Title:
Infant sleeper
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The present invention relates to an infant sleeper for keeping infants warm which contains an inner fabric panel; an outer fabric panel sewn or otherwise joined to the inner fabric panel to define a layered fabric panel having a top edge and a bottom edge, where at least one portion of the bottom edge is folded over a second portion of the bottom edge and sewn or otherwise joined thereto, defining a folded edge in the layered fabric panel; and a closure for releasably attaching one side of the layered fabric panel to the folded edge of the layered fabric panel.



Inventors:
Stapley, Deborah Ellen (San Juan Capistrano, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/897779
Publication Date:
03/06/2008
Filing Date:
08/31/2007
Assignee:
MYNOCHI, INC. (SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, CA, US)
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A41B13/06; A47G9/08
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
KELLEHER, WILLIAM J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DEBORAH STAPLEY (30171 HILLSIDE TERRACE, SAN JUAN CAPISTRANO, CA, 92675, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. An infant sleeper for keeping infants warm, comprising: a. an inner fabric panel; b. an outer fabric panel sewn or otherwise joined to the inner fabric panel to define a layered fabric panel having a top edge and a bottom edge, wherein a first portion of the bottom edge is folded over a second portion of the bottom edge and sewn or otherwise joined thereto, defining a folded edge in the layered fabric panel; and c. a closure for releasably attaching one side of the layered fabric panel to the folded edge of the layered fabric panel.

2. The infant sleeper according to claim 1, wherein a third portion of the bottom edge is folded over the first and second portions of the bottom edge and sewn or otherwise joined thereto.

3. The infant sleeper according to claim 1, wherein the first and second portions of the bottom edge each comprise approximately one-third of the length of the bottom edge.

4. The infant sleeper according to claim 1, wherein the first, second, and third portions of the bottom edge each comprise approximately one-third of the length of the bottom edge.

5. The infant sleeper according to claim 1, wherein corners of the top edge are folded and sewn or otherwise permanently or releasably joined to the layered fabric panel.

6. The infant sleeper according to claim 1, wherein the layered fabric panel is substantially rectangular in shape, and wherein corners of the top edge are sewn or otherwise permanently or releasably joined to the layered fabric panel.

7. The infant sleeper according to claim 1, wherein the top edge comprises an arch.

8. The infant sleeper according to claim 1, further comprising batting between the inner and outer fabric panels.

9. The infant sleeper according to claim 1, wherein the closure comprises a first ribbon or material sewn or otherwise fastened to the one side of the layered fabric panel and a second ribbon or material sewn or otherwise fastened to the folded edge of the layered fabric panel.

10. The infant sleeper according to claim 1, wherein the inner fabric panel comprises at least one fabric selected from the group consisting of chenille, fleece, flannel, cotton, wool, or any other fabric used for making baby sleepers or blankets.

11. The infant sleeper according to claim 1, wherein the outer fabric panel comprises at least one fabric selected from the group consisting of chenille, fleece, flannel, cotton, wool, or any other fabric used for making baby sleepers or blankets.

12. The infant sleeper according to claim 1, wherein both the inner and outer fabric panels comprise at least one fabric selected from the group consisting of chenille, fleece, flannel, cotton, wool, or any other fabric used for making baby sleepers or blankets.

13. The infant sleeper according to claim 1, wherein the inner and the outer fabric panels are single piece sections that are sewn or otherwise joined along their perimeters, the inner fabric panel being approximately 34 inches wide and approximately 52 inches long, and the outer fabric panel being approximately 35 inches wide and approximately 54 inches long.

14. A method of making an infant sleeper comprising: a. sewing or joining two generally rectangular sections of fabric with a batting placed between them; b. folding a first approximately one-third section of the joined fabrics onto the inner fabric; c. folding a second approximately one-third section of the joined fabrics over the first approximately one-third section; d. sewing or joining the folded sections along a bottom edge; e. folding the free, or unattached, corners of the folded sections back onto themselves and sewing or joining them to the fabric so as to create a triangular opening between them; and f. sewing or joining a ribbon or material to an edge of each of the first and second approximately one-third sections.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims the benefit of priority from U.S. Provisional Patent Application No. 60/841,289, filed Aug. 31, 2006, which is hereby incorporated by reference in its entirety.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Numerous methods have been developed over the years in an effort to keep an infant from kicking its covers off and becoming cold at night. One such method is a blanket that is secured to the bed, with the child then being secured under the blanket. For examples of this method, see U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,503,427 and 2,702,385. The main problem with this type of method is that it is too restricting on the child. Another method is securing the child to the blanket, but not to the bed. Examples of this method include U.S. Pat. Nos. 2,968,044 and 4,295, 230 and 6,266,821. The problem with these patents is that the steps required to secure the child to the blanket can be difficult when dealing with a squirming child or can wake a sleeping child. In addition, a child could get tangled in the strings or straps that are meant to secure the child and could possibly choke. U.S. Pat. No. 6,266,821 teaches a blanket with seams at the bottom and sides, similar to a bag, with a midline running down the front center which unzips and unfolds the top third, allowing a child to be inserted into the top open end of the blanket and then secured to the blanket under its arms. This patent gives rise to the restraint problems mentioned above and, more importantly, to the problem that the unfolded blanket material will end up covering the face of the child, leading to a danger of suffocation or choking.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

One embodiment of the present invention is an infant sleeper for keeping infants warm which contains an inner fabric panel; an outer fabric panel sewn or otherwise joined to the inner fabric panel to define a layered fabric panel having a top edge and a bottom edge, where at least one portion of the bottom edge is folded over a second portion of the bottom edge and sewn or otherwise joined thereto, defining a folded edge in the layered fabric panel; and a closure for releasably attaching one side of the layered fabric panel to the folded edge of the layered fabric panel. The layered fabric panel may further comprise batting between the inner and outer fabric panels.

Preferred fabrics for the inner and outer fabric panels include chenille, fleece, flannel, cotton, wool, and any other fabric used for making baby sleepers or blankets. The fabrics of the inner and outer fabric panels may be the same or different.

The inner and the outer fabric panels may be single piece sections that are sewn or otherwise joined along their perimeters, the inner fabric panel being approximately 34 inches wide and approximately 52 inches long, and the outer fabric panel being approximately 35 inches wide and approximately 54 inches long.

In one variation, the layered fabric panel is substantially rectangular in shape, and corners of the top edge are sewn or otherwise permanently or releasably joined to the layered fabric panel. The top edge may comprise an arch.

In another variation, a third portion of the bottom edge is folded over the first and second portions of the bottom edge and sewn or otherwise joined thereto. The first, second, and third portions of the bottom edge may each comprise approximately one-third of the length of the bottom edge.

In yet another variation, the closure comprises a first ribbon or material sewn or otherwise fastened to the one side of the layered fabric panel and a second ribbon or material sewn or otherwise fastened to the folded edge of the layered fabric panel.

One preferred embodiment is an infant sleeper in the shape of a sac with a top open end where the infant's head remains uncovered at all times, while its body remains covered and warm. The object of the sleeper is to prevent the infant from kicking off its covers while sleeping, while still allowing ample room for the infant to move and stretch. Two generally rectangular panels of fabric, with or without an arch in the top, are sewn together, with or without a thin batting between them. The fabric of the right third, or near third, is folded in onto the inner panel. Then, the fabric of the left third, or near third, is folded over the outside fabric of the folded right-third. The panels of fabric are sewn together at the bottom, which bottom seam keeps the fabric folded in thirds, or near thirds. The top free, or unattached, corners of the folded sides are folded back onto themselves and permanently attached to the side edges of the sleeper so as to prevent the sleeper material from covering the infant's head. A ribbon or other material closure for releasably attaching, along with the bottom seam, keeps the sleeper from coming open while the infant sleeps. In use, the infant is placed face up in the sleeper on a flat surface with its feet toward and inside the bottom seam. The sides of the sleeper are then wrapped over and around the infant and tied with the ribbon closure. The infant can then sleep with adequate room to move and stretch, but without the capability of kicking off its covers or the possibility of having its head covered with sleeper material.

Another embodiment of the present invention is a method of making an infant sleeper comprising:

    • a. sewing or joining two generally rectangular sections of fabric with a batting placed between them;
    • b. folding a first approximately one-third section of the joined fabrics onto the inner fabric;
    • c. folding a second approximately one-third section of the joined fabrics over the first approximately one-third section;
    • d. sewing or joining the folded sections along a bottom edge;
    • e. folding the free, or unattached, corners of the folded sections back onto themselves and sewing or joining them to the fabric so as to create a triangular opening between them; and
    • f. sewing or joining a ribbon or material to an edge of each of the first and second approximately one-third sections.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

For the purpose of illustrating the invention, there is shown in the drawings a form which is presently preferred; it being understood, however, that this invention is not limited to the precise arrangements and instrumentalities shown.

FIG. 1A is a front view of the sleeper according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention showing the sleeper in a closed position.

FIG. 2A is a front view of the sleeper according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention showing the sleeper in an open position, prior to the sewing of the bottom seam.

FIG. 3A is a photograph of the front view of the sleeper according to a preferred embodiment of the present invention showing the sleeper in a closed position.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

As shown in FIG. 1A, a preferred embodiment of the infant sleeper 1 of the present invention is generally rectangular in shape when closed. The top 21 is left open for the infant's head to be uncovered in the open area 4, and the bottom seam 41 connects the folded right side 31 and the folded left side 11 to the panel of fabric itself. The shaded areas represent fabric of the outside panel while the blank areas represent the fabric of the inside panel. The top free, or unattached, corner 32 of the right folded side is folded back onto the right side and permanently attached. The top free, or unattached, corner 12 of the left folded side is folded back onto the left side and permanently attached. A right side ribbon 33, or material for closure, attached to the right side fold may be tied to the left side ribbon 13, or material for closure, which is attached to the left side seam, to ensure the sleeper does not get kicked off during the infant's sleep.

As shown in FIG. 2A, a preferred embodiment of the infant sleeper 1 of the present invention begins as a single panel of fabric, the blank area representing the fabric of the inside panel. The right side 36 is folded in, along the right vertical broken line 60. The left side 16 is folded over the folded right side along the left vertical broken line 50. The bottom edges of the right side 36 and the left side 16 are sewn together to the panel of fabric at the bottom edge 40, creating a bottom seam. The top free, or unattached, corner 32 of the right folded side 36 is folded back onto the folded right side 36 along the 45-degree angle broken line 80 and permanently attached. The top free, or unattached, corner 12 of the left folded side 16 is folded back onto the folded left side 16 along the 45-degree angle broken line 70 and permanently attached.

In use, an infant is inserted into the sleeper 1 through the top opening 21. The folded right side 31 is then wrapped over the infant's body, and the folded left side 11 is then wrapped over the folded right side 31. The left side ribbon 13, or material for closure, is then tied to the right side ribbon 33, or material for closure, to prevent the infant from kicking off its covers during sleep. The infant's head lies uncovered in the open area 4, while the infant's body remains covered and warm under the folded right side 31 and the folded left side 11.

FIG. 3A is a photograph of infant sleeper 1 of the present invention with a decorative satin trim 5 and a satin ribbon tied in a bow 6 for closure.