Title:
Article of manufacture for improved segmented jump cue stick
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A jump cue stick for use in the game of billiards having a first and second hollow shaft members that are releasably connected and very light weight, the jump cue stick does not employ a conventional wood handle or wood shaft but has a carbon/graphite handle end and a carbon/graphite shaft.

The jump cue stick of present invention has one embodiment for causing a struck cue ball to be jumped over a obstructing ball and having an overall total weight of less than one half of a conventional jump cue stick and by elevating the handle end of the jump cue to an appropriate height, which is higher than if a conventional jump cue were used, and striking the cue ball at an appropriate angle with an appropriate amount of force enabling the player to facilitate the ball-jumping effect from a much closer distance to the blocking balls.




Inventors:
Dimick, Mark Dean (Oklahoma City, OK, US)
Application Number:
11/607613
Publication Date:
06/05/2008
Filing Date:
12/01/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63D15/08
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GRAHAM, MARK S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MARK DEAN DIMICK (13301 S E 99TH STREET, OKLAHOMA CITY, OK, 73165, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An article of manufacture for a Improved Segmented Jump Cue stick comprising: A very strong and improved segmented jump cue stick being of ten parts and comprising an annular and elongated progressively tapered body, specifically designed for causing a pool cue ball to jump and wherein said jump cue stick comprises; A handle end shaft (A) being of said stick and having a shaft connecting end for being releasably connected to end of shaft (B); and A shaft (B) having a connecting end and a striking end; A ferrule and tip assembly on shaft (B) being the end most portion of said stick wherein said ferrule and tip is secured to said stick at the striking end of said stick; A improved segmented jump cue stick according to claim 1 wherein said shaft (A) and said shaft (B) are made of carbon/graphite material;and A ferrule and tip assembly according to claim 1 wherein said tip having an annular body being predominately flat on the end with a radial edge around the contact area, said tip being used for striking a pool cue ball;and A slip sleeve, a means for transferring force being positioned annularly to said shaft (B); and A ferrule fitting annularly at the striking region of said shaft (B) and secured; and A Phenolic tip being secured to said shaft (B) at said striking end region and being the endmost member and being used for striking a pool cue ball.

2. The jump cue stick of claim 1, wherein the center of gravity (G) is within plus or minus 5% of the middle point (M) of the total length (L) of the jump cue stick and comprises; An elongated body having a first end and a second end, wherein said body has a length (L) having a middle point (M) and a center of gravity (G) and is progressively tapered so as to be more narrow towards said second end than said first end.

3. A improved segmented jump cue stick of claim 1 with a overall total weight of 50% or less of a conventional jump cue stick.

Description:

CROSS REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application is based on provisional application Ser. No. 60/731,685, filed on Oct. 31, 2005.

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable

DESCRIPTION OF ATTACHED APPENDIX

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to pool cues more specifically designed for causing a pool cue ball to jump, the present invention relates to jump cues that are made from carbon/graphite material rather than a conventional wood, metal, or fiber glass type of material. One embodiment of the invention is a Jump Cue stick made with a carbon/graphite handle end and a carbon/graphite shaft “The striking end” to facilitate jumping a pool ball over an obstructing ball from a very close distance.

While deciding when to attempt a jump shot the player must determine at what distance the cue ball can be jumped over a blocking ball, depending on the skill of the player the average jump shot (the distance from cue ball to the blocking ball) is generally attempted from 6 inches or more from the block ball, if when attempting a jump shot closer than 4 inches from the blocking ball the shot becomes much more difficult and closing the distance of the jump shot to less than an inch becomes impossible for the conventional jump cue.

Cues, also called billiard cues or pool cues, are commonly employed in the popular games of billiards. Often during the course of play in the game of billiards the situation arises where the player wishes to strike a particular ball that is being obstructed or blocked by the ball of an opponent, or by another ball of the player's own, that is not intended or desired to be hit. To avoid hitting the ball of the opponent, or any other obstructing ball, “Jumping” the Cue Ball over the obstructing ball is sometimes practiced, thereby striking only the intended ball.

Jump cues are conventionally designed the same as traditional pool cues and are only one half there length and generally weigh 10 ounces or more.

The handle end and shaft end or “striking end” of the cue conventionally are made of wood, metal or fiber glass material which is characteristically heavy in nature, the striking end of the cue conventionally comprises a ferrule and having a tip made of leather or comparable synthetic material.

Striking the cue ball with the cue's tip being angled appropriately by holding the handle end of the cue at an elevated angle generally causes the cue ball to jump. In other words, the cue stick strikes the cue ball (or other desired ball) at a relatively sharply elevated angle with a simultaneous downward and forward motion and with an increased amount of force. Upon proper execution of this task, the cue ball will jump off the table playing surface, avoid contact with the obstructing ball, and successfully strike the desired ball. This, however, requires a considerable amount of skill and hours of practice to successfully perform. Because of the high level of skill involved, the player often times will run the risk of not hitting his own ball with the cue ball and will instead strike the obstructing ball with the cue ball, or even another ball on the table not intended to be struck. The player also runs the risk of mis-striking the cue ball with the cue and hitting the cue tip against the table. This, of course can cause damage to the cue tip itself due to the tremendous force generated to cause the ball to jump. Additionally, hitting the table with the cue tip can tear the delicate felt cloth material that traditionally covers pool tables.

One method of jumping the cue balls is described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,326,329 (Doss). Doss '329 describes a modified cue stick having a significantly shortened length, approximately one half that of standard cue sticks and having a plurality of weights placed in the handle of the stick, and having a tip. However, the invention described in Doss '329 still requires the player to elevate the stick at approximately a forty-five degree angle to the table and thrusting the cue stick downwardly, and is still manufactured in the conventional way plus utilizing added weight. Therefore, Doss '329 does not solve the problem that the present invention seeks to solve.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,251,024 B1 (summers et al.) describes a pool cue having a modified tip for purposes of jumping a cue ball over an obstructing ball. The tip of the pool cue summers et al. '024, which is made of a resilient material, comprises a concave depression. It is the combination of the concave depression with the particular shore hardness of the resilient material that serves to provide the control and performance characteristics of the invention of summers et al. '024. The tip can also either be permanently placed on the cue stick or can be removable so that varying tips providing varying jumping ability and control can be employed, depending on the particular situation at hand.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The primary advantage of the present invention is to provide a pool jump cue stick that has lightness, strength, and convenience of construction.

Another advantage of the jump cue stick of claim 1, wherein the center of gravity (G) is within plus or minus 5% of the middle point (M) of the total length (L) of the jump cue stick.

Another advantage of this invention is to provide a jump cue stick with greater accuracy.

A further advantage of the invention is that it allows for jumping a cue ball from very close distances to obstructing balls.

Other advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following descriptions, taken in connection with the accompanying drawings, wherein, by way of illustration and example, an embodiment of the present invention is disclosed.

In accordance with a preferred embodiment of the invention, there is disclosed an Improved Segmented Jump Cue stick comprising: A jump cue stick having greater structural shaft strength than conventional jump cues and being one half the overall total weight of conventional jump cues. Unlike prior art jump cues, the shaft construction of present invention allows for greater force transfer to the cue ball to give the ability to jump the cue ball over an obstructing ball from a much closer distance.

The light weight combined with the solid resilient tip provides the player with an improved device for the purpose of jumping cue balls over obstructing balls or an opponent's ball during play. Having a modified handle shaft end and a modified shaft striking end with a ferrule tip assembly. The tip has a striking end which is predominantly flat on the end with a radial edge around the contact point. Conventional jump cues being standard in weight are restricted as to how close a jump shot can be preformed, the closer the distance between the cue ball and the obstructing ball the more difficult the jump shot becomes, the weight of the jump cue stick becomes a major factor in the ability of the jump cue stick to be able to perform the jump shot.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The drawings constitute a part of this specification and include exemplary embodiments to the invention, which may be embodied in various forms. It is to be understood that in some instances various aspects of the invention may be shown exaggerated or enlarged to facilitate an understanding of the invention.

FIG. 1 is an exploded perspective view of the pool jump cue.

FIG. 2 is an exploded view of the endmost member of handle shaft (A) of the pool jump cue stick as shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is an exploded view of the shaft connecting ends of shaft (A) and shaft (B) engaged with a transparent view of the connecting joint and the slip sleeve onto shaft (B) of the pool jump cue stick as shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is an exploded view of the endmost member of shaft (B) ferrule and tip assembly as shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the jump cue stick invention as shown in FIG. 1.

FIG. 6 is an exploded view of the threaded connector rod as shown in FIG. 3.

FIG. 7 is an exploded transparent view of the connector assembly as shown in FIG. 3.

FIG. 8 is an exploded transparent view of the shaft (A) connector as shown in FIG. 3 and FIG. 7.

FIG. 9 is an exploded view of the spacer as shown in FIG. 1,3,5,7.

FIG. 10 is an exploded transparent view of shaft (B) connector as shown in FIG. 3 and FIG. 7.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Detailed descriptions of the preferred embodiment are provided herein. It is to be understood, however, that the present invention may be embodied in various forms. Therefore, specific details disclosed herein are not to be interpreted as limiting, but rather as a basis for the claims and as a representative basis for teaching one skilled in the art to employ the present invention in virtually any appropriately detailed system, structure or manner.

The present invention is now described with reference to the drawings, wherein like reference numerals are used to refer to like elements throughout. In the following description, for purposes of explanation, numerous specific details are set forth in order to provide a thorough understanding of the present invention. It will be evident, however, to one skilled in the art that the present invention may be practiced without these specific details.

In accordance with the present invention, FIG. 1 the improved segmented jump cue stick is shown and referred to generally as numeral 10. Jump cue stick 10 comprises a non-conventional hollow, elongate first member or shaft (A) 15 having an end piece 16, a non-conventional hollow, elongated second member shaft (B) 17 having a striking end, ferrule 18 and tip 19. Shaft (A) 15 is engaged with shaft (B) 17 to form a contiguous device 10. It is a feature of the invention that device 10 is tapered in general from end piece 16 being of a larger diameter than tip 19 being of a smaller diameter. The shaft members, shaft (A) 15 and shaft(B) 17 are preferably made from non-conventional jump cue stick materials being that of carbon/graphite and more associated with carbon/graphite golf shafts and being manufactured in the same way. Of course the objects of the present invention can still be attained having device 10 comprising a single piece having no individual members or even having more than two individual members. Device 10, having two members engaged, generally has a length(L) of about 41 inches. However, Device 10 can be of any length common in the art.

Turning to FIG. 2, shows an exploded view of end piece 16 and shaft (A) 15 both having longitudinal center line being in alignment with the longitudinal center line 22 of device 10.

Turning now to FIG. 3, a more detailed description of the jump cue device 10 is provided. Shaft (A) 15 comprises one-third, or about 13 inches, of the total length of device 10. Shaft (A) 15 is a hollow, elongated, annular member having a cylindrical tapered surface and a cylindrical tube interior, Shaft (B) 17 is a hollow, elongated annular member having a cylindrical tapered surface and a cylindrical tube interior, both having a longitudinal center line, aligned with that of the Longitudinal center line 22 of the shaft connecting inserts 21 and 24. Shaft (A) 15 and shaft (B) 17 are preferably made of carbon/graphite type material. Metallic shaft connecting insert 21, and metallic shaft connecting insert 24 are preferably threaded and threadingly engaged with threaded connector rod 25 with spacing disc 23 inserted between shaft connecting inserts 21 and 24. One of the features of the invention shown on FIG. 3. Is the slip sleeve 26 which is used to grip the device 10 and thrust the jump cue simultaneously downwardly and forwardly making contact with the cue ball causing it to jump. The slip sleeve 26 is preferably made of Vinyl like material.

Turning now to FIG. 4 shaft (B) 17 is shown with an exploded view of the striking end of device 10, with the ferrule 18 and tip 19 secured and bonded together onto end of shaft (B) 17 completing the striking end assembly. The ferrule 18 has an annular outer surface with a taper preferably made of a resin/plastic like material preferably hard in nature. Tip 19 has a striking end which is predominantly flat on the end with a radial edge around the contact area. Being preferably elongated, cylindrical/rod like in shape and are preferably made from a phenolic/epoxy like material.

Referring now to FIG. 5 showing the device 10 in a perspective view having a total length (L) of about 41 inches, and a total weight of 4 ounces. Conventional jump cues have a total weight of approximately 10 ounces or more. One of the features of the invention is the center of gravity or the horizontal balancing point being very near the horizontal mid point of the device 10, conventional jump cues have a center of gravity near the handle end or traditionally called the butt end of pool cues.

Turning now to FIG. 6 showing threaded connecting rod 25 having a preferable length of 2 inches being ¼ inches in diameter and 20 threads per inch, and being elongated, cylindrical rod like in design.

Referring now to FIG. 7 showing exploded view of releasable joint connecting assembly, for releasably connecting shaft (A) 15 to shaft (B) 17, in operation the shaft connecting insert 21 of connecting end of shaft (A) 15 having the connecting rod 25 threadingly engaged and bonded to said shaft connecting insert 21 to a depth of 0.750 inches and having the spacer 23 aligned onto said rod 25 and bonded to the shaft (A) 15, having shaft shaft connecting insert 24 press fitted and bonded to connecting end of said shaft (B) 17, therefore allowing the connecting rod 25 to be initially loosely joined with shaft (B) 17 shaft connecting insert 24 then by twisting the shaft (A) 15 and shaft (B) 17 relative to each other and along there longitudinal center-line 22 causing the threaded connecting rod 25 to frictionally engage the threaded interior of shaft connecting insert 24. This connection assembly is provided to allow disassembly to facilitate transporting.

Turning now to FIG. 8 showing shaft connecting insert 24 comprising an elongated cylindrical body having an elongated and threaded central bore.

Turning now to FIG. 9 showing spacer 23 being disc like in shape with a ¼ inch bore thru its center and outside diameter of 0.550 inches with a thickness of 0.128 inches. Preferably made from metal/alloy type material.

Turning now to FIG. 10 showing shaft connecting insert 21 comprising an elongated cylindrical body having an elongated and threaded central bore. Both shaft connecting inserts 21 and 24 have a longitudinal length of 0.750 inches a central threaded bore ¼ inch diameter and internal threads of 20 threads per inch.

In accordance with the present invention FIG. 11 shows jump cue 10 being used to jump a cue ball 40 over an obstructing ball 42 during a jump shot. Shown in FIG. 11 is the position the jump cue 10 is held in the most advantageous angle 55 which is the angle created at the intersection of longitudinal center line 22 with the plane of the top of the billiard table. Angle 55 created when using jump cue stick 10 to jump cue ball 40 is represented as (0). The player (not shown) strikes cue ball 40 with jump cue stick 10 at angle 55 that transmits an advantageous amount of force F1 in a simultaneous downwardly and forwardly direction. Upon striking cue ball 40, cue ball 40 “jumps” over obstructing ball 42 and strikes a target ball 48 thereby ideally causing target ball 48 to be moved into intended pocket 51.

This is shown in contrast to using a conventional jump cue stick 60 as illustrated. When using a conventional jump cue stick 60 to jump the cue ball 40 over obstructing ball 42 in the same manner, jump cue stick 60 uses a lower angle 56 (0)2 causing the cue ball 40 to jump with a more horizontal trajectory. Conventional jump cue stick 60 is limited to how near a jump shot can be preformed do to the lower angle 56 causing a lower trajectory with the cue ball 40.

In addition, the chance of the cue ball 40 going out of control and flying completely off of the table and causing damage to anything around the table is very possible. Both the angle 55 and the weight of the jump cue stick 10 and the direction of the force F1 enables the cue ball 40 to jump in a more vertical trajectory and in a much more directed manner.

While the invention has been described in connection with a preferred embodiment, it is not intended to limit the scope of the invention to the particular form set forth, but on the contrary, it is intended to cover such alternatives, modifications, and equivalents as may be included within the spirit and scope of the invention as defined by the appended claims.