Title:
Maximum concealment holster and shorts combination
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The invention is a concealed carry holster for handguns. The holster comprises a pair of shorts comprising a lightweight material such as spandex and having a waist opening and two leg openings. The shorts comprise a waistband around the waist opening. A drawstring may be provided in the waistband for providing additional support in securing the holster and firearm to the body of the wearer. Non-slip material may be provided around each leg opening. This non-slip material may include elastic material. A holster piece attaches to the exterior of the shorts in the crotch region. In one embodiment, the holster piece is formed in the shape of an uppercase “A.” In this embodiment, a lower region of the holster piece is sewn into the shorts using industrial strength stitching. A fastening means such as Velcro®, secures the upper region of the holster piece to the shorts. The holster piece is arranged such that a user can pass his hand down his pants or exterior shorts to easily retrieve a handgun stowed within the holster.



Inventors:
Pellerin, Timothy (Norfolk, VA, US)
Application Number:
11/412168
Publication Date:
11/01/2007
Filing Date:
04/26/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
224/587
International Classes:
A41D13/00; A45C1/04
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20080222774Surgical gloveSeptember, 2008Di Lorenzo et al.
20070136921Attachment for an item of protective sports gearJune, 2007Tiegs
20080216210Flexible cap band with logoSeptember, 2008Tai
20030204892Swimwear and method of manufactureNovember, 2003Vafi
20090271904Headband device and method of using the sameNovember, 2009Bentley
20090229038Cushioning pressure-relieving device for headbandsSeptember, 2009Zachares et al.
20020166156Hand manipulation and comfort for rubber gloves by incorporating bellowsNovember, 2002Clark et al.
20090172862Multi-purpose hospital gownJuly, 2009Sheward et al.
20040078872Dress sock providing health and appearanceApril, 2004Lancellotti
20070061950LipowearMarch, 2007Delonas
20080222775Hair drying capSeptember, 2008Dacruz



Primary Examiner:
HALE, GLORIA M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Bradley D. Goldizen (HC 80 BOX 261, Maysville, WV, 26833, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A conceal carry holster comprising: an undergarment comprising shorts that include a crotch region, a waist opening and two leg openings, the waist opening comprising a means of fastening the shorts around a waist of a wearer; and, a holster panel having upper and lower regions attached to said shorts in the front crotch region to create a pocket for accepting a handgun, such that the upper region detachably engages the shorts to allow for a handgun to be deposited in and withdrawn from said pocket while still providing support for the handgun when the upper region of the holster panel engages the shorts, said lower region being attached to the crotch region of the shorts via stitching.

2. The conceal carry holster of claim 1 further comprising a fastening means that secures the upper region of the holster panel to a crotch region of the shorts comprising a hook and loop material.

3. The conceal carry holster of claim 1 wherein the means of fastening the shorts around a waist of a wearer include an elastic band of material that contracts to secure the waist opening about the waist of the wearer.

4. The conceal carry holster of claim 1 wherein the means of fastening the shorts around a waist of a wearer includes a draw-string that passes about the waist opening.

5. The conceal carry holster of claim 1 wherein the pocket includes two openings near the lower region of the holster panel and arranged to open towards the leg openings of the shorts, such that the shorts may serve either a left-hand withdrawal or a right-hand withdrawal of the handgun.

6. The conceal carry holster of claim 1 wherein said holster panel comprises a strip of material that is formed in the exterior shape of an uppercase “A.”

7. The conceal carry holster of claim 6 includes the holster piece comprising an upper region and a lower region, said upper region having fastening material running along an exterior edge thereof and including a top and two oblique sides that extend into the lower region, said lower region including stitching along each of the oblique sides and including a separate stitching that forms support for a trigger guard on a firearm disposed within the holster, said separate stitching running in a line and formed in a same shape as the fastening material

8. A conceal carry holster for a handgun comprising: a holster piece comprising an upper region and a lower region, said upper region having fastening material running along an exterior edge thereof and including a top and two oblique sides that extend into the lower region, said lower region including stitching along each of the oblique sides and including a separate stitching that forms support for a trigger guard on a firearm disposed within the holster, said separate stitching running in a line and formed in a same shape as the fastening material; and, an undergarment comprising shorts that include a crotch region, a waist opening and two leg openings, the waist opening comprising a means of fastening the shorts around the waist of the wearer and having complementary fastening material formed in the same shape as the fastening material of the upper region to mate therewith to secure the firearm disposed within the holster wherein the stitching along each oblique side and the separate stitching that forms support for the trigger guard on the firearm disposed within the holster fastens the holster piece to the undergarment.

9. The conceal carry holster of claim 8 further comprising a fastening means that secures the upper region of the holster piece to a crotch region of the shorts and comprises a hook and loop material.

10. The conceal carry holster of claim 8 wherein the means of fastening the shorts around a waist of a wearer include an elastic band of material that contracts to secure the waist opening about the waist of the wearer.

11. The conceal carry holster of claim 8 wherein the means of fastening the shorts around a waist of a wearer includes a draw-string that passes about the waist opening.

12. The conceal carry holster of claim 8 wherein the pocket includes two openings near the lower region of the holster panel and arranged to open towards the leg openings of the shorts, such that the shorts may serve either a left-hand withdrawal or a right-hand withdrawal of the handgun.

13. The conceal carry holster of claim 8 wherein said holster panel comprises a strip of material that is formed in the shape of an uppercase “A.”

14. A conceal carry holster for a handgun comprising: a holster piece comprising an upper opening and a lower opening, said upper opening is parallel to the lower opening and having a top, bottom, and two sides, each side comprising double stitching; and, an undergarment comprising shorts that include a crotch region, a waist opening and two leg openings, the waist opening comprising a means of fastening the shorts around the waist of the wearer and having complementary fastening material formed in the same shape as the fastening material of the upper region to mate therewith to secure the firearm disposed within the holster.

15. The conceal holster of claim 14 wherein stitching on one of the two sides includes stitching shaped in a profile of a handgun, said profile extending from a butt of the handgun and includes at least the shape of a trigger guard and barrel.

Description:

There are no related patent applications.

This application did not receive federal research and development funding.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Generally, the present invention relates to shorts that are outfitted with a secure concealment pocket fit to hold a small caliber handgun. More specifically, the pocket is positioned in the front crotch area and is easily accessed by a slight pulling on the waistband from either the right or left hand side.

While the right to bear arms is granted to private citizens, the invention is particularly ideal for individuals involved in law enforcement, the Federal Bureau of Investigations, Drug Enforcement Agency, Alcohol, Tobacco and Firearms, as well as military employees. Individuals in such fields are particularly vulnerable to attack, thus the ability to conceal a weapon in an unexpected place could potentially save lives.

Members of our law enforcement forces are constantly in perilous positions. Thus, their ability to effectively defend themselves is of great importance. In today's world, the ability to defend one often directly correlates with the use of a gun. In fact, many law enforcement workers carry both a primary weapon, and one or more back up weapons.

Additionally, the Second Amendment's “Right to Bear Arms” Clause grants the people the right to keep and bear arms. Coinciding with this grant are the concealed-carry weapons laws prevalent in many states. Many citizens have relied on these laws to ensure that they are equipped to defend themselves should it become necessary.

To feed this ever-growing demand, an array of products have been introduced. These products intend to equip both law enforcement and the private citizen. The majority of the prior art utilizes a holster to meet its objective. U.S. Pat. Nos. 5,265,781 and 3,227,336 disclose handgun holsters that are worn inside the lower garment, but depend on support from the user's belt or waistband. These patents are ineffective for law enforcement forces and for any user who makes substantial movements. The holster is not secured to anything structurally sound and thus does not stay in place. Additionally, U.S. Pat. No. 3,168,972 shows a swivel joint between the belt loop and holster that allows the user to put their gun in the holster and have it hang from their pants. However, this holster is on a movable joint and thus is not securely held in an angular position and so it moves around during strenuous activity by the wearer. Therefore, the waist or belt mountable holsters may be suitable for a private user who does not plan to move around too much, but are useless to law enforcement and active citizens.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,260,089 introduces a shoulder holster. This classic holster is a traditional place for law enforcement to carry a back up or primary weapon. However, because this fact is so widely known, it puts these individuals at a disadvantage. Criminals know that it is common practice to utilize a shoulder holster thus any move toward grabbing the gun is a sign to them. Also, they may also assume a gun is there and try to take it from the individual. Moreover, shoulder holsters offer little concealment because the user must wear a large shirt or jacket to cover the gun. In periods of hot weather, the private citizen is unable to effectively use a shoulder holster. Finally, it has also been documented that it is difficult for people of larger girth to draw from a shoulder holster which leads to ineffective use of the holster.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,176,402 discloses an ankle holster system. The ankle holster system is also a classic back up weapon system. However, it presents certain disadvantages because of the difficulty encountered in drawing the weapon. When law enforcement or private citizens are defending themselves or others, it is cumbersome to reach to one's ankle and quickly retrieve a weapon from an ankle holster.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,170,919 discloses a pouch with a concealed interior that is worn like a fanny pack. This pouch is unsuitable for use by an entire class of individuals. Citizens who are in suits or dresses are unable to utilize the pouch. More importantly, the user has no control over the weapon. Criminals can either tear the pouch from the user or the pouch may inadvertently be left behind. Also, fanny packs are useless to law enforcement personnel in carrying weapons because they are not concealed from public view.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,909,834 discloses a vest replete with a carrying pocket for a gun. This invention also has problems related to control over the gun. As with the fanny pack, the vest could be taken off and left, or simply stolen. Additionally, because the user could not take the vest off, it presents a comfort and ease of use problem. Similarly U.S. Pat. No. 5,671,830 discloses a briefcase with hidden compartments. This patent also shares the same control and discomfort issues. However, it also presents a new problem because of the slow access it affords the user. If attacked, the user must somehow open and access the gun quickly. This response is highly complicated and thus the briefcase is not likely to be helpful in a crisis. More importantly, it is completely ineffective for law enforcement officers because they cannot carry around briefcases during their ordinary police activities.

Finally U.S. Pat. No. 5,551,711 relays a concealed weapon holder for the car. While this invention serves a certain audience, it is also ineffective for anyone planning on defending himself or herself outside of the car.

Reviewing the holsters reveals that it is clear that there has yet to be an invention that serves the needs of law enforcement personnel or the active private citizen.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The invention is a concealed carry holster for handguns. The holster comprises a pair of shorts comprising a lightweight material such as spandex and having a waist opening and two leg openings. The shorts comprise a waistband around the waist opening. A drawstring may be provided in the waistband for providing additional support in securing the holster and firearm to the body of the wearer. Non-slip material may be provided around each leg opening for further aiding in the carrying of a concealed handgun. This non-slip material may include elastic material.

A holster piece attaches to the exterior of the shorts in the frontal crotch region. In the preferred embodiment, the holster piece is typically formed in the shape of an uppercase “A.” A lower region of the holster piece is sewn into the shorts using industrial strength stitching. A fastening means such as Velcro®, secures the upper region of the holster piece to the shorts.

In a further embodiment, the holster piece is individualized for either left-handed or right-handed weapon retrieval. In this embodiment, the holster includes a top edge that is longer than the bottom edge and a first edge of the holster that is nearest the trigger forms right angles to the top and bottom edges. A second edge of the holster, most further from the trigger, forms an angle with the bottom that is greater than ninety degrees and an angle with the top that is less than ninety degrees. Stitching near the first edge is generally in the shape of an outline of the trigger guard and barrel or lower receiver of the weapon. This stitching helps secure the weapon in place.

The holster piece is arranged such that a user can pass his hand down his pants or exterior shorts to easily retrieve a handgun stowed within the holster.

The invention at hand features important improvements in comfort, control, accessibility, and in the element of surprise. It is also novel because it presents a new and secure alternative for weapon concealment that does not involve the use of a traditional holster. The invention comprises shorts made of nylon and/or spandex with a sturdy waistband. To offer additional safety, non-slip bases are placed around each leg opening of the shorts. A six-inch by six-inch pocket is double-stitched on the top and bottom into the front crotch area with either nylon or plastic. Approximately, five inches of industrial strength Velcro® is sewn along the side seams for form a secure pocket that allows access to the inner contents. Notably, one inch of the side seam may be left open to allow the user to quickly insert their finger and pull apart the Velcro®.

Alternatively, the invention may be manufactured without the frontal flap and the industrial strength Velcro® along the side seams. In this embodiment of the invention, the holster is comprised of a pocket double-stitched onto the front crotch of the shorts in which the upper portion of the holster remains open, allowing the holster to fit more closely against the body and for easier access to the gun. The holster may be manufactured so that the wearer may choose an embodiment that is designed for a singularly left or right sided draw of the gun from the shorts. The dimensions and features of this pocket are specifically designed to hold small caliber, ‘back up’ weapons (preferably a .380 caliber handgun). Larger caliber weapons are harder to conceal, and much heavier, thus they are rarely used as a ‘back up’ weapon.

The present invention makes great advancements toward providing a more comfortable weapon concealment system. For one, the shorts can be worn under any type of clothing. Most of the prior art presented cumbersome restrictions requiring the user to wear a jacket, long pants, or some other limitation. Also, most holsters are built to fit a man's frame, and thus are uncomfortable on a female's smaller frame. The present invention eliminates this problem because the spandex shorts easily conform to every individual's unique frame. Finally, the holsters that comprise the prior art tend to move around and thus cause discomfort. The present invention also alleviates this problem because the taut spandex conforms to the user's body and therefore holds the weapon securely. Therefore, the user may comfortably conceal their weapon, even during the most strenuous activity. Complete freedom of body movement is particularly ideal for law enforcement personnel because their job is so physically demanding.

Control over one's weapon is also a vital element of a weapon concealment system. A great deal of the prior art, such as briefcases and fanny packs, is disappointing because it can easily be taken off and left, or ripped from one's body. The present invention ensures that the user will have complete control over their weapon at all times. In the present invention, the weapon is concealed safely within another garment, thus the user cannot inadvertently displace the weapon or have it stolen from their person.

The user's ability to access their weapon is another important characteristic needed in a weapon concealment system. In the past, some of the prior art, most notably the ankle holsters, have ignored this requirement. For the user to make effective use out of their concealed weapon they must be able to retrieve it. The current invention serves this need because it is easily and quickly accessible to the user. The user need only pull on the waistband to grab and pull out their weapon.

Finally, in any attack the element of surprise often determines the victor. As the prior art shows, hiding a weapon along the lower portion of one's abdomen is not a common trend. Therefore, the present invention offers law enforcement and the private citizen the ability to regain the element of surprise against an attacker. Usually back up weapons are carried on ankles, or in shoulder holsters. This fact has become such common knowledge that the attacker often reacts once the individual reaches toward those areas. Or even worse, the attacker takes the weapon from its hiding place before the user has an opportunity to. Consequently, storing a back up weapon in an unexpected place has the potential to save the user's life.

The present invention offers several embodiments intended to offer the greatest utility and comfort to every user. First, the pocket can be altered into different sizes to fit a user's individual gun. Also, the pocket may singularly accessible from either the right or left-handed side. This allows the user to decide whether they are more comfortable drawing with their weak or strong side and then to get the corresponding access pocket. Also, the instant invention can be made with one triangularly shaped, ambidextrous pocket that allows extraction from either side.

The present invention improves the comfort, mobility, ease of access, and ability of surprise of and is therefore superior to other weapon concealment systems. A concealment system must do many things. For one, it must provide a secure harness where the gun can be stored. Additionally, a concealment system must allow the user to remain combat ready, while at the same time allowing them to be comfortable. Also important, the concealment system must adequately conceal the weapon. The instant invention meets all of these objectives because the front pocket provides a safe place where the gun will not move, even during strenuous activity. This invention also allows the user easy access to the gun, thus enabling them to be ready for combat at any time. Yet, because the short are spandex, they also afford the user a comfortable wear and support. Finally, the shorts easily conceal the weapon when worn under other garments. Therefore, the instant invention provides multiple ease of use improvements for the user while also upholding the objective of a concealed weapon.

These and other objects and advantages of the invention will be set forth, appear in part or become apparent after considering the specification and accompanying drawings. It is to be realized that the following embodiments of the invention have been represented in their simplest form for ease in understanding the invention. The above explanations are provided to illustrate the utility of the invention. And, by no means necessary were these explanations intended to limit the application of this invention to other purposes.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective side view of the holster of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is an elevation view of the holster from the front and showing the holster in use and securing a handgun therein.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the holster from the front and showing the holster piece folded downward to expose the handgrip of the pistol stored therein.

FIG. 4 is an elevation view of the inside surface of the holster piece separated from the shorts portion of the holster.

FIG. 5 is a plan view of the holster from above and showing a handgun secured within the holster.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view of another embodiment of the holster which is designed for a left-handed draw.

FIG. 7 is an overhead view of the embodiment of the holster of FIG. 6 and showing the holster separate from the shorts.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIGS. 1-3 are various perspective views of a first embodiment of the holster 50 and showing it holding a pistol. In FIG. 1, the flap 4 of the holster piece 3 is fastened to an upper region of the shorts 1 near a waist band 5. The flap 4 includes a region of fastening material denoted as 8. The fastening material 8 includes a first strip of fastening material 8A, as shown in FIG. 4. A strip of complementary fastening material 8B is fastened to the front of the shorts and in contact with the fastening material 8A. The shapes of the fastening material 8A and 8B are identical. Preferably, the lower stitching 33 formed between each of the openings 6 is identical in shape to the fastening materials 8. This lower stitching 33 includes a plurality of top stitches 33B that connect with two other plurality of stitches 33A, 33C formed at obtuse angles to the top stitches 33B. The fastening material may be hook and loop material sold under the brand name of Velcro®.

The grip region of the handgun 2 extends from one of the two oblique sidewalls of the holster piece 3 and between fastening materials 8A, 8B. The holster 50 is designed for ambidextrous use and includes a pair of lower openings 6 with each opening towards a thigh region of the shorts 1. These openings 6 accommodate the barrel or a firearm. By providing an opening near the bottom of the holster on both legs of the shorts, the holster advantageously is an ambidextrous holster for facing the butt of the gun grip towards either the left or right.

The shorts 1 include a waist opening 5 that comprises elastic for securing the shorts onto a waist of the wearer. The shorts further include a pair of short legs that are each longer than the holster piece each includes an opening 7 that preferably comprises elastic material. The holster strip 3 resembles a capital “A” and includes a top edge 36. Sides 37, 38 extend from each end of the top edge 36 to define a first side of an opening 6 in a lower region 45. The sides 37, 38 intersect top edge 36 at oblique angles to be oblique sides. An upper region 9 of each oblique side includes Velcro®. This upper region 9 of the holster piece 3, along with the top edge 36, defines the flap 4 that may be folded down to provide easy access to the grip of the handgun 2. A bottom edge 44 of the holster piece 3 includes a second pair of oblique edges 44A, 44C, shown in FIG. 4. The oblique edges 44A, 44C are parallel to the sides 37, 38. The oblique edges 44A, 44C help defines the second side of the openings 6. The oblique edges 44A, 44C connect to an upper edge 44B of the bottom edge that is parallel to the top edge 36 of the holster piece. Preferably, the stitches in stitching 31-33 comprise industrial strength stitching.

The holster 50 generally comprises an upper region 40 and a lower region 45, as shown in FIG. 3. The upper region 40 includes fastening material 8 running along an exterior edge 9 and including a 36 and two oblique sides 37, 38 that extend into the lower region 45. The lower region 45 includes stitching 31, 32 along respective oblique sides and includes a separate stitching 33 that forms support for a trigger guard on a firearm disposed within the holster 50.

FIGS. 6 and 7 are views of another embodiment of the holster designed to be singularly accessible from left-hand side. It is apparent that the stitching on the holster piece may be reversed to create a holster 90 that may be accessible from the right-hand side. The holster 90 is double-stitched to the shorts 1 and is comprised of seams 11, 12 that create a holster shape to secure the gun inside the holster 90. The holster 90 provides an upper opening 10, through which the gun 2 may be inserted. The upper opening 10 is parallel to the waistband 5. The holster 90 also provides a lower opening 13 through which the barrel of the gun 2 may be threaded. The lower opening is parallel to the waist band 5 and upper opening 10. Preferably, the side seams 11, 12, 15-17 of the holster 90 comprise industrial strength stitching. Seams 11 are double stitched, as shown. Stitching 16 is generally in the shape of a trigger guard of weapon 2 and connects at opposite ends to stitching 17, 15 which are parallel to one another. It should be noted that most handguns include trigger guards in accord with that shown in FIG. 6. This profile begins from the butt of the handgun and extends along the trigger guard and to the barrel as represented by stitching 16. As more clearly shown in FIG. 7, the holster piece includes a back piece 75. The holster piece 90 comprises top 81 which has a longer length than bottom 82. Side 84 attaches between top 81 and bottom 82 and intersects each preferably at ninety degree angles. Side 83 preferably intersects bottom 82 at an obtuse angle and top 81 at an acute angle.

While the invention has been described with respect to preferred embodiments, it is apparent to those skilled in the art that changes, modifications and additions may be made to the herein described embodiments without departing from the scope of the invention. Accordingly, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description or shown in the accompanying drawings shall be interpreted as illustrative and not in a limiting sense or use.