilings. A depth of 6 inches is more preferable for smaller residential buildings. For a 6-inch depth, 6-inch studs are used. Likewise, for an 8-inch depth, 8-inch studs are used. Further, the studs 16 may be spaced apart approximately 16 inches from each other, although larger or smaller spacings can be used.

The studs 16 may be made of galvanized steel. Each stud 16 may be defined by a member having a body and a flange extending generally perpendicularly from each longitudinal side of the body. The body may include a sinusoidal-like inner portion generally defining an apertured web having a plurality of adjacent triangular-like shaped apertures 20, although other types of studs are within the scope of the invention. Due to the apertured web of the studs 16, each stud is therefore low in weight yet structurally strong. Further, the apertures 20 in the studs 16 allow for easy installation of plumbing 21 and electrical wiring 22 through the studs 16. Another significant advantage of the triangular-like apertures 20 of the studs 16 is that the apertures change the thermal paths of conduction 23 through the studs. The triangular-like apertures 20 lengthen the conductive paths 23 through the studs 16 from one longitudinal side of the stud to the opposite longitudinal side of the stud, thereby hindering the transfer of heat through the studs. This results in less loss of heat from inside the basement through the basement wall system 10. One type of suitable studs 16 for the basement wall system 10 are StudRite™ brand studs sold by MARINO/WARE, although other studs are within the scope of the invention.

A metal deck 24, such as that made of a high construction-grade galvanized steel material or similar, is secured to the studs 16, preferably with fasteners such as screw fasteners, rivets, or similar. The deck 24 is secured to outer edges of the studs 16 and is generally disposed adjacent the outside flange portions of the upper and lower C-channels 14, 18.

The metal deck 24 may be a corrugated sheet including an outwardly disposed facade 26, an inwardly disposed face 28, and a plurality of integral, spaced, raised ribs 30 that extend generally perpendicular to the studs 16 when the deck is secured to the studs. Further, when the deck 24 is secured, only the ribs 30 are disposed against the studs 16, and the ribs are connected to the studs. Thus, a majority of the deck 24 does not touch the studs 16. Instead, there are openings between each stud 16 and the deck 24 between the ribs 30. This structure advantageously forms pockets of air insulation between the studs 16 and the deck 24, which in turn reduces the transfer of heat from the studs to the deck, reducing heat loss from the basement through the wall system 10. Wide ribbed metal roof deck may be used as the deck material for the basement wall system 10. One type of suitable deck material for the basement wall system 10 is Type F36 1½″ Intermediate Rib Roof Deck sold by Wheeling, although other deck materials are within the scope of the invention.

When the basement wall system 10 is installed, lower portions of the panels 12 forming the basement wall are somewhat more likely to come into contact with water. Therefore, a water-resistant coating may be applied to the lower portions of the panels 12 of the basement wall. The water-resistant coating may be a liquid asphalt solution that coats the bottom 4 inches of the basement wall system 10 and dries into a high gloss water-resistant shell. The water resistant shell covers and seals the lower portions of the studs 16 and the lower C-channel 14 to prevent moisture from contacting the metal surfaces of the lower C-channel and the studs.

Furthermore, the lower portion of the basement wall system, including the lower C-channel, may be wrapped with a waterproof boot 32 such as a rubber membrane boot or similar. The waterproof boot 32 provides the basement wall system 10 with a waterproof bottom surface, and separates the panels 12 of the wall system from the footing and floor of the basement as described in more detail below. Also, after erection and installation of the panels 12 of the basement wall system, a wood sill plate 34 may be installed on top of the upper C-channel 18.

Insulation 36 is applied to the outer facade surface 26 of the deck 24. The insulation 36 may be a polymeric foam coating such as a polyurethane foam material or similar. One suitable polyurethane foam material is WALLTITE® sold by BASF Corporation, although other polyurethane foam materials are within the scope of the invention. The closed cell rigid structure of the insulation 36 provides thermal insulation as well as an air barrier. The insulation 36 thereby reduces heat loss through the deck 24 of the basement wall system 10.

A waterproofing material 38 such as a polyurea spray coating or similar is applied over the insulation 36. The polyurea coating 38 forms an outer layer of the basement wall system 10. One suitable polyurea spray coating material is ELASTOCOAT® sold by BASF Corporation, although other polyurea spray coatings are within the scope of the invention. The polyurea coating 38 provides a durable, flexible, waterproof outer layer for the basement wall system 10. The outer polyurea layer 38 protects the basement wall from water-related damage. The polyurea layer 38 also protects the basement wall system 10 from structural damage during backfill of the basement excavation, which occurs after installation of the wall. Overall, the combination of the polyurethane foam coating layer 36 and outer polyurea coating layer 38 provide the basement wall structure 10 with a high degree of thermal efficiency, water resistance, and mechanical durability. Furthermore, the insulation layer 36 and outer polyurea coating layer 38 are continuous layers that cover over and seal the joints between the edges of adjacent panels 12 of the basement wall system 10.

Each panel 12 of the basement wall system 10 is supported on its lower end (defined by lower C-channel 14) by a footing 40 installed within an excavation dug below ground level. The footing 40 may be a concrete footing that is poured and leveled prior to erecting the panels 12 of the basement wall system 10. The footing 40 may be leveled to an exacting tolerance, such as within approximately 1/16″ or similar. It is important to the basement wall system 10 that the footing 40 is as level as possible to assure that once the basement wall system is erected, it is itself level. This is in contrast to a poured concrete basement wall, for which variations in the level of the footing do not significantly effect the leveling of the wall itself.

In one embodiment, the footing 40 may be made by setting up pre-manufactured footing forms 42 about the floor of the excavation. Since the footing forms 42 are manufactured, there are few to no variations from one form to another. This makes the process of leveling the footing 40 much easier and results in a precisely level footing when concrete is poured into the forms 42. In contrast, when wood is used as the material for the footing forms, natural warps and other inconsistencies in the wood make leveling the footing difficult. Further, the manufactured footing forms 42 are left in place after the concrete forming the footing 40 is poured, eliminating the step of removing the forms that is customary when wood footing forms are used, thereby saving time. Once the concrete footing 40 has been installed within the footing forms 42, a basement floor 46 may be installed (e.g., by pouring concrete) within the area defined by the footing forms.

As shown in FIGS. 2 and 4, the footing forms 42 may also include an integral drainage system. For example, the footing forms 42 may include an internal conduit 50 and openings 52 along an outer side, the internal conduit and openings defining the drainage system. The openings 52 allow for communication of fluid (liquid and gas) to and from the internal conduit 50 to the area (e.g., ground) outside of the footing 40. A drain pipe also may be connected to the outer side of the footing forms 42 to allow for flow of water from the internal conduit 50 to an area away from the footing 40. Further, a drain pipe conduit 54 may connect an outer footing form 42 with an inner footing form 42 to allow for flow of water from the internal conduit 50 of the outer footing form to the internal conduit 50 of the inner footing form. The drainage system thereby aids in the removal of water from the area inside the footing 40 (i.e., underneath the basement floor 46) and the area surrounding the outer periphery of the footing. Even more, the internal conduit 50 may be used to pipe radon gas from the ground around the footing 40 to a location away from the footing and any structure built on the footing. For example, after the basement wall system 10 is erected on the footing 40, a pipe 56 for radon gas may be connected to a radon gas outlet in the footing form and positioned generally vertically within the basement wall. Hence, the pipe 56 is conveniently hidden from site. Alternatively, the radon gas pipe 56 may extend upwardly adjacent to the basement wall. After a building is constructed above the basement wall, this pipeline may extend through the roof of the building to exhaust the radon gas into the atmosphere above the house. One suitable material for the footing forms 42 is Form-A-Drain™ brand footing forms sold by CertainTeed Corporation, although other footing forms are within the scope of the invention.

In one embodiment, two footing forms 42 may be stacked one on top of the other to form a two-tiered internal drainage conduit system. The internal conduit 50 in the upper of the two footing forms 42 is used to channel radon gas and the internal conduit 50 in the lower of the two footing forms 42 is used to channel ground water. This is due to the fact that radon gas generally rises while ground water generally seeps downward through the ground. In this embodiment, the footing 40 will have a depth that is approximately twice as large in comparison to an embodiment in which only one layer of footing forms 42 is used.

The C-channels 14, 18, studs 16, and deck 24 may be pre-assembled in sections, such as 10 to 40 foot long sections, and then later transported to construction sites as needed. The liquid asphalt solution may also be applied to the lower portion of the pre-assembled sections prior to shipment to a construction site. Alternatively, the entire basement wall system 10 may be assembled directly at the construction site.

In either case, the basement wall system 10 is erected on the footing 40. Once the studs 16, C-channels 14, 18, and deck 24 are erected on the footing 40, the insulation layer 36 is applied. After application of the insulation layer 36, the polyurea layer 38 is then applied. A basement floor, such as a concrete floor 46, may also be installed (e.g., by pouring concrete) after construction of the wall system 10 on the footing 40. After application of the polyurea layer 38, earth may be backfilled (backfill 57) into the open space between the basement wall system 10 and the basement excavation.

Turning to FIG. 5, in an alternative embodiment, the panels 112 as described or modified may be used to also form a steel basement floor as a substitute for a concrete floor. In this embodiment, a plurality of connected horizontally and vertically disposed panels 112 similar to those described above define a steel basement wall and floor system 110. The vertically disposed panels 112 are erected on the footing 140 as described above. Then, a plurality of panels 112 are disposed horizontally between the vertical panels with the outer side of the horizontal panels facing down towards the ground. The horizontal panels 112 are connected to each other and to the vertical panels 112, and the horizontal panels may also be connected to the footing 140.

Although the invention has been described by reference to specific embodiments, it should be understood that numerous changes may be made within the spirit and scope of the inventive concepts described. Accordingly, it is intended that the invention not be limited to the described embodiments, but that it have the full scope defined by the language of the following claims.