Title:
Game apparatus with pegs and die
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A game played with pegs and a six-sided die that accommodates two to six players and is suitable for all ages. A playing board with die indicia and peg receptacles is incorporated into the lid of the game box which serves as storage for the pegs, die, and an instruction sheet. Each player starts with six pegs, and after establishing the order of play, they take turns rolling the die and inserting pegs into the holes corresponding to the number on the die. A player takes a peg from the board if a hole is already occupied. Rolling six repeatedly is the fastest way to get rid of pegs since the number six position is always empty. The first player to get rid of all of their pegs becomes the winner.



Inventors:
Krejcik, Kirsten (Agua Dulce, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/399838
Publication Date:
10/11/2007
Filing Date:
04/07/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
273/281
International Classes:
A63F3/06; A63F3/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MENDIRATTA, VISHU K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Edwin, Tarver (16830 Ventura Blvd., SUITE 360, Encino, CA, 91436, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A game apparatus comprising: a plurality of pegs, a die cube, a box-like member with a hollow base and a removable lid to cover the hollow base, and six holes disposed on the top surface of the removable lid, the holes being dimensioned to receive the pegs individually, and one of the six holes is hollow and descends entirely through the removable lid thereby allowing the pegs to completely pass through it and fall into the hollow base while the other five holes are adapted to partially receive and hold the pegs, each face of the die cube including a different number or a symbol is assigned to each one of the holes, wherein the plurality of pegs and the die cube are stored in the hollow base and covered by the removable lid when the game apparatus is not in use.

2. The game apparatus of claim 1, wherein the numbers or symbols assigned to each one of the holes are imprinted beside their respective holes.

3. A game apparatus comprising: a plurality of pegs, a plurality of numbered die cubes, a box-like member with a hollow base and a removable lid to cover the hollow base, and a plurality of holes disposed on top surface of the removable lid, the number of the plurality of holes being same as the number of sum combinations obtained by using the plurality of numbered die cubes, the holes being dimensioned to receive the pegs individually and one (at least one) of the plurality of holes is hollow and descends entirely through the removable lid thereby allowing the pegs to completely pass through it and fall into the hollow base while the other holes are adapted to partially receive and hold the pegs, each hole assigned to one of the sum combinations obtained by using the plurality of die cubes, wherein the plurality of pegs and the die cube are stored in the hollow base and covered by the removable lid when the game apparatus is not in use.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This is a utility patent application which claims benefit of U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/669,266 filed on Apr. 6, 2005.

FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH

Not Applicable

SEQUENCE LISTING OR PROGRAM

Not Applicable

FIELD OF INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to games and more particularly to a game with pegs and a die. The game board is incorporated into a cube that serves as a container when the game is not in use. The game itself is simple and suitable for players of any age over five.

BACKGROUND

Several games with pegs and dice are known in the art:

U.S. Pat. No. 6,523,827 to Watson discloses a board game with pegs and dice for providing a game of strategy. It includes a game board having a top side and also having a plurality of game-piece movement sections arranged in rows. This device differs from the present invention in the overall structure of the game board, pieces and rules, and is overall much harder to play and more cumbersome than the present invention.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,050,888 to Schultz, et al. discloses a board game with a plurality of tracks formed on the playing board, each defined by a series of blind bores. Each of the tracks are arranged coextensively and coaxially relative to one another in a contiguous relationship. This device is much more complicated than the present invention, and overall, much more difficult to learn and play.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,927,155 to Bellinger discloses a combat strategy game played on a board with pieces that move to goal spaces. U.S. Pat. No. 4,844,473 to Landsberg discloses a board game of strategy in which a plurality of unique game pieces are moved about a uniform array of discrete positions on a board.

U.S. Pat. No. 4,813,678 to Collazo, et al. discloses a game with squares and pegs for receiving specially designed chips of different colors. U.S. Pat. No. 4,522,408 to McKee discloses, a board game with playing fields arranged in rows and columns, each playing field having a hole adapted to receive four types of playing pieces, or pegs. Finally, U.S. Pat. No. 3,891,219 to Foerst discloses a game apparatus with pins that move between two playing boards.

Although these devices commonly use pins and occasionally a die or dice to generate random play values, they are universally more complicated than the present invention. The present invention also improves over the foregoing by providing a novel game apparatus that is convenient for both play and storage, contains a minimum of pieces, and is simple in design. The present invention also provides a game that is easy to learn and play, can be enjoyed by multiple age groups, and can be played for any length of time.

Therefore, the game with pegs and die of the present invention substantially departs from the traditional concepts and designs known in the art, and in doing so provides a game and game apparatus which is easy to set-up, relatively simple to play and master, and easy to put away.

SUMMARY

The present invention relates generally to games and more particularly to a game with pegs. An ordinary six-sided die and a playing board are incorporated into the lid of the game box. The game accommodates two to six players and is suitable for all ages over five. The pegs, die, and an instruction sheet can be stored in the game apparatus to prevent them from getting lost. The rules of the game are simple to learn, and the fact that the box doubles as a playing surface makes the game easy to set up, play, put away and store. It is also a fun and convenient game to play while traveling.

The playing board, incorporated into the box lid, consists of two rows of three cylindrical peg holes. Each peg hole is accompanied by the image of one side of a six-sided die, so that each face of the die is represented by a peg hole. According to the rules of the game, each player starts with six pegs. After a die roll to establish the order of play, the players take turns rolling the die and inserting a peg into the cylindrical hole corresponding to the number on the die. For instance, if a two is rolled, a player inserts a peg into the hole marked with the symbol for “two.”

If a player rolls a six, a peg is inserted into the hole at number six. However, the hole at number six is bottomless and leads into the chamber of the game apparatus. When a player inserts a peg into this hole, the peg falls into the game box; therefore the number six position is always empty. The other five cylindrical holes accommodate a single peg each.

If a player rolls a number corresponding to a position already occupied by a peg, the player takes that peg from the board. Rolling six repeatedly on the die is therefore the fastest way to get rid of pegs. As players roll the die and either place a peg on the board or take a peg from the board, the number of pegs in that player's possession changes. The first player to get rid of all of their pegs becomes the winner.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the game apparatus of the present invention, showing the lidded game box with incorporated game board, and an example of a peg or die that could be used to play the game.

FIG. 2 is a top view of the removable top lid of the game apparatus of the present invention, showing the hollow sixth peg hole.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the game apparatus of the present invention, with the lid and contents removed.

FIGURES—REFERENCE NUMERALS

  • 10 Game Apparatus
  • 11 Side Wall
  • 12 Base
  • 13 Removable Top Lid
  • 14 Cylindrical Hole
  • 15 Indicia
  • 16 Die Cube
  • 17 Peg
  • 18 Projecting Surface

DESCRIPTION

The novel features of the present invention will become apparent from the following description of the preferred embodiments of the invention, and as illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 3.

The game apparatus 10 with pegs 17 and die 16 of the present invention is a lidded box. In one preferred embodiment, the box is cubical as shown in FIG. 1. The game apparatus 10 includes a box with a base 12, four sides 11, and a removable lid 13. In one preferred embodiment, the lid has a projecting surface 18 that is dimensioned to-be firmly received in the inner chamber of the base, as shown in FIG. 3 in order to secure the lid 13 to the base 12.

The removable lid 13 of the game apparatus 10 has a playing surface built into it. Six cylindrical depressions or holes 14 disposed on the top side of the box allow players to insert pegs adjacent to indicia 15 corresponding to the six sides of a conventional die cube 16, respectively, as illustrated in FIG. 2. The cylindrical hole 14 adjacent to the graphic indicating six on the die descends entirely through the removable lid 13, allowing a peg inserted into this hole to fall into the inner chamber of the game apparatus 10. The flat side walls on the front and back of the game apparatus can accommodate a trade name or logo for advertising purposes.

The die cube 16, a plurality of pegs 17 and a small rule pamphlet can be stored in the inner chamber of the main box and covered by the removable lid 13 when the game is not in use. During play, the removable lid 13 can be set on a surface to serve as the game board, or re-attached to the box. The game can be played virtually anywhere by two to six players and is meant for all ages from five up.

The rules of the game are as follows: Every player starts with six pegs 17. On their turn, each player rolls the die cube 16 once and inserts a peg 17 in the corresponding numbered hole 14. If a peg 17 already occupies that space, the player takes that peg. Rolling a six on the die is the fastest way to get rid of pegs, since pegs inserted there fall into the game apparatus. The first player to get rid of their pegs becomes the winner.

The game of the present invention improves over the prior art because it is easy to set-up, requiring only that the few contents of the game apparatus be emptied prior to play. It is easy to learn and play, with a minimum set of rules and an uncomplicated play structure. Finally, it is easy to put away and store, since the complete contents of the game store inside the game apparatus, and particularly since the self-contained game apparatus itself is relatively small. The complete game comprises the box-type game apparatus, one six-sided die, 36 pegs, a few extra pegs, and an instruction sheet containing the rules.

All features disclosed in this specification, including any accompanying claims, abstract, and drawings, may be replaced by alternative features serving the same, equivalent or similar purpose, unless expressly stated otherwise. Thus, unless expressly stated otherwise, each feature disclosed is one example only of a generic series of equivalent or similar features.

Any element in a claim that does not explicitly state “means for” performing a specified function, or “step for” performing a specific function, is not to be interpreted as a “means” or “step” clause as specified in 35 U.S.C. § 112, paragraph 6. In particular, the use of “step of” in the claims herein is not intended to invoke the provisions of 35 U.S.C. § 112, paragraph 6.

Although preferred embodiments of the present invention have been shown and described, various modifications and substitutions may be made thereto without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention. Accordingly, it is to be understood that the present invention has been described by way of illustration and not limitation.