Title:
WALL CONSTRUCTION AND INSTALLATION METHOD
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
To install a wall, a placement area for a set of prefabricated wall sections is determined. The placement area includes a starting end and a terminating end. A wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections includes a first layer of urethane foam, a second layer of urethane foam, an extension and depression to mate with a corresponding depression and extension of another wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections, and a through bore extending from an upper face of the extension, passing through the extension and exiting a lower face of the extension. During installation, surface vegetation is removed from the placement area in response to surface vegetation being present on the placement area, the soil is compacted in the placement area, and a first wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections is placed at the starting end. In addition, the first wall section is secured to the starting end, a next wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections is placed at the placement area, and the next wall section is affixed to a previously secured wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections. Furthermore, the next wall section is secured to the placement area, the steps of placing, affixing, and securing next wall section are continued until the terminating end is reached. Moreover, a last wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections is placed at the terminating end and the last wall section is affixed to the previously secured wall section.



Inventors:
Rothgeb, Brady S. (Columbus, OH, US)
Wintzer, James W. (Westerville, OH, US)
Regenauer, Volker (Campbell Hall, NY, US)
Application Number:
12/016540
Publication Date:
07/24/2008
Filing Date:
01/18/2008
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
52/263, 52/270, 52/309.4
International Classes:
E04B2/08
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
MAESTRI, PATRICK J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BAKER & HOSTETLER LLP (WASHINGTON SQUARE, SUITE 1100, 1050 CONNECTICUT AVE. N.W., WASHINGTON, DC, 20036-5304, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A method of installing a wall, the method comprising the steps of: determining a placement area for a set of prefabricated wall sections, the placement area having a starting end and a terminating end, a wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections comprises: a first layer of foamed plastic; a second layer of foamed plastic; an extension and depression to mate with a corresponding depression and extension of another wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections; and a through bore extending from an upper face of the extension, passing through the extension and exiting a lower face of the extension; removing surface vegetation from the placement area in response to surface vegetation being present on the placement area; compacting soil in the placement area; placing a first wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections at the starting end; securing the first wall section to the starting end; placing a next wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections at the placement area; affixing the next wall section to a previously secured wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections; securing the next wall section to the placement area; continuing the steps of placing, affixing, and securing next wall section until the terminating end is reached; placing a last wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections at the terminating end; and affixing the last wall section to the previously secured wall section.

2. The method according to claim 1, wherein the first layer is a urethane foam.

3. The method according to claim 1, wherein the second layer is a urethane foam.

4. The method according to claim 1, wherein the wall is a retaining wall and the method further comprises: back filling the wall.

5. The method according to claim 1, further comprising: removing soil from the placement area to a predetermined depth.

6. The method according to claim 5, wherein the predetermined depth is about 1 inch to about 12 inches.

7. The method according to claim 5, wherein the predetermined depth is about 3 inch to about 6 inches.

8. The method according to claim 1, further comprising: disposing a layer of gravel on the placement area.

9. The method according to claim 8, further comprising: compacting the layer of gravel.

10. The method according to claim 1, further comprising: driving a rod through the through bore and into soil disposed below the placement area.

11. The method according to claim 1, further comprising: applying an adhesive to the extension and depression to affix same to the corresponding depression and extension.

12. A wall section comprising: a first layer of urethane foam; a second layer of urethane foam; an extension and depression to mate with a corresponding depression and extension of another wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections; and a through bore extending from an upper face of the extension, passing through the extension and exiting a lower face of the extension.

13. The wall section according to claim 12, wherein the first layer has a density of about 80 kilograms per cubic meter (“Kg/m3”) to about 320 Kg/m3.

14. The wall section according to claim 12, wherein the first layer has a compressive strength of greater than about 4.5 kilogram per square centimeter (“Kg/cm2”).

15. The wall section according to claim 12, wherein the second layer has a density of about 1.5 Kg/m3 to about 15 Kg/m3.

16. The wall section according to claim 12, wherein the first layer has a compressive strength of less than about 1.5 Kg/cm2.

17. The wall section according to claim 12, further comprising an exterior surface having an appearance mimicking stone.

18. The wall section according to claim 12, further comprising a plurality of mating surfaces disposed on the extension and depression.

19. The wall section according to claim 18, wherein the plurality of mating surfaces are configured to receive an adhesive.

20. A column comprising: a first layer of urethane foam, wherein the first layer has a density of about 80 kilograms per cubic meter (“Kg/m3”) to about 320 Kg/m3; and a second layer of urethane foam, wherein the second layer has a density of about 1.5 Kg/m3 to about 15 Kg/m3.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/881,151, filed on Jan. 19, 2007, titled “POLYURETHANE ROCK FAUX FENCE WALL,” the disclosure of which is incorporated herein by reference in its entirety.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention generally relates to construction and installation techniques for walls. More particularly, the present invention pertains to a plastic wall construction and installation method.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The addition of stone fences and retaining walls can greatly improve the aesthetic appeal of a property as well as provide privacy and/or structural support for landscaping features such as terraces and the like. In addition, a stone wall may require no maintenance for many years. Unfortunately, stone walls are extremely expensive due to the high cost of materials and labor involved. Furthermore, conventional stone wall are constructed on site and are therefore subject to the weather. Excessive rain or freezing temperatures can cause delays and raise costs.

Another disadvantage of conventional stone walls is the required footing upon which the walls are constructed. Generally, footing are twice the thickness of the walls being constructed thereon. In regions subject to freeze/thaw cycles, the footings must be placed below the frost level which may be several feet below the surface in the northern areas of the United States. The construction of these footings adds considerable costs to the construction of conventional walls. Moreover, conventional stone wall construction generally disturbs the ground and any plant roots or buried cables and pipes in the vicinity. Accordingly, it may not be possible to construct conventional stone walls near mature plantings.

Accordingly, it is desirable to provide a method of constructing and installing walls capable of overcoming the disadvantages described herein at least to some extent.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The foregoing needs are met, to a great extent, by the present invention, wherein in one respect a method of constructing and installing walls is provided.

An embodiment of the present invention pertains to a method of installing a wall. In this method, a placement area for a set of prefabricated wall sections is determined. The placement area includes a starting end and a terminating end. A wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections includes a first layer of urethane foam, a second layer of urethane foam, an extension and depression to mate with a corresponding depression and extension of another wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections, and a through bore extending from an upper face of the extension, passing through the extension and exiting a lower face of the extension. During installation, surface vegetation is removed from the placement area in response to surface vegetation being present on the placement area, the soil is compacted in the placement area, and a first wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections is placed at the starting end. In addition, the first wall section is secured to the starting end, a next wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections is placed at the placement area, and the next wall section is affixed to a previously secured wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections. Furthermore, the next wall section is secured to the placement area, the steps of placing, affixing, and securing next wall section are continued until the terminating end is reached. Moreover, a last wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections is placed at the terminating end and the last wall section is affixed to the previously secured wall section.

Another embodiment of the present invention relates to a wall section. The wall section includes a first layer of urethane foam, a second layer of urethane foam, an extension and depression to mate with a corresponding depression and extension of another wall section of the set of prefabricated wall sections, and a through bore extending from an upper face of the extension, passing through the extension and exiting a lower face of the extension.

Yet another embodiment of the present invention pertains to a column including a first layer of urethane foam and a second layer of urethane foam. The first layer has a density of about 80 kilograms per cubic meter (“Kg/m3”) to about 320 Kg/m3 and the second layer has a density of about 1.5 Kg/m3 to about 15 Kg/m3.

There has thus been outlined, rather broadly, certain embodiments of the invention in order that the detailed description thereof herein may be better understood, and in order that the present contribution to the art may be better appreciated. There are, of course, additional embodiments of the invention that will be described below and which will form the subject matter of the claims appended hereto.

In this respect, before explaining at least one embodiment of the invention in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and to the arrangements of the components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the drawings. The invention is capable of embodiments in addition to those described and of being practiced and carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology and terminology employed herein, as well as the abstract, are for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting.

As such, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the conception upon which this disclosure is based may readily be utilized as a basis for the designing of other structures, methods and systems for carrying out the several purposes of the present invention. It is important, therefore, that the claims be regarded as including such equivalent constructions insofar as they do not depart from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a wall section suitable for use with an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view of the wall section in accordance with an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 3 is a flow diagram for a method of generating the wall section in accordance with an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an installed wall suitable for use with an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of the installed wall in accordance with an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 6 is a flow diagram for a method of generating the installed wall in accordance with an embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a male and female end joint suitable for use with another embodiment of the invention.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of an assembled male/female joint in accordance with FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a completed male/female joint in accordance with FIG. 7.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The present invention provides a method of constructing a wall that appears to be made from stone. In fact this novel method includes the use of plastic molded to resemble stone. It is an advantage of embodiments of the invention that the wall is less expensive to produce and install and may be installed more rapidly than an actual stone wall.

Preferred embodiments of the invention will now be described with reference to the drawing figures, in which like reference numerals refer to like parts throughout. FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a wall section 10 suitable for use with an embodiment of the invention. As shown in FIG. 1, the wall section 10 includes one or more extensions 12 and one or more depressions 14. As shown herein the extensions 12 and depressions 14 of one wall section 10 are configured to mate with the depressions 14 and extensions 12 of another wall section 10 to form a joint.

The extension 12 includes a through bore 16 (Shown in FIG. 5). As shown herein, the through bore 16 is configured to pass from an upper face of the extension 12, through the body of the extension 12, and to a lower face of the extension 12. In general, the through bore 16 is sized to accept a rod or spike. As shown herein, by driving the rod or spike through the through bore 16 and into the ground below, the wall section 10 may be anchored to the ground.

Also shown in FIG. 1, the extension 12 and depression 14 include a plurality of bearing or mating surfaces 18a to 18n. Examples of mating surfaces 18a to 18n include the illustrated mating surfaces 18a to 18h. In response to introducing the mating surfaces 18a to 18h of a first wall section 10 to the mating surfaces 18a to 18h of a second wall section, respective mating surfaces 18a to 18h facilitate alignment and act to reduce rotational movement of the first wall section 10 relative to the second wall section 10. In addition, the mating surfaces 18a to 18h are configured to provide bonding surfaces. That is, the mating surfaces 18a to 18h are configured to accept an adhesive. In this manner, the first wall section 10 may be affixed to the second wall section 10.

FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view A-A of the wall section 10 in accordance with an embodiment of the invention. As shown in FIG. 2, the wall section 10 includes a first layer 30 and a second layer 32. In general, the first layer 30 is a relatively high density, high strength, and high durability material. In a particular example, the first layer 30 may include a urethane foam having a density of about 80 kilograms per cubic meter (“Kg/m3”) to about 320 Kg/m3 and having a compressive strength of greater than about 4.5 kilogram per square centimeter (“Kg/cm2”). Specific examples of materials suitable for use in the first layer 30 include those described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,185,383. Other examples of materials suitable for use in the first layer 30 include those manufactured by Urethane Technology Company, Inc. of Newburgh, N.Y., 12550 U.S.A.

Generally, the second layer 32 is comparatively lower in density and compression strength as compared to the first layer 30. This lighter weight layer provides added strength while reducing weight of the wall section. The cost of materials used in the fabrication of the wall section are typically based on the weight of the materials used. By reducing the overall weight of the wall section 10, the production cost may be reduced.

In a particular example, the second layer 32 may include a urethane foam having a density of about 1.5 Kg/m3 to about 15 Kg/m3, and a compressive strength of less than about 1.5 Kg/cm2. Specific examples of materials suitable for use in the second layer 32 include those described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,185,383. Other examples of materials suitable for use in the second layer 32 include those manufactured by Urethane Technology Company, Inc. of Newburgh, N.Y., 12550 U.S.A.

In addition, the first layer 30 includes a set of surface characteristics 34 consistent with a stone wall or other molded item. In a particular example and as shown in FIG. 1 and FIG. 2, the wall section 10 includes the appearance of a stone wall. More particular, the set of surface characteristics 34 may include mortar lines, a stone-like texture, stone mimicking coloration, and the like. In other examples, the set of surface characteristics 34 may be configured to mimic dry stacked stone (e.g., without mortar lines), wood, plaster, concrete, and the like.

FIG. 3 is a flow diagram for a method 40 of generating the wall section 10 in accordance with an embodiment of the invention. Prior to generating the wall section 10, a variety of processes may be performed. In no particular order, these processes may include one or more of: wall section design; building and testing mockups; obtaining materials; and the like. As shown in FIG. 3, the method 40 may generally include constructing a mold at step 42 and fabricating the wall section 10 at step 44.

To construct the mold, at step 46 a pattern for the wall section 10 may be built or fabricated. In a specific example, a stone wall may be laid in a traditional manner or an existing stone wall may be prepared for use as the pattern. For example, pattern preparations may include applying a release coat, modifications to form the extensions and/or the depressions, and the like.

At step 48, the pattern may be incased in an impression material or molding material. In general, the molding material may include any suitable molding material. Examples of suitable materials include: sand, concrete, plaster, epoxy, plastics, resins, and the like. In a particular example, silicone rubber may be applied to the pattern in a liquid form and allowed to solidify. Specific examples of suitable silicone rubber include VI-SIL V340 and other products manufactured by Rhodia Inc of Cranbury N.J. 08512, U.S.A.

At step 50, the pattern may be removed from the mold. In various examples, the pattern may be incased in two separate halves, a partition may be placed along the outside of the pattern, or the molding material may be cut to form two or more mold pieces. In other examples, the mold may be sufficiently flexible to be removed from the pattern as a unitary piece. As such, the method of removing the mold from the pattern may depend upon the shape of the pattern and the characteristics of the mold.

To fabricate the wall section 10, the first layer 30 is applied to an inside surface of the mold at step 52. For example, an about 80 Kg/m3 to about 320 Kg/m3 density urethane foam may be sprayed into the mold. That is, two liquid components of the urethane may be pressurized and dispensed from a spray gun for example. As the components are ejected from the spray gun, they are atomized and mix in the air or on the sprayed surface. The thickness of the first layer 30 may depend upon a variety of factors such as, for example, the overall size of the wall section 10, anticipated use for the wall section 10, empirical data, and the like. The first layer 30 may be applied in one or more applications and may be allowed to cure or not prior to application of the second layer 32.

If the first layer 30 is to be colored, a coloring agent may be applied to the mold prior to application of the first layer 30, may be mixed in with the liquid components, and/or may be applied after the wall section 10 is removed from the mold. In another example, the coloring agent may be added to one or both urethane components A/B prior to being sprayed in the mold.

At step 54, the second layer 32 is applied to the applied first layer 30. For example, an about 1.5 Kg/m3 to about 15 Kg/m3 density urethane foam may be sprayed onto the first layer 30 In another example, the urethane components A/B may be mixed in a container and poured into or otherwise introduced to the mold. The thickness of the second layer 32 may depend upon a variety of factors such as, for example, the overall size of the wall section 10, anticipated use for the wall section 10, empirical data, and the like. The second layer 32 may be applied in one or more applications and may completely fill the mold (minus the first layer 30) or a void may be allowed to remain.

At step 56, the cast wall section 10 may be cured. In various embodiments, curing may be performed via heat activation, allowing a specified length of time to elapse, via exposure to ultraviolet light, and the like. In a specific example, the cast wall section 10 may be allowed to cure at room temperature for 15 minutes to 24 hours before being removed from the mold.

At step 58, the wall section 10 is removed from the mold. For example, in a manner similar to removal of the pattern from the mold, the mold may be separated into pieces that are removed from the wall section 10 or the mold may be removed as a unitary structure.

Following removal from the mold, the wall section 10 may be cleaned, milled, sanded, colored, or otherwise treated. For example, surface voids may be filled, sprue and excess flash may be cut or milled flush, and the like. In another example, paint or other colorized coating may be applied to all of part of the wall section 10.

Of note, embodiments of the invention are not limited to fabricating wall sections, but rather, any suitable structure may be fabricated according to the method 40. In a particular example, a suitable structure that may be fabricated according to the method 40 may include columns and the like.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of an installed wall 70 suitable for use with an embodiment of the invention. As shown in FIG. 4, the wall 70 includes a plurality of the wall sections 10 joined to form the wall 70. In the particular example shown, the wall 70 include a pair of end sections 72 flanking a mid section 74. However, the wall 70 is not limited to the pair of end sections 72 flanking mid section 74 but rather, may include any suitable number of the mid sections 74 and end sections 72. In addition, while the wall 70 is illustrated as a generally straight wall, in other examples the wall 70 may include one or more angled section and/or may include curved or serpentine elements. As shown in FIG. 4, the mid sections 74 and end sections 72 mate together to generate a unitary appearance.

FIG. 5 is a cross-sectional view of the installed wall 70 in accordance with an embodiment of the invention. As shown in FIG. 5, the wall 70 includes two of the mid sections 74 and two of the end sections 72. Also shown in FIG. 5, the wall sections 10 are anchored via a rod 80 passing through the through bore 16, through a layer of compacted gravel 82, and into underlying soil 84. To further secure one wall section 10 to the next, an adhesive 86 may be disposed at the interface of the mating surfaces 18a to 18n.

According to various examples, the bottom of the wall 70 may be disposed at or below a ground level 88. For example, a layer of sod 90 may be removed from the area of wall construction. In addition, the soil 84 may be removed to a suitable depth. In a particular example, about 1 to 12 inches of soil may be removed. More particularly, about 3 inches of the soil 84 may be removed.

FIG. 6 is a flow diagram for a method 100 of generating the wall 70 in accordance with an embodiment of the invention. Prior to generating the wall 70, a variety of processes may be performed. In no particular order, these processes may include one or more of: landscape design; wall design; marking out the wall location; obtaining materials; and the like. As shown in FIG. 6, the method 70 may generally include preparing a base at step 102 and installing the wall section 10 at step 104.

To prepare the base, at step 106 any surface vegetation may be removed from the area the wall 70 is to be placed. In a specific example, the sod 90 from an area marked out for wall placement may be remove with a sod cutter or shovel. The removal of the sod 90 is to facilitate creating a stabile base. If left in place, the sod 90 may die and decompose—possibly undermining the wall 70.

At step 108, the soil 84 may be removed to a suitable depth. In general, the soil 84 is removed to provide a shallow depression for the gravel 82 placed at step 110. A suitable depth to provide a shallow depression ranges from about 1 inch to about 12 inches. More particularly, a depth of about 3 inches to about 6 inches is suitable. In addition, the soil 94 at or near the ground level 88 may be less compacted and may contain a greater amount of vegetative matter. By removing this upper layer, the base upon which the wall sections are placed may be more stabile. Following removal, the underlying soil 84 may be compacted. In addition, a permeable membrane such as builder's felt or the like may be placed on the soil 84 to limit movement of the soil 84 into the gravel 82 placed at step 110.

At step 110, the gravel 82 may be placed in the depression made at steps 106 and 108. For example, a sufficient amount of the gravel 82 may be placed in the depression to bring the level up to about the ground level 88. In addition, the gravel 82 may be compacted to consolidate or stabilize the layer of gravel 82.

To install the wall 70, a first wall section 10 is disposed upon the compacted gravel 82 at a starting location at step 112. In general, the starting location occurs at one end of the area for the wall installation. As such, typically the first wall section 10 will include the end section 72. Once the wall section 10 is determined to be properly placed, the rod 80 is driven through the through bore 16, the gravel 82, and into the soil 84 at step 114. The length of the rod 80 and the depth to which the rod 80 is driven into the soil 84 may vary according to a variety of factors. For example, the factors may include one or more of the consistency of the soil 84, the size of the wall 70, the designed load on the wall 70, empirical data, and the like.

At step 116, the adhesive 86 may be applied to secure a next wall section 10 to the installed wall section 10. For example, the adhesive 86 may be applied to one or more of the mating surfaces 18a to 18n. The adhesive may be applied according to the manufacturer's instruction. For example, instructions provided by the manufacturer may recommend cleaning the parts to be affixed with a solvent or abrading the mating surfaces to improve adhesion. Accordingly, prior to application of the adhesive, the mating surfaces 18a to 18n may be cleaned and/or abraded.

At step 118, the next wall section 10 is positioned. For example, the extensions 12 and depressions 14 of the next wall section 10 may be aligned with the extensions 12 and depressions 14 of the first (or previous) wall section 10. Once aligned, the next wall section may be urged against the previously secured wall section. Preferably, the next wall section 10 is urged against the previous wall section until an interface between the two wall sections 10 is not noticeable.

At step 120, it is determined if the wall 70 is complete. For example, the plan or design may be reviewed to determine if all wall sections 10 have been placed. In another example, the final wall section 10 generally includes the end wall section 72. The end wall section may be configured to mate to another wall section on only one side. Therefore, if the end wall section 72 is affixed to a secured wall section 10, the wall 70 may be complete. If it is determined that the wall 70 is not complete, the wall section positioned at step 118 may be fixed in portion at step 114.

Following completion of the wall 70, the wall 70 may be cleaned, colored, caulked, etc. In a particular example, caulking may be applied to the joints and sand or other textured substrate may be applied to the uncured caulk. Any suitable paint or colorant may be applied to the sanded joints. Examples of suitable paint include urethane based paints. Specific examples of suitable urethane based paints include Polane® S Plus and other products manufactured by The Sherwin-Williams Company of Cleveland, Ohio, U.S.A. In addition, the sod 90 may be replaced along the edges of the wall 70 and the area may be cleared of debris.

Of note, while the wall 70 is suitable for free standing wall installation, embodiments of the invention are not limited to free standing wall application. Instead, the wall 70 is suitable for retaining wall installations as well as fee standing walls. In this regard, to install the wall 70 as a retaining wall, soil from a slope, hill, or the like may be removed as appropriate to clear an area for preparing the base as described at step 102. The wall 70 may be installed as described at step 104 and the wall 70 may be back filled to generate an embankment or retaining wall. At step 114, additional rods such as the rod 80 may be installed and/or the length of the rod 80 may be increased in accordance with anticipated loading of the retaining wall. The back filling operations may include the application of a drainage media such as gravel and/or perforated pipe. In addition, a builder's felt or other such permeable membrane may be applied during back filling.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a male end 130 and female end 132 suitable for use with another embodiment of the invention. As shown in FIG. 7 the male end 130 and female end 132 are configured to mate to form a joint. The male end 130 and female end 132 facilitate alignment of the wall sections 10. In addition, the male end 130 and female end 132 provide a variety of mating surfaces 18a to 18n to stabilize the joint between the wall sections 10 and to provide gluing surfaces.

Also shown in FIG. 7, the wall sections 10 may optionally include a base flange 134 to provide a broader base for the wall section 10. If included, the rod 80 (shown in FIG. 5) may be driven trough the base flange 134 to facilitate anchoring the wall section 10 to the ground.

In various embodiments the wall section 10 may include an integral or separate cap 136. If the cap 136 is fabricated as a separate piece, the wall section 10 may include a tongue 138 and the cap 136 may include a corresponding groove 140. If included, the tongue 138 and groove 140 facilitate aligning the components during assembly.

Optionally, the wall 70 includes one or more cover stones 142 to cover any joint lines between the male end 130 and female end 132. If the cover stones 142 are included, the wall section 10 may include a recess 144 to receive the cover stones 142.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of an assembled male/female joint in accordance with FIG. 7. During assembly, the wall sections 10 are aligned, the adhesive 86 (shown in FIG. 5) may be applied to the male end 130 and female end 132, and the wall sections 10 may be slid together. Thereafter, the adhesive 86 may be applied to the tongue 138 and recess 144 and the cap 136 and cover stones 142 may be applied to the wall sections 10.

Also shown in FIG. 8, the rod 80 may be driven through the tongue 136 or top of the wall section 10, down through the wall section 10 and into the ground to secure the wall section 10 to the ground. Alternatively or in addition to driving the rod 80 through the tongue 136, the rod 80 may be driven into the ground through the base flange 134

FIG. 9 is a perspective view of a completed male/female joint in accordance with FIG. 7. As shown in FIG. 9, the joints and flanges of the wall sections 10 may be covered in the completed wall 70 to give a natural stone wall appearance. To complete construction, additional cover stones 142 may be affixed to unfinished end of the wall sections 10 and the base flange (shown in FIG. 8) may be covered with soil and/or sod. In addition, as described herein, joint lines may be filled with a urethane-based caulk, dusted with sand, and colored with paint.

The many features and advantages of the invention are apparent from the detailed specification, and thus, it is intended by the appended claims to cover all such features and advantages of the invention which fall within the true spirit and scope of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and variations will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation illustrated and described, and accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.