Title:
GUIDED ROCKING EXERCISE DEVICE AND METHOD
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An exercise device that rocks in a base via the movement of an extended stick-like member along which a movable element may be guided. Movement of the movable element can rock the stick and base.



Inventors:
Krietzman, Mark (Palos Verdes Estates, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/670947
Publication Date:
08/09/2007
Filing Date:
02/02/2007
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
482/109, 482/110
International Classes:
A63B21/06; A63B15/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
HWANG, VICTOR KENNY
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Eric L. Lane (McKenna Long & Aldridge LLP 600 West Broadway, Suite 2600, San Diego, CA, 92101, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A method of exercise comprising: providing a weighted element guided along a stick member wherein the weighted element is movable both up and down along the axis of stick member and the stick member is rockable within a defined invert cone of movement; the stick member being affixed at its bottom end to a curved rockable support; and, the curved rockable support being in a rocking guide whereby the movement of the bottom end of the stick member is restricted to the bottom of the inverted cone of movement during exercise.

2. The method of claim 2 wherein a fixed guide limits the cone angle through which the stick member may pass.

3. The method of claim 1 wherein the curved rockable support weighs less then weighted element.

4. The method of claim 1 wherein the curved rockable support weighs more then weighted element.

5. A method of exercise comprising: providing a volumetric element that is guided along a rockable stick, wherein the volumetric element is movable both up and down along the axis of rockable stick and the rockable stick is movable within a inverted cone of movement with its bottom end at the narrow portion of the inverted cone; providing a resistance between the rockable stick and the volumetric element to increase the resistance to movement of the volumetric element along or about the rockable stick; the stick being affixed at its bottom end to a curved rockable support; the curved rockable support being placed in a rocking guide to limit the rocking movement of the curved rockable support to within the rocking guide.

6. The method of claim 5 wherein a fixing guide limits the cone angle through which the rockable stick member may pass.

7. The method of claim 5 wherein the curved rockable support weighs more then volumetric element.

8. The method of claim 5 wherein the resistance is selected from the group consisting of frictional and magnetic.

Description:

RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit under 35 U.S.C. Section 119(e) of provisional Application Ser. No. 60/765,817 entitled “Guided Orbiting Weight Exercise Device And Method” filed Feb. 7, 2006, which application is incorporated by reference herein.

BACKGROUND OF THE DISCLOSURE

1. Field of the Invention

This disclosure relates to a rocking exercise device and method of use. More specifically, to a stick-like member affixed to a rocking support with a base or collar, the stick-like member also being a guide for handles and/or weights.

2. Background Art

Tai Chi is a system of controlled movements which when properly executed is believed by practitioners to develop the internal life energy or “Chi” of the practitioners. Tai Chi is suitable for all age groups, is non-jarring and can build stamina and strength. Tai Chi movements derive from a concept of “yin” and “yang” which roughly means opposing forces, smooth fluid controlled movements are a hallmark of Tai Chi. Learning the controlled Tai Chi movements is accomplished through repetitive practice.

Benefits of Tai Chi are said to include greater balance and Chi. Tai Chi also provides aerobic exercise, strengthening and muscle development.

A medicine ball is an exercise tool and workout which can provide weight-resistance through a full range of motion. A torso twist is often preformed while carrying the medicine ball. The risk of uncontrolled movement or injury may result from the medicine ball.

Sticks or poles are used in many forms of exercise often behind the shoulders or held horizontally in front of the body.

It would be a desideratum to have controlled Tai Chi movements applied to the use of a medicine ball or weight element(s).

SUMMARY OF THE DISCLOSURE

In some exemplary implementations the present disclosure provides a rocking guide which is a collar or base in which a weighted support with at least a partially curved surface rocks and/or moves orbitally on and an elongated member affixed to the weighted support useful for moving the weighted support in the rocking guide. The elongated member may also be weighted.

In some exemplary implementations a stick-like member is affixed movably to a weighted support with at least partially curved bottom. The stick-like member can also act as a guide for handles, grips, bars, or other weighted or non-weighted elements which may include, but shall not be limited to, balls, disks, cones, spheres, geometric or non-geometric or other volumetric shapes.

In some exemplary implementations a stick guided element is supported at least partially on an elongated member which is connected at one end to a weighted support, the elongated member being useful to orbitally rock the weighted support within a rocking guide.

In some aspects the stick guided element is guidable up, down and/or around the stock member the movement of the stick guided element elongated being useful to orbitally rock the weighted support within the rocking guide.

In some exemplary implementations the weighted support has at least a partially curved bottom portion and the partially curved portion being at least partially textured to impact the frictional interface between the curved bottom and rocking guide.

In some exemplary implementations a stick guided element (which may be selectively weighted) such as a ball, disk, cone, sphere, geometric or non-geometric or other volumetric shape is movably attached to a stick-like member wherein the stick guided element is pushed and/or pulled through a range of motion. Changes in the positions of a user (which may include, but is not limited to the arms, legs, and torso) relative to a stick member, can be used to target different muscle groups.

Some exemplary implementations provide a selectable limit on the movement of a stick guided element.

In some exemplary implementations the weighted support is a sphere-like member such as a base ball.

In some exemplary implementations the weighted support and rocking guide at least partially counter balance against the movement of the stick guided element off-set from center.

In some exemplary implementations the base ball or weighted support has a substantially hard outer shell and is at least partially hollow.

In some exemplary implementations the base ball or weighted support has a substantially hard outer shell, is at least partially hollow and contains a weighted material that is substantially not fluid, such as sand, pellets, beads and the like.

In some exemplary implementations the base ball or weighted support has a substantially flexible outer shell, is at least partially hollow and contains a weighted material that is substantially not fluid, such as sand, pellets, beads and the like.

In some exemplary implementations the base ball or weighted support is at least partially hollow and filled with a weighted material that is substantially movable, such as metal bearings, plastic beads, resins, fluids, cement, metal and the like.

In some exemplary implementations the base ball or weighted support is at least partially hollow and filled with a weighted material that is substantially fixed, such as plastic, resins, cement, metal and the like.

In some exemplary implementations the weight of the weighted support is selectable.

The weighted support is textured to lubricate and facilitate movement or to dampen movement. The weight of the weighted support provides inertial resistance to movement. Changing the radius, of the curved portion of the weighted support which contacts the rocking guide during use, alters the center of weight when the stick member is offset from center.

In some exemplary implementations the curved region in contact with the rocking guide has increased or decreased surface area in contact with the rocking guide which may be used to alter the resistance to movement between the weighted support and rocking guide.

In some exemplary implementations resistance springs or elastic bands may be affixed between the top of the stick member and the three dimensional shape, such as a ball, disk, cone, sphere, geometric or non-geometric or other volumetric shape to add resistance to exercise with.

In some exemplary implementations resistance springs or elastic bands may be affixed between the weighted support and the three dimensional shape, such as a ball, disk, cone, sphere, geometric or non-geometric or other volumetric shape to add resistance.

In some exemplary implementations resistance springs or elastic bands may be affixed between the base and the three dimensional shape, such as a ball, disk, cone, sphere, geometric or non-geometric or other volumetric shape to add resistance.

In some exemplary implementations resistance to the movement of a stick guided member is through pressure elements such as wheels, springs, brakes, bearing or other frictional members which may be fixed or variable.

In some exemplary implementations resistance to the movement of the stick guide member is through magnetic resistance which may be fixed or variable.

Other features and advantages of the present disclosure will be set forth, in part, in the descriptions which follow and the accompanying drawings, wherein preferred embodiments and some exemplary implementations of the present disclosure are described and shown, and in part, will become apparent to those skilled in the art upon examination of the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings or may be learned by practice of the present disclosure. The advantages of the present disclosure may be realized and attained by means of the instrumentalities and combinations of elements and instrumentalities particularly pointed out in the appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a front view of the guided weight exercise device.

FIG. 2 is a top view of the exercise device of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is another front view showing movement of the exercise device of FIG. 1.

FIG. 4 is a top view of the exercise device.

FIG. 5 is a front view of another implementation of the guided weight exercise device showing some possible movements.

FIG. 6 is a front view of another implementation of the guided weight exercise device shown in FIG. 5 showing some possible movements.

FIG. 7 is a front view of another implementation of the guided weight exercise device.

FIG. 8 is a front view of another implementation of the guided weight exercise device.

FIG. 9 is a front view of another implementation of the guided weight exercise device.

FIG. 10 is a cut-away front view of the implementation shown in FIG. 9.

FIG. 11 is a cut-away front view of a radiussed inertial member of a guided weight exercise device.

FIG. 12 is a cut-away front view of an implementation of a radiussed inertial member of a guided weight exercise device.

FIG. 13 is a cut-away front view of an implementation of a radiussed inertial member of a guided weight exercise device.

FIG. 14 is a cut-away view of a weighted sphere for use with a guided weight exercise device.

FIG. 15 is a diagram view of a weighted object for use with a guided weight exercise device.

FIG. 16 is a diagram view of a weighted sphere, with handles, for use with a guided weight exercise device.

FIG. 17 is a cut-away view along line A-A of the weighted sphere shown in FIG. 16.

FIG. 18 is a front view of another implementation of the guided weight exercise device.

FIG. 19 is a front view of another implementation of the guided weight exercise device.

FIGS. 20 through 23 show a method of use of a guided weight exercise device.

FIGS. 24 through 26 show a method of use of a guided weight exercise device.

FIGS. 27 and 28 are front views comparing a to weighted radiussed inertial members with guided weight exercise device.

FIG. 29 is a cut-away top view of a hollow radiussed inertial member.

FIG. 30 shows an implementation of a cut-away view of radiussed inertial member and rocking guide.

FIG. 31 shows a front view of an implementation of a guided weight exercise device with magnetic resistance.

FIG. 32 shows a cut-away view of the implementation of the guided weight exercise device of FIG. 31 along line “A-A”.

FIG. 33 shows a partial blow up of the top of the ovoid shown in of FIG. 32.

FIG. 34 shows a front view of an implementation of a guided weight exercise device with frictional resistance.

FIG. 35 shows a cut-away view of the implementation of the guided weight exercise device of FIG. 34 along line “A-A”.

It should be appreciated that for simplicity and clarity of illustration, elements shown in the Figures have not necessarily been drawn to scale. For example, the dimensions of some of the elements are exaggerated relative to each other for clarity. Further, where considered appropriate, reference numerals have been repeated among the Figures to indicate corresponding elements.

DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS OF THE DISCLOSURE

Detailed embodiments are disclosed herein; however, it is to be understood that the disclosed embodiments are merely exemplary implementations of the disclosure, which may be embodied in various forms. Therefore, specific structural and functional details disclosed herein are not to be interpreted as limiting, but merely as a basis for claims and as a representative basis for teaching one skilled in the art to variously employ the present disclosure in virtually any appropriately detailed structure.

Shown in FIGS. 1-4 is a guided exercise device 100 with a sphere 110 (a volumetric shape) guided on a moving stick member 120. In this implementation the sphere 110 is preferably weighted. The sphere may be hard, soft or flexible. It may be hollow or solid. It may be weighted with viscous fluid, sand, beads, gravel, pellets, metal, resin, or other weighted material. The amount of weight may be fixed or varied. The weighted material may be moving or fixed solid. One or more weighted elements (such as the weighed sphere 110) may be added to one stick member 120. The stick member has a top end 125 and a bottom portion 130. The bottom portion is affixed to a radiussed inertial member 135 such as a curved support. The affixation may be permanent or removable. The radiussed inertial member rests in a rocking guide 140 set on a base 150. The sphere may be moved around the stick and/or up and down along the line of arrow 1500 during use. The radiussed inertial member need not be a sphere and merely requires a curved surface that is capable of rocking movement within the rocking guide 140. The curved surface may be covered or textured to impact movement within the rocking guide. Different materials, such as plastics may have different lubricity which can impact the coefficient of friction between the rocking guide and the weighted support. Also, different textures such as bumps or divots also impact the coefficient of friction. The rocking guide may also be selected of a material and/or with a textured to select the level of friction between the rocking guide and the weighted support thereby impacting the resistance of the weighted support to movement in the rocking guide.

The circumference of the radiussed inertial member 135 may be selected to vary the function of the device. A larger radiussed inertial member 135 can provide a greater surface area to move within a rocking guide and therefore offers greater opportunity to use friction within the rocking guide to impact the exercise. Conversely, a smaller radiussed inertial member has a reduced surface area. A more heavily weighted radiussed inertial member also may be useful in some applications to counter-balance the weighted sphere 110 (or other weighted element). A larger and/or heavier radiussed inertial member may also have greater inertia. When moving the sphere 110 and the connected stick member 120 the inertia of the radiussed inertial member is available to act as another resistive force to exercise against. The materials useful for adding weight to the radiussed inertial member are at least those materials which may be added to weight the volumetric shape (sphere).

FIG. 3 shows the movement of the weighted sphere 110 along an inverted cone shown by the path of arrow 2000 forming a cone angle. The inverted cone described by the movement along arrow 2000 is not a limitation for this implementation. The stick member 120 and weighted sphere 110 can move in substantially a half dome above the base 150. The stick member may be removably inserted into the radiussed inertial member.

While moving along the inverted cone the weighted sphere may also be moved up and down along the path of arrow 1500. The guided stick member 120 is movable in complex arrangements, shown in FIG. 4 is a figure “8” movement, along the line if arrow 2500, of the weighted sphere 110.

Shown in FIG. 5 is an implementation of a guided exercise device whereby extended hand grips 210 are affixed to the sphere 110 which may be weighted. The hand grips may be removable. Movement of the hand grips both up and down relative to the base 150 and left to right relative to the stick member 120 is depicted along the line of arrow 3000.

Shown in FIG. 6 in an implementation of a guided exercise device and the movement of the sphere 110 which may be weighted and hand grips are shown through a circle along the line of arrow 2000.

Shown in FIG. 7 is a guided exercise device using a sphere 110 which may be weighted, wherein the movement of the weighted sphere along the stick member 120 is limited by a stop 310. The stop may be fixed or adjustable, the stop 310 may be a pressure clamp or a latching and catch member.

The implementation of a guided exercise device shown in FIG. 8 provides a movable cross bar 410 affixed via a fastener 420 to the weighted sphere 110. The movable crossbar 410 can independently rotate around its fastener 420, and rotate around the stick member 120, with the movement of the weighted sphere 110, and move up down, and all around the radiussed inertial member 135.

Shown in FIGS. 9 and 10 is an implementation of a guided exercise device. The sphere 110 may be hard, soft or flexible. It may be hollow or solid. It may be weighted with viscous fluid, sand, gravel, pellets, metal or other weighted material. The amount of weight may be fixed or varied. One or more weighted elements (such as the weighed sphere 110) may be added to one stick member 120. The stick member has a top end 125 and a bottom portion 130. The bottom portion is affixed to a radiussed inertial member 135. The affixation may be permanent or removable. A support collar 510 mounts to the base 150 via one or more collar mounts 155 which hold a bottom edge of the collar 512. The radiussed inertial member rests in a rocking guide 140 set on a base 150. The fan angle of the inverted cone region through which the stick member and weighted sphere 110 move through is limited by the top edge 514 of the collar 510. The radiussed inertial member 135 may also be weighted.

Shown in FIG. 11 is an implementation of the radiussed inertial member 135 and rocking guide 140 on a base 150. A top cover 610 with an enlarged opening 620 fit over the radiussed inertial member 135. The enlarged opening allows the stick member and weighted sphere, or other volumetric element to move through a selected fan angle of the inverted cone region. The stick member 120 is limited in its movement when the bottom portion 130 of the stick member 120 contacts the surrounding edge 630 of the enlarged opening 620. The stick member may be removable from the radiussed inertial member for storage.

Shown in FIG. 12 is an implementation in which the radiussed inertial member 135 limits the movement of the weighted sphere 110. The rocking guide 710 mounted to a base 150 has an internal wall 720 which defines a tail guide 730. A tail 138 extends from the radiussed inertial member 135 and into the tail guide 730. The tail may be contiguous or non-contiguous with the stick member. The movement of the radiussed inertial member 135, stick member and sphere, or other volumetric element has limited movement defined by the interaction of the tail 138 and the internal wall 720.

Shown in FIG. 13 is an implementation in which the radiussed inertial member 135 limits the movement of the weighted sphere 110. The rocking guide 710 mounted to a base 150 has an internal wall 720 which defines a tail guide 730. An anchor 740 formed as part of, or affixed to, the base 150. A cable 750 is affixed to the anchor at a first end 752 and connected to the center bottom 138 of the radiussed inertial member 135 at another section 754. In this implementation the remainder of the cable 750 passes through the anchor 135 and is fixed, at a selected length via a second end of the cable 756 connected to a threaded section 758 which passes through a threaded tension knob 760. The length of the cable defines the allowed movement or “orbit’ of the radiussed inertial member 135 within the rocking guide 710 limits the movement of the radiussed inertial member 135, stick member and sphere, or other volumetric element. It is within the scope of this disclosure to have a fixed length cable that is not adjustable. It is also within the scope of the disclosure to reverse the cable and adjust the cable length from the first end. The cable may be non-elastic (yet flexible), elastic, semi-elastic. A chain, rope, cord band or combination and the like may be used in place of a cable.

A movable sphere 110 is shown in FIG. 14 has an internal guide 112 which provided a pathway through which a the stick member may be inserted. FIG. 15 shows an hourglass shaped volumetric element 800 with an internal guide 112 which provided a pathway through which a the stick member may be inserted. The concave and convex portions of the hourglass shaped volumetric element 800 provide hand holds. The movable volumetric element, whether spherical, toroid (not shown) or complex, such as an hourglass may be a substantially stiff material or a more flexible or elastic material. The weighted member may be a combination of materials both hard and soft. The surface of the member, in some implementations, may be varied to obtain a desired tactical feel. Depending on usage an increase or decrease in the frictional characteristics of the surface from smooth to tacky may be desirable.

Another movable sphere 805 is shown in FIGS. 16 and 17 has an internal guide 112 which provided a pathway through which a the stick member may be inserted. Hand holds 812 are affixed to, or formed as, part of the sphere 805. Hand hold guides 814 are provided around a portion of the hand holds 812.

Shown in FIGS. 18 and 19 are implementations whereby a spring member 910 or elastomeric member 920 is attached to a movable sphere 110/930 to provide a force to exercise against. The movable sphere may be weighted 110 or it may be non-weighted 930. In FIG. 18 the spring member 910 or elastomeric member 920 is indicated to be attached between the top 125 of the stick member 120. A downward pressure on the movable sphere is resisted by the spring member or elastomeric member. In FIG. 19 the spring or elastomeric member 930 is attached at a first end 945 at the radiussed inertial member 135 and at a second end 950 to the movable sphere 110/930, or an elastomeric member 950 is attached at a first end 945 at the base 150 and at a second end 950 at the movable sphere 110/930.

Shown in FIGS. 20 through 22 is a method of using the exercise device. A user 200 grasps the movable sphere 110 with is arms 2010 while standing on his legs 2020. The users trunk 2030 being between the arms 2010 and legs 2020. By moving the arms 2010 and the legs 2020 and twisting at the trunk 2030 a user can move the movable sphere and stick member 120 support from side to side and around about the radiussed inertial member 135. The users arms 2010, legs 2020, trunk 2030 and other connected muscles are thereby involved in the exercise. FIG. 23 shows the position of the movable sphere 110 shown in FIGS. 20 through 22. The change in position of the movable sphere 110 relative to the top 125 of the stick member 120 is shown as distance one “d1”, distance two “d2” and distance three “d3”. The movable sphere 110 can be guided during the user's exercise, via the internal guide 112, up and down the stick member 120.

In other implementations the method of exercise can be altered by grasping a hand hold 210 (as shown in FIGS. 5 through 8). Be grasping an extended handle the user 200 may increase the twisting motion and thereby target trunk 2030, back and abdominal area muscles.

Shown in FIGS. 24 through 26 is a method of using the exercise device. A user 2000 grasps the movable sphere 110 with is arms 2010 while standing on his legs 2020. The users trunk 2030 being between the arms 2010 and legs 2020. By moving squatting the legs 2020 the user 200 moves the movable sphere 100 from distance one “d1′” to distance two “d2′”, along the axis of the stick member, and thereby exercise muscles of the legs 2020, and/or arms 2010, back and all other attached muscles. The user then stand up and lifts the movable sphere 110 from distance two “d2′” to distance three “d3′”.

Shown in FIGS. 27 and 28 are force diagrams comparing an implementation of the device 975 with a more weighted radiussed inertial member 980 compared to an implementation of the device 100 without a less weighted radiussed inertial member 135. The more weighted radiussed inertial member is shown enlarged, a larger sphere may be more easily and economically weighted, however it is not a limitation. Additionally, as previously discussed a larger curved section in contact with the rocking guide provides a larger surface area to interact with the rocking guide which also can be sued to impact the movement of the radiussed inertial member within the rocking guide. The radiussed inertial member may be solid made of a heavy substrate, or hollow and filled with substrate. Any weighted adding substrate may be used, aqueous fluid, particulate, gel, or solid and may be movable within a hollow radiussed inertial member or immovable within. The amount of weighted substrate may be variable. The increased weight of the more weighted radiussed inertial member 980 as compared to a less weighted radiussed inertial member 135 provides greater inertia. The greater inertia can add to the exercise experience.

To displace the movable sphere 110 (or other weighted element) a distance of “D” the user (not shown) must apply force to move the weight of the movable sphere 110 and to overcome the inertia of the radiussed inertial member 980/135. To move the implementation with a more weighted radiussed inertial member 980 with a mass “m” a force of “F” must be applied. To move the implementation with a less weighted radiussed inertial member 135 with a mass “m′” a force of “F′” must be applied. Basic physics tells us that F=ma. Therefore, to overcome inertia and the resistance to movement such inertia provides, when m>m′ if acceleration (displacement) of the movable sphere 110 and stick member attached to the radiussed inertial member 135/980 is a constant then the force needed to overcome a greater mass is a greater force. Accordingly, F>F′. Conversely, applying the same formula, to stop the movement of the more weighted radiussed inertial member 980 requires greater force than is needed to stop the movement of the non-weighted radiussed inertial member 135 and F1>F1′.

The weight of the more radiussed inertial member 980 is in the range of between about 0.01 and about 200 times the weight of the volumetric element or sphere 110. More preferably in the range of between about 0.1 and about 50 times the weight of the volumetric element or movable sphere 110, and most preferably in the range of between about 0.5 and about 15 times the weight of the volumetric element or movable sphere 110.

Shown in FIG. 29 is a baffled radiussed inertial member 3050. The cavity 3060 inside the weighted radiussed inertial member 3050 contains baffles 3070 which interfere with the movement of non-fixed material such as fluids and particles during movement of the device. The baffling may also be applied to the weighted movable sphere or other hollow movable element being moved on, or in conjunction with, a stick member.

Shown in FIG. 30 shows a partial cut-away view of a hollow radiussed inertial member 990 and partial stick member 120, or the device, offset from center. Inside the radiussed inertial member 992 is a non-movable weighted material 994. A first portion of the weighted material 995 is on one side of center and above “at rest” which is the horizontal line. The second portion of the weighted material 996 is below the “at rest” line and to the other side of center. The radiussed inertial member is shown in a not at rest state. The weighted material, and radiussed inertial member will move to “at rest” along the line of arrow 4000 if the force “F″” is removed.

Shown in FIGS. 31-33 is a guided exercise device 1000 with an ovoid 1010 guided on a moving stick member 1020. The stick member is affixed to a radiussed inertial member 135 such as a curved support within a rocking guide 140. The ovoid 1010 may be hard, soft or flexible and it may or may not contain additional weights. It may be hollow or solid. Inside the ovoid are magnetic elements 1030 mounted to a spindle screw 1040 which is held in a specific orientation within the ovoid via spindle guides 1050. A knob 1060 is attached to each spindle screw 1040 whereby the magnetic element or elements 1030 may be adjusted relative to the stick member 1010 to increase or decrease magnetic resistance to movement, by varying the magnetic field applied. Those of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that the knob, spindle guide arrangement is but one of many different well known method for moving an internal element within an enclosure and is not a limitation on the disclosure.

The stick member 1020 is shown as a multi-layered member. A spacer 1070 which, may be optional, can be constructed of a plastic and functions to space the magnetically attractive layer 1075 from the ovoid 1000. The region of magnetically attractive material 1075 and the optional spacer are supported on a stick member 1080. In addition to, or in lieu of, the spacer 1070, protruding spacers 1012 may also be formed on, or attached to, the guide channel 1014 of the ovoid 1010 through which the stick member 1020 extends. The placement of the magnet(s) relative to the magnetically attractive material 1075 will impact the amount of magnetic field applied to the magnetically attractive material 1075 and thereby impact the resistance of the ovoid housing the magnets to movement along the stick member. Those of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that the number, shape, orientation, composition of, or size of the magnets are variable depending on the intended usage of the device and the examples shown are not a limitation.

Shown in FIGS. 34-35 is a guided exercise device 1100 with an ovoid 1110 guided on a moving stick member 1120. The stick member is affixed to a radiussed inertial member 135 such as a curved support within a rocking guide 140. The ovoid 1110 may be hard, soft or flexible and it may or may not contain additional weights. It may be hollow or solid. Inside the ovoid are pressure wheels 1130 mounted to a spindle screw 1140 which is held in a specific orientation within the ovoid via spindle guides 1150. A knob 1160 is attached to each spindle screw 1140 whereby the pressure wheel (frictional elements) 1130 may be adjusted relative to the stick member 1120 to increase or decrease resistance to movement of the ovoid along the stick member. Those of ordinary skill in the art will recognize that the knob, spindle guide arrangement is but one of many different well known method for moving an internal element within an enclosure and is not a limitation on the disclosure. Those of ordinary skill in the art will also recognize that the number, shape, orientation, composition, or size of the wheels or other friction providing members (including but not limited to springs, brakes, pressure plates, and bearing) are variable depending on the intended usage of the device and the illustrations herein are not a limitation.

The resistance providing elements described above increase the force necessary to move or displace the stick guided element along, about or around the stick member.

Since certain changes may be made in the above apparatus without departing from the scope of the disclosure herein involved, it is intended that all matter contained in the above description, as shown in the accompanying drawing, shall be interpreted in an illustrative, and not a limiting sense.