Title:
Money Management Board Game & Method of Use Thereof
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A money management board game comprising a playing board having a board surface with a plurality of marked spaces formed into a continuous track, one of such spaces designated as a starting space, at least one space designated as a first type of card space, at least one space designated as a second type of card space, and at least one space designated as a third type of card space. A plurality of games may be played on the playing board based on instructions printed on first, second and third types of cards. Each player is represented by one player token. Each player advances a player token by the sum of numbers shown upon a roll of a pair of dice. Each player at the start of game is provided with an equal allotment of currency-representing paper bills. The player at the end of the game with either the least amount or the largest amount of paper bills, depending upon which game is played, is declared the winner.



Inventors:
Randle, Ezra L. (Elk City, OK, US)
Application Number:
11/946033
Publication Date:
07/31/2008
Filing Date:
11/27/2007
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F3/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
MENDIRATTA, VISHU K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
QUICKPATENTS (6671 Las Vegas Blvd. Suite 210, Las Vegas, NV, 89119, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A board game for playing a plurality of games, comprising: a playing board having a board surface with a plurality of marked spaces formed into a continuous track, one of such spaces designated as a starting space, at least one space designated as a first type of card space, at least one space designated as a second type of card space, and at least one space designated as a third type of card space; a plurality of first type of cards, each having printed instructions on one side thereof; a plurality of second type of cards, each having printed instructions on one side thereof; a plurality of third type of cards, each having printed instructions on one side thereof; a pair of standard dice; a plurality of currency-representing paper bills; and a plurality of player tokens; whereby a plurality of games may be played on the playing board based on the instructions printed on the first, second and third types of cards, each player represented by one of the player tokens, each player advancing his player's token by the sum of the numbers shown on the dice upon his roll of the pair of dice, each player at the start of the game provided with an equal allotment of the paper bills.

2. The board game of claim 1 wherein at least one space is designated as a “go back” space with an indicator of a number of spaces, such that if a player's token lands thereon the player's token is immediately sent backward the number of spaces.

3. The board game of claim 1 wherein at least one space is designated as a “collection” space with an indicator of a multiplier number, such that if a player's token lands thereon the player rolls the dice and collects currency-representing bills representing the multiplier number times the resulting sum of the numbers indicated by the dice.

4. A method of playing a first game comprising the steps: a) providing the board game as recited in claim 1; b) instructing the plurality of players to each select one of the player tokens to be represented thereby; c) instructing the plurality of players to designate one player as a banker and instructing the banker to provide each player with a predetermined number of the currency-representing paper bills; d) instructing the players to each roll the pair of dice to determine which player is to go first, the next player to go thereafter being the player adjacent to the first player in a pre-determined direction, either clockwise or counter-clockwise; e) instructing each player on his turn to roll the dice and move his player token the number of spaces represented by adding the numbers of each die; f) instructing each player to select a first type of card and follow the instructions thereon if the player's token lands on the first type of card space; g) instructing each player to select a second type of card and follow the instructions thereon if the player's token lands on the second type of card space; and h) upon one player, by following the instructions on either the first or second type of card, surrenders all of his currency-representing paper bills, instructing the players to declare that player the winner.

5. The method of playing the first game of claim 4 wherein steps b) and c) are interchanged.

6. The method of playing the first game of claim 4 wherein step e) is replaced with the following step: e) instructing each player on his turn to roll the dice and move his player token the number of spaces represented by adding the numbers of each die, unless his player token has not yet moved, in which case the player must roll a sum of over five with the dice in order to move.

7. The method of playing the first game of claim 4 wherein step e) is replaced with the following step: e) instructing each player on his turn to roll the dice and move his player token the number of spaces represented by adding the numbers of each die, unless his player token has not yet moved, in which case the player must roll a sum of over five with the dice in order to move, and passing the dice to the next adjacent player unless the player rolled the same number on each die, whereupon the player takes another turn.

8. The method of playing the first game of claim 4 wherein step a) is replaced with a) providing the board game as recited in claim 2, and further including between steps g) and h) the step g′) instructing each player to go back the indicated number of spaces if the player's token lands on any of the at least one “go back” spaces.

9. The method of playing the first game of claim 4 wherein step a) is replaced with a) providing the board game as recited in claim 3, and further including between steps g) and h) the step g″) instructing each player to roll the dice and collect from the banker currency-representing bills representing the multiplier number times the resulting sum of the numbers indicated by the dice if the player lands on any of the at least one “collection” spaces.

10. A method of playing a second game comprising the steps: a) providing the board game as recited in claim 1; b) instructing the plurality of players to each select one of the player tokens to be represented thereby; c) instructing the plurality of players to designate one player as a banker and instructing the banker to provide each player with a predetermined number of the currency-representing paper bills; d) instructing the players to each roll the pair of dice to determine which player is to go first, the next player to go thereafter being the player adjacent to the first player in a pre-determined direction, either clockwise or counter-clockwise; e) instructing each player on his turn to roll the dice and move his player token the number of spaces represented by adding the numbers of each die; f) instructing each player to select a first type of card and follow the instructions thereon if the player's token lands on the first type of card space; g) instructing each player to select a second type of card and follow the instructions thereon if the player's token lands on the second type of card space; h) instructing each player to select a third type of card and follow the instructions thereon if the player's token lands on the third type of card space; and i) upon one player being the last player to have any of the currency-representing paper bills, instructing the players to declare that player the winner.

11. The method of playing the second game of claim 10 wherein steps b) and c) are interchanged.

12. The method of playing the second game of claim 10 wherein step e) is replaced with the following step: e) instructing each player on his turn to roll the dice and move his player token the number of spaces represented by adding the numbers of each die, unless his player token has not yet moved, in which case the player must roll a sum of over five with the dice in order to move.

13. The method of playing the second game of claim 10 wherein step e) is replaced with the following step: e) instructing each player on his turn to roll the dice and move his player token the number of spaces represented by adding the numbers of each die, unless his player token has not yet moved, in which case the player must roll a sum of over five with the dice in order to move, and passing the dice to the next adjacent player unless the player rolled the same number on each die, whereupon the player takes another turn.

14. The method of playing the second game of claim 10 wherein step a) is replaced with a) providing the board game as recited in claim 2, and further including between steps h) and i) the step h′) instructing each player to go back the indicated number of spaces if the player's token lands on any of the at least one “go back” spaces.

15. The method of playing the second game of claim 10 wherein step a) is replaced with a) providing the board game as recited in claim 3, and further including between steps h) and i) the step h″) instructing each player to roll the dice and collect from the banker currency-representing bills representing the multiplier number times the resulting sum of the numbers indicated by the dice if the player lands on any of the at least one “collection” spaces.

16. The method of playing the second game of claim 10 wherein step i) is replaced with the following step: i) upon one player reaching a pre-determined number of times around the continuous track of spaces, instructing all players to count the sum of currency-representing paper bills and declaring the player having the largest sum the winner.

17. The method of playing the second game of claim 10 wherein step h) is replaced with the following step: h) instructing each player to select a third type of card and follow the instructions thereon if the player's token lands on the third type of card space, the player skipping his next turn.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Patent Application 60/886,922, filed on Jan. 27, 2007, and incorporated herein by reference.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH AND DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to games, and more particularly to a game that teaches certain aspects and managing money.

DISCUSSION OF RELATED ART

Numerous innovations for board games have been provided in the prior art that will be described. Even though these innovations may be suitable for the specific individual purposes in which they address, however, they differ from the present invention.

A first example, U.S. Pat. No. 2,026,082, issued on Dec. 31, 1935, to Darrow teaches in a board game apparatus a board acting as a playing-field having marked spaces constituting a path or course extending about the board, the path affording a continuous track for the purpose of continuity of play, certain of the spaces being designated as by position or color so as to constitute a distinguishable group, there being a plurality of such groups each differing from the others and each having its spaces adjacent on the same side of the board, the apparatus having indications of the rentals required for the use and occupancy, by opponent players, of spaces of one or more such groups, which rentals are subject to increase by the acquisition of an additional space or spaces of the same group by the same individual player, thereby making it possible for the possessor to exact greater payments or penalties from any opponent resting or trespassing thereon. One drawback with this type of game is that only one game with one set of rules may be played.

A second example U.S. Pat. No. 3,889,954, issued on Jun. 17, 1975, to Malisow teaches a game having a board with marked spaces or areas constituting a path of progression about the board. A portion of the spaces are designated for various property locations such as particular gambling hotels, restaurants, and the like. Spaces are also designated for certain reward/penalty spaces, such as “Pass,” “Don't Pass,” “Income Tax,” “Go To Jail,” “Jail,” “Vigorish,” “Airport,” and the like. Playing pieces are provided with one piece representing each player, and chance taking apparatus, such as dice, determine the movement of each piece about the board. The game further includes a medium of payment, such as token money, and ownership indicators, such as title cards, for properties that may be purchased. Additional chance taking apparatus, such as cards, a roulette wheel, or the like, are provided to determine the payments from a player whose playing piece at the end of a particular cycle of movement comes to rest on a particular location. The amounts of such payments are controlled by chance taking limits set forth at each such location and further by the choice of the players and whether or not another player has ownership rights in the particular location. One drawback with this type of game is that only one game with one set of rules may be played.

A third example U.S. Pat. No. 4,012,046, issued on Mar. 15, 1977, to Liket teaches a game apparatus having a game board with a continuous path around its perimeter, the path being divided into consecutive spaces, each space bearing instructions for playing the game. Playing pieces are utilized by the game players to move around the spaces. Play money is distributed to the players with the remainder remaining in the bank. Two decks of standard playing cards are utilized. Some of the cards are distributed to the players; the remainder forming a supply for selection by the players in consecutive order. The playing cards serve as both a determination of the number of moves for each playing piece, as well as providing for unique combinations in the hands of the players to determine the winning player. One drawback with this type of game is that all of the players must use two decks of playing cards during the play of the game, making the game more difficult to learn. Further, only one game with one set of rules may be played.

A fourth example U.S. Pat. No. 4,032,154, issued on Jun. 28, 1977, to Magiera teaches a game apparatus having a board with marked spaces or areas constituting a path of progression about the board. The preferred embodiment of the game apparatus further includes a medium of payment, such as token money, a first set of cards indicating limits for at least one type of game points, a second set of cards adding and/or subtracting game points, and a third set of cards adding or subtracting from the balance of the monetary notes. Also in the preferred embodiment, a portion of the spaces of the game board path are designated for certain reward/penalty spaces, major game object spaces for directing the players to draw a card from the second set of cards adding or subtracting game points, minor game object spaces for directing a player to draw a card from the third set of cards adding and/or subtracting from the balance of monetary notes, and game completion squares. The preferred embodiment of the game apparatus further includes game markers for each individual player to move around the spaces on the board as determined by chance taking apparatus such as dice. In the preferred embodiment, the objective of the game is for a player to meet a first game object, obtaining game points within the limits set by a card from the first set of cards, and land on the game completion square while simultaneously meeting a second game object, maintaining a proper balance of monetary notes to meet expenses. The drawback with this type of game is that all of the players must add and subtract game points during the play of the game, making the game difficult for younger players and more difficult to learn in general. Further, only one game with one set of rules may be played.

A fifth example U.S. Pat. No. 4,109,918, issued on Aug. 29, 1978, to Mele et al. teaches a game apparatus that includes a game board having a plurality of playing zones defining a circumferential path of travel around the board, each zone containing a respective designation of a discipline of learning. A roulette-type spinning wheel is positioned in the center of the gameboard and includes individual sections containing both numeric designations for providing the direction and magnitude of movement along the playing zones, as well as providing game instructions including references to various income opportunities. A plurality of playing pieces are included for use by the participants in moving around the path of travel. Groups of cards are included, wherein each group is associated with either a respective one of the disciplines of learning or a respective one of the income opportunities. Each card includes a statement or a question and answer with a corresponding dollar amount of income or expense. Financial instruments are also included such as play money, bonds and checks. Recesses on the game board provide storage room for the card after being used. One drawback with this type of game is that it is relatively difficult to learn, and only one game with one set of rules may be played.

A sixth example U.S. Pat. No. 6,402,143, issued on Jun. 11, 2002, to Brindley teaches a board game apparatus for a game that requires exercise of both judgment and ability to solve problems, simulates a capitalist system and provides players with opportunity to trade off potential reward against risk according to their ability to solve problems. The apparatus includes a board marked with a series of spaces in a loop, including an event space and territory spaces, player pieces, tokens and property pieces for placing on territory spaces. An event affecting the standing of one or more players arises when a player piece lands on an event space. When a player piece lands on a territory space, the outcome depends upon the ability of a player to solve a problem and the player's judgement on whether to trade off potential reward against risk according to their perceived ability to solve the problem. When a player is defeated, that player may join the side of the victorious player, and assist in solving problems. One drawback with this type of game is that all of the players must solve problems during the play of the game, making it difficult for some players. Further, only one game with one set of rules may be played.

It is apparent now that numerous innovations for board games have been provided in the prior art that are adequate for various purposes. Furthermore, even though these innovations may be suitable for the specific individual purposes to which they address, accordingly, they would not be suitable for the purposes of the present invention as heretofore described.

None of the aforementioned prior art board games teaches a money management board game that is simple to learn, may be played in a number of different ways with different rules, and is easy to play. The present invention accomplishes these objectives.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

An object of the present invention is to provide a money management board game that avoids the disadvantages of the prior art.

Another object of the present invention is to provide a money management board game that is simple and inexpensive to manufacture.

Still another objects of the present invention is to provide a money management board game that is simple to use.

Briefly stated, still yet another object of the present invention is to provide a money management board game comprising a playing board having a board surface with a plurality of marked spaces formed into a continuous track, one of such spaces designated as a starting space, at least one space designated as a first type of card space, at least one space designated as a second type of card space, and at least one space designated as a third type of card space. A plurality of games may be played on the playing board based on instructions printed on first, second and third types of cards. Each player is represented by one player token. Each player advances a player token by the sum of the numbers shown upon a roll of a pair of dice. Each player at the start of the game is provided with an equal allotment of currency-representing paper bills. The player at the end of the game with either the least amount or the largest amount of paper bills is declared the winner.

The novel features which are considered characteristic of the present invention are set forth in the appended claims. The invention itself, however, both as to its construction and its method of operation, together with additional objects and advantages thereof, will be best understood from the following description of the specific embodiments when read and understood in connection with the accompanying drawing.

DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a plan view of the playing board of the present invention;

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of some of the player tokens;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the pair of dice used to determine the moves of each player token;

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a stack of a first type of cards titled “draw & play” for the playing board;

FIG. 4b is a plan view of one of the first type of cards showing the instructions thereon;

FIG. 5a is a perspective view of a stack of a second type of cards titled “draw & receive” for the playing board;

FIG. 5b is a plan view of one of the second type of cards showing the instructions thereon;

FIG. 6a is a perspective view of a stack of a third type of cards titled “draw, pay & skip” for the playing board;

FIG. 6b is a plan view of one of the third type of cards showing the instructions thereon; and

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of two stacks of currency-representing paper bills in differing denominations.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Referring now to the figures, in which like numerals indicate like parts, and particularly to FIGS. 1 through 7, the present invention will be discussed with reference thereto. A money management board game 10 is provided. The board game 10 is for playing a plurality of games and comprises a playing board 20 having a board surface 25 with a plurality of marked spaces 30 formed into a continuous track 40, one of such spaces 30 designated as a starting space 50, at least one space 30 designated as a first type of card space 60, at least one space 30 designated as a second type of card space 70, and at least one space 30 designated as a third type of card space 80. The board 20 is preferably a rigid cardboard or other stock material, preferably having fold lines (not shown) so as to allow the board 20 to be folded to fit into a packaging box, or the like (not shown). The board surface 25 may be a printed paper stock adhered to the board 20, for example.

A plurality of first type of cards 65 titled “draw & pay”, each have printed instructions 66 on one side 67 thereof. A plurality of second type of cards 75 titled “draw & receive”, each have printed instructions 76 on one side 77 thereof. A plurality of third type of cards 85 titled “draw, pay & skip”, each have printed instructions 86 on one side 87 thereof. Each card type 65,75,85 are preferably cut from a card-stock material and are all substantially the same size, and are preferably rectangular. A pair of standard dice 90, a plurality of currency-representing paper bills 100 and a plurality of player tokens 110 are also provided. Each currency-representing paper bill 100 may have a numerical indicia (not shown) thereon for representing a denomination of the currency.

A plurality of games may be played on the playing board 20 based on the instructions 66, 76, 86 printed on the first, second and third types of cards, 65, 75, 85. Each player is represented by one of the player tokens 110. Each player advances his player's token 110 by the sum of the numbers shown on the dice 90 upon his roll of the pair of dice 90. Each player at the start of the game is provided with an equal allotment of the paper bills 100.

At least one space is designated as a “go back” space 32 with an indicator 33 of a number of spaces 30, such that if a player's token 110 lands thereon the player's token 110 is immediately sent backward the number of spaces 30. At least one space 30 is designed as a “collection” space 34 with an indicator 35 of a multiplier number, such that if a player's token 110 lands thereon the player rolls the dice 90 and collects currency-representing bills 100 representing the multiplier number times the resulting sum of the numbers indicated by the dice 90. Depending upon the rules selected by the players, the player at the end of the game with either the least amount or the largest amount of paper bills 100 is declared the winner.

A first game may be played with the board game 10 by following of the following steps:

    • 1. Providing the board game 10.
    • 2. Instructing the plurality of players to each select one of the player tokens 110 to be represented thereby.
    • 3. Instructing the plurality of players to designate one player as a banker and instructing the banker to provide each player with a predetermined number of currency-representing paper bills 100.
    • 4. Instructing the players to each roll the pair of dice 90 to determine which player is to go first (such as the player with the highest roll), the next player to go thereafter being the player adjacent to the first player in a pre-determined direction, such as clockwise or to the player's left.
    • 5. Instructing each player on his turn to roll the dice 90 and move his player token 110 the number of spaces 30 represented by adding the numbers of each die 90.
    • 6. Instructing each player to select a first type of card 65 and follow the instructions 66 thereon if the player's token 110 lands on the first type of card space 60.
    • 7. Instructing each player to select a second type of card 75 and follow the instructions 76 thereon if the player's token 110 lands on the second type of card space 70.
    • 8. Upon one player, by following the instructions 66, 76 on either the first or second type of card 65, 75 surrendering all of his currency-representing paper bills 100, instructing the other players to declare that player the winner.

In the rules for playing the first game steps 2 and 3 may be interchanged. Also, step 5 may be replaced with the following step:

    • 5. Instructing each player on his turn to roll the dice 90 and move his player token 110 the number of spaces 30 represented by adding the numbers of each die 90, unless his player token 110 has not yet moved, in which case the player must roll a sum of over five with the dice 90 in order to move.

In the rules for playing the first game step 5 may alternately be replaced with the following step:

    • 5. Instructing each player on his turn to roll the dice 90 and move his player token 110 the number of spaces 30 represented by adding the numbers of each die 90, unless his player token 110 has not yet moved, in which case the player must roll a sum of over five with the dice 90 in order to move, and passing the dice 90 to the next adjacent player unless the player rolled the same number on each die 90, whereupon the player takes another turn.

In the rules for playing the first game, the step 7a may be inserted between steps 7 and 8, as follows: Instructing each player to go back the indicated number of spaces 30 if the player's token 110 lands on any of the at least one “go back” spaces 32.

In the rules for playing the first game, the alternate step 7a maybe inserted between steps 7 and 8, as follows: Instructing each player to roll the dice 30 and collect from the banker currency-representing bills 100 representing the multiplier number times the resulting sum of the numbers indicated by the dice 90 if the player lands on any of the at least one “collection” spaces 34.

A second game may be played with the board game 10 by following of the following steps:

    • 1. Providing the board game 10.
    • 2. Instructing the plurality of players to each select one of the player tokens 110 to be represented thereby.
    • 3. Instructing the plurality of players to designate one player as a banker and instruct the banker to provide each player with a predetermined number of the currency-representing paper bills 100.
    • 4. Instructing the players to each roll the pair of dice 90 to determine which player is to go first, the next player to go thereafter being the player adjacent to the first player in a pre-determined direction, either clockwise or counter-clockwise.
    • 5. Instructing each player on his turn to roll the dice 90 and move his player token 110 the number of spaces 30 represented by adding the numbers of each die 90.
    • 6. Instructing each player to select a first type of card 65 and follow the instructions 66 thereon if the player's token 110 lands on the first type of card space 60.
    • 7. Instructing each player to select a second type of card 75 and follow the instructions 76 thereon if the player's token 110 lands on the second type of card space 70.
    • 8. Instructing each player to select a third type of card 85 and follow the instructions 86 thereon if the player's token 110 lands on the third type of card space 30.
    • 9. Upon one player being the last player to have any of the currency-representing paper bills 100, instructing the other players to declare that player the winner.

In the rules for playing the second game steps 2 and 3 may be interchanged. Also step 5 may be replaced with the following step:

    • 5. Instructing each player on his turn to roll the dice 90 and move his player token 110 the number of spaces 30 represented by adding the numbers of each die 90, unless his player token 110 has not yet moved, in which case the player must roll a sum of over five with the dice 90 in order to move

Alternately, in the rules for playing the second game, step 5 may be replaced with the following step:

    • 5. Instructing each player on his turn to roll the dice 90 and move his player token 110 the number of spaces 30 represented by adding the number of each die 90, unless his player token 110 has not yet moved, in which case the player must roll a sum of over five with the dice 90 in order to move, and passing the dice to the next adjacent player unless the player rolled the same number on each die 90, whereupon the player takes another turn.

In the rules for playing the second game, a step 8a may be inserted between steps 8 and 9 the step 8, as follows: Instructing each player to go back the indicated number of spaces 30 if the player's token 110 lands on any of the at least one “go back” spaces 32.

In the rules for playing the second game, the alternate step 8a may be inserted between steps 8 and 9 the step 8a, as follows. Instructing each player to roll the dice 90 and collect from the banker currency-representing bills 100 representing the multiplier number times the resulting sum of the numbers indicated by the dice 90 if the player lands on any of the at least one “collection” spaces 34.

In the rules for playing the second game, step 9 may be replaced with the following step:

    • 9. Upon one player reaching a pre-determined number of times around the continuous track 40 of spaces 30, instructing all players to count their sum of currency-representing paper bills 100 and declaring the player having the largest sum the winner.

In the rules for playing the second game, step 8 may be replaced with the following step:

    • 8. Instructing each player to select a third type of card 85 and follow the instructions 86 thereon if the player's token 110 lands on the third type of card space 80, the player skiping his next turn.

It will be understood that each of the elements described above, or two or more together, may also find a useful application in other types of constructions differing from the type described above. While the invention has be illustrated and described as embodiments of a money management card game, accordingly it is not limited to the details shown, since it will be understood that various omissions, modifications, substitutions and changes in the forms and details of the device illustrated and its operation can be made by those skilled in the art without departing in any way from the spirit of the present invention.

Without further analysis, the foregoing will so fully reveal the gist of the present invention that others can, by applying current knowledge, readily adapt it for various applications without omitting features that, from the standpoint of prior art, fairly constitute characteristics of the generic or specific aspects of this invention.