Title:
DIGITALLY PRINTED BREAKOUT LOTTERY TICKET
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A break-open ticket for a game of chance includes a first ply, a second ply and a break-open portion on one of the first ply and the second ply for revealing a play combination. The play combination is printed by a printer based on data that includes a randomized plurality of tickets. The printer does not perform a further randomization of the plurality of tickets.



Inventors:
Ellis, Neil (St. John's, CA)
Application Number:
11/460810
Publication Date:
09/13/2007
Filing Date:
07/28/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F1/18
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20100078889THREE OR MORE PLAYER CHESS GAMEApril, 2010Owen
20040217547Method of playing a new wagering card gameNovember, 2004Lau et al.
20090280882System, method and computer program product for educational triva gameNovember, 2009Saghatelyan et al.
20090280457CARD GAME FOR LEARNING AND PRACTICING FOREIGN LANGUAGESNovember, 2009Elazari-volcani
20090160128GAME MEDIUM SHOOTING MECHANISMJune, 2009Takeuchi et al.
20100019449METHOD OF LOCATING RANK AND SUIT SYMBOLS ON CARDSJanuary, 2010Downs III et al.
20090160129Lottery-type game with rollover featureJune, 2009Thinnes et al.
20030201605Method and apparatus for forming wordsOctober, 2003Badger
20070126183Method and apparatus for playing a projectile and board gameJune, 2007Willett
20080303211Three-dimensional logical cubeDecember, 2008La et al.
20060226607Goal for ball gamesOctober, 2006Chen



Primary Examiner:
LAYNO, BENJAMIN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PEARNE & GORDON LLP (1801 EAST 9TH STREET, SUITE 1200, CLEVELAND, OH, 44114-3108, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A method of forming a plurality of break-open tickets for a game of chance, comprising the steps of: generating data that includes a randomized plurality of tickets; printing the tickets on a substrate; unwinding the substrate including the printed tickets from a roll; and folding the substrate to form a first ply and a second ply.

2. The method of claim 1, wherein an inner side of one of the first ply and the second ply includes a blockout area, and further wherein an inner side of the other one of the first ply and the second ply includes a play combination.

3. The method of claim 1, wherein an inner side of the first ply includes a first play combination, and further wherein an inner side of the second ply includes a second play combination.

4. The method of claim 1, further comprising the step of statically printing on the substrate.

5. The method of claim 1, wherein the data includes a complete game of chance.

6. The method of claim 1, wherein the data includes a digital press sheet.

7. The method of claim 1, further comprising the step of scoring the substrate to form a fold line, wherein the step of folding includes the step of folding the substrate along the fold line.

8. The method of claim 1, further comprising the step cutting a plurality of break-open portions into one of the first ply and the second ply.

9. The method of claim 8, further comprising the steps of: scoring the substrate to form a fold line; and gluing the first ply to the second ply, wherein the step of folding includes the step of folding the substrate along the fold line, wherein an inner side of one of the first ply and the second ply includes a blockout area, and further wherein an inner side of the other one of the first ply and the second ply includes a play combination.

10. A break-open ticket for a game of chance, comprising: a first ply; a second ply; and a break-open portion on one of the first ply and the second ply for revealing a play combination, wherein the play combination is printed by a printer based on data that includes a randomized plurality of tickets, and wherein the printer does not perform a further randomization of the plurality of tickets.

11. The break-open ticket as set forth in claim 10, wherein the data includes a digital press sheet.

12. The break-open ticket as set forth in claim 10, further comprising a scratch-off area.

13. The break-open ticket as set forth in claim 10, further comprising a lenticular screen.

14. The break-open ticket as set forth in claim 10, further comprising an area printed with a metallic ultraviolet ink.

15. The break-open ticket as set forth in claim 10, further comprising a blockout area located on the break-open portion.

16. The break-open ticket as set forth in claim 15, wherein the blockout area includes an area printed with ultraviolet ink.

17. The break-open ticket as set forth in claim 16, wherein the ultraviolet ink is a metallic ultraviolet ink.

18. The break-open ticket as set forth in claim 15, wherein the blockout area includes an area printed with a first ultraviolet ink and a second ultraviolet ink, wherein the second ultraviolet ink is a metallic ultraviolet ink.

19. The break-open ticket as set forth in claim 15, wherein the first ply is glued to the second ply.

20. The break-open ticket as set forth in claim 15, further comprising additional break-open portions for revealing additional play combinations.

21. A method of forming a plurality of break-open tickets for a game of chance, comprising the steps of: generating data that includes a randomized plurality of tickets; providing the data to a printer, wherein the printer does not perform a further randomization of the plurality of tickets; printing the plurality of tickets on a substrate; cutting break-open portions into the substrate; and forming a first ply and a second ply from the substrate.

22. The method of claim 21, wherein the data includes a digital press sheet.

23. The method of claim 21, wherein the data includes a complete game of chance.

24. The method of claim 21, wherein the step of printing includes a static printing technique.

25. The method of claim 21, wherein the step of printing does not include a static printing technique.

26. The method of claim 21, wherein the step of cutting includes the step of cutting break-open portions into the substrate with a laser cutting device.

27. The method of claim 21, further comprising the step of gluing the first ply to the second ply.

28. The method of claim 27, further comprising the step of cutting the substrate to form a plurality of separated break-open tickets.

29. The method of claim 28, wherein the step of cutting the substrate to form a plurality of separated break-open tickets includes the step of cutting the substrate with a laser cutting device.

30. The method of claim 21, wherein the step of forming includes the step of folding the substrate.

31. The method of claim 30, wherein the step of forming includes the step of scoring the substrate to form a fold line, and wherein the step of folding includes the step of folding the substrate along the fold line.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/703,128, filed Jul. 28, 2005. This application is a continuation-in-part of U.S. application Ser. No. 11/385,090, filed Mar. 21, 2006, which claims the benefit of U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/663,824, filed Mar. 21, 2005. Each of the foregoing applications is hereby incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to break-open tickets for a game of chance, and more particularly to digitally printed break-open tickets for a game of chance, amusement, promotional, or advertisement purposes.

2. Description of Related Art

Jar tickets are folded tickets for a game of chance. They are small, paper, folded and banded tickets that are purchased by a player for a predetermined amount. They are typically stored in a jar or other receptacle prior to purchase by a player. They can be produced and purchased in a single ticket format or bundled in groups, such as groups of 2, 3, 4, 5 or 10's. Tickets can be stapled or glued together when in bundles. The jar ticket is traditionally a single ply folded and banded paper ticket, featuring symbols, letters or numerals. Tickets can be sold to a player in bundles or mounted on a board. Players reveal the symbols by ripping or breaking open the ticket from a banded bond.

After the player opens the banded section to reveal the symbol(s), they compare the ticket to a “flare” or display card to determine if they have a winning or losing ticket. The flare, which is enclosed with each set of game tickets, illustrates the pre-determined winning symbol(s), letter(s) or number(s), their associated prize amounts and the quantity of each contained in the set. The flare card also specifies the game name, cost per ticket to players, the manufacturer's form number and set serial number.

Jar tickets are often not used in the charitable bingo games and state lottery games because their small size and non-sequential packaging makes it difficult to track and sell them.

Break-open tickets are constructed of two plys of material connected together by adhesive with perforated windows on one side that break-open when the ticket is played. Break-open tickets often have multiple play combinations on a single ticket. Break-open tickets are often used in the charitable bingo games and state lottery games. The size and construction of a break-open ticket is more conducive to handling and tracking of product during its pre-sale and sale than that of a jar ticket. Traditionally break-open tickets are packaged in sets of 100 with an elastic band around them for easy counting.

Traditional gaming tickets are manufactured in a sheet-fed printing plant using multiple printing plates of static images to produce press sheets. Normally, there are a limited number of press sheets produced to make a volume of tickets because each press sheet requires a plurality of plates and additional set-ups and wash-ups on the printing press. This process can be expensive, which may make it uneconomical to produce small quantities of tickets or completely unique sets of tickets. In the traditional process, the use of serial numbers is important to differentiate a ticket from one set from a ticket from a different set, primarily because each set of tickets in a specific product are exactly the same but shuffled into a different order. In some instances, gaming tickets make use of a variable print technology that depend on the use of databases at the time of printing to randomize the product. This method of manufacture is still not utilized to its full capacity because of the high cost of variable printing and the low quality of the printed images.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

Provided is a method of forming a plurality of break-open tickets for a game of chance. The method includes the steps of generating data that includes a randomized plurality of tickets, printing the tickets on a substrate, unwinding the substrate including the printed tickets from a roll, and folding the substrate to form a first ply and a second ply.

Further provided is a break-open ticket for a game of chance that includes a first ply, a second ply and a break-open portion on one of the first ply and the second ply for revealing a play combination. The play combination is printed by a printer based on data that includes a randomized plurality of tickets. The printer does not perform a further randomization of the plurality of tickets.

Further provided is a method of forming a plurality of break-open tickets for a game of chance. The method includes the steps of generating data that includes a randomized plurality of tickets, providing the data to a printer, wherein the printer does not perform a further randomization of the plurality of tickets, printing the plurality of tickets on a substrate, cutting break-open portions into the substrate, and forming a first ply and a second ply from the substrate.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows front and rear elevation views of a game ticket;

FIG. 2 shows a front elevation view of a game ticket;

FIG. 3 shows a front elevation view of a game ticket;

FIG. 4 shows a front elevation view of a game ticket;

FIG. 5 shows a front elevation view of a game ticket;

FIG. 6 shows a perspective view of a game ticket;

FIG. 7 shows a perspective view of a game ticket;

FIG. 8 shows a perspective view of a game ticket in an unopened position;

FIG. 9 shows a perspective view of a game ticket in an unopened position;

FIG. 10 shows a digital press sheet;

FIG. 11 shows outer sides of attached break-open tickets; and

FIG. 12 shows inner sides of attached break-open tickets.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

Described herein is a ticket for amusement purposes, advertisement purposes, promotional purposes and/or a game of chance, such as a lottery, and a method of manufacturing said ticket. In FIG. 1, it can be seen that the ticket 13 includes two sides, an “A” side and a “B” side. Side A is the rear side of the ticket 13 and side B is the front side of the ticket 13. In an embodiment, the ticket 13 is constructed from a single-ply material, such as paper or card stock, and includes printing on both sides of the single-ply material. In an embodiment, the ticket 13 forms an elongated strip wherein the strip's length exceeds its height. The height of the ticket 13 can be any desired height, for example, 3.75 inches, 3 inches, 2.5 inches, 2 inches, 1.5 inches, 1 inch, 0.75 inches, or 0.5 inches. A series of folds along fold lines 1, 2, 3, 4 divide the ticket into several panels 5, 6, 7, 8, 9. The ticket 13 is shown in an unfolded or completely opened position

Panel 5 is an identification panel. Printed on side A of the identification panel 5 is the game's name and form number. For example, the game shown in FIG. 1 is called “BILL FOLDS” and has form number 12345. The form number corresponds to the name of the game, the number of tickets in the game and the game's payout. The form number functions as a model number.

Panels 6, 7 and 8 are game panels. Printed on side B of the game panels 6, 7, 8 are play combinations that can include symbols, characters, images, numbers or other markings that provide winning or losing game plays. Game plays can also include an instant win indication, as can be seen in game panel 8. In FIG. 1, each game panel, 6, 7 and 8 includes two play combinations or one play combination and one instant win indication, for a total of six plays on the ticket 13. A ticket 13 can include any number of game panels, for example, one, two, or three or more game panels. A ticket 13 can include any number of game plays per game panel, such as one game play per panel, more than one game play per panel, or combinations of single and multiple game plays per panel on one ticket 13.

A code, for example a serial number or alphabetic serial code 15 is printed on each game panel 6, 7 and 8. The code could include both letters and numbers, such as a hexadecimal code. The alphabetic serial code 15 is a series of letters that uniquely identifies a particular deal of a game. For example, the same form number may be repeatedly printed and played, that is, dealt, over a given period of time. However each repetition has a unique alphabetic serial code 15 so that only winning tickets for that deal, bearing the correct alphabetic serial code 15, can be used to collect a prize. By printing the alphabetic serial code on each game panel 6, 7, and 8, a winning ticket can be accidentally or intentionally ripped, for example, ripped along a fold line 1, 2, 3, 4, and a winning portion of the ticket 13 submitted to claim a prize.

Printed on side A of game panel 6 is the alphabetic serial code 15, which is visible when the ticket 13 is folded up along fold lines 1, 2, 3, 4 as described further below. Also printed on side A of game panel 6 are the game's payout scheme and winning symbols 16.

Printed on side B of panel 9 is a winner/loser and total win indication 17. Further printed on side B of panel 9 is an advertisement, coupon, or other message, such as a message regarding a charity 18. For example, panel 9 can include a warning message about compulsive gambling and/or information about sources of help for compulsive gamblers. Panel 9 can include one or both of the advertisement, coupon, or other message 18 and the winner/loser and total win indication 17. In an embodiment, panel 9 is not provided and the ticket 13 includes an identification panel 5 and one or more game panels 6, 7, 8. In an embodiment, the advertisement, coupon, or other message extends inward from an end of the ticket 13 to at least 0.25 inches from the end.

The ticket 13 is folded up prior to playing to form an unopened position and held shut by glue, for example, fugative glue 10. The glue 10 may be placed on the ticket 13 in dots, lines or other configurations. The ticket 13 may also be held shut by other methods including crimping, stapling and banding. The ticket 13 is folded up by panel 9 being folded over panel 8 along fold line 4. Then panels 9 and 8 are folded over panel 7 along fold line 3. Then panels 9, 8 and 7 are folded over panel 6 along fold line 2. Then panel 5 is folded over panels 6, 7, 8 and 9 along fold line 1 and glued to side A of panel 7. When the ticket 13 is completely folded up prior to playing, side A of panels 5 and 6 are visible, along with part of side A of panel 7. Panel 5 is not as wide as panels 6, 7, 8 and 9 and, therefore, does not completely cover panel 7 when folded over and glued to panel 7.

The ticket is played by unfolding the ticket in a manner opposite from the folding process described above.

The ticket 13 includes a blockout area 11, which can be formed by printing one or more colors on top of each other to increase the opacity of a portion of the ticket 13 and reduce the ability of light to pass through the folded ticket 13.

In an embodiment, one or more panels of the ticket 13 include printing 12 that defines a perimeter area within a panel. For example, the perimeter area 12 can surround the play combinations within a game panel. The perimeter area 12 is printed with a metallic ultra violet (UV) ink and/or coating that acts as a security strip, and which will stop the glue 10 from bleeding into the play area and hinder the ability for duplicating of the ticket 13 on a photocopier. Wording can be applied to the UV metallic ink security strip to ensure that a ripped ticket is reassembled in a correct order.

In addition to the embodiment described above, FIG. 1 shows a ticket 13b having a single play combination of three symbols spread over several game panels 6, 7, 8.

FIG. 1 further shows a ticket 13c having a progressive/digressive play scheme in which successive game panels provide increased or decreased winnings. Game panel 6 shows a play combination that results in a $100 win. However, game panel 7 shows a play combination that results in a $50 loss. Game panel 8 shows a play combination that results in a $10 win. A total win of $60 is displayed in panel 9, which is the sum of the winnings and losses provided by all of the game panels 6, 7, 8.

FIG. 1 further shows a ticket 13d having a progressive play scheme in which a condition provided in one game panel must be met by another game panel to result in increased winnings. For example, game panel 6 provides that a $100 win will be doubled if the play combination of game panel 7 is less than the play combination of game panel 6. Because the play combination of game panel 7 is less than the play combination of game panel 6, game panel 7 provides an indication that the total winnings have been doubled to $200. Game panel 7 provides that the $200 win will be doubled if the play combination of game panel 8 is more than the play combination of game panel 7. Because the play combination of game panel 8 is less than the play combination of game panel 7, game panel 8 provides an indication that there is no increase in winnings. Panel 9 provides a total win indication of $200. In an embodiment, game panels 6, 7, 8 include conditions that, if met, result in decreased winnings. In an embodiment, if the condition for a game panel 6, 7, 8 is not met by another game panel, then there is a win of $0 for said game panel 6, 7, 8.

FIG. 2 shows side B of a ticket 13 having an identification panel 5 with block out area 11, a single game panel 6 with two play combinations on the game panel 6, and a panel 9 that includes a winner/loser and total win indication 17and a coupon 18. The ticket 13 includes fold lines 1, 2 that divide the ticket 13 into panels 5, 6, 9.

FIG. 3 shows side B of a ticket 13 having an identification panel 5 with block out area 11, two game panels 6, 7 with two play combination on each game panel 6, 7, and a panel 9 that includes a winner/loser and total win indication 17 and an advertisement 18. The ticket 13 includes fold lines 1, 2, 3 that divide the ticket 13 into panels 5, 6, 7, 9.

FIG. 4 shows side B of a ticket 13 having an identification panel 5 with block out area 11, four game panels 6, 7, 8, 19 with two play combination on each game panel 6, 7, 8, 19 and a panel 9 that includes a winner/loser and total win indication 17 and an advertisement 18. The ticket 13 includes fold lines 1, 2, 3, 4, 41 that divide the ticket 13 into panels 5, 6, 7, 8, 19, 9.

FIG. 5 shows side B of a ticket 13 having an identification panel 5 with block out area 11, a single game panel 6 with five play combinations on the game panel 6, and a panel 20 with a block out area 11. The ticket 13 includes fold lines 1, 2 that divide the ticket 13 into panels 5, 6, 20.

FIG. 6 and FIG. 7 each show perspective view of a substantially unfolded ticket 13. FIG. 8 shows the ticket 13 folded up into the unopened position. As discussed above, the ticket 13 can be held in the unopened position by glue. The ticket 13 can also be held in the unopened position by stapling or crimping, for example, crimping along one or more of the folded ticket's 13 edges. As shown in FIG. 9, the ticket 13 can also be held in the unopened position by a band 21 wrapped around the folded ticket 13.

The ticket 13 can be constructed so that it can be played in both the traditional jar ticket market as well as the break-open ticket market. It can be constructed from heavier paper stock than a jar ticket but lighter than a break-open ticket. Tickets 13 can be packaged and sold in a receptacle, such as a jar or a bag, or assembled in a joined set, such as a banded set of 100 tickets, for example.

The multi-fold design of the ticket 13 allows for a single play ticket with increased play value or a multi play ticket with multiple chances of winning. Tickets 13 having a single game panel 6, such as those of FIG. 2 and FIG. 5, can be constructed with a card stock similar to a break-open ticket to match the size and feel of a break-open ticket but with a unique flip open style. The multi-fold ticket 13 also allows for a self-promotion or advertising panel at one end of the ticket, which is viewable after the ticket is completely open. This panel will provide increased value to the marketers by giving the ability to advertise new games, provide charitable messages, as well as relationship marketing techniques like a mail in coupon.

A method for manufacturing tickets for a game of chance will now be described. The printing techniques discussed below can be used to print the ticket 13 discussed above or other types of tickets, such as a break-open tickets, discussed further below.

The folded jar tickets and break-open tickets disclosed herein will take advantage of traditional printing for portions of the ticket that are static but incorporate digital printing for other portions, such as gaming and advertising portions. For example, portions of the ticket that are static, that is, portions that are the same from ticket-to-ticket can be printed using traditional plate-based static printing techniques. Portions that change from ticket-to-ticket can be printed using digital printing techniques discussed in detail below. Alternatively, all portions of the ticket can be printed using digital printing techniques without using any traditional plate-based static printing techniques.

As used herein, the terms “digital printing” and “digital printing techniques” refer to printing processes in which data is provided to a printer, such as via a downloaded file. The printer then prints an image or images based on information contained in the provided data.

The digital printing portions of a ticket are not printed using variable data printing in which databases of symbols must be used to populate the print stream during the process of printing. Instead, a data file is provided to the printer. The data in the file represents a full game set to be printed onto one or more sheets of paper, card stock, etc. The game set is already randomized when the data file is provided to the printer. The printer does not randomly print play combinations selected from a database, but prints the full, already randomized game set from the provided data file.

The data, which represents a full game set, provides a collection of viewable digital press sheets that can be viewed using an appropriate software package. The digital press sheets can be viewed electronically and checked/verified prior to printing. In an embodiment, the data is in the form of a PORTABLE DOCUMENT FORMAT (.pdf) file and can be viewed via the ADOBE READER software package.

A method for creating digital press sheets will now be described. An example digital press sheet 22 having three tickets 13 can be seen in FIG. 10.

A game symbol set is picked from a pre-determined set of ticket symbol sets, or a new set is developed and entered into a database. The game rules are set by the operator of a program for generating digital press sheets, which includes factors such as what constitutes a winning or losing play combination and the number of tickets in a game set. Other rules may include special symbols or number combinations that would be omitted, for example, per a customer request.

The program then goes into a loop that will create one ticket at a time and compare it against the rules that have been set. If the ticket passes the rules test it is stored and the number of needed tickets is decreased by one. If the ticket fails the test it is discarded and a ticket counter does not advance.

Once a game set has been generated, the program creates a random placement list. This is a table of data that reorders the ticket output for subsequent game. This allows for per-ticket tracking for easy reprinting or checking. Each list can be identified by the batch serial number allowing for easy retrieval of the data.

Next the individual tickets are generated and saved in a folder. Each ticket's data is read from the database and the ticket symbols are arranged on the digital press sheet template and saved. These tickets are used in the next phase of the process. Generating tickets in this manner reduces the processing time because the tickets need only be created once.

The process continues with the creation of single or multi page .pdf documents. Each page of the .pdf document contains at least one and preferably contains at least 2 or more tickets. The process is done by loading a placement list and using it to determine the order in which the pre-generated tickets are imposed onto the digital press sheet. The placement and number of tickets placed on the press sheet is determined by a calculation based on the size of the final press sheet and the number of tickets that can fit on the preset size. Each placement list is processed in the same manner thus giving each box of tickets a unique ticket order. In this phase the serial number or alphabetic serial code is applied, the correct serial number is always used because the only number available is the one stored with the placement list.

The .pdf documents are digitally stored as complete press sheets for printing on the digital printer/press. Once the .pdf document is complete, no further randomization of ticket placement on the press sheet occurs. Each digital press sheet can be printed off for final customer approval before the printing process and all approved press sheets can then be printed on the digital printer based on the operators instructions to download specific sheets to the digital printer. The operator can choose to print a complete multipage file on the printer with a full or partial game set or he/she can choose to print single pages.

Digital press sheets are not limited to any particular file format. All acceptable storage formats including, .pdf, 1 bit tiff, jpg, tif, postscript, ppml, xml, or any other digital formats that can be used to store a set of tickets digitally in a pre-set sequence on a page is included in this method of printing tickets.

It is important to note that the process discussed above for creating digital press sheets does not interact directly with the digital printer and singe tickets are not sent to the printer in random format for population on the Raster Image Processor (RIP) of the digital printer/press. The process creates the final digital press sheet before the data is sent to the RIP allowing for customer verification and approval. Absolutely no variable data is applied to the press sheets after the sheets have been generated.

This system allows for easy duplication of a game set during a subsequent printing. Digital press sheets can eliminate the need for multiple films and plates and press runs. The pre-generation of digital press sheets into multi-page documents will allow for the printing of one set of tickets for review and approval before printing a full game set or printing just the game and advertising information for that set of tickets onto an approval proof sheet for the customer to approve before the job is printed. The use of online digital sign-offs by a customer on complete ticket sets can also be accomplished.

Digital press sheets, in single page or multi-page format, having a ticket or tickets imposed on each sheet can be downloaded to the printer in the page description format of that printer. Example page description formats include postscript, pcl, ppml, xml, and other page description formats used to describe to the digital printer how to image the contents of the data file to the substrate media on which printing is to occur. Digital press sheets can be provided in other formats, such as bitmapped formats or vector-based formats, for example. In some instances the complete ticket will be digitally printed including all information included on both sides of the ticket, and no portion of the ticket will be printed statically.

The printing of a data file discussed above differs from a variable print process in that variable printing requires a database that is accessible by a printer at the time of printing. Population of a game ticket with various play combinations happens at the time of actual printing via the printer's accessing of the database, so customer pre-approval of a game set cannot be achieved. Database errors can occur and an incorrect ticket set can be produced and sealed with no digital verification. Digital construction of press sheets into multi-page files ensures that all game sets can be checked and approved before the digital press is used to apply the data.

The static portion of the printing can be applied using traditional forms of printing such as offset or flexo printing. In some instances rolls of paper are pre-printed on a web press and in other instances sheet-fed presses are used. This portion of the printing may require films, plates or digital plates. On one side of the ticket, the ticket identification information is pre-printed. On the other side of the ticket a blockout area is printed along with a metallic ink security strip to discourage photocopy duplication of the ticket. The blockout area will be printed with one or more colors printed on top of each other to form a substantially or completely opaque barrier. One of the colors used may be a metallic ink to provide further opacity as well as further security features. In some instances, the security blockout area can be printed on the identification side of the ticket and/or on the game play and advertising side of the ticket. UV inks can be used in the static printing process. UV inks sit on top of the paper and are generally more opaque than traditional offset and waterbased inks. Glue does not stick to UV ink, so when the glue is applied to seal the tickets, the metallic security strip 12 on side B of ticket 13 will act as a barrier for the glue, not to encroach on the game play/advertising areas of the ticket 13. This will help for minimal destruction of the play areas when the ticket is opened.

FIGS. 11 and 12 show twelve attached break-open tickets, three across and four down, printed on a substrate as discussed below, but prior to folding and gluing the tickets, cutting the break-open portions or windows, and separating individual tickets. FIG. 11 shows outer sides of the tickets prior to folding. FIG. 12 shows inner sides of the tickets prior to folding. The terms “outer side” refer to the sides of ticket that are accessible to a player prior playing the game of chance, that is, prior to opening any break-open windows. The terms “inner side” refer to the sides of the ticket that are not accessible to a player prior to playing the game of chance.

The tickets include a front outer side 30 and a rear outer side 31. The front outer side 30 includes information printed thereon, such as a name of the game, payout information and a game serial number. The rear outer side 31 includes a plurality of break-open portions or windows 33 for revealing corresponding game play combinations 34 that are printed on front inner side 35. In an embodiment, play combinations are printed on the rear inner side 36. The break-open portions or windows 33 can be formed by cutting several lines of weakness into the ticket, so that the break-open portion 33 is partially or completely separated from the ticket when played.

The rear inner side 36 includes a plurality of blockout areas 37 printed on the break-open portions 33. In an embodiment, the blockout areas 37 are created with a single UV ink, such as a metallic UV ink, or multiple combinations of UV inks, one of which may be a metallic UV ink. Metallic ultraviolet inks can be used to create security patterns on tickets and areas exhibiting metallic effects.

As discussed below, glue is applied to the rear inner side 36 of the tickets, the attached break-open tickets are folded along fold line 38, and the front inner side 35 is glued to the rear inner side 36. The attached tickets are then separated into individual single tickets.

Break-open tickets can include scratch-off areas (not shown) having a layer of removable, scratch-off material. A scratch-off layer could be provided on a break-open ticket for security purposes. For example, a scratch-off layer could conceal a winning ticket verification. A scratch-off layer could be provided on the front inner side 35 of the ticket, which could be revealed by opening a break-open portion.

A method of digitally printing break-open tickets will now be described. A substrate comprising a roll of paper is pre-printed on an offset web or flexo press, providing a static printing step. At this point, static printing is completed. The substrate is re-wound at the end of the static print step. If desired, the tickets can be completely digitally printed and no portion statically printed.

The roll of substrate is then transferred to a digital printer. The digital printer prints images onto the substrate. The images are represented by digital information or data provided to the digital printer. The data is pre-generated and sent to the digital printer as a data file. The data in the file represents a complete, randomized game of chance set. The printer does not perform a further randomization of the tickets or play combinations. In an embodiment, the data is in the form of digital press sheets. After images corresponding to the game set are printed onto the substrate, the substrate is re-wound onto a roll at the end of the digital printer. The roll of substrate is then introduced to a finishing line where the substrate is scored along its center, in the direction of the web. The score line is provided along fold line 38 and is used to fold the web of substrate onto itself.

Break-open portions 33 are diecut into rear outer side 31 of the web of substrate. Cutting the break-open portions 33 may occur at the time of scoring the substrate along its center. Glue is then pattern applied to rear inner side 36 of the substrate to areas that surround the break-open portions 33. The glue is applied so as to avoid the break-open portions 33, allowing the break-open windows 33 to be pulled open.

The web enters a plow fold, which folds the left side of the web onto the right side of the web along scored fold line 38. It then passes through two nipper rollers that press the two sides of the single substrate and seals them together. The substrate has been folded to form a first ply and a second ply and the web is half its original width.

If desired, a decorative die can be introduced for specially shaped tickets. The die would cut through the laminated substrate leaving nicks to hold the tickets in place. Laser cutting devices, such as laser die cutters could be used to cut the windows 33 and the decoratively shaped tickets.

The folded and glued web then passes through a slitter that slits the folded and glued web into ribbons of tickets. The ribbons of tickets are then cross cut using a sheeter into single tickets and delivered shingled on a conveyor. Alternatively the sheeter can sheet the tickets into sheets of tickets that can then be placed on a guillotine cutter to cut them into individual tickets.

Lenticular screens are lenses that have varied angles within them that, when placed upon a printed image, create the illusion of movement. Lenticular screens can be included in a break-open ticket to create the illusion of movement of the images on the ticket. Such an effect is produced by printing images on top of each other and then applying a lenticular lens, with each angle on the lens showing one of the images to which it is applied. Lenticular screens can be used to create multiple game plays in a single area, wherein viewing the area from different angles reveals different play combinations.

It should be evident that this disclosure is by way of example and that various changes may be made by adding, modifying or eliminating details without departing from the fair scope of the teaching contained in this disclosure. The invention is therefore not limited to particular details of this disclosure except to the extent that the following claims are necessarily so limited.





 
Previous Patent: CASINO CRAPS CARD GAME

Next Patent: Intelligent Baccarat shoe