Title:
Sudoku board game apparatus
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An improved Sudoku board game apparatus includes a game board having a grid of squares and a plurality of predetermined positions within each square for tracking candidate numbers. Each of the predetermined positions comprises a hole extending into the game board. Pegs are placed into the predetermined positions to signify candidate numbers. The above Sudoku board game apparatus provides an improved method of tracking candidate numbers by eliminating the need for a writing instrument or numbered game pieces. It allows candidate numbers, and more specifically patterns of candidate numbers, to be easily recognized, which is an important strategy in solving Sudoku puzzles.



Inventors:
Terbush, George Edward (Elverson, PA, US)
Terbush, James Shannon (Elverson, PA, US)
Application Number:
11/314651
Publication Date:
06/28/2007
Filing Date:
12/22/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F9/00
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
LAYNO, BENJAMIN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
JAMES S. TERBUSH (111 DERBY DRIVE, ELVERSON, PA, 19520, US)
Claims:
We claim:

1. A Sudoku board game apparatus comprising: a game board consisting of a grid of squares, each of said squares having a plurality of peg holes, and; a plurality of pegs which are placed in said peg holes to signify candidate numbers.

2. The Sudoku board game apparatus of claim 1 wherein: said game board includes a nine-by-nine grid of squares, each of said squares having nine peg holes.

3. A Sudoku game board consisting of a nine-by-nine grid of squares, each of said squares having nine peg holes.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Not Applicable

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

Not Applicable

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING, A TABLE, OR A COMPUTER PROGRAM LISTING COMPACT DISC APPENDIX

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to Sudoku board games, and more specifically to a Sudoku board game apparatus comprising a game board having a grid of squares and a plurality of predetermined positions within each square for tracking candidate numbers.

The use of Sudoku puzzles is known in the prior art. Sudoku (sometimes spelled Su Doku) are logic puzzles that use numbers and a nine-by-nine grid of squares. The squares are grouped into nine boxes, each containing a three-by-three grid of squares. Some of the squares contain a number. The goal is to fill in the empty squares so the numbers 1 through 9 appear just once in every row, column, and box.

To solve Sudoku puzzles, it is essential to keep an accurate list of possible numbers (known as candidates) for each blank square. There are two popular notations for keeping track of candidate numbers: subscripts and dots. In subscript notation, the candidate numbers are written in subscript in the squares. The drawback to this is that the original puzzles printed in newspapers are often too small to accommodate more than a few digits. In dot notation, a pattern of dots is written to represent the candidate numbers, with a dot in the top left corner representing a 1 and a dot in the bottom right corner representing a 9. Dexterity is required in placing the dots, since misplaced dots or inadvertent marks inevitably lead to confusion and may not be easy to erase without adding to the confusion.

The puzzle's origin dates back to the 18th century, where Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler invented a puzzle called Latin Squares. The modern day Sudoku puzzle originated in 1979 when a grid titled “Number Place” was published in an American puzzle magazine. By the early 1980s, the puzzle was renamed Sudoku (which means “single number”) and appeared in several Japanese magazines. In 2004, the first Sudoku puzzle was published in a London newspaper. It quickly gained popularity, and is now considered to be an international craze.

Sudoku puzzles were originally available only in printed form—appearing in newspapers, magazines, and books. Recently, Sudoku board games have begun to appear on the market, and consist of familiar, expected and obvious structural configurations.

While these devices fulfill their respective, particular objectives and requirements, the aforementioned Sudoku board games do not provide an efficient means of tracking candidate numbers. More specifically, they require a plurality of game pieces, each bearing a number from 1 through 9, to signify candidate numbers; or they require the solver to write candidate numbers on the game board using a dry erase marker; or they provide no means of tracking candidate numbers (other than using a paper and pencil). Each of these tracking methods has its disadvantages.

Sudoku board games that require a plurality of numbered game pieces to signify candidate numbers do not provide adequate space within the squares for more than four candidate numbers. It can be difficult to add or remove the small game pieces from the board, and it can also be difficult to find a particular number in a pile of game pieces. Sudoku board games that require the solver to write candidate numbers on the game board have the same drawbacks as the printed versions in newspapers. It can be difficult to erase candidate numbers without erasing adjacent numbers, and the process of erasing creates a fine dust.

The inventive device includes a game board having a grid of squares and a plurality of predetermined positions within each square for tracking candidate numbers. Each of the predetermined positions comprises a hole extending into the game board. Pegs are placed into the predetermined positions to signify candidate numbers from 1 through 9. A peg in the top left corner of each square represents a 1, and a peg in the bottom right corner of each square represents a 9. Pegs can easily be added or removed from the game board during the solving process. The inventive device simplifies the process of tracking candidate numbers by eliminating the need for a writing instrument or numbered game pieces. It eliminates the possibility of confusion caused by misplaced dots or inadvertent marks. The inventive device allows candidate numbers, and more specifically patterns of candidate numbers, to be easily recognized, which is an important strategy in solving Sudoku puzzles.

In these respects, the inventive device substantially departs from the conventional concepts and designs of the prior art, and in so doing provides an improved method of tracking candidate numbers.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In view of the foregoing disadvantages inherent in the known types of Sudoku board games now present in the prior art, the present invention provides an improved method of tracking candidate numbers which is not anticipated, rendered obvious, suggested, or even implied by any of the prior art Sudoku board games, either alone or in any combination thereof.

To attain this, the present invention comprises a game board having a grid of squares and a plurality of predetermined positions within each square defining possible candidate numbers. Each of the predetermined positions comprises a hole extending into the game board. Pegs are placed into the predetermined positions to signify candidate numbers from 1 through 9. The position of the peg within each square determines the numerical value of the candidate number.

There has thus been outlined, rather broadly, the more important features of the invention in order that the detailed description thereof that follows may be better understood, and in order that the present contribution to the art may be better appreciated.

In this respect, before explaining at least one embodiment of the invention in detail, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited in its application to the details of construction and to the arrangements of the components set forth in the following description or illustrated in the drawings. The invention is capable of other embodiments and of being practiced and carried out in various ways. Also, it is to be understood that the phraseology and terminology employed herein are for the purpose of description and should not be regarded as limiting.

As such, those skilled in the art will appreciate that the conception, upon which this disclosure is based, may readily be utilized as a basis for the designing of other structures, methods and systems for carrying out the several purposes of the present invention. It is important, therefore, that the claims be regarded as including such equivalent constructions insofar as they do not depart from the spirit and scope of the present invention.

Further, the purpose of the foregoing abstract is to enable the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and the public generally, and especially the scientists, engineers and practitioners in the art who are not familiar with patent or legal terms or phraseology, to determine quickly from a cursory inspection the nature and essence of the technical disclosure of the application. The abstract is neither intended to define the invention of the application, which is measured by the claims, nor is it intended to be limiting as to the scope of the invention in any way.

It is therefore an object of the present invention to provide an improved Sudoku board game apparatus which is not anticipated, rendered obvious, suggested, or even implied by any of the prior art Sudoku board games, either alone or in any combination thereof

It is another object of the present invention to provide an improved Sudoku board game which may be easily and efficiently manufactured and marketed.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide an improved Sudoku board game which is of a durable and reliable construction.

An even further object of the present invention is to provide an improved Sudoku board game which is susceptible of a low cost of manufacture with regard to both materials and labor, and which accordingly is then susceptible of low prices of sale to the consuming public, thereby making such game economically available to the buying public.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide an improved Sudoku board game which provides in the apparatuses and methods of the prior art some of the advantages thereof, while simultaneously overcoming some of the disadvantages normally associated therewith.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide an improved Sudoku board game which includes a game board having a grid of squares and a plurality of predetermined positions within each square defining possible candidate numbers. Each of the predetermined positions comprises a hole extending into the game board. Pegs are placed into the predetermined positions to signify candidate numbers.

Yet another object of the present invention is to provide an improved Sudoku board game which simplifies the process of tracking candidate numbers by eliminating the need for a writing instrument or numbered game pieces, thereby allowing the solver to concentrate on the logic required to solve the puzzle.

Still yet another object of the present invention is to provide an improved Sudoku board game which allows candidate numbers, and more specifically patterns of candidate numbers, to be easily recognized, which is an important strategy in solving Sudoku puzzles.

These together with other objects of the invention, along with the various features of novelty which characterize the invention, are pointed out with particularity in the claims annexed to and forming a part of this disclosure. For a better understanding of the invention, its operating advantages and the specific objects attained by its uses, reference should be made to the accompanying drawings and descriptive matter in which there are illustrated preferred embodiments of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING

The invention will be better understood and objects other than those set forth above will become apparent when consideration is given to the following detailed description thereof Such description makes reference to the annexed drawings wherein:

Sheet 1/3—FIG. 1 is a plan view of the game board of the present invention, showing a nine-by-nine grid of squares, and nine peg holes within each square.

Sheet 2/3—FIG. 2 is a cross-sectional view taken along line 2-2 of the present invention.

Sheet 3/3—FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the pegs of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

With reference now to the drawings, and in particular to FIGS. 1 through 3 thereof, an improved Sudoku board game apparatus embodying the principles and concepts of the present invention and generally designated by the reference numeral will be described.

As best illustrated in FIGS. 1 through 3, the present invention comprises a game board 10 and a plurality of pegs 20. The game board 10 has eighty-one squares 12, which are arranged in a nine-by-nine grid 14. Each of the squares 12 contains nine peg holes 16, which are arranged in a three-by-three grid 18.

Pegs 20 are placed into the peg holes 16 to signify candidate numbers from 1 through 9. A peg 20 in the top left corner 22 of each square 12 represents a 1, and a peg 20 in the bottom right corner 24 of each square 12 represents a 9. Each of the pegs 20 has a top portion 26 and a bottom portion 28. Each of the top portions 26 has a shape adapted to make it easier to see and pick up. Each of the bottom portions 28 has a shape adapted to fitting in the peg holes 16.

The three-by-three grid 18 of peg holes 16 within each square 12 allows candidate numbers to be quickly identified. Squares 12 containing the same candidate numbers are easy to find because the pegs 20 signifying those numbers are in the same position of each square 12. Further, the three-by-three grid 18 allows patterns of candidate numbers to be easily found because the pegs 20 create recognizable patterns within each square 12.

With respect to the above description, it is to be realized that the optimum dimensional relationships for the parts of the invention, to include variations in size, materials, shape, form, function and manner of operation, assembly and use, are deemed readily apparent and obvious to one skilled in the art, and all equivalent relationships to those illustrated in the drawings and described in the specification are intended to be encompassed by the present invention.

Therefore, the foregoing is considered as illustrative only of the principles of the invention. Further, since numerous modifications and changes will readily occur to those skilled in the art, it is not desired to limit the invention to the exact construction and operation shown and described, and accordingly, all suitable modifications and equivalents may be resorted to, falling within the scope of the invention.