Title:
COLLAPSIBLE HIGHCHAIR
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A collapsible highchair with a rack has a seat, a shackle section, and legs, which are pivotable towards one another about a hinged joint between an upright position for use and an opposite compact position. A first latching device from the shackle section is designed to pivot for detachable connection with a section of the rack. The first latching device is provided on the front side of the seat leaving two free spaces for the legs of a seated child, with a connecting device encompassing the rack from the outside on the side facing away from the seat. The connecting device is designed as a clamping bracket comprising an upper claw-like section supported on a tubular section of the rack, a second mobile section clamped on the tube, and a third engaging section provided on the mobile section and extending the lever of the mobile section.



Inventors:
Lake, Jon (Sunnyvale, CA, US)
Kho, Davy (Paris, FR)
Application Number:
11/942671
Publication Date:
07/31/2008
Filing Date:
11/19/2007
Assignee:
iLinko Ltd. (Quarry Bay, HK)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47D1/02
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
ALEX, JAMES S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
CHRISTENSEN O'CONNOR JOHNSON KINDNESS PLLC (1201 Third Avenue Suite 3600, Seattle, WA, 98101, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A collapsible highchair with a rack, which has a seat, a shackle section limiting the seat to the front, and legs, which are pivotable towards one another about a hinged joint between an upright position for use and an opposite compact position, wherein a first latching device from the shackle section is designed to pivot and limits the seat forwards for detachable connection with a section of the rack and/or of the seat, in the upright position positioned under the shackle section.

2. A collapsible highchair as claimed in claim 1, wherein the first latching device is provided at a lower, free end for fixing the mounting with a connecting device about a section of the rack and/or of the seat.

3. A collapsible highchair as claimed in claim 1, wherein the first latching device is provided on the front side of the seat leaving two free spaces for the legs of a seated child, with a connecting device encompassing a tubular section of the rack from the outside on the side facing away from the seat.

4. A collapsible highchair as claimed in claim 2, wherein the connecting device is designed as a clamping bracket comprising an upper claw-like section supported on a tubular section of the rack, a second mobile section clamped on the tube, and a third engaging section provided on the mobile section and extending the lever of the mobile section.

5. A collapsible highchair as claimed in claim 1, further comprising a tray set on the shackle section limiting the seat in a forward direction.

6. A collapsible highchair as claimed in claim 1, further comprising at least one diagonal member provided to pivot on at least one front leg, which is provided with a guide device in which guide elements are provided on the rear legs.

7. A collapsible highchair with a rack having a seat, a shackle section limiting the seat to the front, and legs, which are pivotable towards one another about a hinged joint between an upright position for use and an opposite compact position, wherein at least one diagonal member is provided to pivot on at least one front leg, which is provided with a guide device in which guide elements provided on the rear legs move, so that the guide device or the diagonal member approximate the extending of the legs when the legs are pivoted towards one another and take up a position substantially parallel to the legs, when in the compact position.

8. A collapsible highchair as claimed in claim 1 or 7, wherein the rack is a tubular rack.

9. A collapsible highchair as claimed in claim 6 or 7, wherein the guide device is a slot guide and the guide elements are bolts.

10. A collapsible highchair as claimed in claim 1 or 7, wherein the hinged joint is provided at the level of the shackle section limiting the seat is a forward direction and/or that the shackle section also pivots without latching on the hinged joint.

11. A collapsible highchair as claimed in claim 1 or 7, further comprising a second latching mechanism that connects at least one rear leg or one element provided with a rear leg in the folded state engaging with the underside of the folded shackle section and/or connects the tray set thereon to one of the rear legs.

12. A collapsible highchair as claimed in claim 1 or 7, further comprising a strut connecting the rear legs which encloses the second latching device.

13. A collapsible highchair as claimed in claim 1 or 7, wherein the front legs are a component of a substantially U-shaped frame in the form of a tubular rack, and the arc of the U-shaped upper region of the frame runs in an upper end edge of a seat shell of the seat.

14. A collapsible highchair as claimed in claim 1 or 7, further comprising a diagonal member located substantially in the seat plane, which is connectable or connected to the guide device, and which, when in the upright position, has a foot rest at its front end extending obliquely downwards.

15. A collapsible highchair as claimed in claim 14, wherein the foot rest on the lower end of the pivoting diagonal member pivots at least partially beyond the rear legs when in a compact position.

16. A collapsible highchair as claimed in claim 1 or 7, wherein the front and/or rear legs are adjustable in length.

17. A collapsible highchair as claimed in claim 1 or 7, wherein the front legs and/or the rear legs have at least in part an arched form with a bulge in the direction of the front side of the collapsible highchair.

Description:

BACKGROUND

With the use of collapsible highchairs, as they apply in particular for small children at the meal table, there is a problem of improving the folding mechanism of these chairs such that they can be operated by a parent using one hand as far as possible, and otherwise cannot be activated by small children sitting on them. There is also a problem of constructing a collapsible highchair that remains stable when being used and which is easy to transport in a collapsed position without opening up.

Opened highchairs, normally used only for a short time by small children for eating, occupy a significant amount of space due to the large footprint required for stability against collapse. They are thus mostly collapsed between mealtimes so that the space at and around the table can be used for other purposes. Additionally, since adults, when wanting to sit children in the highchair, are frequently carrying the children in their arms when coming from another room and so have only one hand free, those highchair mechanisms that require two hands for setting up the highchair prove to be highly unfavourable, since the children have to be set down again for the time it takes to set up the highchair.

A generic collapsible highchair is already known from DE 20 2004 014 197 U1, in which a folding standard can be fixed at a specific angle on a highchair frame with a pushbutton mechanism. The drawback to this construction is that though the seat shell can be pivoted, a considerable width remains however due to the bale located in front of the seat shell and tray being formed as one piece with the rear legs.

It is especially disadvantageous that at least two hands need to be used to set up this prior art highchair, specifically for raising the seat shell while using the other hand to keep the chair in a preset position and also to secure it against the lifting movement.

SUMMARY

In various embodiments, disclosed herein is a collapsible highchair with a tubular rack having a seat and a shackle section limiting the seat to the front and legs, which can be pivoted towards one another about a hinged joint between an upright position for use and an opposite compact position.

Embodiments of a collapsible highchair are disclosed herein which are easier to operate and preferably can be set up with one hand, which stands stably in the upright state with a bale in front of the seat, and in a collapsed state, take up as little space as possible.

At least one embodiment is achieved by an easy-to-operate construction, and comprises a first latching device extending from the shackle section limiting the seat in a forward direction and designed to pivot for detachable connection with a section of the tubular rack. The first latching device of the seat is provided in the seat region and is positioned in particular transversely under the shackle section in the upright position. The latching device can accordingly serve, e.g., as vertical strut for support on a section of the tubular rack and/or of the seat provided in the seat region and positioned under the latter in the upright position.

In a preferred configuration, a first latching device in the form of a hasp fitting can be provided at a lower free end for fixing the mounting with a connecting device about a section of the rack and/or of the seat. Here it is of particular advantage for the first latching device to be located on the front side of the seat in the middle, leaving two free spaces for the legs of a seated child. The first latching device is provided with a connecting device and encloses the tubular section from the outside on the side facing away from the seat.

In this way, the chair can be carried both in the opened and in the folded state, for example, by gripping the upper end of the seat shell. Moreover, the chair can easily be assembled in that, while still in the folded state, the collapsible highchair is leaned against a wall or the body of the carrier. After a preferably provided second latching device holding the collapsed chair is released, while the chair is still leaning against the body, the chair is slowly unfolded and the end position of the shackle section holding the child in the chair in the opened state is fixed by the first latching device.

In a further configuration, the connecting device, in particular the hasp fitting, is designed as a particularly monobloc clamping bracket, in particular a synthetic pressure clamp, and comprises an upper claw-like support on the tubular section, a second mobile section clamped on the tube and a third section provided on the mobile-engaging section extending the lever of the mobile section.

Further disclosed herein is a collapsible highchair, that, in addition to the features of the abovementioned variants, contains at least one diagonal member that pivots on at least one front leg. The at least one diagonal member is provided with a guide device, in particular a slot guide, in which guide elements provided on the rear legs (e.g., bolts) shift, so that the guide device, i.e., the diagonal member, approximates the extension of the legs when the legs are swung towards one another, and in particular assumes a position in the compact position that is substantially parallel to the legs.

Other variants of the collapsible highchair disclosed herein are optionally characterised in that the hinged joint is provided at the level of the shackle section limiting the seat in a forward direction and/or that the shackle section also pivots on the hinged joint without latching. At the same time, further embodiments of a collapsible highchair can also have a second latching device that connects at least one rear leg or an element provided with a rear leg in the folded state, engaging with the underside of the folded shackle section and/or of the tray set thereon to one of the rear legs.

At the same time, a brace connecting the rear legs substantially horizontally may encompass the second latching device, in particular in the manner of a hasp fitting and/or in a compact position, to encompass particularly from below.

At the same time, according to a further embodiment, the front legs may be a component of a substantially U-shaped, monobloc frame, in particular in the form of a tubular rack. The arc of the U-shaped upper region of the frame, in particular a tubular rack, runs in an upper end edge of a seat shell of the seat.

Further advantageous developments of a collapsible highchair in this context have a diagonal member located substantially in the seat plane, and in particular is connectable or connected to the guide device. The diagonal member has a foot rest at its front end extending obliquely down when in an upright position. At the same time, the foot rest, when in a compact position, pivots at the lower end of the pivoting diagonal member as far as the rear legs, and in particular in behind them.

The chair can thus be securely set up, using weight in the chair to constantly push the legs apart, by limiting the angle of pivot of the legs which can be effected by at least one diagonal member laid pivotably on the front legs. The at least one diagonal member is provided with a guide device, in particular in the form of a slot guide, in which guide elements provided on the rear legs, such as radially projecting side bolts, move.

Only when it is unstressed will the diagonal member approximate the extending of the legs when the legs are pivoted towards one another and take up a position in the compact position substantially parallel to the legs.

The intuitively simple construction of the collapsible highchair enables safe operation in that incomplete unfolding of the bracket or respectively of the tray on the bale will result in the vertical strut (still) not being able to be fixed due to excessive length, but whereby complete unfolding is safely achieved by simply moving the strut further. In this position, the vertical strut of the first latching device is latched.

An added advantage of the construction is that movement can be controlled using one hand only. In particular, the arm of the user can “clamp” an upper section of the seat shell under an arm, while the respective hand grasps the first latching device. At the same time, by sliding the hand to the lower end of the first latching device, the advantageously-provided hasp fitting can be fastened about a tubular section of the tubular rack and/or of the seat.

A monobloc synthetic pressure clamp has proven effective for fastening, for example, which can be formed from an upper, claw-like section supported on the tubular section of the seat and a second section clamped around the tube. The synthetic pressure clamp advantageously has another third section projecting like a tab to give the operator a larger lever for exerting force on the second mobile section of the clamped clamping bracket, in particular when opening.

The third section, for example, projects radially outwards from the claw of the clamping bracket, and also makes it easier to release the first latch, whenever the chair is to be folded up again. Releasing the first latch is possible using one hand, whereby the chair is again supported by the body and the actuating arm.

Moreover, a small child sitting in the collapsible highchair, whose legs come to rest near the latching mechanism under the bracket that limits the collapsible highchair seat to the front, will not be able to reach the underside of the seat and, using intrinsic force, open the likewise fastened clamping bracket. Even if this were to succeed, it would readily lead to the shackle section or the tray fastened thereon folding down. Due to a diagonal member, the chair will stand stably under the seat on which gravity is exerted by the child, and no other position for the legs will be possible. Only the legs of the child will be restricted gently in their freedom of movement by a fold down tray. Consequently, collapsible highchairs as disclosed herein can have a tray set on the shackle section limiting the seat forwards.

In each case, the length of the front and/or the rear legs can be adjusted telescopically.

Embodiments of collapsible highchairs as disclosed herein have proven to be particularly suitable, in which the front legs and/or the rear legs have at least a partial arched form, in particular with a bulge, in the direction of the front side of the collapsible highchair.

The foregoing summary introduces a selection of concepts in a simplified form that are further described below in the Detailed Description. This summary is not intended to specify key features of the claimed subject matter, nor is it intended to be used to determine the scope of the claimed subject matter.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The foregoing aspects and many of the attendant advantages of this invention will become more readily appreciated as the same become better understood by reference to the following detailed description, when taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, wherein:

FIG. 1 shows an embodiment of a collapsible highchair in an upright position,

FIG. 2 shows the collapsible highchair in a folded compact position,

FIG. 3 shows the collapsible highchair in a first embodiment only with a bale limiting the seat to the front in an upright state with an already-released first latching device,

FIG. 4 shows the collapsible highchair of FIG. 3 with a tray set on the bale in front of the seat and released pivoted first latching device,

FIG. 5 shows the chair of FIG. 4 in a further collapsed position, in which the diagonal member is easily recognisable,

FIG. 6 shows the fully collapsed compact position of the collapsible highchair, in which the foot rest is evident behind the slightly S-shaped pivoted tubular rack, and

FIG. 7 is a detailed illustration of FIG. 6, in which a second latching device, which extends claw-like from the underside of the tray to a diagonal member, is evident.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The collapsible highchair illustrated in FIGS. 1 to 7 has a tubular rack 10 as a load-bearing construction, which accommodates a seat, preferably as a synthetic shell (not illustrated), and a shackle section 12 limiting the seat to the front against letting the seat come forwards. The tubular rack 10 forms legs 14, 16. In at least one embodiment, the length of the legs 14, 16 can be individually telescopically adjusted.

Both front legs 16 are interconnected under the seat by a cross connection, which has an advantageously tubular section that the first latching device can engage. Further up, both front legs 16 form part of the tubular rack 10 bearing the seat and are connected there as well.

A hinged joint 26 on each side of the seat connects the front legs 16 to two rear legs 14, which are interconnected to a diagonal member 34, so that the leg pairs can be adjusted between an upright position for use and an opposite compact position. A first latching device 18 from the shackle section 12 limiting the seat in a forward direction results in detachable connection on a section of the tubular rack and/or of the seat provided in the seat region, positioned transversally in the upright position under the bale.

The first latching device 18 is provided as a vertical strut at its lower, free end for fixing to a hasp fitting 20 about a tubular section of the tubular rack 10 and/or of the seat.

The first latching device 18 engages on the front side of the seat in the centre, leaving two free spaces for the legs of a seated child, with a hasp fitting 20 on the side facing away from the seat and encompassing the tubular section from the outside, preferably designed as a monobloc synthetic pressure clamp. This synthetic pressure clamp preferably comprises a first claw-like section supported on the tubular section, a second mobile section clamped on the tube and encompassing the latter and a third section, an engaging section provided on the mobile second section, extending the lever of the mobile section for more powerful handling.

In a further embodiment, a tray is set on the shackle section 12 limiting the seat in a forward direction.

At the same time, the hinged joint 26 provided on both sides and forming a common axis is provided at the level of the shackle section 12 limiting the seat forwards, whereby the shackle section 12 also pivots on the hinged joint 26 without latching. At least one diagonal member 28 is provided to pivot on the front legs 16, which is provided with a slot guide 30 in which bolts provided on the rear legs move so that the diagonal member 28 approximates the extending of the legs. When the legs 14 and 16 are pivoted towards each other, the diagonal member 28 takes up a position in the compact position that is substantially parallel to the legs.

A second latching mechanism 32 ensures that a compact form is maintained by connecting elements in the region of the rear legs 14 in the folded state and engaging with the underside of the folded shackle section 12 and/or of the tray 22 set thereon to one of the rear legs or adjacent regions of the tubular rack. The second latching mechanism 32 can be fastened eccentrically as a hook 32 on the table bottom such that it can be folded back and clamped to the tray underside when not in use.

This second latching mechanism 32 preferably engages the horizontal strut 34 horizontally connecting the rear legs, and does this encompassing from below in the manner of a hasp fitting, so that the degree of detachment is readily evident to the user viewed from above.

It is finally proposed that the front legs 16 are designed as a U-shaped monobloc, and the resulting arc 36 of the U-shaped upper region of the tubular rack runs in an upper end edge of a seat shell of the seat to strengthen the latter and at the same time to make it easier to bear on the upper edge. A recessed grip can be omitted by leaving an arched area out of the seat as a grip.

The diagonal member 28 located substantially in the seat plane is provided at its front end extending obliquely down, when in an upright position, with a foot rest 40 extending transversally over the front side, which however still fits in between the free space of the leg pairs 16 and also 14 during collapsing. The diagonal member 28 pivots in behind the rear legs 14 on the lower end of the pivoting diagonal member 28, when in a compact position.

The features of the invention disclosed in the above description, in the claims and in the drawings can in their different embodiments be present both individually and in any combination required in order to realise the invention.

While illustrative embodiments have been illustrated and described, it will be appreciated that various changes can be made therein without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention.