Title:
ROOFING AND SIDING SYSTEMS
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Embodiments of the present invention provide improved metal roofing and siding systems. In one aspect of the invention, a roofing or siding system configured to be positioned against a structure is provided. The roofing or siding system includes a first panel including a female locking element opening away from the structure when positioned thereon; a second panel including a male locking element directed toward the structure when positioned thereon; and an anchor bar configured to be attached to the structure, wherein the anchor bar defines an channel directed away from the structure which is configured to engage the male locking element and defines a flange directed towards the structure that is configured to engage the female locking element.



Inventors:
Cotter, Donald Patrick (Carson City, NV, US)
Application Number:
11/949506
Publication Date:
08/07/2008
Filing Date:
12/03/2007
Assignee:
Fabral, Inc.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04B7/20
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
LAUX, JESSICA L
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ALSTON & BIRD LLP (BANK OF AMERICA PLAZA, 101 SOUTH TRYON STREET, SUITE 4000, CHARLOTTE, NC, 28280-4000, US)
Claims:
That which is claimed:

1. A roofing or siding system configured to be positioned against a structure comprising: a first panel including a female locking element opening away from the structure when positioned thereon; a second panel including a male locking element directed toward the structure when positioned thereon; and an anchor bar configured to be attached to the structure, wherein the anchor bar defines a channel directed away from the structure which is configured to engage the male locking element and further defines a flange directed towards the structure that is configured to engage the female locking element.

2. The roofing or siding system of claim 1, wherein the female locking element comprises a hem section formed in a substantially U-shape.

3. The roofing or siding system of claim 1, wherein the male locking element comprises a hem section.

4. The roofing or siding system of claim 1, wherein the first panel has an elongate shape having an elongate length and a first and second lateral edge and wherein further, the female locking element is positioned proximate the first lateral edge.

5. The roofing or siding system of claim 4, wherein the anchor bar is an elongate structure having an elongate length substantially the same as the elongate length of the first panel.

6. A roof panel or siding panel system configured to be positioned against a structure comprising: a first panel having a first lateral edge portion extending upwardly relative to the structure when the first panel is positioned thereon, wherein the first lateral edge portion includes a groove portion and an inclined portion; and a second panel having a second lateral edge portion that includes a first leg portion extending upwardly relative to the structure when the second panel is positioned thereon, and a second leg portion which is substantially parallel with the first leg and terminates in a lock flange directed towards the first leg portion, wherein the first and the second panels are configured to be adjacently positioned, and wherein the second lateral edge portion of the second panel is configured to receive the first lateral edge portion of the first panel between the first and the second leg portions such that the lock flange engages the groove portion.

7. The roof panel or siding panel system of claim 6, wherein the first leg portion and the second leg portion are jointed by a U-shaped section.

8. The roof panel or siding panel system of claim 6, wherein the first lateral edge portion includes a female locking element opening away from the structure when positioned thereon.

9. The roof panel or siding panel system of claim 6, wherein the second lateral edge portion includes a male locking element directed toward the structure when positioned thereon.

10. The roof panel or siding panel system of claim 6 further comprising an anchor bar configured to be attached to the structure and to discourage movement of the first and second panels.

11. A roofing or siding system for attachment to a structure comprising: an elongate panel having two opposing lateral edge portions and an intermediate portion between the opposing lateral edges wherein the intermediate portion has a substantially convex shape when the panel is positioned on the structure; and a pair of anchor bars, each having an engagement element configured to engage a lateral edge portion of the roofing panel and wherein the pair of anchor bars are attached to the structure wherein the pair of anchor bars are substantially parallel and spaced apart a predetermined distance such that the intermediate portion remains convex when the panel is engaged by the pair of anchor bars.

12. The roofing or siding system of claim 11, wherein one of the two opposing lateral edge portions includes a female locking element opening away from the structure when positioned thereon.

13. The roofing or siding system of claim 11, wherein the female locking element comprises a hem section formed in a substantially U-shape.

14. The roofing or siding system of claim 12, wherein the other of the two opposing lateral edge portions includes a male locking element directed toward the structure when positioned thereon.

15. The roofing or siding system of claim 14, wherein the male locking element comprises a hem section.

16. The roofing or siding system of claim 14, wherein each of the pair of anchor bars define a channel directed away from the structure and a flange directed towards the structure.

17. The roofing or siding system of claim 11, wherein one of the lateral edge portions extends upwardly relative to the structure when the elongate panel is positioned thereon, and wherein the one of the lateral edge portions defines a groove portion.

18. The roofing or siding system of claim 17, wherein another of the lateral edge portions includes a first leg portion that extends upwardly relative to the structure when the panel is positioned thereon, and transitions into a second downwardly directed second leg portion that terminates in an locking flange directed toward the first leg portion.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/872,160, entitled “Roofing and Siding Systems for Extremely High Winds”, filed Dec. 1, 2006, which is incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

Embodiments of the present invention relate to metal roofing and siding systems, and more particularly to unique panel profiles for joining adjacent panels and for improved aesthetics.

2. Description of Related Art

Metal roofing and siding panels are typically roll-formed from long, continuous coils of pre-painted metal and are secured to structures using concealed-fastener type systems. The lateral sides of the long panels are often formed into various ribbed profiles with a wide expanse of thin sheet metal between the ribs. This expanse can have slight waves and distortion, which is commonly known in the industry as “oil canning.” One cause of this condition is the stresses and strains imparted to the metal when metal plates are cold-formed into thin gages of sheet metal. Some architects will not specify metal roofs or wall systems due to this condition. Thus, a need exists for metal panels that minimize the appearance of “oil canning.”

Another visual problem that may be experienced with metal panels is distortion caused by protuberances in the subroof or wall framing that the metal panels are secured to. Welding bands, plugs, plywood corners, and misaligned frames can all distort the panels from underneath. Accordingly, there is a need in the industry to reduce the undesirable aesthetic effects of distortions in metal panels.

An issue that sometimes arises in connection with metal roofing and siding systems is the penetration of moisture through the systems into the underlying structure. A cause of this penetration is often due to the location of the seams between the adjacent panels. In some designs, the seam is positioned proximate the drainage plane, which is the primary surface of the panel that water flows over. The moisture may penetrate the seam by capillary action or may be wind-driven. One solution has been to apply sealants to the seams; however, sealants can crack and fail over time. Thus, there is a need for novel joint designs that provide improved sealing and that may reduce the need for sealants.

In the field, some metal roofs fail due to high wind uplift loads. In an attempt to quantify the performance of metal roofs with respect to uplift loads, standards organizations such as Underwriters Laboratories (U.L.) and the American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) have developed tests for wind uplift (e.g., U.L. 580; ASTM-E1592). Their tests involve placing an exemplary roofing structure in a chamber and subjecting it to wind loads. A common failure mode for these tests is that the panels are blown off the structure due to seam failure. Just prior to blow off, the wind separates the thin substantially planar sections of the panel between ribs from the structure thereby creating a “ballooning” type effect. This in turn causes the base of the ribs to spread apart, which is referred to herein as “rib spread.” This rib spread condition creates significant stress on the seams between the adjacent panels, which are located at the ribs and often causes the seam to fail and the panel to blow off the structure. A need exists in the industry to provide improved wind uplift resistance.

Thermal expansion and contraction are issues experienced by all metal roofs. For example, a typical structure may have roof panels that are 100 feet long and 2 feet wide. Several panels may be joined to cover a building width of 200 feet. During a 100 degree Fahrenheit day, these exemplary panels may expand 1 9/16-inches longitudinally and 3¼ inches over the entire width of the building. The width expansion translates to 1/32 inch expansion in width for each 2 foot wide panel. A need exists in the industry for roofing and siding systems that can accommodate this type of expansion.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The above and other needs are met by the present invention which, in one embodiment, provides a roofing or siding system configured to be positioned against a structure. The roofing or siding system includes a first panel including a female locking element opening away from the structure when positioned thereon; a second panel including a male locking element directed toward the structure when positioned thereon; and an anchor bar configured to be attached to the structure, wherein the anchor bar defines a channel directed away from the structure which is configured to engage the male locking element and further defines a flange directed towards the structure that is configured to engage the female locking element.

In another embodiment, a roof or siding panel system configured to be positioned atop a structure is provided. The roof or siding panel system includes a first panel having a first lateral edge portion extending upwardly relative to the structure when the first panel is positioned thereon, wherein the first lateral edge portion includes a groove portion and an inclined portion; and a second panel having a second lateral edge portion that includes a first leg portion extending upwardly relative to the structure when the second panel is positioned thereon, and a second leg portion which is substantially parallel with the first leg and terminates in a lock flange directed towards the first leg portion, wherein the first and the second panels are configured to be adjacently positioned, and wherein the second lateral edge portion of the second panel is configured to receive the first lateral edge portion of the first panel between the first and the second leg portions such that the lock flange engages the groove portion.

In a further embodiment, another roofing or siding system for attachment to a structure is provided. This roofing or siding system includes an elongate panel having two opposing lateral edge portions and an intermediate portion between the opposing lateral edges wherein the intermediate portion has a substantially convex shape when the panel is positioned on the structure; and a pair of anchor bars, each having an engagement element configured to engage a lateral edge portion of the roofing panel and wherein the pair of anchor bars are attached to the structure wherein the pair of anchor bars are substantially parallel and spaced apart a predetermined distance such that the intermediate portion remains convex when the panel is engaged by the pair of anchor bars.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING(S)

Having thus described the invention in general terms, reference will now be made to the accompanying drawings, which are not necessarily drawn to scale, and wherein:

FIG. 1 is a partial cut-away view of a batten seam roofing system 10 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a cross section view of a batten style panel 20 for use in the batten seam roofing system 10 shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a cross section view of an anchor bar 30 for use in the batten seam roofing system 10 shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a partial cut-away view of a batten system 45 in accordance with another embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 5A and 5B are side views of a panel 20 modified to accomplish a change in direction for a batten seam roofing system 10 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIGS. 5C and 5D are side views of a batten 40 modified to accomplish a change in direction for a batten seam roofing system 10 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 6 is a partial cut-away view of a standing seam roofing system 50 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 7 is a cross-section view of a panel 55 for use in the standing seam roofing system 50 shown in FIG. 6;

FIG. 8 is a cross-section view of an anchor bar 90 for use in the standing seam roofing system 50 shown in FIG. 6;

FIG. 9 is a partial cut-away view of a tubular standing seam system 100 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention;

FIG. 10 is a cross-section view of a panel 105 for use in the standing seam roofing system 100 shown in FIG. 9.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention now will be described more fully hereinafter with reference to the accompanying drawings, in which some, but not all embodiments of the inventions are shown. Indeed, these inventions may be embodied in many different forms and should not be construed as limited to the embodiments set forth herein; rather, these embodiments are provided so that this disclosure will satisfy applicable legal requirements. Like numbers refer to like elements throughout.

Various embodiments of the present invention are directed to novel metal roofing and siding systems, which address needs in the industry. Although features of various embodiments of the present invention may be applicable to any metal roofing or siding system, aspects of the present invention will be described with reference to three general design types: batten seam, standing seam, and tubular standing seam. Also, for convenience, various aspects of the invention will be described with reference to a roofing system but are applicable to siding systems as well.

Batten Seam Embodiments

FIG. 1 is a schematic diagram of a portion of a batten seam roofing system 10 with a cut-away section illustrating how adjacent panels are secured to a structure 5 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention. The illustrated embodiment includes two elongate panels 20A,B, an anchor bar 30, fasteners 38 and a batten cap 40.

FIG. 2 is a cross-section view of a panel 20 used in connection with the batten seam roofing system 10. Panel 20 is a substantially elongate structure formed from sheet metal. The panel may be formed using roll-forming techniques or other known or developed methods for forming sheet metal.

Panel 20 includes two upstanding vertical leg portions 22A,B, and an intermediate portion 29. The vertical leg portions 22A,B are located on opposing lateral edges of the panel 20 and are mirror images of one another. The vertical leg portions 22A,B include spreader flanges 23A,B, inward opening hem sections 24A,B and vertical sections 26A,B. The spreader flanges 23A,B are substantially planar and extend from the lateral edges of the panel 20. They are oriented on an incline downwardly toward the intermediate portion 29. As will be discussed in greater detail later, the incline configuration of the spreader flanges 23A,B facilitate installation of the batten cap 40.

The spreader flanges 23A,B lead to the hem sections 24A,B. The hem sections 24A,B create grooves 25A,B, which open toward the intermediate portion 29 of the panel 20. The hem sections 24A,B lead to the vertical sections 26A,B, which are generally planar sections.

Extending from the vertical sections 26A,B are the upturned hem sections 28A,B. These hem sections 28A,B are formed into a U-shape positioned on the opposite side of the vertical sections 26A,B from the intermediate portion 29 (i.e. outboard sides). The hem sections 28A,B extend to the intermediate portion 29. In various embodiments, the intermediate portion 29 is formed with a generally convex shape to minimize the appearance of “oil canning.” In other embodiments, the intermediate portion 29 may be substantially planar.

Turning to FIG. 3, the anchor bar 30 is a substantially elongate structure formed from sheet metal or other materials that are sufficiently strong. The sheet metal may be formed using roll-forming techniques, stamping or other known or developed metal forming methods. The anchor bar 30 includes a first U-shaped section 32, a center section 34 and a second U-shaped section 36. The first U-shaped section 32 extends from a lateral edge of the anchor bar 30 and opens substantially downwardly to form pocket 33. The first U-shaped section 32 transitions into the substantially planar center section 34. The center section 34 defines a plurality of holes (not shown) that are configured to accept fasteners for securing the anchor bar 30 to a structure. Extending from the center section 34 is the second U-shaped section 36, which is also oriented to open substantially downwardly to form pocket 37. The anchor bar 30 is secured to the structure 5 using a plurality of fasteners 38 as shown in FIG. 1.

Returning to FIG. 1, the batten cap 40 is a generally elongate structure having a U-shaped cross section. The batten cap 40 also includes two inwardly directed locking flanges 42A,B located on the lateral edges of the batten cap 40, which are configured to engage the hem sections 24A,B on adjacent panels 20A,B.

Referring to FIGS. 1-3, in use, elongate panels 20A,B are oriented substantially parallel and placed adjacent to each other. An anchor bar 30 is positioned between the adjacent panels 20A,B such that the U-shaped sections 32,36 of the anchor bar 30 engage respective upturned hem sections 28A,B of the adjacent panels 20A,B. The anchor bar 30 is then secured to the structure 5 using fasteners 38. The anchor bars 30 are spaced apart such that the convex shape of the intermediate portion 29 of the panels is maintained and lateral movement of the panels are restricted by engagement anchor bar 30 with the upturned hem sections 28A,B. The lateral movement restriction can also reduce the chance that static loads such as snow or ice accumulation will flatten the convex shape.

A batten cap 40 is placed over the vertical legs 22A,B of the adjacent panels 20A,B such that the locking flanges 42A,B engage the spreader flanges 23A,B of the two vertical legs 22A,B. As a downward force is applied to the batten cap 40, the inclined configuration of the spreader flanges 23A,B causes the vertical legs 22A,B and/or the legs of the batten cap 40 to flex until the locking flanges 42A,B engage the grooves 25A,B. The interaction between the batten cap 40 and grooves 25A,B resists the passage of water from outside batten seam roofing system 10 to the channel formed by batten system.

As will be understood by those of skill in the art, the batten seam roofing system will include a plurality of elongate panels oriented substantially parallel with adjacent edges of the panels joined by respective anchor bars and batten caps to form a continuous covering for a subroof. Moreover, the seam created between the batten cap 40 and the adjacent panels 20A,B is located above the drainage plane of the system, which would lie along the intermediate portion 29.

A benefit of various embodiments of the batten systems is that architects can alter the aesthetics of a structure for minimal costs by simply changing the battens used. Profile, style and appearance can be changed while maintaining novel interlock of the batten cap to panel. The largest cost in metal roofing is to produce the panel. However, batten caps are small, shallow, and relatively inexpensive components.

FIG. 4 illustrates another embodiment of the batten seam roofing system 45 in accordance with the present invention. In this embodiment, the vertical legs do not include open hem sections configured to accept the locking flange of a batten cap. Instead, pockets 48A,B are formed between the lower end of the vertical legs and the intermediate portions of the panels. These pockets are configured to accept the locking flanges of the batten cap. Since the panel and batten connection is at the drainage plane of the system, moisture may be drawn up between panel and batten legs due to capillary action. To resolve this potential moisture issue, the spreader flanges of the panel legs, when assembled, create a trough or gutter 49A,B to interrupt the capillary action and to carry moisture away. These gutters 49A,B act as additional barriers against moisture entering the structure.

Roofing panels today are typically formed at the job site. It is customary to cut one length of panel for each planar surface and use flashings, counter-flashings, neoprene and metal closures with sealant and fasteners at each change in direction. These joints and laps create a potential for moisture penetration and require highly-intensive skilled manual labor to properly seal, which can be very costly.

FIGS. 5A-D, illustrate embodiments of the present invention that provide improved systems for accomplishing a change in direction that minimizes labor and the chance of leaks. FIGS. 5A,B are side views of a panel 20 that illustrate the steps for modifying the panel 20 to accomplish a change of direction, for example a change in the pitch of a roof. As illustrated in FIG. 5A, a slit may be cut into the vertical legs of the panel 20 thereby creating a hinge 21. The panel 20 may then be bent about hinge 21 to accommodate the changing direction as shown in FIG. 5B.

Similarly, FIG. 5C,D are side views of a batten 40 that has been modified to accomplish a change in direction. As illustrated in FIG. 5C, a slit may be cut in the batten 40 to create a hinge 43. The slit would be at an angle bisecting the change in direction angle. The batten may then be folded about hinge 43 to accommodate the change in direction as illustrated in FIG. 5D.

Standing Seam Embodiments

FIG. 6 is a schematic diagram of a portion of a standing seam roofing system 50 with a cut-away section illustrating how adjacent panels are secured to a structure 5 in accordance with an embodiment of the present invention. The illustrated embodiment includes two elongate panels 55A,B, an anchor bar 90, and fasteners 57.

FIG. 7 illustrates a cross-section of a roofing panel 55 for use with a standing seam roofing system 50 of the present invention. The roofing panel 55 includes a first vertical leg 60, an intermediate portion 70 and a second vertical leg 80.

The first vertical leg 60 is located on a lateral edge of the panel 55 and includes a spreader flange 62, an inward opening hem section 64, a vertical section 66 and upturned hem section 68. The spreader flange 62 is substantially planar and extends from a lateral edge of the panel 55 downwardly and toward the intermediate portion 70 at an incline.

The spreader flange 62 extends to the hem section 64. The hem section 64 opens toward the intermediate portion 70 of the panel 55 and creates a groove 65. The hem section 64 leads to the vertical section 66.

Extending from the vertical section 66 is the upturned hem section 68. This hem section 68 is formed into a U-shape located on the opposite side of the vertical section 66 from the intermediate portion 70 (i.e. outboard side) and leads to the intermediate portion 70 of the panel 55.

The intermediate portion 70 includes a first ridge 72, a convex portion 74 and a second ridge 78. The hem section 68 extends to the first ridge 72, which is located proximate the vertical section 66 but on the opposite side from the upturned hem section 68. When installed, the first ridge 72 is spaced apart from the structure. The first ridge 72 transitions downward into the convex portion 74 such that the base 75 of the convex portion 74 is proximate the structure when installed. The convex portion 74 extends from the base 75 to an apex 76, which is located at the approximate midpoint between the first and second vertical legs 60, 80 and then to the base 77 proximate the second vertical leg 80. When installed, the base 77 is proximate the structure 5. As discussed earlier with respect to other embodiments, a benefit of the convex shape of the intermediate portion 70 is that it minimizes the appearance of “oil canning” and other visual defects. However, in the illustrated embodiment, the benefits of the standing seam arrangement could still be enjoyed with a generally flat intermediate portion 70.

The convex section 74 at the base 77 transitions upward to the second ridge 78. When installed, the second ridge portion 78 is spaced apart from the structure and is configured to provide clearance for and to conceal the anchor bar 90.

The second ridge 78 extends to a downwardly directed hem section 82, which leads to a vertical leg 83. The vertical leg 83 is formed over and down to create a general U-shape section 86. In other embodiments, the vertical leg 83 may be formed over and downward to created different profiles having rounded or squared forms. The terminating edge of the U-shaped section 86 is formed inward to create a locking flange 88.

FIG. 8 is a cross-section view of an anchor bar 90 for use with the standing seam roofing system 50. The anchor bar 90 is an elongate structure made of metal and formed using roll-forming techniques or other known or developed forming methods, or could be formed using other materials or methods provided the resultant bar has sufficient strength properties. The anchor bar 90 includes a base portion 92, a hemmed attachment portion 94, vertical leg 96, a flange 97 and a U-shaped portion 98. The base portion 92 is substantially planar and is configured to engage a structure on one side. On one lateral side of the base 92, a hemmed attachment portion 94 is formed. The attachment portion 94 defines a plurality of holes (not shown), which are configured to receive fasteners to secure the anchor bar 90 to a structure. The hemmed attachment portion 94 leads to a vertical leg 96, which terminates in a substantially horizontal flange 97.

The opposite lateral side of the base 92 leads to a substantially U-shaped portion 98. The U-shaped portion 98 is spaced apart from the vertical leg 96 such that an upwardly directed pocket 99 is created. The U-shaped portion 98, itself, creates a downwardly directed pocket.

Referring to FIGS. 6, 7 and 8, the method of assembly of the standing seam roofing system 50 will be described. First, a panel 55B is positioned on a structure 5. The U-shaped portion 98 of the anchor bar 90 is laid over the upturned hem section 68 of the first vertical leg 60 of the panel 55B. Next, the anchor bar 90 is secured to the structure using fasteners 57. Alternatively, the anchor bar 90 could be secured first to the structure 5 and then the upturned hem section 68 is turned under the U-shaped portion 98 of the anchor bar 90. Although only one length of anchor bar 90 is illustrated, multiple lengths could be aligned and even spaced along a common axis on the structure 5 to achieve the necessary anchoring.

After securing the first panel 55B using the anchor bar 90, a second panel 55A is positioned adjacent the first panel such that second vertical leg 80 of the second panel 55A is positioned above the first vertical leg of the 60 of the first panel 55B. The spreader flange 62 of the first panel 55B is positioned inside the U-shaped section 86 of the second panel 55A. By applying a downward force on the second vertical leg 80 of the second panel 50A, the inclined configuration of the spreader flange causes one or both of the vertical legs 60, 80 to flex as the second vertical leg 80 of the second panel 55A moves downward until the locking flange 88 of the second panel 55A engages the pocket 65 of the first panel. Simultaneously, the hem section 82 of the second panel 55A engages the pocket 99 of the anchor bar 90.

The engagement of the hem section 82 by the pocket 99 of the anchor bar 90 discourages “rib spread,” which is often experienced by prior art designs when subjected to an uplift wind load. In prior art designs, an uplift wind load often causes a ballooning effect that spreads the base of the ribs causing excessive stress on the seam along the ribs created by joining the vertical legs of the adjacent panels. The engagement by hem section 82 of the pocket 99 as well as the engagement of the hem section 68 with the anchor bar 90 significantly reduce the stress on the seam between the adjacent panels and improves uplift wind load resistance of the panel system.

FIG. 9 illustrates another embodiment of the standing seam roofing system 100. In this embodiment, the “standing seam” has a tubular profile, while the prior standing seam embodiment 50 had a U-shaped profile. The standing seam roofing system 100 includes two elongate panels 105A,B and an anchor bar 90. The various hemmed sections and the anchor bar, which facilitate attachment of the roofing system to a structure are the same as the prior standing seam embodiment 50. The differences lie in the profile of the “vertical legs” as is discussed below.

FIG. 10 is a cross-section view of a panel 105 for use in the standing seam roofing system 100. The roofing panel 105 includes a first vertical leg 110, an intermediate portion 130 and a second vertical leg 140. The first vertical leg 110 is directed upwardly and located on a lateral edge of the panel 105.

The first vertical leg portion 110 includes a spreader flange 112, an inwardly opening hem section 114, an arcuate portion 116, a vertical portion 118 and an upturned hem section 120. The spreader flange 112 extends from the lateral edge of the panel 105 downwardly at an incline toward the intermediate portion 130 and terminates in the inwardly opening (i.e. toward the intermediate portion) hem section 114. The hem section 114 creates a pocket 115.

The hem section 114 leads to an arcuate section 116, which extends approximately 90 degrees. This arcuate section 116 terminates in a vertical leg 118, which extends at an angle inwardly and downwardly. The vertical leg 118 extends to an upturned hem section 120, which is formed into a U-shape located on the outboard side of the panel. The hem section 120 transitions into the intermediate portion 130. The intermediate portion 130 includes a first ridge portion 132, a convex portion 134 and a second ridge portion 136. The various portions of the intermediate portion 130 are configured similar to that described with reference to the previous embodiment intermediate portion 70.

The second ridge portion 136 extends to a downwardly directed hem section 142 of the second vertical leg 140. The hem section 142 leads to a substantially planar vertical section 144, which itself terminates at an arcuate section 146. The vertical section 144 is angled outwardly as it extends to the accurate section 146. In the illustrated embodiment, the arcuate section 146 extends to approximately 270 degrees. The arcuate section 146 terminates in a locking flange 148. The locking flange is configured to engage the pocket 115 of a first leg of an adjacent panel such that the combination of the arcuate section of the first leg and the arcuate section of the section leg generally form a circle as shown in FIG. 9.

Referring to FIGS. 6, 9 and 10, the method of assembly of the standing seam roofing system 100 will be described. Initially, a first panel 105B is laid into position. The U-shaped portion 98 of the anchor bar 90 is laid over the upturned hem section 120 of the first vertical leg 110 of panel 105B. Next, the anchor bar 90 is secured to the structure using fasteners. As with the prior embodiment 50, these steps may be reversed and multiple anchor bars 90 may be used.

After securing the first vertical leg of panel 105B using the anchor bar 90, a second panel 105A is positioned adjacent the first panel 105B such that second vertical leg 140 of the second panel 105A is positioned above the first vertical leg 110 of the first panel 105B. The spreader flange 112 of the first panel 105B is positioned inside the arcuate section 146 of the second panel 105A. By applying a downward force on the second vertical leg 140 of the second panel 105A, the inclined configuration of the spreader flange 112 causes one or both of the vertical legs 110, 140 to flex as the second vertical leg 140 of the second panel 105A moves downward until the locking flange 88 of the second panel 105A engages the pocket 115 of the first panel 105B. Simultaneously, the hem section 82 of the second panel 105A engages the pocket 99 of the anchor bar 90.

One advantage the various embodiments of the present invention have over the prior art is that movement of the panels proximate the vertical legs is minimized due to the engagement of the anchor bar and hemmed sections of the adjacent panels. In particular, the engagement of the hem section 82 by the pocket 99 of the anchor bar 90 as well as the engagement of the upturned hem section 68 by the anchor bar 90 discourages rib spread. By restricting movement of the panels, uplift wind performance is improved. In prior art designs, the seam was relied on to restrict movement of the panels and when the panels experienced an uplift wind load, the panels would tend to spread or separate proximate the seam (e.g., rib spread condition). In various embodiments of the present invention, the anchor bar maintains the seam configuration by securing both panels proximate the seam. In addition, by placing the securing responsibility on the anchor bar instead of the seam in various embodiments of invention, a substantial stress is removed from the seam. This can improve seam durability.

The convex surface between the vertical legs of the various embodiments provide many benefits over the prior art. For example, the convex surface minimizes “oil canning.” Also, the convex surface accommodates thermal movement of the panels. In particular, during the heat of the day, thermal movement may cause the convex area to rise slightly. Similarly, curvature of the convex section may decrease slightly during cold days. Furthermore, since the convex surface is raised slightly thereby created a void between the panel and the sub-roof, projections and fasteners will have decreased affect on the visual appearance of the panels. Thus, embodiments of the present invention may decrease the effect of these projections on the aesthetics of the finished roof or wall.

Many modifications and other embodiments of the inventions set forth herein will come to mind to one skilled in the art to which these inventions pertain having the benefit of the teachings presented in the foregoing descriptions and the associated drawings. Therefore, it is to be understood that the inventions are not to be limited to the specific embodiments disclosed and that modifications and other embodiments are intended to be included within the scope of the appended claims. Although specific terms are employed herein, they are used in a generic and descriptive sense only and not for purposes of limitation.