Title:
Seating unit convertible into chaise
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A seating unit includes: a frame configured to rest on an underlying surface, the frame including a fixed seat, the frame further including a chaise storage cavity beneath the seat; a backrest attached to the frame; a chaise unit including a base and a chaise panel; a chaise extending assembly attached to the frame and to the chaise unit, the chaise extending assembly configured to move the chaise between a retracted position, in which the chaise unit is positioned in the chaise storage cavity, and an extended position, in which the chaise unit is positioned forwardly of the seat; and a chaise panel raising mechanism attached to the chaise unit base and to the chaise panel. The mechanism is configured to raise the chaise panel from a lowered position to a raised position, wherein in the raised position the chaise panel is located forwardly of the seat and is declined relative to the underlying surface. This configuration can enable a conventional seating unit to be converted into a chaise complete with a declined chaise panel.



Inventors:
Beaver, Terry Wayne (Asheboro, NC, US)
Murphy, Marcus L. (Lexington, NC, US)
Application Number:
11/400543
Publication Date:
11/01/2007
Filing Date:
04/07/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47C7/50
View Patent Images:
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20090152917APPARATUS, SYSTEM, AND METHOD FOR TUNEFUL ATTENUATIONJune, 2009Ostler et al.
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20060214478Folding chair with footrestSeptember, 2006Tsumura



Primary Examiner:
DUNN, DAVID R
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MYERS BIGEL, P.A. (PO BOX 37428, RALEIGH, NC, 27627, US)
Claims:
That which is claimed is:

1. A seating unit, comprising: a frame configured to rest on an underlying surface, the frame including a fixed seat, the frame further including a chaise storage cavity beneath the seat; a backrest attached to the frame; a chaise unit including a base and a chaise panel; a chaise extending assembly attached to the frame and to the chaise unit, the chaise extending assembly configured to move the chaise between a retracted position, in which the chaise unit is positioned in the chaise storage cavity, and an extended position, in which the chaise unit is positioned forwardly of the seat; and a chaise panel raising mechanism attached to the chaise unit base and to the chaise panel, the mechanism configured to raise the chaise panel from a lowered position to a raised position, wherein in the raised position the chaise panel is located forwardly of the seat and is declined relative to the underlying surface.

2. The seating unit defined in claim 1, wherein the backrest is attached to the frame via a reclining mechanism that moves the backrest between upright and reclined positions.

3. The seating unit defined in claim 1, wherein the seat is inclined relative to the underlying surface.

4. The seating unit defined in claim 1, wherein the chaise unit includes wheels, and wherein the chaise extending assembly is configured such that the chaise unit rolls when moving between the retracted and extended positions.

5. The seating unit defined in claim 4, wherein the chaise extending assembly includes rails fixed to the frame that engage the wheels from the chaise unit.

6. The seating unit defined in claim 1, wherein the chaise unit base includes a front wall, and wherein the chaise panel rests on an upper edge of the front wall when the chaise panel is in the raised position.

7. The seating unit defined in claim 1, wherein the chaise raising mechanism is configured such that, when the chaise panel is moving from the lowered to the raised position, initially a forward end of the chaise panel is positioned above a rear end of the chaise panel.

8. The seating unit defined in claim 7, wherein the chaise raising mechanism includes front and rear control links pivotally interconnected with the chaise base, and wherein the front control link first rotates in a first rotative direction, then in a second opposite rotative direction, then again in the first rotative direction as the chaise panel moves from the lowered to the raised position.

9. A seating unit, comprising: a frame configured to rest on an underlying surface, the frame including a fixed seat, the frame further including a chaise storage cavity beneath the seat; a backrest attached to the frame, the backrest being attached to the frame via a reclining mechanism that moves the backrest between upright and reclined positions; a chaise unit including a base and a chaise panel; a chaise extending assembly attached to the frame and to the chaise unit, the chaise extending assembly configured to move the chaise between a retracted position, in which the chaise unit is positioned in the chaise storage cavity, and an extended position, in which the chaise unit is positioned forwardly of the seat; and a chaise panel raising mechanism attached to the chaise unit base and to the chaise panel, the mechanism configured to raise the chaise panel from a lowered position to a raised position, wherein in the raised position the chaise panel is located forwardly of the seat.

10. The seating unit defined in claim 9, wherein the seat is inclined relative to the underlying surface.

11. The seating unit defined in claim 10, wherein, when the chaise panel is in the raised position, the chaise panel is declined relative to the underlying surface.

12. The seating unit defined in claim 9, wherein the chaise unit includes wheels, and wherein the chaise extending assembly is configured such that the chaise unit rolls when moving between the retracted and extended positions.

13. The seating unit defined in claim 12, wherein the chaise extending assembly includes rails fixed to the frame that engage the wheels from the chaise unit.

14. The seating unit defined in claim 9, wherein the chaise unit base includes a front wall, and wherein the chaise panel rests on an upper edge of the front wall when the chaise panel is in the raised position.

15. The seating unit defined in claim 9, wherein the chaise raising mechanism is configured such that, when the chaise panel is moving from the lowered to the raised position, initially a forward end of the chaise panel is positioned above a rear end of the chaise panel.

16. The seating unit defined in claim 15, wherein the chaise raising mechanism includes front and rear control links pivotally interconnected with the chaise base, and wherein the front control link first rotates in a first rotative direction, then in a second opposite rotative direction, then again in the first rotative direction as the chaise panel moves from the lowered to the raised position.

17. A seating unit, comprising: a frame configured to rest on an underlying surface, the frame including a fixed seat, the frame further including a chaise storage cavity beneath the seat; a backrest attached to the frame via a reclining mechanism that moves the backrest between upright and reclined positions; a chaise unit including a base and a chaise panel; a chaise extending assembly attached to the frame and to the chaise unit, the chaise extending assembly configured to move the chaise between a retracted position, in which the chaise unit is positioned in the chaise storage cavity, and an extended position, in which the chaise unit is positioned forwardly of the seat; and a chaise panel raising mechanism attached to the chaise unit base and to the chaise panel, the mechanism configured to raise the chaise panel from a lowered position to a raised position, wherein in the raised position the chaise panel is located forwardly of the seat and is declined relative to the underlying surface; wherein the chaise raising mechanism is configured such that, when the chaise panel is moving from the lowered to the raised position, initially a forward end of the chaise panel is positioned above a rear end of the chaise panel.

18. The seating unit defined in claim 17, wherein the seat is inclined relative to the underlying surface.

19. The seating unit defined in claim 17, wherein the chaise raising mechanism is configured such that, when the chaise panel is moving from the lowered to the raised position, initially a forward end of the chaise panel is positioned above a rear end of the chaise panel.

20. The seating unit defined in claim 19, wherein the chaise raising mechanism includes front and rear control links pivotally interconnected with the chaise base, and wherein the front control link first rotates in a first rotative direction, then in a second opposite rotative direction, then again in the first rotative direction as the chaise panel moves from the lowered to the raised position.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates generally to seating units, and more particularly to movable seating units.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Many homes have multiple seating units, such as chairs and sofas, residing and arranged in a living room or den. With the trend toward increased use of the living room or den as a recreational, entertainment and dining space, many consumers desire furniture pieces that provide function and/or flexibility beyond the conventional seating and support provided by conventional furniture. As an example of furniture having added flexibility, many manufacturers offer “sectional” sofas, which enable the user to place multiple sections of a sofa (typically lacking one or both arms) side-by-side to create multiple seating locations. The consumer may purchase different numbers of sections in order to create a desired sofa configuration, and the sections can be rearranged by the seller or the consumer to create more sofa configurations. Sectional sofas may have generally aligned seating locations or may include one or more corner sections that provide an L-shaped or U-shaped sofa.

One popular feature incorporated into many sectional sofas is a “chaise” section, which includes a backrest and an elongated seat. In many instances the seat has sufficient length that an occupant can sit with his back against the backrest and have his legs supported by the seat with the legs extended completely. Often a chaise will have one section nearest the backrest with some degree of “inclined” pitch (i.e., sloping upwardly from rear to front) to support the occupant's backside and thighs and a second section with “declined” pitch (i.e., sloping downwardly from rear to front) in the section of the seat farthest from the backrest to support the occupant's lower legs.

One potential shortcoming of a typical chaise is that the elongated seat occupies up space in the living area when the chaise is not in use. Another is that the backrest of a chaise, particularly when part of a sectional sofa, will typically conform in style and pitch to the remaining sections of the sofa, which are generally designed for comfortable conventional sitting rather than for the more leisurely reclining often done on a chaise. As such, it may be desirable to provide a seating unit that addresses these issues.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In view of the foregoing, as a first aspect embodiments of the present invention are directed to a seating unit, comprising: a frame configured to rest on an underlying surface, the frame including a fixed seat, the frame further including a chaise storage cavity beneath the seat; a backrest attached to the frame; a chaise unit including a base and a chaise panel; a chaise extending assembly attached to the frame and to the chaise unit, the chaise extending assembly configured to move the chaise between a retracted position, in which the chaise unit is positioned in the chaise storage cavity, and an extended position, in which the chaise unit is positioned forwardly of the seat; and a chaise panel raising mechanism attached to the chaise unit base and to the chaise panel. The mechanism is configured to raise the chaise panel from a lowered position to a raised position, wherein in the raised position the chaise panel is located forwardly of the seat and is declined relative to the underlying surface. This configuration can enable a conventional seating unit to be converted into a chaise complete with a declined chaise panel.

As a second aspect, embodiments of the present invention are directed to a seating unit, comprising: a frame configured to rest on an underlying surface, the frame including a fixed seat, the frame further including a chaise storage cavity beneath the seat; a backrest attached to the frame, the backrest being attached to the frame via a reclining mechanism that moves the backrest between upright and reclined positions; a chaise unit including a base and a chaise panel; a chaise extending assembly attached to the frame and to the chaise unit, the chaise extending assembly configured to move the chaise between a retracted position, in which the chaise unit is positioned in the chaise storage cavity, and an extended position, in which the chaise unit is positioned forwardly of the seat; and a chaise panel raising mechanism attached to the chaise unit base and to the chaise panel, the mechanism configured to raise the chaise panel from a lowered position to a raised position, wherein in the raised position the chaise panel is located forwardly of the seat. This configuration can convert a conventional seating unit into a reclining chaise.

As a third aspect, embodiments of the present invention are directed to a seating unit, comprising: a frame configured to rest on an underlying surface, the frame including a fixed seat, the frame further including a chaise storage cavity beneath the seat; a backrest attached to the frame via a reclining mechanism that moves the backrest between upright and reclined positions; a chaise unit including a base and a chaise panel; a chaise extending assembly attached to the frame and to the chaise unit, the chaise extending assembly configured to move the chaise between a retracted position, in which the chaise unit is positioned in the chaise storage cavity, and an extended position, in which the chaise unit is positioned forwardly of the seat; and a chaise panel raising mechanism attached to the chaise unit base and to the chaise panel, the mechanism configured to raise the chaise panel from a lowered position to a raised position, wherein in the raised position the chaise panel is located forwardly of the seat and is declined relative to the underlying surface. The chaise raising mechanism is configured such that, when the chaise panel is moving from the lowered to the raised position, initially a forward end of the chaise panel is positioned above a rear end of the chaise panel.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a seating unit of the present invention, with the backrest shown in the upright position and the chaise unit shown in the extended position.

FIG. 2 is a cutaway side view of the seating unit of FIG. 1, with the backrest shown in the upright position and the chaise unit shown in the retracted position.

FIG. 3 is a cutaway side view of the seating unit of FIG. 1 with the backrest in a reclined position and the chaise unit shown in the retracted position.

FIG. 4 is a cutaway side view of the seating unit of FIG. 1 with the backrest in the upright position and the chaise unit shown in the extended position, the chaise panel being in its lowered position.

FIG. 5 is a cutaway side view of the seating unit of FIG. 1 with the backrest in the upright position and the chaise unit shown in the extended position, the chaise panel being in its raised position.

FIG. 6 is a top view of the seating unit in FIG. 1 in the positions shown in FIG. 5.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF EMBODIMENTS OF THE INVENTION

The present invention will be described more particularly hereinafter with reference to the accompanying drawings. The invention is not intended to be limited to the illustrated embodiments; rather, these embodiments are intended to fully and completely disclose the invention to those skilled in this art. In the drawings, like numbers refer to like elements throughout. Thicknesses and dimensions of some components may be exaggerated for clarity. Well-known functions or constructions may not be described in detail for brevity and/or clarity.

Unless otherwise defined, all terms (including technical and scientific terms) used herein have the same meaning as commonly understood by one of ordinary skill in the art to which this invention belongs. It will be further understood that terms, such as those defined in commonly used dictionaries, should be interpreted as having a meaning that is consistent with their meaning in the context of the relevant art and will not be interpreted in an idealized or overly formal sense unless expressly so defined herein.

In addition, spatially relative terms, such as “under”, “below”, “lower”, “over”, “upper” and the like, may be used herein for ease of description to describe one element or feature's relationship to another element(s) or feature(s) as illustrated in the figures. It will be understood that the spatially relative terms are intended to encompass different orientations of the device in use or operation in addition to the orientation depicted in the figures. For example, if the device in the figures is inverted, elements described as “under” or “beneath” other elements or features would then be oriented “over” the other elements or features. Thus, the exemplary term “under” can encompass both an orientation of over and under. The device may be otherwise oriented (rotated 90 degrees or at other orientations) and the spatially relative descriptors used herein interpreted accordingly.

The terminology used herein is for the purpose of describing particular embodiments only and is not intended to be limiting of the invention. As used herein, the singular forms “a”, “an” and “the” are intended to include the plural forms as well, unless the context clearly indicates otherwise. It will be further understood that the terms “comprises” and/or “comprising,” when used in this specification, specify the presence of stated features, integers, steps, operations, elements, and/or components, but do not preclude the presence or addition of one or more other features, integers, steps, operations, elements, components, and/or groups thereof. As used herein the expression “and/or” includes any and all combinations of one or more of the associated listed items.

Where used, the terms “attached”, “connected”, “interconnected”, “contacting”, “coupled”, “mounted” and the like can mean either direct or indirect attachment or contact between elements, unless stated otherwise.

In addition, some components of the seating units described herein (particularly mechanisms thereof) are illustrated herein as a series of pivotally interconnected links or members. Those skilled in this art will appreciate that the pivots between links or other components can take a variety of configurations, such as pivot pins, rivets, bolt and nut combinations, and the like, any of which may be suitable for use with the present invention. Also, the shapes and configurations of the links themselves may vary, as will be understood by those skilled in this art. Further, some links may be omitted entirely in some embodiments, and additional links may be included in some embodiments.

Referring now to the drawings, a chair, designated broadly at 10, is illustrated in FIG. 1. The chair 10 includes a frame 12 (best seen in FIGS. 2-6), a seat 22, a backrest 24, and a chaise unit 50. These components identified above are described in greater detail below. For the sake of clarity, the chair 10 will be described initially with respect to FIG. 2, in which the backrest 24 is in its upright position and the chaise unit 50 is in its retracted position; Description of the chair 10 in its other positions will then follow. As used herein to describe the relative positions of components, the terms “lateral”, “outward” and derivatives thereof indicate the directions defined by a vector beginning at a vertical plane P (shown in FIG. 6) that bisects the chair 10 normal to the seat 22 and the backrest 24 and extending normal thereto. Conversely, the terms “inward”, “inboard” and derivatives thereof indicate the direction opposite the “outward” direction. Together, the “inward” and “outward” directions comprise the “transverse” axis of the chair 10. The “rear” of the chair 10 is located at the tip of the backrest 24, and the “front” of the chair 10 is located at the end of the seat 22 farthest from the backrest 24. The “front” and “rear” directions comprise the “longitudinal” axis of the chair 10.

Referring now to FIG. 2, the frame 12 includes side walls 14 (only one of which is shown in FIG. 2), a rear panel 18 that spans the rear ends of the side walls 14, and a seat panel 16 that extends between the inboard edges of the side walls 14. In the illustrated embodiment, the seat panel 16 is inclined from front to back; the incline angle α is typically between about 0 and 10 degrees relative to the floor or other underlying surface. Arms 20 are attached to the outer surfaces of the side panels 14. A seat ledge 23 spans the side walls 14 in front of the seat panel 22. Thus, the side walls 14, the rear panel 18, the seat panel 16 and the seat ledge 23 define a chaise cavity 26 with a front opening 27 within which the chaise unit 50 is stored.

Those skilled in this art will appreciate that the frame 12 can take many forms and be suitable for use with the present invention. For example, the arms 20 may be omitted. Alternatively, the seat ledge 23 may be omitted or simply be an extension of the seat panel 22. Other alternatives will be recognized by those skilled in this art.

Referring again to FIG. 2 and to FIG. 6, a reclining mechanism 30 interconnects the frame 12 and the backrest 24. The reclining mechanism 30 includes two mounting brackets 32 that are fixed to the inner surfaces of the side wall 14, two pivot links 34, and a gas cylinder 36. Each pivot link 34 is pivotally attached to the forward end of one of the mounting brackets 32 at a pivot 38 and extends upwardly and rearwardly therefrom to a fixed mounting location to a backrest panel 28 of the backrest 24. A bridging member 35a extends between the upper ends of the pivot links 34, and a second bridging member 35b extends between the rear ends of the mounting brackets 32. The gas cylinder 36, which includes a retractable rod 37, is pivotally interconnected with the bridging member 35b at a pivot 40 located at a flange 35c. The rod 37, which is in an extended condition in FIG. 2, is pivotally attached with the bridging member 35a at a pivot 42 located on a flange 35d. In this embodiment, the gas cylinder 36 is a locking-type of gas cylinder that enables the rod 37 to ceases movement in any position as it retracts; an exemplary locking gas cylinder is the BLOC-O-LIFT Model No. 732125, available from Stabilus GmbH, Charlotte, N.C.

To move the chair 10 from the upright position of FIGS. 1 and 2 to the reclined position of FIG. 3, an occupant of the chair 10 applies a rearwardly-directed force onto the backrest 24 (typically this force is generated by the occupant pressing forward on the arms 20 to press his back into the backrest 24). This force causes the backrest 24, and in turn the pivot link 34, to rotate about the pivot 38. Rotation is resisted by the gas cylinder 36, which resists retraction of the rod 37 within the cylinder 36. Although the occupant can cease movement of the backrest 24 in any desired position, movement ceases entirely when the retraction of the rod 37 into the cylinder 36 is complete (FIG. 3). In this position, the backrest 24 is typically inclined relative to the floor at an angle of between about 25 and 40 degrees.

Those skilled in this art will appreciate that other configurations for reclining mechanism may also be employed. For example, a reclining mechanism such as that disclosed in co-assigned U.S. patent application Ser. No. 11/156,187 that controls the reclining movement of the backrest and the seat may also be used. In addition, a reclining mechanism that does not allow the user to cease reclining movement in any selected position may also be used. Moreover, some seating units may omit the reclining mechanism entirely. Other variations will also be recognized by those skilled in this art.

Continuing to refer to FIG. 2, the chaise unit 50 includes a base 51 having a transversely-extending front wall 52, side members 54 that extend rearwardly from the front wall 52, and a rear member 56 that spans the rear ends of the side members 54. In the retracted position illustrated in FIG. 2, the front wall 52 is beneath the front edge of the seat ledge 23 and serves as the front panel of the chair 10.

Referring once again to FIG. 2, a chaise extender assembly 61 includes front wheels 58 are attached to the inner surfaces of the side members 54 via brackets 59, and rear wheels 60 are attached to the outer surfaces of the side members 54 via brackets 63. The front wheels 58 are positioned to rest and roll on the floor; however, the rear wheels 60 are positioned slightly higher to be received in respective rails 62 mounted on the inner surfaces of the side walls 14 of the frame 12. A roller 64 is mounted on each side wall 14 just forwardly of a corresponding rail 62 and is positioned to bear against the outer surface of the adjacent side member 54 of the chaise base 51. Also, a retaining pin 65 is mounted to the side wall 14 at the front end of the rail 65 and extends inwardly therefrom.

The chaise unit 50 can be moved from the retracted position of FIG. 2 to the extended position of FIG. 4 by applying a forwardly-directed force to the front wall 52 of the chaise unit 50. Such a force will cause the base 51 to roll forwardly on the front wheels 58 (which roll on the floor) and the rear wheels 60 (which roll on the rails 62). This motion is augmented by the action of the rollers 64 on the outer surfaces of the side members 54. Forward movement ceases when the rear wheels 60 strike retaining pins 65.

Those skilled in this art will recognize that the chaise extending assembly may take other forms. For example, the rear wheels may rest on the ground rather than on the rails 62. The wheels may be replaced with sliding surfaces, or the assembly may comprise a pivoting or telescoping mechanism of some variety. Other variations may be apparent to those skilled in this art and need not be described in detail herein.

Referring once more to FIG. 2 and to FIG. 6, a chaise panel 66 is interconnected with the base 51 via a pair of mirror image chaise panel mechanisms 70, only one of which will be described herein. The chaise panel mechanism 70 includes a horizontally disposed mounting member 72 that is mounted to the inner surface of the side member 54. A rear control link 74 is pivotally interconnected with the mounting member 72 at a pivot 75 and extends downwardly and slightly forwardly therefrom. A front control link 76 is also pivotally interconnected with the mounting member 72 at a pivot 77 (located in front of the pivot 75) and extends downwardly and rearwardly therefrom. A rear swing link 78 is attached at one end to the front control link 76 at a pivot 79. The rear swing link 78 extends downwardly and rearwardly to attach to the rear control link 74 at a pivot 81, then upwardly and rearwardly to attach at a pivot 85 to a chaise support 82 (which supports the chaise panel 66 from underneath). A horizontally disposed front swing link 80 is pivotally attached to the front end of the mounting member 72 at a pivot 83, and extends rearwardly to attach via a pivot 84 to the chaise support 82. The chaise panel 66 is fixed to the upper portion of the chaise support 82 and, in its lowered position in FIG. 2, is substantially horizontally disposed.

Once the chaise unit 50 is in the extended position, the chaise panel 66 can be elevated from the lowered position shown in FIGS. 2, 3 and 4 to the raised position shown in FIGS. 5 and 6. This movement is initiated by the occupant lifting the front end of the chaise panel 66. This action causes the front swing link 80 to rotate counterclockwise (from the vantage point of FIG. 4) about the pivot 83. This action draws the chaise support 82 forwardly and raises its forward end, such that the chaise panel 66 is inclined from rear to front. Also, as the chaise panel 66 rises, the rear swing link 78 moves forwardly and drives the front and rear control links 76, 74 clockwise about the pivots 77, 75 respectively. Once the pivots 77, 81 and 75 reach an “on-center” condition, continued ascension of the chaise panel 66 causes the front control link 76 to reverse its rotative direction and begin to rotate counterclockwise about the pivot 77. As the chaise panel 66 continues to rise, continued clockwise rotation of the rear control link 74 permits the rear end of the chaise support 82, and in turn the chaise panel 66, to move upwardly. Eventually, the front edge of the chaise panel 66 rises to a point above the upper edge of the front wall 52 of the chaise unit 50 prior moving directly over the front wall 52. When the front control link 76 and the rear control link 74 have rotated sufficiently that the pivots 77, 79 and 81 are in an over-center condition, the front control link 77 continues its counterclockwise rotation, which action lowers the front end of the chaise panel 66 toward the upper edge of the front wall 52 of the chaise unit 50. Action ceases when the lower surface of the chaise panel 66 contacts and rests against the upper edge of the front wall 52 of the chaise unit 50.

In the raised position, the chaise panel 66 is declined with respect to the floor. Typically, the angle of decline β is between about 0 and 15 degrees, although in some embodiments the chaise panel 66 may not be declined in the raised position. Particularly when combined with an inclined seat, the chaise panel 66 can provide a comfortable support surface for an occupant of the chair 10.

Those skilled in this art will appreciate that the chaise raising mechanism may take different forms. The links may be shaped differently and the pivot locations moved. More or fewer links may be included. Other mechanisms that cause the chaise panel to rise, including pneumatic or electrically powered devices, may also be employed with the present invention.

Those skilled in this art will appreciate that, although a chair is shown herein, seating units of the present invention may include sofas, love seats, sectional sofas and the like.

The foregoing is illustrative of the present invention and is not to be construed as limiting thereof. Although exemplary embodiments of this invention have been described, those skilled in the art will readily appreciate that many modifications are possible in the exemplary embodiments without materially departing from the novel teachings and advantages of this invention. Accordingly, all such modifications are intended to be included within the scope of this invention as defined in the claims. The invention is defined by the following claims, with equivalents of the claims to be included therein.





 
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