Title:
Ventilation tube and accompanying system
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The ventilation tube and system of the present invention comprises a ventilation pipe designed to properly aerate drainage systems and prevents overflow of system fluids into the atmosphere or onto the ground.



Inventors:
Zahner, Joseph F. (Wrentham, MA, US)
Application Number:
11/272405
Publication Date:
05/17/2007
Filing Date:
11/14/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E03D9/04
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20090271921USER-SYSTEM INTERFACE FOR TUBSNovember, 2009Castellote
20090151065COVERED POOL STRUCTUREJune, 2009Watson
20090241252Mobile inflatable bubble massage bathtubOctober, 2009Li
20090025129FLUSH VALVE MECHANISMSJanuary, 2009Le et al.
20080134426Integrated poolscape comprised of pre-fabricated elements and related methodsJune, 2008Cronise et al.
20100024121Autoflow aka. postive drain teeFebruary, 2010Dille
20050102747Sealed toiletMay, 2005Stewart
20060048296Lifting toilet seatMarch, 2006Sutou et al.
20050108817Collapsable spa enclosureMay, 2005Wilson et al.
20070261162Portable handsink and method for useNovember, 2007Atkinson
20060242761Dual capacity sinkNovember, 2006Babick et al.



Primary Examiner:
NGUYEN, TUAN N
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Melissa Patangia (Lambert & Associates 92 State Street, Boston, MA, 02109, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. a ventilation tube comprising: a cylindrical member; a spherical member, designed to fit within said cylindrical member; means for attachment to a fluid piping system including a pumping mechanism; wherein said spherical member prevents fluid from leaving said cylindrical member and creates a backflow which deactivates said pumping mechanism.

2. The ventilation tube of claim 1 further comprising a switch which when depresses by said spherical member deactivates said pumping mechanism.

3. The ventilation tube of claim 1 further comprising a system of graduated markings positioned along said outer surface of said cylinder.

4. The ventilation tube of claim 1 further comprising an annular end cap located at said distal end.

5. The ventilation tube of claim 1 wherein said annular end cap includes a series of cavities.

6. The ventilation tube of claim 1 wherein said spherical member is a ball.

7. The ventilation tube of claim 6 wherein said ball is of a hollow stainless steel construction.

8. The ventilation tube of claim 6 wherein said ball is of a PVC construction.

9. The ventilation tube of claim 6 wherein said ball is of a plastic construction.

10. The ventilation tube of claim 1 wherein said spherical member is a disc.

11. The ventilation tube of claim 1 wherein said ventilator tube is an indicator vent.

12. The ventilation tube of claim 1 wherein said ventilator tube is a forced main vent.

13. The ventilation tube of claim 1 wherein said ventilator tube is composed of PVC pipe.

14. The ventilation tube of claim 1 wherein said ventilator tube is composed of schedule 40 PVC pipe.

15. The ventilation tube of claim 1 wherein said graduated markings extend 24 inches.

16. The ventilation tube of claim 1 wherein said graduated markings extend 39 inches.

17. The ventilation tube of claim 1 wherein said tube is 2 inches in diameter.

18. The ventilation tube of claim 1 wherein said tube is 4 inches in diameter.

19. The ventilation tube of claim 1 wherein said tube is at least 6 inches in diameter.

20. A ventilation apparatus comprising: a hollow shaft comprising of a top end, a bottom end, and an outside perimeter wherein said outside perimeter is marked with graduations; a top seal attached to said top end; a bottom seal attached to said bottom end; and a sphere within said hollow shaft which is allowed to traverse from said bottom end to said top end.

Description:

BACKGROUND

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates generally to the field of piping and drainage systems and ventilation of such systems and more specifically ventilation tubes or pipes which properly aerate systems and prevent overflow of system fluids into the atmosphere or onto the ground.

2. Description of the Invention

Since the initial conception of piping systems, major problems have surrounded proper aeration of systems, the build up of entrained air and the removal of such air from systems. In particular, sewage or waste water drainage systems have a tendency to entrap great amounts of air and other gases that need be vented to the atmosphere in order to maintain proper system operation and actually monitor the flow level.

Additionally, a strong need exists for an indication system which warns or notifies the home or business owner, absent a visit by a service representative, of the exact level of the system and when the system needs purging. In prior inventions, a technician would have to come to the site and take an actual measurement or sounding on the system.

Further, as illustrated by prior inventions, many attempts have been made to perfect a vent component and overall pumping system that work to properly aerate a septic or other enclosed systems. Current systems do not afford provisions for proper aeration.

Moreover, another disadvantage of the aforementioned devices is that prior vents allow offensive liquid to pump out onto ground surfaces upon system failure; therefore, these systems are environmentally unsafe.

The utility U.S. Pat. No. 5,196,114, issued to Burwell discloses an aerobic septic system having a conventional tank, conical separator or clarifier, and air injection system has an air header discharging air around the entire periphery of the tank. Substantially all solids suspended in wastewater are therefore mechanically agitated and aerated, greatly increasing system efficiency. Wastewater rises along the tank walls and spills over the top of the separator. It then descends in the separator. A vent pipe has an egress port in the roof of the tank, and rises to join an incoming sewage line from a residential plumbing system, which in turn communicates with a vent stack.

The utility U.S. Pat. No. 4,303,350, issued to Dix discloses a septic leaching system for leaching septic effluent from a source thereof, a first leach field has an input, a porous bed and means for distributing effluent from the input throughout the bed. A second leach field similarly has an inlet, a pervious bed and means for distributing effluent from that inlet throughout the pervious bed. Distribution means, having an intake coupled to the source, selectively feeds the effluent only to the input until the effluent level in the first field reaches a predetermined depth. Thereafter, the effluent is automatically fed to the inlet of the second leach field. The principle of operation is extended to the use of a third or more leach fields, the distribution means selectively feeding the effluent to the entrance to the third field only after the effluent in the second field reaches a preselected depth and so on.

The utility U.S. Pat. No. 4,123,358, issued to Flagge discloses an automatic liquid volume compensation apparatus is disclosed having particular application to septic systems. The apparatus limits septic tank air volume to optimize bacterial decomposition of wastes and controls the flow rate from the inlet piping through the tank to the drain field to limit passage of unprocessed fluid and prevent backups in the inlet piping. In the first of two embodiments, a bladder within a settling tank inflates or deflates to accommodate changes in liquid volume while maintaining tank level within desired limits. In the second embodiment, an auxiliary tank stores excess liquid which is returned to the primary settling tank when settling tank liquid level has declined to a desired height.

The utility U.S. Pat. No. 4,756,827, issued to Mayer discloses a liquid flow drainage control in gravity type systems such as sewage septic tank systems. A plastic cap which is insertable into the ends of the drainage pipes that project into a distribution box is formed with an end face and a cylindrical body. The end face is generally circular having a larger diameter than the outer diameter of the drainage pipes into which the cap is to be inserted. The outer periphery of the end face is provided with an interdigital or scalloped pattern to facilitate easy gripping even in the most adverse conditions. The end face is further provided with an eccentric discharge hole which is located along a diameter of the end face so that the hole is always some distance from the interior surface of the cylindrical body so that the hole forms a weir to the inlet of the drainage pipe into which the end cap is inserted. The eccentric hole is provided with an outwardly projecting flange which, in cooperation with a spirit level, is used for rough leveling. The cylindrical body is made of a pliant material allowing it to conform to the irregular internal diameter of a plastic drainage pipe. The projecting end of the cylindrical body is provided with a radially extending sealing flange which also conforms to the internal diameter of the plastic drainage pipe.

The instant invention has come to fruition in order to vitiate or at very least obviate the afore-described shortcomings of conventional drainage systems.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The primary objective of the instant invention is to provide a vent and system which allows for complete and proper aeration of a drainage system and particularly a septic system.

A primary advantage of the instant device surrounds the system design which will not allow offensive liquid to pump out onto ground surfaces if the system fails, and thus rendering the system environmentally safe.

An additional advantage of the instant device is that the need for inspectors to go to an actual site and sound the system becomes eradicated as the home or business owner can readily check the indication system without disassembling pipes. Further, the system enables an inspector to check the distill pressure on a pressure dose system without disassembling pipes. The Zahn-Air™ Vent can be made with a clear PVC pipe with gradients shown on it.

A further advantage of the instant system centers around the capability to allow air to get back into the leaching area, thus properly aerating and extending the life of the system.

An additional advantage of the instant system is that upon system failure, when the leaching water reaches the top, the ball prohibits the effluent from escaping from the vent, by sealing the opening located at the top of the tube and thus backflow to the pump will either trip a breaker or continue to pump until an alarm activates. Further, the pump can be shut off by a switch located within the cylinder which is triggered when depressed by the ball. The alarm system will inform the business or home-owner that problems exist in their leaching area, without causing an unsafe environmental condition.

Finally, a further advantage of the instant system is that it truly operates as a closed system.

Accordingly, it is an object of the present invention to provide a ventilation tube and overall system that enhances overall system performance and environmentally maximizes system parameters.

It is an object of the present invention to provide vents to properly aerate septic leaching systems.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a system that indicates the performance of the drain field.

It is an object of the present invention to provide a vent which itself indicates the performance of the drain field.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the ventilation pipe of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a top view of the ventilation pipe of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a bottom view of the ventilation pipe of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a cross-section view of the ventilation pipe of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The vent systems come in differing sizes and configurations, including Zahn-Air™ Indicator Vent and the Zahn-Air™ Forced Main Vent. The Zahn-Air™ Indicator Vent comes in 2, 4, 6 and 8 inch diameters which are determined by system design flow and application. However the vents are not limited to these sizes or configurations. However, depending upon the application, as dictated by size of field and absorption required, the size of the tube constitutes a critical parameter. The purpose of these vents is to vent septic leaching systems, and to indicate the performance of the drain field. The performance of the leaching field over time is determined by the position of the top ball, thus indicating absorbing area saturation or a failed leaching field. For example, if the depth of the absorption area is 24 inches, and the ball remains at 14 inches above the bottom of the vent gradient, then we will know that the depth of absorption area still has 10 inches of depth remaining. If the ball remains at the top of the tube, then the system absorption is 0 and the system has thus failed. This configuration of the vent indicators can be used for all gravity conventional septic systems, but not for forced main leaching area systems.

The ball maybe constructed of stainless steel or polyvinyl chloride (PVC) pipe, depending on the application. Further, the ball may be substituted with a PVC flap which like the ball serves to indicate the fluid level on the gradients and also serves to shut off the vent and prevent effluent overflow. The back flow which occurs when the ball or flap close the tube itself may be constructed of all levels of PVC (including but not limited to schedule 40) as dictated by the requirements of the specific system.

A further embodiment, Zahn-Air™ Forced Main Vents are used for forced main septic leaching systems. These models come in 4 inch and 6 inch diameter pipes which are determined by system design flow. None of the vent configurations are limited to the 4 inch or 6 inch diameter models as varying configurations of Zahn-Air™ Forced Main Vents may exist. The specific sizes of the ventilation pipe are important as the individual ventilation pipe serves to perfectly regulate the particular system which it is installed within.

The ventilation tube 1 of the present invention is seen in a perspective view in FIG. 1. The ball 2 is illustrated inside the tube 1 and running against the graduated tape 3 in FIG. 1. The top seal 6 is located inside the proximal portion 4 of the tube 1. The end cap 7 is located inside the distal portion 5 of the tube 1, including the 5/8 inch cavities 8 illustrated in FIG. 1. The top seal 6 and end cap 7 is further illustrated in FIG. 2 and FIG. 3. FIG. 4 illustrates a cross section view of the tube 1, showing the relation of ball 2 and ventilation tube 1.





 
Previous Patent: Karate cap

Next Patent: Non-wobbling toilet seat