Title:
System for training a golfer to improve swing of a golf club
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A method of locating the point of impact of a golf club face after striking a ball wherein a spray is applied removably as a coating to the face before striking and the point of impact is determined by the mark produced on the face while leaving the remainder of the coating intact.



Inventors:
Reich, Jack P. (Parsippany, NJ, US)
Application Number:
11/487749
Publication Date:
01/17/2008
Filing Date:
07/17/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
473/237
International Classes:
A63B69/36
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
PASSANITI, SEBASTIANO
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
THEODORE JAY (SUITE 600 16 NORTH CHATSWORTH AVE., LARCHMONT, NY, 10538, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A method of locating the point of impact of a golf club face after striking a ball wherein a spray is applied removably as a coating to the face before striking and the point of impact is determined by the mark produced on the face while leaving the remainder of the coating intact.

2. The method of claim 1 wherein the spray is composed of a mixture of acetone, liquefied petroleum gas, talc and silicon dioxide.

3. The method of claim 2 wherein the coating can be wiped of as desired by the user.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention is directed toward a system for training an average golfer to improve the golfer's swing of a golf club.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Golfers of average competence have learned that the quality and timing of their efforts to improve their game depends in large part upon their abilities to swing a golf club to strike a golf ball in such manner that the point of impact of the ball upon the club face is exactly that which is needed either to hit a straight drive or a deliberate curved drive. This desired exact point of impact is defined as a “sweet spot”.

When the average golfer swings a club to strike a golf ball, more often than not the drive is faulty, thus indicating that the point of impact is not a sweet spot. In order to learn the error in the swing, it is necessary to identify the actual point of impact so that the golfer can correct the swing to move the point of impact to attain that of a “sweet spot”.

The present invention is directed toward a system for enhancing the ability of an average golfer to identify the exact point of impact of the club face upon the golf ball to enable the golfer to correct the swing by using successive swings and measuring and improving the point of impact to approach that of a “sweet spot”.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In accordance with the principles of this invention, a golfer sprays a coating onto a golf club face and allows the coating to dry quickly. The golfer then swings the club to strike a golf ball. Thereafter, the golfer inspects the club face and finds the spot identifying the point of impact because the impact has left a mark on the club face.

The golfer can then compare the results of the swing with the mark and can continue this process to improve the swing as desired. The spray can be repeated as desired. The golfer can wipe the club face clean with a dry cloth.

The content of the spray is a mixture of acetone, liquefied petroleum gas, talc and silicon dioxide.

Further objects and advantages of this invention will either be explained or will become apparent hereinafter.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 illustrates the application of the spray to a club head,

FIG. 2 illustrates the impact of the club head to a ball.

FIG. 3 illustrates the point of impact on the club head.

FIG. 4 illustrates the method of cleaning the spray from the club head.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Referring now to FIGS. 1-4, a golfer holds in his hand 10 a golf club 12 to expose the club face 14. Spray from can 16 is applied to the cub face. The contents of the spray have been disclosed above. After the face strikes the ball 18, the point of impact 20 is displayed. The spray can then be wiped off with a dry cloth or brush 22.

While the invention has been described with detailed reference to the disclosure and drawings, the protection solicited is to be limited only by the terms of the claims which follow.