Title:
BABY SUPPLY TOTE
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A baby supply tote comprises an enclosure formed from pliable material. The enclosure includes a bottom panel, a front panel, a rear panel and a pair of side panels, and further includes a top panel removably fastenable to each of the front panel, rear panel and side panels. The panels when assembled define an interior surface and an exterior surface. The panel exterior and interior surfaces have compartments formed thereon. A removable baby-changing board, formed from substantially nonpliable material, has an upper surface and a lower surface. The removable baby-changing lower surface is disposed substantially adjacent and substantially coextensive with the bottom panel. The removable baby-changing board upper surface has a pliable covering disposed thereon. The baby-changing board provides structural support to the bottom panel when installed within the enclosure in a position adjacent the bottom panel.



Inventors:
Patterson, Dorothy D. (Chicago, IL, US)
Application Number:
11/617367
Publication Date:
07/05/2007
Filing Date:
12/28/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
206/223, 383/38, 383/40, 383/121.1
International Classes:
B65D30/22; B65D30/00; B65D69/00; B65D71/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20060175224Cheese box coverAugust, 2006Wilcox
20020100699Cookie packing containerAugust, 2002Yoon
20060283760Child resistant tablet packageDecember, 2006Nivala
20060022025Article withdrawal deviceFebruary, 2006Beasley
20070000800Storage system for a paint-wet paint roller coverJanuary, 2007Stoddart
20030024887Disk carrierFebruary, 2003Dunford et al.
20070227921Promotional display systemOctober, 2007Hluchan
20010033863Pharmaceutical product and method of makingOctober, 2001Chrai et al.
20050241983Monitored medication packageNovember, 2005Snyder et al.
20080164161Cigarette box and an outer blank thereforJuly, 2008Tosaka et al.
20060169618Gift cake designsAugust, 2006Capes



Primary Examiner:
CHU, KING M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
MCANDREWS HELD & MALLOY, LTD (500 WEST MADISON STREET, SUITE 3400, CHICAGO, IL, 60661, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A baby supply tote comprising: (a) an enclosure formed from pliable material, said enclosure comprising a bottom panel and, extending upwardly therefrom, a front panel, a rear panel and a pair of side panels, and further comprising a top panel at least partially removably fastenable to each of said front panel, rear panel and side panels, said panels when assembled defining an interior surface and an exterior surface, at least one of said panel exterior surfaces having at least one compartment formed thereon, and at least one of said panel interior surfaces having at least one compartment formed thereon; (b) a removable baby-changing board formed from substantially nonpliable material, said removable baby-changing board having an upper surface and a lower surface, said removable baby-changing lower surface disposed substantially adjacent and substantially coextensive with said bottom panel, said removable baby-changing board upper surface having a pliable covering disposed thereon, whereby said baby-changing board provides structural support to said bottom panel when installed within said enclosure in a position adjacent said bottom panel.

2. The baby supply tote of claim 1, wherein said top panel is removably fastened to each of said front panel and side panels.

3. The baby supply tote of claim 2, wherein said top panel is removably fastened to each of said front panel and side panels by a fastener, said fastener comprising at least one of a zipper, a detachable hook-and-loop fastener, a plurality of snaps, and a plurality of buttons attached to one of said front panel, rear panel and side panels, each of said plurality of buttons insertable into a corresponding opening formed in said top panel.

4. The baby supply tote of claim 1, wherein said pliable covering is formed from a water-resistant material.

5. The baby supply tote of claim 4, wherein said water-resistant material is polymeric.

6. The baby supply tote of claim 5, wherein said water-resistant material comprises polytetrafluoroethylene.

7. The baby supply tote of claim 1, wherein pliable covering is removable and washable.

8. The baby supply tote of claim 1, wherein one of said front panel, rear panel and side panels has an opening formed therein in a position adjacent said bottom panel when said enclosure is assembled, said opening adapted to accommodate the insertion of said removable baby-changing board into said enclosure.

9. The baby supply tote of claim 8, wherein said opening has a fastener associate therewith for securing said opening in a closed position.

10. The baby supply tote of claim 9, wherein said fastener is one of a zipper, a detachable hook-and-loop fastener, a plurality of snaps, and at least one button attached to one of said front panel, rear panel and side panels, said at least one button insertable into a corresponding opening formed in said top panel.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION(S)

This application relates to and claims priority benefits from U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/754,727, filed Dec. 29, 2005, entitled “Baby Supply Tote”. The '727 provisional application is hereby incorporated by reference herein in its entirety.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to a baby supply tote bag having a plurality of pockets for carrying and storing baby supplies. More particularly, the present disclosure relates to a baby supply tote bag that accommodates baby supplies and items for the caregiver, such as a caregiver could store in a separate purse. The present disclosure also relates to a baby supply tote that has a plank member disposed at its interior bottom portion, which provides structural support to the tote and can be used as a diaper-changing surface.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

A number of baby supply bags are known in the field of the disclosure. Prior baby supply bags generally attempt to address the issue of carrying the supplies that are useful for traveling with a baby or small child, such as diapers, toys, snacks, or clothing. Indeed, the overwhelming amount of things that a baby can need during even the shortest of journeys outside of the home makes a baby supply bag useful.

Just as the baby requires numerous supplies for his comfort on a trip, the mother also requires supplies for her own comfort and convenience, such as her wallet, checkbook, sunglasses, cosmetics, hair brush, and mobile phone. The mother's effects are often relegated to a separate purse, requiring her to juggle yet another item in addition to handling the baby. Alternatively, the mother can attempt to store her effects in a conventional baby bag, but due to deficient consideration for non-baby supplies found in such bags, this results in an inefficient mixture of baby supplies with the mother's supplies.

In addition to the multitude of diapers and other supplies that are useful to carry along with a child, it is often desirable find an area to change the child on very short notice. Often times, the need to change a baby occurs suddenly and when a restroom is not convenient. Furthermore, even if a restroom is nearby, many do not provide sufficient counter space, let alone a sanitary surface, on which to change a baby. The ability to provide a ready, stable and sanitary surface upon which to change a baby is greatly desired by tote users.

The structural design of these bags is also a concern of the mother or caregiver. A stiff or rigid structure of a tote can make the tote heavier and more cumbersome to carry. Furthermore, when the sides of the tote are stiff or rigid, the volume of the tote can be larger than needed, making the tote cumbersome. When the sides of a tote are not rigid this allows the bag to take up less volume when the bag is not full. However, at the other end of the spectrum, some rigidity can help to maintain the organization of the materials inside the tote. A tote with a rigid or semi rigid bottom, and sides that are not rigid has a desirable weight and can be less cumbersome to carry. Furthermore, the rigid or semi rigid component at the bottom of the tote can help to maintain the organization of the materials in the tote.

Examples of prior disclosed baby bags include: Kalozdi U.S. Pat. No. 6,298,993, Gonzalez U.S. Pat. No. 5,743,649, Delligatti U.S. Pat. No. 5,439,154, Lim U.S. Pat. No. 4,781,277, Titus U.S. Pat. No. 4,685,559, and Coates U.S. Pat. No. 4,566,130, which disclose diaper bags with compartments for baby supplies.

Kalozdi U.S. Pat. No. 6,298,993, Delligatti U.S. Pat. No. 5,439,154, Lim U.S. Pat. No. 4,781,277, Coates U.S. Pat. No. 4,566,130, and Taniguchi U.S. Pat. No. 4,068,786 disclose a changing surface. While these designs do provide a changing surface, they are cumbersome to fold and carry, inconvenient to use, and do not provide a sufficiently rigid surface.

To overcome the aforementioned problems with baby supply bags, it would be desirable to have a bag that accommodates the needs of the baby and the caregiver alike, as well as for a bag that provides a ready, stable, and sanitary surface upon which to change the baby. This bag should also have sufficient structural rigidity to maintain its shape and organization of its contents without being overly bulky and cumbersome.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

At least some of above-cited shortcomings of prior conventional baby supply bags are overcome by a baby supply tote comprising:

(a) an enclosure formed from pliable material, the enclosure comprising a bottom panel and, extending upwardly therefrom, a front panel, a rear panel and a pair of side panels, and further comprising a top panel at least partially removably fastenable to each of the front panel, rear panel and side panels, the panels when assembled defining an interior surface and an exterior surface, at least one of the panel exterior surfaces having at least one compartment formed thereon, and at least one of the panel interior surfaces having at least one compartment formed thereon;

(b) a removable baby-changing board formed from substantially nonpliable material, the removable baby-changing board having an upper surface and a lower surface, the removable baby-changing lower surface disposed substantially adjacent and substantially coextensive with the bottom panel, the removable baby-changing board upper surface having a pliable covering disposed thereon.

In operation, the baby changing board provides structural support to the bottom panel when installed within the enclosure in a position adjacent the bottom panel.

In a preferred embodiment, the top panel of the baby supply tote is removably fastened to each of the front panel and side panels. The top panel is preferably removably fastened to each of the front panel and side panels by a fastener, the fastener comprising at least one of a zipper, a detachable hook-and-loop fastener, a plurality of snaps, and a plurality of buttons attached to one of the front panel, rear panel and side panels, each of the plurality of buttons insertable into a corresponding opening formed in the top panel.

In a preferred embodiment, the pliable covering of the baby supply tote is formed from a water-resistant material. The water-resistant material is preferably polymeric and comprises polytetrafluoroethylene. The pliable covering is also preferably removable and washable.

In a preferred embodiment of the present baby supply tote, one of the front panel, rear panel and side panels has an opening formed therein in a position adjacent the bottom panel when the enclosure is assembled. The opening is adapted to accommodate the insertion of the removable baby-changing board into the enclosure. The opening preferably has a fastener associate therewith for securing the opening in a closed position. The fastener is preferably one of a zipper, a detachable hook-and-loop fastener, a plurality of snaps, and at least one button attached to one of the front panel, rear panel and side panels. The at least one button is insertable into a corresponding opening formed in the top panel.

The present baby supply tote has compartments for the caregiver's supplies and the baby's supplies. The tote has exterior compartments, providing ready access for the caregiver to items such as a wallet, keys, cosmetics, and water bottle. The interior of the tote also has a plurality of compartments for baby supplies, such as baby bottles, baby food jars, snacks, clothes and toys.

The preferred baby supply tote has a shoulder strap, attached to the sides of the tote, which allows the tote to be carried as a shoulder bag.

In a preferred embodiment, the present baby supply tote also has back straps attached to the rear of the tote such that the tote can optionally be worn as a backpack. When the tote is worn as a backpack, the shoulder strap can be stored inside the tote and secured by a shoulder strap retention device. When the tote is carried like a shoulder bag, draw buckles on the back straps can be tightened such that the back straps are held in tension against the tote and out of the way.

A purse compartment can also be attached to the exterior of the tote. The inside of the purse compartment preferably has one or more interior compartments to hold small items and an open volume large enough to accommodate a wallet and checkbook.

The exterior of the tote can also include a cosmetics compartment for holding items such as lipstick, mascara, eyeliner and the like. The purse compartment and the cosmetics compartment can be accessed without opening the tote and entering the tote's interior.

The interior of the tote preferably contains several compartments specifically adapted to accommodate baby supplies. These compartments can include, but are not limited to: baby bottle holders, baby food compartments, diaper compartments, and toy compartments.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING(S)

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a baby supply tote in accordance with the disclosure

FIG. 2 is front view of a baby tote.

FIG. 3 is rear view of a baby tote.

FIG. 4 is a side view of the left and right sides of a baby tote.

FIG. 5 is an inside view of the rear and side panels of a baby tote.

FIG. 6 is an inside view of the front panel of a baby tote.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF PREFERRED EMBODIMENT(S)

Referring now to the appended drawing figures and initially to FIGS. 1-3, a baby supply tote in accordance with the disclosure is designated generally by reference numeral 100. This embodiment includes a front panel 101, a rear panel 102, a top panel 103, a bottom panel 104, and side panels 105. Preferably, the panels are constructed of waxed canvas, vinyl, polyester, uncoated nylon, polyurethane coated nylon, urethane coated nylon, CORDURA® or some other similarly water-resistant textile. The panels can also be constructed of leather or synthetic leather. Although the preferred dimensions of the tote 100 are: 17 inches tall, 19 inches wide, and 6 inches deep (approximately 43 centimeters by 48 centimeters by 15 centimeters), variations in these dimensions can be made as part of the disclosed baby tote. The side panels 105 can be constructed of an elastic material or have expansion panels to allow the depth of tote 100 to be expanded or contracted as desired.

A fastener 106 allows the top panel 103 to be detached from the front 101 and side panels 105. Preferably, the fastener 106 is a snap or cooperating hook-and-loop fastening material (commercially available under the trade name VELCRO®), although it can be a button, zipper, clasp, or other similar closure. A shoulder strap 107 can be attached to the side panels 105 to allow the tote 100 to be carried like a shoulder bag. The shoulder strap 107 can optionally include a shoulder harness 108.

As presented in FIG. 3, the tote 100 preferably has back straps 109 attached to the rear panel 102 such that tote 100 can optionally be worn as a backpack. When the tote 100 is worn as a backpack, the shoulder strap 107 can be stored inside the tote 100 and optionally secured by a shoulder strap retention device 110 attached to the interior side of the top panel 103. The shoulder strap retention device 110 is preferably a loop formed from cooperating hook-and-loop fastening material (VELCRO®), although it can be a button strap or tie-strap. When the tote 100 is carried like a shoulder bag, draw buckles 111 on the back straps 109 can be tightened such that the back straps 109 are held in tension against the tote 100 and out of the way.

The exterior of the front panel 101 carries a purse compartment 112 as demonstrated by FIGS. 1 and 2. Although the preferred location of the purse compartment 112 is the front panel 101, other panels can carry the purse compartment 112. The inside of the purse compartment 112 preferably has one or more interior compartments to hold small items and an open volume large enough to accommodate a wallet and checkbook. In a preferred embodiment, the purse compartment 112 is approximately 8 inches wide and 7 inches high (approximately 20 centimeters by 18 centimeters).

In a preferred embodiment, the exterior of the front panel 101 also has a cosmetics compartment 113 for holding items such as lipstick, mascara, eyeliner and the like. Although the preferred location of the cosmetics compartment 113 is the front panel 101, any of the other panels can carry the cosmetics compartment 113. In a further embodiment, the cosmetics compartment 113 is approximately 6 inches high and 6 inches wide (approximately 15 centimeters by 15 centimeters).

As shown in FIGS. 1-4, other features preferably disposed on the exterior of tote 100 include: water/baby bottle holder(s) 114, an ID tag 115, a mobile phone compartment 116, and a time piece 117.

The tote 100 can include a diaper-changing surface 118. In a preferred embodiment, the diaper changing surface 118 is a rigid or semi-rigid plank constructed of plastic, although cardboard, wood, metal, or other material can also be used. The diaper-changing surface 118 is preferably covered with a soft material for the baby's comfort. Preferably, the diaper changing surface 118 is stored at or near the bottom of the tote 100 and is removed and replaced through a plank portal 119 located on a side panel 105. Alternatively, the plank portal 119 can be located on the front panel 101, on the bottom panel 104, or on the rear panel 102. The plank portal 119 is preferably secured by a flap 120 and the flap 120 can be secured by snaps, buttons, zippers, drawstring, elastic, VELCRO®, or other similar closure mechanism. Alternatively, the diaper changing surface 118 can be removed and replaced through the main opening of the tote 100, without use of a plank portal 119. When the diaper-changing surface 118 is stored, it can provide additional structural support to the bottom of the tote 100 by reducing the bending of the bottom panel.

The tote 100 can also have the mobile phone compartment 116 alternatively located inside the tote 100 on the interior side of the top panel 103 or any other panel. An earpiece wire orifice 121 is provided to allow an earpiece to be used with a mobile phone stored inside the tote 100.

Turning now to FIGS. 5 and 6, the interior of the tote 100 contains a plurality of compartments. Preferably, bottle compartment(s) 122 can be disposed on the inside of the side panels 105. Similarly, baby food compartment(s) 123 can also be disposed on the inside of the side panels 105. The preferred dimensions of the bottle compartment(s) 122 and the baby food compartment(s) 123 are approximately 7 inches by 3 inches (approximately 18 centimeters by 8 centimeters) and approximately 5 inches by 3 inches (approximately 13 centimeters by 8 centimeters), respectively.

In FIG. 5, a first diaper pocket 124 is preferably disposed on the inside of the rear panel 102. The preferred dimensions of the first diaper pocket 124 are 12 inches by 12 inches (approximately 30 centimeters by 30 centimeters). Additional compartments, such as a rattle compartment 125, teething ring compartment 126, and other miscellaneous compartment(s) 127, can be disposed upon the first diaper pocket 124.

In FIG. 6, the inside of the front panel 101 preferably carries a second diaper pocket 128. Additional compartment(s), such as a brush and comb compartment 129, can be disposed upon the second diaper pocket 128.

The various compartments of the tote 100 can be constructed of nylon, fabric, opaque fabric, see-through mesh or any other similar material. Items can be secured in the compartments by snaps, buttons, zippers, drawstring, elastic, cooperating hook-and-loop fastening material (VELCRO®), or other closure mechanism.

While particular steps, elements, embodiments and applications of the present invention have been shown and described, it will be understood, of course, that the invention is not limited thereto since modifications can be made by persons skilled in the art, particularly in light of the foregoing teachings. It is therefore contemplated by the claims to cover such modifications as incorporate those steps or elements that come within the scope of the present apparatus.