Title:
Candle enhancement device that is a safety sinking snuffer and follower designed to extinguish the flame on a displaced wick and assists in retaining a wick within a central position, in even melting of wax and in reducing wax buildup on the inner surfaces of the vessel
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
My invention relates to candle accessories and is a safety sinking snuffer and candle follower designed to extinguish the flame on a displaced wick and assist in retaining a wick within a central position, in even melting of wax and in reducing wax buildup on the inner surfaces of the vessel containing a candle. Its' unique design to achieves the above stated functions allows it to operation in varying placements within the vessel; while on the top surface of the candle and during the burning process while within the molten wax layer on the top surface of the solidified wax below.



Inventors:
Carlson, Vicki Lynn (Prospect, OR, US)
Application Number:
11/491562
Publication Date:
01/24/2008
Filing Date:
07/24/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
F23N5/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
BASICHAS, ALFRED
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Vicki Lynn Carlaon (P.O. Box 63, Prospect, OR, 97536, US)
Claims:
The embodiments of the invention in which an exclusive property or privilege is claimed are defined as follows:

1. A safety and enhancement device that may be used with a candle contained within a vessel that uses a solid or semi-solid fuel such as solidified wax or tallow that melts at low temperature, comprising, in combination, a flat plate having a hole or opening at through which to receive a wick, made of non-combustible or semi-noncombustible material, capable of heat absorbs ion and distribution and designed or formed to fit into the vessel containing a candle, allowing the surface area of the flat plate to span the majority of the surface of the aforesaid fuel to within close proximity of the inner surfaces of the vessel, which in combination allows the device to improve heat distribution over the top surface of aforesaid fuel which can reduce the buildup of wax on the inner surfaces of the vessel, to sink below the molten wax layer and cause the flame on a displaced wick to be snuffed out or extinguished and to function as a candle follower that retains the wick with the area of its hole or opening.

1. A safety and enhancement device of claim 1 wherein the flat plate has a uniform thickness.

2. A safety and enhancement device of claim 1 and 2 where in aforesaid flat plate has an edge and the major portion thereof is disposed of in a flat plane.

3. A safety and enhancement device of claim 1, 2 and 3 where in aforesaid plate has a hole or opening through which to receive a wick.

4. A safety and enhancement device of claim 1, 2, and 3 wherein aforesaid plate is made of noncombustible or semi-noncombustible material similar to that of metal.

5. A safety and enhancement device of claim 1, 2, 3, and 4 wherein aforesaid plate is capable of heat absorption and distribution similar to that of metal.

6. A safety and enhancement device of claim 1, 2, 3, 4 and 5 wherein aforesaid flat plate has a weight similar to that of metal.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Not Applicable

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

My invention relates to candle accessories and is a sinking safety snuffer and candle follower designed to extinguish the flame on a displaced wick and assist in retaining a wick within a central position, even melting of wax and in reducing wax buildup on the inner surfaces of the vessel.

In general when a candle within a vessel or container (glass, metal or other material; hereafter termed “vessel”) is manufactured the vessel is filled to somewhat full with combustible fuel that may be wax, tallow or an other solidified combustible substance that is solid at ambient temperatures and becomes melted when heated somewhat above ambient or low temperature (thereafter termed ‘solidified wax’) and it is presumed that it is intended that the wick, that may be composed of an absorbent material, generally a type of cotton, nylon or other material in the formation of a string or thread that may have a thin wire in its center used as a stiffener (hereafter termed ‘wick’) is set, or becomes fixed within a central position of the solidified wax. There is usually a wick holder (generally a thin piece of metal with a crimping hole that crimps the lower most portion of the wick) that is designed to hold the wick at the bottom of the vessel before the molten wax is poured into the vessel during the process of making the candle. The wick extends the full length of the solidified wax in a vertically upward posture, exits the solidified wax and a nominal piece of bare wick protrudes above the top surface of the solidified wax for the purpose of enabling the wick to be ignited. However, during the manufacturing process sometimes the wick will be displaced and deviate from the aforesaid central position of the solidified wax (hereafter termed ‘displaced wick’).

A displaced wick can range anywhere between the intended central position of the solidified wax to a position that severely deviates from a central position within the solidified wax. These candles within vessels are in the marketplace and are frequently purchased and used.

A minor to mild displaced wick is one that has set within the central core area of the solidified wax (the central core area obviously varies depending on the size of the candle) and can be curved to one side and or the other which causes an uneven melting of the solidified wax.

This condition results in eventual candle failure as the un-molten wax remains and or builds-up on the inner surfaces of the vessel causing less available air and a number of other factors that lead to the eventual situation whereby the wick is unable to sustain a flame.

Generally a minor to mildly displaced wick will allow the candle to burn somewhat properly for a period of time but eventually the aforesaid condition causes the flame to decrease in intensity to the point that it becomes unable to generate enough heat to melt the solidified wax into a molten wax and as the flame is dependent on the wick absorbing molten wax to use as fuel for the flame, the eventuality of the aforesaid condition is candle failure.

A mild to severely displaced wick is a wick that has set within the solidified wax in a position where it deviates outside of the inner core area of the solidified wax and the severely displaced wick is one that deviates so far from the central core area that it actually comes into contact with the inner surface of the vessel. This is not an uncommon mishap.

A visual examination of the candle within the vessel will not reveal the placement or location of the wick as it is hidden within the solidified wax.

Burning a candle with a displaced wick is at risk of causing damage and or harm to either person(s) and or the property in the surrounding area. During the process of burning a candle with a displaced wick, the area where the wick displaced can over heat and through heat transference and can cause items in the surrounding area to ignite and or cause breakage to the vessel which can cause the area surrounding the candle to ignite, placing the user at danger of damage to self or property.

Most candles come with a warning that they not be burned without supervision. However it is commonly known that people do not generally sit and observe a candle for the entire duration of time that a candle burns. There are generally, spans of time that ignited candles are not visually supervised by the user and there are also times when they are unintentionally left burning without any supervision whatsoever.

The object of the present invention is to remedy and or assist in preventing the problems presented by burning candles within vessels. The present invention assists in retaining a displaced wick within the central area of the hole that is in the center of the present invention and it can extinguish the flame on a displaced wick. The present invention will also assist in distributing the heat evenly over the top surface of the solidified wax at the initial ignition of the wick, which assists reducing the buildup of un-molten wax on the inner surfaces of the vessel and assist in the continual even distribution of heat while submerged within the molten wax layer and on the top surface of the solidified wax below. The weight on the aforesaid surface also assists in the even melting of the solidified wax.

My research into candle followers and other patented devices and apparatus invented to assist in the burning of candles have been designed to maintain their position on the surface of the molten wax in order to perform the functions and or operations and many are designed to use on free standing candles with exposed wax surfaces. The present invention is designed specifically for candles within vessels and it is unique because it is designed to operate for a short period of time on the surface of the solidified wax to perform the aforesaid function and is novel in the fact that it is designed to sink below the surface of the molten wax layer to perform its other functions and or operations as aforesaid. The candle snuffers and followers in other patents are consistently attempt to design a device or apparatus that will ensure that the device maintains an upper or top position on the surface of the molten wax, yet unpredictably, the present invention functions and operates and provides an advantageous use as aforesaid by first being available and useful on the top surface of the solidified wax and then functions and operates and provides an advantageous use as aforesaid by sinking below the molten wax layer.

References Cited By Inventor

Listed below are prior patents of which I am aware that bears some relationship to the present invention. Below is a list of prior inventions and the differences between these inventions and the present invention

U.S. Pat. Nos.:

6,695,611 B2 Feb. 24, 2004 Lee

2,092,471 Sep. 7, 1937 H. D. Pomije

3,885,905 May 27, 1975 Giangiulio

4,332,548 Jun. 1, 1982 Linton et al.

3,048,025 Aug. 7, 1952 A. I. Root

4,234,303 Nov. 18, 1980 Neugart

977,567 Dec. 6, 1910 M. H. Sterling

The above Patents pertain to the same classification or field of the present invention. For simplicity, ease and to avert confusion I have listed each patent numbered above with a short description of relevancy to the present invention.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,695,611 B2 Feb. 24, 2004 Lee

This device has the primary function of a wick holding device. It is designed to hold and or support a permanent wick in a position above the molten wax. The present invention is not related nor does it claim any relationship to the claims and or functions of this patent. The present invention is not a wick holder it is designed to retain the wick within the hole in its center.

U.S. Pat. No. 2,092,471 Sep. 7, 1937 H. D. Pomije

This Candle Accessory has a function to maintain an upper position on the top surface of a free standing, uncontained candle. Its function is to reduce and or regulate the flame and consists primarily of a baffle element adapted to be placed above and over the top of a free standing candle with an exposed wax surface. The present invention is not designed for use with free standing candles with exposed wax surfaces.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,885,905 May 27, 1975 Giangiulio

This Device is designed to be used on the top surface of a vessel containing liquid fuel and extinguish the flame should the candle be bumped or knocked over. The present invention is not designed for use with candles that use liquid fuel. The present invention is designed to use with candles that use a solid or semi solid combustible substance and is not designed to function as protection should the candle be bumped or knocked over.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,332,548 Jun. 1, 1982 Linton et al.

This Disc is designed to fit inside of a vessel containing a candle, it is designed to maintain an upper position on the top surface of the candle with the main function of containing bits of extraneous material below the burning surface. The present invention is not designed to maintain a position on the top surface of the candle nor is its function to contain extraneous material below the flame.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,048,025 Aug. 7, 1952 A. I. Root

This device is invented for use with a candle that is not in a vessel or container. Its primary functions relate to providing a protective outer covering for a free standing candle with exposed wax surfaces for the purpose of containing seepage of wax on the outer surface of a vertical free standing wax candle. The present invention is not made for a free standing candle with exposed wax surfaces.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,234,303 Nov. 18, 1980 Neugart

This device is a Disc that is designed to fit into a candle that is contained within a vessel however, its function is to maintain an upper position on the top of the molten surface or to float on the top surface of the candle during the burning process of a lit candle. Although the present invention, during the initial stage of a lit candle is on the top surface of the solidified wax and it does assist in the even melting of the surface wax which reduces or lessons buildup of wax on the inner surfaces of the vessel, it is not designed to maintain an upper position on the top of the molten wax layer It is designed to sink below the surface of the candles molten wax layer to perform its functions and operations. The present invention is designed to sink below said top surface and into the molten wax layer to settle onto the surface of solidified wax below where it also assists in the even distribution of heat across said surface to assist in the reduction of wax buildup on the inner surfaces of the vessel.

U.S. Pat. No. 977,567 Dec. 6, 1910 M. H. Sterling

This device is invented for use with a candle that is not in a vessel or container. Its primary function is to economize the waste of combustible substance during burning. This device has a hollow inner core and is invented to maintain an upper position on the top of a free standing candle with exposed wax surfaces. Although the present invention does cause less consumption of combustible substance during the process of burning a candle with a displaced wick and may cause less consumption of combustible substance during the process of burning a candle with a straight wick, its design is not for use with free standing candles with exposed wax surfaces nor is it designed to maintain a position on the top surface of the candle.

The present invention is novel due to the fact that none of these prior patents are designed to sink below the molten wax layer. The present invention is unique because it is designed to operate for a short period of time on the surface of the solidified wax to perform some of its functions and is novel in the fact that it, by design, unexpectedly sinks below the surface of the molten wax to perform its other functions and or operations.

The present invention is unique in that it does sink below the surface of the molten wax and settles on the surface of the un-molten or solidified wax which not only functions as a candle follower in that it retains a straight or semi straight wick within the central core area of the hole at it center, it also serves the purpose of bending a displaced wick under its weight which will eventually snuff out the flame on a displaced wick. No other patent that I have found is designed to sink below the surface of the molten wax layer to perform its functions and or operations.

The present invention is innovative because while it is within the molten wax layer and settled onto the top surface of the solidified wax below it naturally absorbs the ambient temperature of the molten wax. This assists in an even distribution of heat to spread across the top surface of the solidified wax along with its weight on said surface which assists in a constant horizontal melting of said surface. This assists in reducing or lessoning the build-up of wax on the inner surfaces of the vessel.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

My invention relates to Candle Accessories and is a Sinking Safety Device and follower designed to extinguish the flame on a displaced wick and to assist in retaining a wick within a central position, even melting of wax and in reducing wax buildup on the inner surfaces of the vessel containing a candle.

The object of the present invention is to remedy and or assist in reducing and or preventing the problems presented in burning candles within vessels. The present invention assists in maintaining a wick that has a minor displacement to be retained within the central area of the hole that is in the center of the present invention and to extinguish the flame on a displaced wick. It is designed to assist in the even melting of the solidified wax and in reducing or lessoning the buildup of wax on the inner sides of the vessel.

The Operation of the Present Invention:

The device is placed within the vessel and seated in a horizontal position onto the top surface of the solidified wax with the wick protruding in a vertically upwards posture through the hole in the center of the present invention. The wick is then ignited and as is normal to any candle within a vessel, as the flame on the wick burns it heats the solidified wax surrounding the area of the wick changing it into a molten and liquefied state. The wick absorbs the molten wax and this provides fuel for the flame.

The present invention becomes heated by the flame and distributes the heat across the top surface of the solidified wax and this affect provides an even melting of the surface solidified wax which assists in reducing the wax buildup on the inner surfaces of the vessel.

As the candle burns, slowly more of the solidified wax becomes molten and forms a layer of molten wax. The weight of the present invention allows it to continually sink below the surface of the of the molten wax and settle onto the top surface of the solidified wax below where it performs as a candle follower as it retains the wick within the central area of the hole in its center. As the candle burns and the process continues whereby the present invention continues to sink below the molten wax layer and settles onto the top surface of the solidified wax below, it continues to restrain and maintain the wick in a central position of the open area of its hole as well as within a central position within the molten wax layer and above the surface of the molten wax.

If the wick is not placed in a straight and upwards posture within the solidified wax when the candle is manufactured (hereafter termed ‘displaced wick), the present invention will assist in retaining the displaced wick the central area of the hole.

This process continues until all the available wax is exhausted and the present invention can be removed and used in another candle. If the candle has a severely displaced wick, as the candle burns, the inner edge of the hole in the center of the device will eventually come into contact with the displaced wick. The weight of the present invention puts pressure on the displaced wick. This occurs below the molten wax layer.

The pressure exerted by of the weight of the present invention on the displaced wick slowly pushes down on the displaced wick causing it to bend. This causes flame on the wick above the surface to be reduced or lessen in intensity because the portion of displaced wick that is above the molten wax layer has become reduced or become smaller in available mass from the bending of the displaced wick within the molten wax layer. As the process of burning the candle continues, the wick continues to be bent under the weight of the present invention until the wick is more or less compressed or stuck between the present invention and the solidified wax.

The reduced heat generated by the flame on a displaced eventually exhausts or consumes the available layer of molten wax until the flame is burning on the wick at the point where the wick is stuck under the bottom surface of the edge of the hole in the center of the present invention. The flame will burn the wick until it exhausts all available molten wax it is able to produce and it goes out, or is snuffed out due to the aforesaid conditions created by the present invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION

Herein is a brief description of the several views of the drawing. The present invention is described by the use of these illustrations. The illustrations are a representation of a prototype of the present invention used for illustrative purpose and is designed as per the specifications of the present inventions descriptions and claims, to use with a common seven day prayer candle that 5snot part of the present invention. Therefore, I do not intend to limit the breadth of this invention to the single embodiment illustrated and described. Rather, it is intended that the scope of this invention be determined by the appended claims, detailed descriptions and their equivalents. A listing including all figures by number with statements is below the following brief description.

Page 1 Summary

FIGS. 1, 2, 3, and 4 show four different views of the prototype of the present invention that has been designed and manufacture as per the specifications of the present inventions descriptions and claims for use with a common seven day prayer candle (not part of the present invention). The said prototype of the present invention is made of 3/32 inch thick stamped steel and is comprised of an annular or circular flat disc having a uniform thickness with an edge and a major portion thereof disposed in a flat plane with a central hole or opening through which to receive a wick.

Page 2 Summary

FIGS. 5 and 7 depicts two illustrations of a common seven day prayer candle which is a candle that is made within a vessel (not part of the present invention). FIG. 6 is an illustration of the prototype of the present invention depicting the required measurements for use with a common seven day prayer candle.

Page 3 Summary

FIGS. 8 and 9 show two progressive burning stages of the candle with the functions and operation of the prototype of the present invention depicted. These two illustrations depict the beneficial affects of the present invention as an accessory for use while burning a candle within a vessel. It is an illustrative demonstration of how the present invention will sink below the surface of the molten wax and maintain a normal and centralized wick within a central position of the candle.

Page 4 Summary

FIGS. 10 and 11 show illustrations of a candle that has a displaced wick. FIG. 10 shows the candle with a displaced wick and the prototype of the present invention properly inserted and ready to use. FIG. 11 shows the same candle 10 in the resulting condition after the candle had been ignited and the candle burned for a period of approximately two days and depicts the affects that the prototype of the present invention has during the burning process of the candle. It is an illustrative demonstration of how the present invention will sink below the surface of the molten wax and maintain the displaced wick within a central area of the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention and in the central area of the solidified wax and molten wax layer.

Page 5 Summary;

FIGS. 12 and 13 depict the same candle as in FIGS. 11 and 12 in two further stages of the burning process of the candle. These two illustrations show the beneficial affects of the present invention as an accessory for use while burning a candle that has a displaced wick. It is an illustrative demonstration of how the prototype of the present invention functions and operates while a candle with a displaced wick is burning. It is an illustration of how the prototype of the present invention snuffs out or extinguishes the flame on a displaced wick.

Page 6 Summary

FIG. 14 shows an enlarged slightly angled cut out side view of FIG. 12 from the perspective of looking downwards from the top of the candle towards the bottom of the candle.

Page 7 Summary

FIG. 15 shows an enlarged slightly angled cut out side view of FIG. 13 from the perspective of looking downwards from the top of the candle towards the bottom of the candle.

Page 8 Summary

FIGS. 16, 17, 18 and 19 show four comparative illustration; FIGS. 16 and 17 depict a candle in two stages of the burning process and the resulting condition of the candle without the use of the prototype of the present invention and FIGS. 18 and 19 depict a candle in two stages of the burning process and the resulting condition of the candle with the use of the prototype of the present invention. These four comparative illustration enables the viewer clearly see the beneficial use the prototype of the present invention to assist in reducing the build-up of solidified or un-molten wax on the inner sides of the vessel during the process of burning these types of candles.

Below is a listing of all of the figures by number with corresponding statements explaining what each figure depicts.

Page 1 Summary

FIGS. 1, 2, 3, and 4 show four different views of the prototype of the present that is made of three thirty second of an inch ( 3/32″) thick stamped steel and is comprised of an annular or circular flat disc having a uniform thickness with an edge and a major portion thereof disposed in a flat plane with a central hole or opening through which to receive a wick.

FIG. 1 shows a full flat frontal view of the prototype of the present invention

FIG. 2 shows three dimensional frontal views the prototype of the present invention

FIG. 3 shows a three dimensional angular view of the prototype of the present invention

FIG. 4 shows a one dimensional angular view of the prototype of the present invention and it is this type of angular view that is used to illustrate the present invention when used in conjunction with the candle.

Page 2 Summary

FIGS. 5 and 7 depicts two illustrations of a common seven day prayer candle that is not part of the present invention; FIG. 5 candle without the prototype of the present invention and FIG. 7 the candle with a prototype of the present invention properly inserted and ready to use FIG. 6 is an illustration of the prototype of the present invention depicting the required measurements for use with a common seven day prayer candle.

FIG. 5 depicts all the elements that compose a common seven day prayer candle. A common seven day prayer candle may be composed of the following; a combustible fuel that may be wax, tallow or an other solidified combustible substance that is solid at ambient temperatures and becomes melted when heated somewhat above ambient temperature (thereafter termed ‘solidified wax’) and a wick that may be composed of an absorbent material, generally a type of cotton, nylon or other material in the formation of a string or thread that may have a thin wire in its center used as a stiffener (hereafter termed ‘wick’) and a container with an opening in the top and may be composed of glass, metal or other material able to hold the content of the other components that make up a candle (hereafter termed ‘vessel’). The wick is placed in the central area of the vessel and extends in a vertically upward position through the full length of the solidified and exits through the top surface of solidified wax so that a nominal piece of the wick remains above the top surface of the solidified wax for the purpose of igniting with a flame. Generally these candles have a wick holder that is set on the bottom of the vessel and it secures the very most bottom end of the wick at the bottom of the vessel during the manufacturing process of making the candle within the vessel. The wick holder is usually made of a piece of thin metal in a rectangular shape with a crimping hole in its center to received the end of the wick and secure the wick at an upward ninety degree angle in the bottom of the vessel. The wick holder is shown in FIG. 5 to illustrate all of the actual components of a common seven day prayer candle (hereafter termed ‘candle’) and the candle is not part of the present invention. The wick holder is omitted in all of the remaining illustrations as its presence has no affect on the function or operation of the prototype of the present invention and its absence in the illustrations allows an unimpeded and clear view of the prototype of the present invention and the functions and operations of the prototype of the present invention during use with the candle which is the sole purpose of the illustrations. FIG. 7 shows a candle with a prototype of the present invention properly inserted and ready to use. The view of the candle is at the perspective of looking upwards from the bottom of the vessel, up through the clear solidified wax to the top of the vessel. The solidified wax in all of the illustrations is shown as clear to allow a clear and concise depiction of the elements of the candle and a clear and concise view of the functions and operation of the prototype of the present invention within the candle.

FIG. 5 (1) shows the outline of the vessel which is eight and one quarter inches in height.

FIG. 5 (2) shows the inside area of the vessel that is filled with solidified wax used as fuel for the candle.

FIG. 5 (3) indicates the wick that is placed in the central area of the solidified wax starting at the bottom most part of the vessel extending in a straight vertically upward position for the full length of the solidified wax to the point where it exist the solidified wax

FIG. 5 (4) indicates the nominal piece of the wick that protrudes above the top surface of the wax for the purpose of enabling the wick to be ignited.

FIG. 5 (6) indicates the point at where the wick exits the solidified wax to protrude through to the surface above the solidified wax.

FIG. 5 (8) indicates the top surface area of the solidified wax.

FIG. 5 (13) indicates the inside diameter of the glass vessel that measures 2¼ inches

FIG. 5 (14) indicates a wick holder placed on the bottom of the vessel that secures the wick at the bottom of the vessel during the process of the making candle.

FIG. 5 (18) Indicates the nominal piece of wick in the bottom of the wick holder

FIG. 6 shows an illustration of a full frontal view of the prototype of the present invention with four horizontal lines emanating from its outer and inner edges which depict the outer dimensions of the prototype of the present invention and the and inner dimensions of the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention which is designed foe use with a candle.

FIG. 6 (15) shows a full flat view of the prototype of the present invention with two horizontal lines and arrows indicating the outer dimension measurement: the very upper most and the very lower most horizontal lines indicate an outer measurement of 2 1/16″.

FIG. 6 (16) shows a full flat view of the prototype of the present invention with the two horizontal lines with arrows at its mid area indicating the inner dimensions of the hole in the center of the present invention which measure at ½″.

FIG. 7 shows the candle as depicted in FIG. 5 form the perspective of looking upwards from the bottom of the vessel up through the clear solidified wax to the top of the vessel. The solidified wax in all of the illustrations of a candle is shown as clear space (unmarked) as all other elements depicted in the candle make it logical and obvious where the solidified wax is maintained in the vessel and this method of illustration allows all elements of the candle and function and operation of the prototype of the present invention to be depicted in a clear and concise manner. This illustration depicts the candle with the prototype of the present invention properly inserted and ready for use.

FIG. 7 (2) shows the inside area of the vessel that is filled with solidified wax used as fuel for the candle.

FIG. 7 (3) indicates the wick that is placed in the central area of the solidified wax starting at the bottom most part of the vessel extending in a straight vertically upward position for the full length of the solidified wax to the point where it exist the solidified wax.

FIG. 7 (4) indicates the nominal piece of the wick that protrudes above the top surface of the wax.

FIG. 7 (5) indicates the prototype of the present invention as described in FIG. 4 in a horizontal position and placed on the top surface of the solidified wax with the wick protruding vertically upwards through the hole in its center.

FIG. 7 (6) indicates the point at where the wick exits the solidified wax to protrude through to the surface above the solidified wax.

FIG. 7 (7) indicates the wick at the point where it extends vertically upwards through the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention.

FIG. 7 (8) indicates the top surface area of the solidified wax Page 2 summary

FIG. 6 shows an illustration of the prototype of the present invention with the measurements used for manufacture of this device to use with a candle.

Page 3 Summary

FIGS. 8 and 9 show two progressive burning stages of the candle with the functions and operation of the prototype of the present invention depicted. These two illustrations depict the beneficial affects of the present invention as an accessory for use while burning a candle within a vessel. It is an illustrative demonstration of how the present invention will sink below the surface of the molten wax and maintain a normal and centralized wick within a central position of the candle. igure 8 shows the same candle as described in FIG. 7 except it is now in the resulting condition after the wick had been ignited and the candle had been burning for a period of approximately two days.

FIG. 8 (2) shows the inside area of the vessel that is filled with solidified wax used as fuel for the candle.

FIG. 8 (3) indicates the wick that is placed in the central area of the solidified wax starting at the bottom most part of the vessel extending in a straight vertically upward position for the full length of the solidified wax to the point where it exist the solidified wax.

FIG. 8 (4) (A) indicates the nominal piece of the wick that protrudes above the top surface of the molten wax layer.

FIG. 8 (5) (A) shows that the prototype of the present invention is in a horizontal position and has settled on top surface of the solidified wax below the layer of molten wax and the wick has been maintained within the central area of its hole.

FIG. 8 (6) indicates the point at where the wick exits the solidified wax to protrude through to the surface above the solidified wax

FIG. 8 (7) indicates the wick at the point where it extends vertically upwards through the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention

FIG. 8 (8) indicates the top surface area of the solidified wax

FIG. 8 (9) indicates the top surface of molten wax

FIG. 8 (10) shows the layer of molten wax which is the portion of solidified wax that has become liquefied from the heat of the flame burning on the wick

FIG. 8 (11) indicates the portion of the wick that extends above the solidified wax in a straight vertically upwards position within the layer of molten wax until it exist the molten wax.

FIG. 9 shows the same candle as described in FIG. 8 in the resulting condition after the wick had been ignited and the candle had been burning for a period of approximately seven days and has completed its burning process.

FIG. 9 (1) shows the outline of the vessel.

FIG. 9 (3) (A) indicates the un-burned portion wick at the bottom most part of the vessel

FIG. 9 (5) (B) indicates the prototype of the present invention and the position it is in after the candle has fully burned out (approximately seven days). It has settled on the bottom on the vessel in a horizontal position the wick has been maintained within the central area of its hole.

FIG. 9 (7) (A) indicates the burned out portion of the remaining wick at the point where it extends vertically upwards through the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention at the end of the burning process of the candle.

FIG. 9 (8) (A) indicates the top surface area of remaining unused solidified wax that is stuck onto the inner surfaces of the vessel

Page 4 Summary FIGS. 10 and 11 show two illustrations of a candle that has a displaced wick. FIG. 10 shows the candle with a displaced wick and the prototype of the present invention properly inserted and ready to use. FIG. 11 shows the same candle 10 in the resulting condition after the candle had been ignited and the candle burned for a period of approximately two days and depicts the affects that the prototype of the present invention has during the burning process of the candle. It is an illustrative demonstration of how the present invention will sink below the surface of the molten wax and maintain the displaced wick within a central area of the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention and in the central area of the solidified wax and molten wax layer.

FIG. 10 shows a candle as depicted in FIG. 7 at the perspective of looking upwards from the bottom surface of the vessel, to the top of the vessel that contains the candle which may be composed of wax and a wick. The wick, however, in this illustration is set within the solidified wax in manner that it is not centered within the solidified wax and is angled or curved toward the left side of the vessel and returns to a position of near center before exiting the solidified wax to protrude above the surface of the wax (hereafter termed ‘displaced wick).

FIG. 10 (3) (B) indicates the displaced wick within the solidified wax FIG. 10 (2) placed in a central position from the bottom most part of the vessel and extends vertically upwards at a twenty ten degree angle towards the left side until approximately two thirds the length of the solidified wax and bends horizontally to the left at a sixty degree angle extending left until it comes into contact with the inner side of the vessel from that point it is bent back towards the center of the solidified wax at a thirty degree angle in an upwards posture extending in a vertically upwards position for approximately one sixth the length of the solidified wax within a quarter inch from the center of the solidified wax and continues at a ten percent incline until it exits the solidified wax.

FIG. 10 (4) (B) shows the nominal piece of the displaced wick that protrudes upwards through to the surface of the solidified wax and that it is slightly moved toward the right side approximately one sixteenth of an inch from its previous position as depicted in FIG. 9 (4).

FIG. 10 (5) (C) indicates the prototype of the present invention as described in FIG. 4 in a horizontal position and placed on the top surface of the solidified wax with the displaced wick extending upward through the hole in its center.

FIG. 10 (6) (A) indicates the point at where the displaced wick exits the solidified wax to protrude through to the surface above the solidified wax and that it is angled to the right at the point of exiting the solidified wax.

FIG. 10 (7) (B) indicates the displaced wick at the point where it extends vertically upwards through the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention

FIG. 10 (8) indicates the top surface area of the solidified wax.

FIG. 11 shows the same candle depicted in FIG. 10 in the resulting condition after the candle had been ignited and the candle burned for a period of approximately two days.

FIG. 11 (3) (C) indicates the same displaced wick as described in FIG. 10 (3) (B) in the resulting condition of being in contact with the prototype of the present invention.

FIG. 11 (4) (C) shows the nominal piece of the displaced wick that protrudes upwards through to the surface of the solidified wax and that it is slightly moved toward the right side approximately one sixteenth of an inch from its previous position FIG. 10 4(A).

FIG. 11 (5) (D) indicates that the prototype of the present invention has settled on top of the surface of the solidified wax below the molten wax layer and bottom surface of edge of the hole in its center is in contact with the top surface of the displaced wick at the point where the displaced wick started its ten degree incline.

FIG. 11 (6) (B) indicates the point at where the displaced wick exits the solidified wax to protrude through to the surface above the solidified wax and shows that it has been bent downwards at an increased ten degree angle from its previous position as described in FIG. 10 (6) (A).

FIG. 11 (7) (C) indicates the displaced wick at the point where it extends vertically upwards through the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention and is in contact with the surface of the bottom edge of the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention.

FIG. 11 (8) indicates the top surface area of the solidified wax.

FIG. 11 (9) indicates the top surface of molten wax.

FIG. 11 (10) (A) indicates the layer of molten wax which is the portion of solidified wax that has become liquefied from the heat of the flame burning on the wick.

FIG. 11 (11) (A) indicates the portion of the displaced wick that extends above the solidified wax.

Page 5 Summary

FIGS. 12 and 13 depict the same candle as in FIGS. 11 and 12 in two further stages of the burning process of the candle. These two illustrations show the beneficial affects of the present invention as an accessory for use while burning a candle that has a displaced wick. It is an illustrative demonstration of how the prototype of the present invention functions and operates while a candle with a displaced wick is burning. It is an illustration of how the prototype of the present invention snuffs out or extinguishes the flame on a displaced wick.

FIG. 12 shows the candle with a displaced wick as depicted in FIG. 10 in the resulting condition after the wick had been ignited and the candle burned for a period of approximately three days.

FIG. 12 (1) shows the outline of the vessel.

FIG. 12 (2) shows the inside area of the vessel that is filled with solidified wax used as fuel for the candle.

FIG. 12 (3) (D) indicates the placement of the displaced wick and the change in the top portion of the wick. The top surface area of the top portion of displaced wick is now in full contact with the bottom surface of the prototype of the present invention has increased from the previous state as depicted in FIG. 11 (3) (C) to it current state whereby the full length of the top surface of the angled portion of the displaced wick that extends from point of contact with the inner side of the vessel to the point where it extends upward through the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention is in contact with the bottom surface of the prototype of the present invention and shows that this portion of the displaced wick has been bent at a right angle downward from its previous position by the weight of the prototype of the present invention.

FIG. 12 (4) (D) indicates that the portion of the displaced wick that protrudes upwards through to the top surface of the molten wax has decreased in size and it has been moved further to the right of the previous location depicted in FIG. 11 (4) (C) due to the weight of the prototype of the present invention having settled onto the displaced portion of the wick below the surface of the molten wax and has caused the displaced wick to bend at a full right angle thereby moving the displaced wick further to the right and thereby causing more of the available displaced wick to be used within in the area of a full right angle and less of the displaced wick to be available to protrude through to the surface above the molten at an increased right angle.

FIG. 12 (5) (E) indicates that the prototype of the present invention has settled on top of the surface of the solidified wax below the surface of the molten wax and that it has settled on the entire top surface area of the displaced wick. This illustration also depicts that the slight pressure that the displaced wick has while in contact with the inner left edge of the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention has caused the prototype of the present invention to be pulled to the left side during the process of settling on the surface of the solidified wax while the candle has been burning.

FIG. 12 (6) (C) indicates the point at where the displaced wick exits the solidified wax to protrude through to the surface above the solidified wax is at the point above the very right inner edge of the prototype of the present invention.

FIG. 12 (7) (D) indicates the displaced wick at the point where it extends vertically upwards through the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention and indicates that the displaced wick is in contact with the surface of the bottom edge of the hole and with inner left edge of the hole in the present invention. This also depicts that the weight of the prototype of the present invention settling onto this area of the displaced wick has caused it to bend in a downward position at an increased right angle from where it was in its previous position as described in FIG. 11 (7) (C).

FIG. 12 (8) indicates the top surface area of the solidified wax.

FIG. 12 (9) indicates the top surface of molten wax.

FIG. 12 (10) (A) indicates the layer of molten wax which is the portion of solidified wax that has become liquefied from the heat of the flame burning on the wick and shows that the volume of molten wax is decreased from the volume shown in FIG. 11 (10) due to the fact that the available portion of wick protruding above the surface of the molten wax has decreased from the function of the prototype of the present invention.

FIG. 12 (11) (B) indicates the portion of the displaced wick that extends above the solidified wax

FIG. 13 shows the same candle with a displaced wick as depicted in FIG. 10 in the resulting condition after the wick had been ignited and the candle burned for a time spam of approximately four days.

FIG. 13 (3) (E) shows the displaced wick that the prototype of the present invention has settled onto and has caused it to bend at a full right angel from the point where it is in contact with the inner side of the vessel to the point where it extends towards the center of the solidified wax. The displaced wick is compressed between the prototype of the present invention and the top surface area of the solidified wax.

FIG. 13 (5) (F) shows the prototype of the present invention has settled onto the top of the surface of the solidified wax and has also settled onto the top of displaced wick causing it to bend to a right angle.

FIG. 13 (7) (E) The portion of the burned out displaced wick is approximately one sixteenth inch below the point where the wick came into contact with the bottom surface of the edge of the hole in the prototype of the present invention.

FIG. 13 (8) indicates the top surface area of the solidified wax.

Page 6 Summary

FIG. 14 shows an enlarged slightly angled cut out side view of FIG. 12 from the perspective of looking downwards from the top of the candle towards the bottom of the candle.

FIG. 14 (1) shows the outline of the vessel.

FIG. 14 (3) (E) indicates that at the point where the displaced wick extends from its contact with the inner surface of the vessel to approximately one thirty second of an inch at a right angle towards the center of the candle it is not visible because the prototype of the present invention is on top of the remaking portion of the displaced wick.

FIG. 14 (4) (E) shows a side view of the portion of the displaced wick that protrudes upwards through the molten wax layer and that the displaced wick has decreased in size when compared to the displaced wick as depicted in FIG. 11 (4) (B) and that it has been moved further to the right of the previous location depicted in FIG. 11 (4) (B).

FIG. 14 (5) (G) shows a side view of the prototype of the present invention and that it has settled on top of the surface of the solidified wax below the surface of the molten wax layer and is settled on the entire top surface area of the displaced wick.

FIG. 14 (7) (F) indicates the point where the displaced wick extends in an upward posture at a thirty degree angle and protrudes through the hole in the prototype of the present invention. It is evidenced that it is not in contact with the upper edge of hole in the prototype of the present invention but it is moved to the right approximately one sixteenth of an inch from it previous position as described in FIG. 11 (7) (C).

FIG. 14 (8) indicates the top surface area of the solidified wax.

FIG. 14 (9) indicates the top surface of molten wax.

FIG. 14 (10) (B) indicates a side view of the molten wax layer and shows that the it has decreased in the volume from its previous state as depicted in FIG. 11 (10)

FIG. 14 (11) (B) indicates the portion of the displaced wick that extends above the solidified Wax and is in the molten wax layer.

Page 7 Summary

FIG. 15 shows an enlarged slightly angled cut out side view of FIG. 13 from the perspective of looking downwards from the top of the candle towards the bottom of the candle.

FIG. 15 (1) shows the outline of the vessel.

FIG. 15 (2) shows the inside area of the vessel that is filled with solidified wax used as fuel for the candle.

FIG. 15 (3) (F) indicates that at the point where the displaced wick extends from its contact with the inner surface of the vessel and extends an approximately one thirty second of an inch towards the central area of the top surface of the solidified wax it is not visible because the prototype of the present invention on top of it and has successfully snuffed out or extinguished the flame on the displaced wick.

FIG. 15 (5) (H) shows a side view of the prototype of the present invention settled onto the top of the surface of the solidified wax and that it has also settled onto the top of the top surface area of the displaced wick causing it to bend over to a right angle and that the displaced wick is stuck between the prototype of the present invention and the top surface of the solidified wax.

FIG. 15 (8) indicates the top surface area of the solidified wax.

Page 8 Summary

FIGS. 16, 17, 18 and 19 show four comparative illustration; FIGS. 16 and 17 depict a candle in two progressive stages of the burning process and the resulting condition of the candle without the use of the prototype of the present invention and FIGS. 18 and 19 depict a candle in two progressive stages of the burning process and the resulting condition of the candle with the use of the prototype of the present invention. These four comparative illustrations depict the beneficial use that the prototype of the present invention has to assist in reducing the build-up of solidified or un-molten wax on the inner surfaces of the vessel during the process of burning a candle within a vessel.

FIG. 16 (1) (A) shows the outline of the vessel.

FIG. 16 (3) indicates the wick that is placed in a central position starting at the bottom most part of the vessel and extends the full length of the solidified wax from the bottom most position of the vessel vertically upwards and exits the solidified wax.

FIG. 16 (4) indicates the nominal piece of the wick that protrudes above the top surface of the solidified wax.

FIG. 16 (17) indicates the areas of solidified wax that has not become molten and has built-up or coagulated on the surfaces of the inner surfaces of the vessel.

FIG. 17 (1) shows the outline of the vessel.

FIG. 17 (3) (G) indicates a wick that has become inundated in un-molten wax.

FIG. 17 (17) indicates the area of solidified wax that has built-up or coagulated on the inner surfaces of the vessel.

FIG. 18 (1) shows the outline of the vessel.

FIG. 18 (2) shows the inside area of the vessel that is filled with solidified wax used as fuel for the candle.

FIG. 18 (4) (A) indicates the nominal piece of the wick that protrudes above the top surface of the molten wax layer.

FIG. 18 (5) (D) indicates the prototype of the present invention Settled onto the solidified wax below the molten wax layer.

FIG. 18 (8) indicates the top surface area of the solidified wax.

FIG. 18 (9) indicates the top surface of molten wax.

FIG. 18 (10) indicates the layer of the molten wax.

FIG. 18 (17) (A) indicates the area of solidified wax that has built-up or coagulated onto the inner surfaces of the vessel and that it is substantially less than is shown in FIG. 16.

FIG. 19 (1) shows the outline of the vessel.

FIG. 19 (3) indicates the wick that is placed in a central position starting at the bottom most part of the vessel and is set within the solidified wax. The wick extends the full length of the solidified wax from the bottom most position of the vessel vertically upwards and exits the solidified wax.

FIG. 19 (4) (A) indicates the nominal piece of the wick that protrudes above the top surface of the molten wax layer.

FIG. 19 (5) (D) indicates the prototype of the present invention Settled onto the solidified wax below the molten wax layer.

FIG. 19 (8) indicates the top surface area of the solidified wax.

FIG. 19 (9) indicates the top surface area of the molten wax.

FIG. 19 (10) indicates the layer of the molten wax.

FIG. 19 (17) (A) indicates the area of solidified wax that has built-up or coagulated on the surfaces of the inner surfaces of the vessel and that it is substantially less than is shown in FIG. 18 and the candle is still able to be ignited and burn.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

The preferred embodiment of the present invention for the purpose of illustration and description is designed to use with a typical Seven Hour Prayer Candle FIG. 5 that is not part of the present invention.

The prototype of the present invention is a flat circular or annular plate having a uniform thickness, a circumferential edge and a major portion thereof disposed in a flat plane having a hole or opening at its center through which to receive the wick and is manufactured from and of three thirty seconds of an inch thick ( 3/32″) stamped metal steel which provides the necessary weight for the prototype of the present invention to function properly.

The prototype of the present invention is manufactured so that the major portion of its flat plane is formed into a shape that allows it to fit into the vessel FIG. 5 (1) and to seat in a horizontal position onto the top surface of the solidified wax FIG. 7 (8,) with a circumferential edge that spans the major portion of the surface of the solidified wax and its periphery reaching to a point that is within approximately three thirty seconds of an inch from the inner surfaces or the inner sides of the vessel FIG. (5) (12) and having a hole located in its center through which to receive a wick. That stated, for the purpose of this description the prototype of the present invention has an out side diameter of two inches and one sixteenth of an inch FIG. (6) (15) and an inside diameter of the hole being one half of an inch (½″) FIG. 6 (16).

Four different angled views of the prototype of the present invention FIGS. 1, 2, 3 and 4 shows the following; a full flat one dimensional view FIG. 1, a full flat three dimensional view FIG. 2 a three dimensional view at a ten degree angle FIG. 3 and a one dimensional view at an approximate thirty degree angle FIG. 4 of which this latter view is used in FIGS. 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, and 13.

The common seven day prayer candle that is not part of the present invention FIG. 5 depicts all the elements that compose a common seven day prayer candle. A common seven day prayer candle viewed from its side at an approximate thirty degree angle at a perspective of looking upwards from the bottom of the candle up through the solidified wax (depicted as clear open space without any markings) to the top of the candle eight and a quarter inches in height that may be composed of the following; a vessel or container approximately FIG. 5 (1) with an opening at the top that may be composed of glass, metal or other non-combustible or semi noncombustible material that contains content of the other components that make up the candle portion hereafter termed ‘vessel’), a combustible fuel that may be wax, tallow or an other solidified or semi solidified combustible substance that is solid at ambient temperatures and becomes melted when heated somewhat above ambient temperature (thereafter termed ‘solidified wax’) that fills approximately seven eights of the vessel FIG. 5 (2) and a wick FIG. 5 (3) that may be composed of an absorbent material, generally a type of cotton, nylon or other material in the formation of a string or thread that may have a thin wire in its center used as a stiffener (hereafter termed ‘wick’) FIG. 5 (3) that is placed in the central area of the vessel and extends in a vertically upward position through the full length of the solidified wax FIG. 5 (2) and exits the solidified wax through to the top surface of solidified wax FIG. 5 (8) so that a nominal piece of the wick (one quarter inch up to one inch, depending on the manufacturer of the candle) protrudes FIG. 5 (4) above the top surface of the solidified wax FIG. 5 (8) for the purpose of igniting with a flame.

Generally these candles have a wick holder that is set on the bottom of the vessel FIG. 5 (13) that secures the very most bottom end of the wick FIG. 5 (14) at the bottom of the vessel during the manufacturing process of making the candle within the vessel. The wick holder is usually made of a piece of thin metal in a rectangular shape with a crimping hole in its center to received the end of the wick and secure the wick at an upward ninety degree angle in the bottom of the vessel. The wick holder is shown in FIG. 5 (13) to illustrate all of the actual components of a common seven day prayer candle (hereafter termed ‘candle’). The wick holder is omitted in all of the remaining illustrations as its presence has no affect on the function or operation of the prototype of the present invention and its absence allows an unimpeded and clear view of the prototype of the present invention depicted in the illustrations at different stages of the burning of the candle The solidified wax FIG. 5 (2) in all of the illustrations is shown as clear to allow a clear and concise depiction of the elements of the candle and the function and operation of the prototype of the present invention in an unimpeded, clear and concise manner. The vessel FIG. 5 (1) is depicted by a dashed line in all of the illustrations indicating that the candle is not part of the present invention.

The candle FIG. 7 with the prototype of the present invention viewed from its side at an approximate thirty degree angle at a perspective of looking upwards from the bottom of the vessel, up through the clear solidified wax FIG. 7 (2) to the top of the vessel. The prototype of the present invention FIG. 7 (5) is properly inserted into the vessel and seated in a horizontal position onto the top surface of the solidified wax FIG. 7 (8) with the wick FIG. 7 (3) that is placed in the central area of the solidified wax FIG. 7 (2) and extends through the full length of the solidified wax to the point where it exits the solidified wax FIG. 7 (6) and proceeds in a straight vertical upward position to a point where it enters through the central area of the hole in the prototype of the present invention FIG. 7 (7) and FIG. 7 (5) respectively, a nominal piece of the wick protrudes above the surface of the solidified wax FIG. 7 (4) and FIG. 7 (8) respectively.

The afore said candle in the resulting condition after it had been ignited and allowed to burn for a period of two and a half days FIG. 8 show the affect of the present invention. As is the normal process of any candle within a container, as the flame on the wick FIG. 8 (3) burns it heats the surface of the solidified wax FIG. 8 (8) surrounding the area of the wick turning the solidified wax into a molten, or liquefied state (hereafter termed ‘molten wax’) which causes a top surface of molten wax FIG. 8 (9) to form around the immediate area of the wick. In order for a candle to accomplish the full use of the major portion of the solidified wax FIG. 8 (2) and burn to the completion of its design, it is essential that the wick FIG. 8 (3) has available to it, enough of a molten wax layer FIG. 8 (10) or a supply of molten wax from which to absorb the molten wax that is used to provide fuel for the flame. The prototype of the present invention FIG. 8 (5) (A) having been set onto the top surface of the solidified wax FIG. 7 (8) at the initial time of the ignition of the wick, allowed the prototype of the present invention FIG. 7 (5) to absorb the radiating heat from the flame on the wick and distribute the heat evenly across the top surface of the solidified wax FIG. 7 (8) and this affect resulted in providing an even melting of the top surface of the solidified wax FIG. 8 (8). Other beneficial use of the present invention at the initial ignition of the candle is described later in this description. The resulting condition of the candle FIG. 8 burning for a period of two and a half days is that there has formed an ample layer of molten wax FIG. 8 (10) into which the prototype of the present invention has, because of the weight of its design continued to sink through the molten wax layer FIG. 8 (10) and settle onto the top surface of solidified wax FIG. 8 (8) below, during which time it has continually maintained the wick FIG. 8 (3) within the open area of the hole in its center and the wick continues to extend in a vertically upwards position through the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention FIG. 8 (7) and exit the solidified wax FIG. 8 (6) upwards through the central area of the molten wax layer FIG. 8 (11) and protruded at a central point above the top surface of the molten wax FIG. 8 (4) (A). The weight of the prototype of the present invention FIG. 8 (5) (A) provides it the ability to continually sink below the molten wax layer FIG. 8 (10) and continually maintain the wick within a central position which makes it a unique sinking candle follower and its weight also allows the present invention to settle onto the top surface of the solidified wax which maintains a constant and continuous even melting of the top surface of the solidified wax FIG. 8 (8) below the surface of the molten wax layer FIG. 8 (10) because the present invention is made of a material that is able to absorb the ambient temperature of the molten wax that it is submerged into and distribute a quantity of that heat evenly across the top surface of the solidified wax FIG. 8 (10).

In the resulting condition of the aforesaid candle FIG. 8 having burned for approximately seven days FIG. 9 (hence the name of the candle for which the prototype of the present invention has been designed; a common seven day prayer candle, not part of the present invention for the purpose of this description) the candle has fully burned most of the available solidified wax and the prototype of the present invention FIG. 9 (5) (B) has settled to the bottom of the vessel FIG. 9 (1) and there is a portion of the burned out wick central position of its hole FIG. 9 (7) with the remaining unburned portion underneath. The amount of the top surface area of unused solidified wax that is stuck onto the inner surfaces of the vessel FIG. 9 (8) is minimal.

The overall affects of the present invention FIG. 9 (5) (B) is that it provides the necessary assistance to maintain the wick with the central area of its hole FIG. 9 (7) and within the central area of all areas of wax during the entire process of burning the candle It also provides the assistance of an even distribution of the ambient heat within the molten layer of wax FIG. 8 (10) and to disburse it over and across the top surface of the solidified wax FIG. 8 (8) which causes an even melting of the top surface area of the solidified wax FIG. 8 (8) and that assists in the requirements necessary for candle to exhaust most all of the solidified wax FIG. 8 (2) leaving a small portion of solidified wax FIG. 9 (8) on the surface of the vessel. The prototype of the present invention has also been a factor in maintaining an even top surface melting of the solidified wax FIG. 8 (8). The prototype of the present invention has thus assisted the candle to burn to the full extent of its design. The prototype of the present invention FIG. 9 (5) (B) can be removed and used in another candle As the preferred material used in its manufacturing is that of metal, it can be used for generations and generations because the stated use of it results in extremely little, if any wear and tear whatsoever.

A wick that deviates from a straight, upwards and central position within the solidified wax as previously depicted in FIGS. 5, 7, 8, and 9 (hereafter termed ‘displaced wick’) FIG. 10 (3) (A) is a common cause of candle failure. The prototype of the present invention FIG. 10 (5) (C) assists in maintaining a displaced wick figure within the central area of its hole or it will snuff out or extinguish the flame burning on the displaced wick.

The candle FIG. 10 with a displaced wick FIG. 10 (3) (A) is described as a wick that is placed in a central position from the bottom most part of the vessel and extends vertically upwards at a twenty ten degree angle towards the left side until approximately two thirds the length of the solidified wax when it bends horizontally to the left at a sixty degree angle until it comes into contact with the inner side of the vessel. From that point the wick is bent towards the right at a sharp sixty degree angle towards the center of the solidified wax and extends at said right angel vertically upwards until it is at near central position within the solidified wax at approximately ⅚th the length of the solidified wax and from that point it extends vertically in a straight position upwards at a eight degree right angle until it exits the solidified wax FIG. 10 (6) (A) at approximately one thirty second of an inch to the right of center and the nominal piece of the displaced wick that protrudes upwards through the surface of the surface of the solidified wax FIG. 10 (4) (B) and FIG. 10 (6) respectively, is slightly toward the right side approximately one sixteenth of an inch from the center of the top surface of solidified wax FIG. 10 (8). The prototype of the present invention is seated in a horizontal position on the top surface of the solidified wax FIG. 10 (5) (C) and FIG. 10 (8) respectively with the displaced wick FIG. 10 (3) (A) protruding in an upward position through the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention FIG. 10 (7) (B).

The resulting condition of the candle as described in FIG. 10 after burning for a period of two and a half days FIG. 11 shows that the weight of the prototype of the present invention FIG. 11 (5) (D) has allowed it to sink below the molten wax layer FIG. 11 (10) and settle onto the top of the surface of the solidified wax FIG. 11 (8) and it has had the affect of pressing down on the portion of displaced wick FIG. 11 (3) (C) at the point where it extends vertically upwards through the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention FIG. 11 (7) (C) and is in contact with the bottom surface of the bottom edge of said hole has caused the displaced wick to bend at a ten degree right angle downwards FIG. 11 (3) (C). At the point at where the displaced wick exits the solidified wax FIG. 11 (6) (B) to protrude through to the molten wax layer FIG. 10 (10) said portion of wick FIG. 11 (11) (A) has been bent at an approximately ten degree right angle from the weight of the prototype of the present invention. This also caused the nominal piece of wick that protrudes above the surface of the molten wax FIG. 11 (4) (C) and FIG. 11 (9) respectively to bend in a likewise angle and move approximately one sixteenth of an inch to the right of its previous location as described in FIG. 10 (4) (B). The aforesaid process also causes the nominal piece of displaced wick that protrudes above the surface of the molten wax FIG. 11 (4) (C) to be shortened or lessened in size because of the increased angle of the displaced wick. This causes the flame to burn at a decreased intensity due to less surface area or mass of displaced wick that is available to the flame.

The resulting condition of the aforesaid candle in FIG. 11 after burning for a period of three and a quarter days FIG. 12 indicates that the progressive burning of the flame on the reduced area or mass of the displaced wick FIG. 12 (4) (D) has reduced the intensity of heat generated by the flame which has caused a decreased amount of solidified was FIG. 12 (2) to melt into a molten wax layer FIG. 12 (10) (A). The flame has consumed or exhausted the major portion, approximately three quarters, of the available molten wax layer FIG. 12 (10) (A) which has become substantially less in volume than depicted in FIG. 11 (10). The displaced wick within the molten layer of wax FIG. 12 (11) (A) and the portion of the displaced wick that protrudes above the surface of the molten wax FIG. 12 (4) (D) and FIG. 12 (9) respectively are both at an increased approximately ten degree right angle from where they were previously located as described in FIG. 11 (11) (A) and FIG. 11 (4) (C) respectively. Both the aforesaid portions of the displaced wick FIG. 11 (11) (A) and FIG. 12 (4) (D) have moved to the right approximately one sixteenth of an inch from its previous position as described in FIG. 11 (11) (A) and FIG. 11 (4) (C). The prototype of the present invention FIG. 12 (5) (E) has maintained a position on the top surface of the solidified wax FIG. 12 (8) and its bottom surface is in full contact with and applying the pressure of its weight onto the top surface of that portion of the displaced wick that extends from point of contact with the inner side of the vessel to the point where it extend to the right towards the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention FIG. 12 (3) (D) and FIG. 12(5) (E). During the above stated process the displaced wick at the point where it has come into contact with the inner left edge of the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention FIG. 12 (7) (D) has caused the prototype of the present invention to settle to the left side of the vessel FIG. 12 (5) (E) and 12 (1) respectively.

The same aforesaid candle as in FIG. 12 in the resulting condition of having burned for a period of four and a half days FIG. 13 shows that the prototype of the present invention FIG. 13 (5) (F) has fully settled onto the top surface of the displaced wick; the bottom surface of the prototype of the present invention is in contact with the top surface of the displaced wick and has caused it to bend at a full right angel for the full length of the top surface of the angled portion of the displaced wick that extends from point where it is in contact with the inner side of the vessel to the point where it extends to the area of the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention FIG. 13 (3) (E) and the displaced wick is compressed between the prototype of the present invention FIG. 13 (5) (F) and the top surface area of the solidified wax FIG. 13 (8). The above stated condition has caused the displaced wick FIG. 13 (3) (E) to be snuffed out or extinguished. The portion of the burned out displaced wick is approximately one sixteenth inch below the point where the wick came into contact with the bottom surface of the edge of the hole in the prototype of the present invention FIG. 13 (7) (E) and FIG. 13 (5) (F) respectively.

Turning your attention back to the candle in the state of having burned for a period of two and a half days as described in FIG. 12 this is a description of an enlarged side view from the perspective of looking slightly down (at a ten degree angle) from the top of the candle to the bottom of the candle FIG. 14. At the point where the displaced wick extends from its contact with the inner surface of the vessel to approximately one thirty second of an inch at a right angle towards the center of the candle FIG. 14 (3) (F), it is not visible because the prototype of the present invention FIG. 14 (5) (G) is on top of the remaining portion of the displaced wick. During the process of the flame burning on the wick it is evidenced that the flame has exhausted approximately three quarters of the molten wax layer FIG. 14 (10) (B) and that it is substantially less in volume then is was as described in FIG. 11 (10). The affect that the prototype of the present invention had in lessening or reducing the portion of the wick that protrudes above the surface of molten wax FIG. 14 (4) (E) and FIG. 14 (9) by bending the wick under its weight is clearly seen from the side view as being reduced in size to approximately half of what it was in FIG. (11) (C). At the point where the displaced wick extends in an upward posture at a thirty degree angle and protrudes through the hole in the prototype of the present invention It is evidenced that it is not in contact with the upper edge of hole in the prototype of the present invention but it is moved to the right approximately one sixteenth of an inch FIG. 14 (7) (F). The slight pressure that the displaced wick had while in contact with the bottom surface of the inner left edge of the hole in the center of the prototype of the present invention has caused it FIG. 14 (7) (F) and FIG. 14 (5) (G) respectively to be pulled to the left side of the vessel FIG. 14 (1) during the process that allowed the settling of the prototype of the present invention on the surface of the solidified wax FIG. 14 (8). The displaced wick within the molten layer of wax FIG. 14 (11) (B) and the portion of the displaced wick that protrudes above the surface of the molten wax FIG. 14 (4) (E) are both at an increased, approximately ten percent, right angle and both have moved to the right approximately one sixteenth of an inch FIG. 14 (11) (B) and FIG. 14 (4) (E) respectively from their previous position as described in FIG. 11 (11) (A) and 11 (4) (C) respectively.

Turning the attention back to the aforesaid candle in the state of having burned for a period of four and a half days as described in FIG. 13 this is a description of an enlarged side view from the perspective of looking slightly down at a ten degree angle from the top of the candle to the bottom of the candle FIG. 15. At the point where the displaced wick extends from its contact with the inner surface of the vessel FIG. 15 (3) (F) and FIG. 15 (1) respectively, and extends an approximately one thirty second of an inch towards the central area of the top surface of the solidified wax FIG. 15 (8), after which the remaining portion of the wick is not visible because the prototype of the present invention FIG. 15 (5) (H) is on top of the remaining portion of the displaced wick and has successfully snuffed out or extinguished the flame on the displaced wick 15 (3) (F) as described in FIG. 13.

The present invention is also designed to assist in decreasing or reducing the build up of wax on the inner surfaces of the vessel. Four comparative illustrations; two, FIGS. 16 and 17 are of a candle that has been allowed to burn to its full ability without the use of the prototype of the present invention and the other two FIGS. 18 and 19 are of a candle using the prototype of the present invention and have been allowed to burn for the same periods of time; two days and four and a half days respectively. These candles are viewed from the perspective of looking at the side of the candle at a slightly downward angle of approximately ten degrees from the top of the candle to the bottom of the candle.

The candle FIG. 16 that has burned for two days without a prototype of the present invention shows that wax has built up on the inner surfaces of the vessel FIG. 16 (17) and FIG. 16 (1) respectively and that approximately fifty percent of the available space of the inside diameter of the vessel FIG. 5 (12) at the point where the wick protrudes above the surface of solidified wax FIG. 16 (4) and FIG. 16 (9) respectively, has been filled with wax build up FIG. 16 (17). This build up of un-molten solidified wax FIG. 17 (17) caused eventual candle failure after four days of burning the candle FIG. 17. This is a common and typical cause of candle failure for candles that are within vessels. The flame on the wick FIG. 16 (3) had been deprived of the necessary air due to the process of wax buildup on the inner surfaces of the vessel FIG. 16 (17) and after burning for four days the flame on the wick FIG. 17 (3) (G) was extinguished. The solidified wax that could not become molten wax FIG. 17 (17) had accumulated and built up on the inner surfaces of the vessel FIG. 16 (17) and FIG. 17 (17) and caused a condition whereby the air supply to the flame on the wick FIG. 16 (3) decreased and progressively as the candle burned FIG. 16 to FIG. 17 an increased amount of solidified wax that remained un-molten and remained on the inner surfaces of the vessel FIG. (17) (17) eventually caused the wick FIG. 17 (3) (G) to become inundated in un-molten wax.

When compared to burning a candle FIG. 18 and FIG. 19 for the same duration of time, respectively, with a prototype of the present invention FIG. 18 (5) (I) and FIG. 19 (5) (I) it is evidenced that because there is substantially (over thirty percent) less accumulation of wax build up on the inner surfaces of the vessel FIG. 18 (17) (A) and 19 (17) (A) the wick FIG. 18 (4) (A) and FIG. 19 (4) (A) is able to receive enough air to maintain a flame and thereby maintain a healthy layer of molten wax FIG. 18 (10) and FIG. 19 (10) for the flame to use as fuel thereby circumventing typical candle in a vessel failure.

During the initial lighting or ignition of the wick the prototype of the present invention FIG. 18 (5) (D) and 19 (5) (D) becomes heated by the radiating heat that is generated by the flame and it distributes a portion of that heat evenly across the top surface of the solidified wax FIG. 18 (8) and FIG. 19 (8) which allows an even melting of the top surface area of the solidified wax FIG. 18 (8) and FIG. 19 (8) which reduces the amount of un-molten wax to build up near the inner surface of the vessel FIG. 18 (17) (A) and FIG. 19 (17) (A) and FIG. 18 (1) and FIG. 19 (1) respectively. As the prototype of the present invention FIG. 18 (5) (I) and 19 (5) (I) sinks below the top surface of the molten wax FIG. 18 (9) and FIG. 19 (9) into the molten wax layer FIG. 18 (10) and FIG. 19 (10) and settles horizontally onto the top surface of the solidified wax below FIG. 18 (8) and FIG. 19 (8) its weight and ability to absorb an amount of heat from the ambient temperature of the molten wax both applies pressure and distribute an amount of said heat evenly across the surface of solidified wax FIG. 18 (8) and FIG. 19 (8). This has the affect of reducing or lessoning the amount of un-molten or solidified wax to build up or remain on the inner surfaces of the vessel FIG. 18 (17) (A) and FIG. 19 (17) (A) and FIG. 18 (1) and FIG. 19 (I).

Two modification that could be made to the present invention would consist of a short sleeve attached in an upright position with its edge surrounding the central hole of the present invention allowing the wick to protrude through the present invention and sleeve; one modification with the sleeve projecting in an upward position from said hole and a different modification projecting in an downward position from said hole or a modification consisting of a sleeve on both sides of the present invention. These modifications may or may not have beneficial affects.

It will be understood that the present invention is not limited in its usefulness to assist in the burning of a candle within a vessel but that it could be adapted to use in a variety situations whereby a vessel containing a consumable substance and an article of consumable nature is required to be retained within a centralized position and or the consumable substance requires any aforesaid advantages presented.

Having described the present invention in detail anyone who reads this description can appreciate the benefits of its use, simplicity of its design and its value. It should also be obvious to anyone who reads this description that numerous modifications may be made thereof without departing from the spirit of this invention. The preferred embodiment of the prototype of the present invention, as illustrated, is made to use with a common seven day prayer candle and it is obvious to the most causal observer that the present invention can be made to fit into candles within vessels of a variety of shapes and sizes without departing from principle of the invention or sacrificing any of its advantages.

The simplicity of its design does leave open the possibility of uncountable modifications but it is its simplicity and the expressed manner in which it carries out its functions and operations that are the spirit of this invention. Therefore, I do not intend to limit the breadth of this invention to the single embodiment illustrated and described. Rather, it is intended that the scope and fair meaning of the invention be determined by the appended claims and their equivalents.