Title:
Stackable construction panel intersection assembly
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The invention concerns a wall form intersection assembly for receiving a flowable material. The assembly includes a pair of opposed spaced-apart foam panels having a top surface and a bottom surface, each panel including a first section having first and second opposed ends, the first sections being parallel to each other. Each panel of the pair also includes a second linear section pointing outwardly from said first end of the first linear section and forming an angle therewith. The assembly also includes at least one end foam panel, each including a section facing said second linear sections and being tied in spaced relation therewith. The panels define therebetween a cavity for receiving the flowable material and forming an intersection in a wall. The cavity may be T-shaped or cross-shaped, depending on the at least one end foam panel arrangement.



Inventors:
Beliveau, Jean-louis (Canton de Magog, CA)
Application Number:
11/472623
Publication Date:
05/24/2007
Filing Date:
06/22/2006
Assignee:
POLYFORM A.G.P. INC.
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04B2/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
BUCKLE JR, JAMES J
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
ST. ONGE STEWARD JOHNSTON & REENS, LLC (986 BEDFORD STREET, STAMFORD, CT, 06905-5619, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A wall form intersection assembly for receiving a flowable material, comprising: a pair of opposed spaced-apart foam panels having a top surface and a bottom surface, each panel viewed from the top surface comprising: a first linear section having first and second opposed ends, the first linear sections of the pair being in a parallel relationship to each other; and a second linear section pointing outwardly from said first end of the first linear section and forming an angle therewith; and at least one end foam panel having a top surface and a bottom surface, each of said at least one end foam panel viewed from the top surface comprising: a section facing said second linear sections and being tied in spaced relation therewith; whereby the opposed foam panels and the at least one end foam panel define therebetween a cavity for receiving the flowable material and forming an intersection in a wall, the cavity including a first portion between the fist linear sections and a second portion between the second linear sections and the at least one end foam panel.

2. The wall form intersection assembly of claim 1, wherein the second linear sections are integrally formed with the corresponding first linear sections.

3. The wall form intersection assembly of claim 2, wherein the second linear sections extend in a collinear relationship.

4. The wall form intersection assembly of claim 3, wherein the angle between the second linear sections and the first linear sections is about 90°.

5. The wall form intersection assembly of claim 4, wherein the at least one end foam panel consists of a single end foam panel facing said second linear sections whereby said cavity between the end foam panel and the pair of opposed spaced-apart foam panels is T-shaped.

6. The wall form intersection assembly of claim 5, wherein the end foam panel, viewed from the top surface thereof, has a ridge projecting from in an inner face thereof towards the first portion of the cavity to guide the flowable material into the second portion of the cavity, said ridge extending from the top surface to the bottom surface of the end foam panel.

7. The wall form intersection assembly of claim 6, wherein said ridge has a tapered shape with a curved apex.

8. The wall form intersection assembly of claim 7, wherein said ridge is integrally formed with the end foam panel.

9. The wall form intersection assembly of claim 4, wherein said at least one end foam panel consists of a pair of spaced-apart end foam panels, each end foam panel of the pair comprising: said section, hereinafter referred to as the first section, facing a respective one of the second linear sections; and a second section extending at a right angle from an inner end of a respective one of said first section, and each of said second sections being in a collinear relationship with a respective one of said first linear sections, whereby the cavity between said at least one end foam panel and the pair of opposed spaced-apart foam panels is cross-shaped.

10. The wall form intersection assembly of claim 1, wherein the first linear sections of the opposed foam panels are of equal length.

11. The wall form intersection assembly of claim 1, wherein the second linear sections of the opposed foam panels are of equal length.

12. The wall form intersection assembly of claim 1, wherein the top and bottom surfaces of the opposed foam panels and the at least one end foam panel are provided with alternating projections and recesses to cooperate to enable two wall form intersection assemblies to be sturdily stackable together.

13. The wall form intersection assembly of claim 1, wherein the opposed foam panels are tied together with at least one connector, and said section of the at least one end foam panel is tied to the second linear section of the opposed foam panels with at least one end connector.

14. A wall form intersection system comprising at least two of said wall form intersection assemblies as defined in claim 1, stackable on top of each other, with the at least one end foam panel and the opposed foam panels of a first wall form assembly being respectively mountable on top of the at least one end foam panel and the opposed foam panels of an underlying wall form assembly.

15. The wall form intersection system of claim 14, comprising a first set and a second set of said wall form assemblies, wherein: the second linear sections of the opposed foam panels of said first set are longer than the second linear sections of the opposed foam panels of the second set; and the first linear section of the opposed foam panels of said first set are shorter than the first linear sections of the opposed foam panels of the second set; and whereby the wall form assemblies of the first set is stackable with the wall form assemblies of the second set in a staggered fashion.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

The present application claims priority benefits under 35 U.S.C. §119(e) of U.S. Provisional Patent Application Ser. No. 60/737,750 filed Nov. 18, 2005, the content of which is incorporated herein by reference.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to stackable wall forms for receiving flowable materials such as concrete. More particularly, it concerns assemblies for intersection wall forms.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Various different systems and methods currently exist for making insulating forms for casting a concrete wall. Often, these systems include pairs of opposed foam panels generally made of rigid foam such as polystyrene, which define concrete-receiving cavities therebetween. Those pairs of foam panels are stacked one on top of the other so as to form the wall form assemblage. Once the concrete is solidified, the assembled wall forms remain in place to insulate the wall. Before the pouring of concrete, the opposed foam panels are typically maintained in spaced and parallel relationship by connectors each having a pair of parallel lateral attachment flanges embedded in the respective foam panels, and a connecting web interconnecting the flanges.

The stacking of such panels is performed on the construction site. It is desirable in this field to provide wall forms that allow, on one hand, an easy and very rapid stacking without loosing time and, on the other hand, allow construction of a stable and solid stack that is unlikely to accidentally disassemble prior to the pouring of concrete. As can be easily understood, as soon as the concrete is poured, the chances that the stack collapses or disassembles are greatly reduced. However, it is desirable to maximize the pre-pouring stability of the non-stacked and stacked wall forms, while keeping them manageable.

Pairs of foam panels are used to construct different kinds of wall forms. On the one hand, straight wall forms include two straight parallel foam panels. On the other hand, corner wall forms include two parallel foam panels formed to bend around a corner at various angles. Each foam panel for corner wall forms may include two or more foam panel sections, which should be longitudinally contiguous to define the corner and to avoid the flowable concrete leaking outside of the wall form. However, it is difficult to use the known stackable panels to construct wall forms of certain other types, such as intersection wall forms, that are desired in the construction industry.

By way of example, wall forms and construction foam panels of the type discussed above are shown in published Canadian patent applications nos. 2,292,865, 2,312,158 and 2,358,195, all in the name of the present assignee. Other examples of insulating construction panel are shown in U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,895,469; 4,229,920; 4,704,429; 4,884,382; 4,885,888, 4,894,969; and 5,428,933.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention presents numerous advantages and overcomes disadvantages of the prior art, by proposing a stackable construction panel intersection assembly.

The invention thus provides a wall form intersection assembly for receiving a flowable material. The wall form intersection assembly includes a pair of opposed spaced-apart foam panels having a top surface and a bottom surface. Viewed from the top surface, each panel includes a first linear section having first and second opposed ends, the first linear sections of the pair being in a parallel relationship to each other. Each panel also includes a second linear section pointing outwardly from the first end of the first linear section and forming an angle therewith. The assembly further includes at least one end foam panel having a top surface and a bottom surface. Each of said at least one end foam panel viewed from the top surface includes a section facing the second linear sections and is tied is spaced relation therewith. The opposed foam panels and the at least one end foam panel thereby define therebetween a cavity for receiving the flowable material and forming an intersection in a wall. The cavity includes a first portion between the first linear sections and a second portion between the second linear sections and the at least one end foam panel.

Preferably, the second linear sections are integrally formed with the opposed foam panels. Also preferably, the second linear sections of the opposed foam panels extend at right angles relative to the first linear sections and the at least one end foam panel consists of a single end foam panel facing the second linear sections, thereby making the cavity substantially T-shaped.

Also preferably, the at least one end foam panel consists of a pair of spaced-apart end foam panels. Each end foam panel of the pair includes the section, hereinafter referred to as the first section, facing a respective one of the second linear sections. Each end foam panel also includes a second section extending at a right angle from an inner end of a respective one of said first sections. Each of the second sections is in a collinear relationship with a respective one of the first linear sections. The cavity between the at least one end foam panel and the pair of opposed spaced-apart foam panels is thus cross-shaped.

The present invention also provides a wall form intersection system including at least two of the above-mentioned wall form intersection assemblies. The wall form intersection assemblies are stackable on top of each other, with the end foam panel and the opposed foam panels of a first wall form assembly being respectively mountable on top of the end foam panel and the opposed foam panels of an underlying wall form assembly.

Preferably, the system comprises a first set and a second set of the wall form assemblies. The first and second sets have different lengths of linear sections, to enable them to be stackable on each other in a staggered fashion.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The preferred embodiments are shown in the drawings, and the elements are indicated with reference characters. If an element was indicated in one drawing, it may not be in another one, in order not to weigh down the drawings.

FIG. 1 is a top view of the wall form intersection assembly of the present invention according to a “short” variant thereof.

FIG. 2 is a top view of the wall form intersection assembly of the present invention according to a “long” variant thereof.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of the short variant of the intersection assembly according to the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the long variant of the intersection assembly according to the present invention.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view of the wall form intersection system of the present invention, where a long assembly and a short assembly are stacked together.

FIG. 6 is a top view of the wall form intersection assembly of the present invention according to another variant thereof.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of the wall form intersection assembly of the present invention according to the variant of FIG. 6.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is directed to a stackable construction panel assembly to be used in a stackable construction system, which uses wall forms arranged to define a cavity into which a flowable material may be flowed.

First, the wall form intersection assembly of the present invention is useful for making intersection walls, an more specifically, T-shaped or cross-shaped intersection walls.

Referring to FIGS. 1 to 7, there are shown a few variants of a wall form intersection assembly (10) which are suitable to make a form for receiving flowable material such as concrete or the like into a cavity (11). The assembly (10) includes a pair of opposed spaced-apart foam panels (12A, 12B), which are also called “longitudinal” panels. The opposed panels (12) are preferably parallel and substantially rectangular foamed plastic panels.

Referring briefly to FIG. 3, each of the pair of foam panels (12A, 12B) has a top surface (13A) and a bottom surface (13B).

Referring back to FIG. 1, viewing the assembly from the top surface, each of the pair of foam panels (12A, 12B) has a first linear section (14A, 14B). The first linear sections (14) are preferably tied together in a spaced and parallel relationship along a first axis (15) with at least one connector (16). The first linear sections (14) are in a parallel relation relative to each other since most walls to be formed therein are designed to have a uniform width, among other reasons that would be known to a person skilled in the art. Furthermore, the first linear sections (14A, 14B) delimit therebetween a first portion (18) of the cavity (also called the “first” or “longitudinal” cavity (18)). Preferably, a plurality of connectors (16) is used, depending on the length of the pair of foam panels (12). The connectors (16) may be, for exemple, spaced at about eight inch intervals. However, depending on the width of the first cavity (18) and other parameters of the assembly (10), a person skilled in the art could arrange the connectors at functional intervals that are regularly spaced or not. The width of the first cavity is for example about six inches, but the assembly may be easily adapted depending on the desired width.

Still referring to FIG. 1, it is preferable that the connector (16) include a pair of anchor members (20A, 20B) respectively embedded in the first and second opposed foam panels (12A, 12B), and a web-shaped connecting member (22) extending between the foam panels (12A, 12B) and being connected to the anchor members (20A, 20B).

Furthermore, the opposed foam panels (12A, 12B) are preferably movable between an extended position (as shown in FIG. 1) where the foam panels (12A, 12B) are spaced apart to make the wall form, and a collapsed position (not illustrated) where the foam panels (12A, 12B) are brought close to each other, mainly for transport and shipping purposes. This may be achieved by mounting the web-shaped member (22) to the anchor members (20A, 20B) in a pivotal or otherwise movable relationship.

Each foam panel (12A, 12B) of the pair also has a first end (21A) and a second end (21B); and a second linear section (24A, 24B) pointing outwardly from its first end (21A). Preferably, the second linear sections (24A, 24B) are integrally formed with their respective first linear sections (14A, 14B). Alternatively, the second linear sections (24A, 24B) may be integrated with the assembly using a variety of fixing means, or made to abut on the fist end (21A) of the first linear section (14). In such a case (not illustrated), the first linear sections (14) would have butt-ends at their first ends (21A) to which the second linear sections (24) are operatively connected or abutted. The second linear sections (24A, 24B) extend laterally outward away from the first portion (18) of the cavity (11). Preferably, they extend at right angles relative to the first linear sections (14) to provide for a right-angled intersection. However, as was previously mentioned, the second linear sections (24A, 24B) may also extend at other angles, be they obtuse or acute, different from each other or the same, depending on the desired wall intersection to be formed.

Still referring to FIG. 1, the intersection assembly (10) further includes at least one end foam panel (26). In the preferred embodiment of FIGS. 1 to 5, the at least one end foam panel is a single end foam panel (26). In this case, the end foam panel (26) is the third foam panel in the inventive assembly (10), the others being the pair of opposed foam panels (12A, 12B). The end foam panel (26) has section (27) that may also be referred to as the first section. The end foam panel is tied in spaced relation to the second linear sections (24A, 24B) of the opposed longitudinal panels (12A, 12B) using end connectors (28A, 28B), which are preferably similar to those used to tie together the longitudinal panels (12A, 12B). The end connectors (26) are thus arranged so that the end foam panel (26) and the second linear sections (24A, 24B) define there-between a second portion (30) of the cavity (11) (also called the “second” cavity or the “end” cavity). Preferably, the second cavity (30) extends along a second axis (31). This second axis is preferably at a right angle relative to the first axis (15), but may also be arranged at other angles. Alternatively, when the second linear sections (24A, 24B) point outwardly at different angles, the second axis would be nonlinear, but would have a V-shape or another shape.

In any case, the three foam panels (12A, 12B, 26) are interconnected so that the end cavity (30) and the longitudinal cavity (18) make up a cavity (11) into which the flowable material may be flowed.

Again referring to FIG. 1, the end foam panel (26) is preferably tied to the second linear sections (24A, 24B) so as to be in a parallel relationship therewith. Thus, when the second linear sections (24A, 24B) extend in opposite directions and at right angles relative to the first axis (15) direction, the end foam panel (26) is straight. However, as may be appreciated by a person skilled in the art, if the second linear sections (24A, 24B) extend at forward angles, the end foam panel (26) may be V-shaped in order the remain parallel therewith, thus enabling the assembly to define more of an overall Y-shaped cavity.

Now referring to the embodiment of FIG. 6, the at least one end foam panel (26) consists of a pair of spaced-apart end foam panels (26A, 26B). Thus, for this embodiment, there are four foam panels that make up the wall form intersection assembly. Each end foam panel of the pair includes a section (27A, 27B), hereinafter referred to as the first sections. The first sections (27A, 27B) face a respective one of the second linear sections (24A, 24B). Each end foam panel (26) also includes a second section (29A, 29B) extending at a right angle from an inner end (33A, 33B) of a respective one of said first sections (27A, 27B). Preferably, each of the second sections (29A, 29B) is in a collinear relationship with a respective one of the first linear sections (14A, 14B). The cavity (11) between the at least one end foam panel (26) and the pair of opposed spaced-apart foam panels (12A, 12B) is, for this embodiment, cross-shaped. There is thus a third portion of the cavity (35), which enables another type of intersection wall to be formed.

Referring to FIG. 7, this embodiment of the pair of spaced-apart end foam panels (26A, 26B) is also shown. It should be noted that the second sections (29A, 29B) and/or the first sections (27A, 27B) may be oriented in a fashion to obtain a desired cavity shape, depending on the shape of the intersection wall to be formed. It is nevertheless preferable that the wall form intersection assembly be symmetrical along axes (15) and (31), as shown in FIGS. 6 and 7. Also, the possibilities discussed in relation to variants of FIGS. 1 to 5 are also pertinent in relation to the variant of FIGS. 6 and 7.

As can be appreciated in FIG. 1, it is also preferable that the two opposite ends of the end foam panel (26) respectively extend to a same distance as the ends of the second linear sections (24A, 24B) of the pair of opposed foam panels (12A, 12B). However, depending on other wall forms to be abutted, connected and/or stacked on the wall form intersection assembly (10), the ends of the end foam panel (26) and the second linear sections (24A, 24B) may be designed to be of different lengths, dimensions, etc.

Preferably, the first cavity (18) and the second cavity (30) each have a width of “n”, which is preferably six inches. Also preferably, the assembly (10) may be modified by bringing the longitudinal opposed panels (12A, 12B) closer together (i.e. by changing connectors (16)) so that the width of the first cavity (18) is for example four inches. In such a case, a different end foam panel (26), one which has a length of two less inches, may be used in order that the two ends of the end foam panel (26) respectively extend to a same distance as the second linear sections (24A, 24B) of the pair of opposed foam panels (12A, 12B). As would be readily appreciated by a person skilled in the art, the assembly (10) may be modified to give many different combinations of widths and lengths of the first and second cavities (18, 30).

It is also preferred that the end foam panel (26) further include a ridge (32). Viewed from the top surface of the end foam panel (26), the ridge (32) preferably projects from an inner face (33) thereof towards the first portion (18) of the cavity (11) to guide the flowable material into the second portion (30) of the cavity. The ridge (32) preferably extends from the top surface (13A) to the bottom surface (13B) of the end foam panel (26), as shown in FIG. 3. Preferably, this ridge (32) helps the flowable material flowing into the second cavity (30), distributing the material into both sides thereof. Alternatively, the ridge (32) may be used to direct the flowable material in another desired location depending on the cavities (shape, size, orientation, etc.), the flowable material (fluidity, viscosity, composition, etc.) and the flowing conditions (laminar, turbulent, etc.). Preferably still, the ridge (32), viewed from the top surface (13A), has a tapered shape with a curved apex, and is integrally formed with the end foam panel (26).

Furthermore, similarly to what is possible with the longitudinal opposed panels (12A, 12B), the end foam panel (26) is movable between an extended position, as shown in FIG. 1, where the end foam panel (12A, 12B) is spaced apart from the second linear sections (24A, 24B) to define the second cavity (30) of the wall form, and a collapsed position (not illustrated) where the end foam panel (26) is brought closer to the second linear sections (24A, 24B).

Referring now to FIG. 3, another advantageous aspect of the three interconnected panels (12A, 12B, 26) is that each of the top (13A) and bottom (13B) wall surfaces of each of the foam panels are provided with a median row (38) of alternating recesses (40) and projections (42) having a similar complementary shape. The projections (42) are shown with the reference character “M” in FIGS. 1 and 2. This median row (38) is disposed between two coplanar edge surfaces (44) bordering the edges of the panels (12A, 12B, 26). These coplanar edge surfaces (44) preferably have a width sufficiently large so as to offer an increased stability between interlocked panels (12A, 12B, 26).

Each projection (42) or recess (40) of the top wall surface (13A) of one longitudinal panel (12A) is opposed respectively to a recess (40) or a projection (42) of the bottom wall surface (13B) of the same panel (12A), and is facing respectively a recess (40) and a projection (42) of the top surface (34) of the other longitudinal panel (12B), when the pair of panels (12A and 12B) are in the extended position. It will be understood that in this manner, the pair of longitudinal panels (12A, 12B) may advantageously be interconnected with a like pair of panels with either of its opposed wall surfaces (13A, 13B) acting as the top or bottom wall surface.

Similarly, each projection (42) or recess (40) provided on the top surface (13A) of the end foam panel (26) is opposed respectively to a recess (40) or a projection (42) of the bottom wall surface (13B) of the same panel (26). Advantageously, a projection (42) or recess (40) provided on the top surface (13A) of the second linear sections (24A, 24B) of the longitudinal panels (12A, 12B) are facing respectively a recess (40) and a projection (42) of the top surface (13A) of the end foam panel (26), when the end foam panel (26) is in the extended position.

Referring to FIG. 5, the present invention provides a wall form intersection system (46) including at least two of the above-mentioned wall form intersection assemblies (10). The wall form intersection assemblies are stackable on top of each other, with the end foam panel and the opposed foam panels of a first wall form assembly (10A) being respectively mountable on top of the end foam panel and the opposed foam panels of an underlying wall form assembly (10B).

Preferably, two variants (so called “short” (10A) and “long” (10B)) of the assembly are used together to construct the wall form intersection system (46). When assembling a wall form with stackable assemblies (10), they are placed one on top of each other. The two variants of assemblies are preferably stacked alternatively on top of each other in order in a staggered fashion to increase the stability of the wall form and improve the insulation and other features thereof. The so-called “short” assembly variant is shown in FIGS. 1 and 3, and prescribes, as may be appreciated, that the end foam panel (26) has substantially the same (or shorter) length as the longitudinal panels (12A, 12B). The so-called “long” assembly variant is shown in FIGS. 2 and 4, and prescribes, as may be appreciated, that the end foam panel (26) has a longer length than the longitudinal panels (12A, 12B).

It should be understood also that the cross-shaped variant of FIGS. 6 and 7 is a “short” type assembly, and may be used in combination with a corresponding “long” type assembly that is cross-shaped (not shown).

Referring to FIG. 5, the short variant (10A) has been stacked on top of the long variant (10B), thereby making up a two-assembly wall form setup (46) and extending the cavity vertically. The two variants may be alternatively placed one on top of the other, thereby overlapping while fitting together via the projections (42) and recesses (40) and extending the cavity vertically until a desired height. Furthermore, as can be readily appreciated by a person skilled in the art, there may be more than two different assembly variants used to construct a construction panel wall forms, albeit that the variants should be sufficiently compatible with one another.

Also, the panels of neighbouring wall forms are preferably arranged to abut one another along their horizontal and vertical sides, thereby enabling a variety of arrangements of wall forms to be constructed. Thus, a wall form system may be constructed, which combines one or more intersection assemblies (10) with one or more assemblies known in the art (described in “BACKGROUND” section hereabove).

Preferably, the wall form intersection assembly (10) according to the present invention defines a T-shaped cavity, as shown in the preferred embodiments of FIGS. 1 to 5. The T-shape is preferable since right angles and T-junctions are commonly used in the construction industry. However, as may be envisioned by a person skilled in the art, the wall form assembly may more generally define a cavity for forming an intersection wall, that is, a wall combination that includes at least three wall segments. As shown in FIGS. 6 and 7, the intersection wall may have four wall segments that intersect to form a cross-shaped wall. Various different wall shapes may be desirable for different construction and architectural needs and constraints. The assembly is thus not restricted to the embodiment of strictly right-angled or symmetrical T-shapes or cross-shapes. For example, the end part of the “T” or cross may be angled or non-symmetrical with respect to the longitudinal part; also, the end part may be longer, shorter or the same length as the longitudinal part. The shape of the assembly may, alternatively, substantially resemble a “Y”, an “→”, or another shape (curved, irregular, etc.) useful in forming an intersection wall. These embodiments are not shown in the appended FIGs, but would be evident to a person skilled in the art.

Although preferred embodiments and variants of the invention have been described in detail herein and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, it is to be understood that the invention is not limited to these precise embodiments and/or variants and that various changes and modifications may be effected therein without departing from the scope of the invention as defined in the appended claims.