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Title:
Arm braces that maintain the arm straight and fully extended and are also comfortable to wear even in hot weather
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
This invention claims new methods to make arm braces that maintain the users' arms straight and fully extended and are also comfortable to wear even in hot weather, by making the braces with nonuniform thickness, their inside surface contoured, and providing them with a plurality of holes penetrating through their inner cushioning liner which are aligned with a plurality of holes penetrating through their outer layer in order to create ventilating channels to allow air to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device. Embodiments of the arm braces made by these new methods can be used as golf swing training devices that maintain the golfers' lead arms straight and fully extended and are also comfortable to wear even in hot weather. One embodiment can be described as a clamshell tubular device comprising two partially tubular sections which are hinged lengthwise of the arm and of which at least one section is inflexible lengthwise of the arm, another embodiment can be described as a sheet which is wrapped on the lead arm until it becomes inflexible lengthwise of the arm and another embodiment can be described as a partially tubular device that is inflexible lengthwise of the arm.


Inventors:
Moscovici, Armand (Woodbridge, CT, US)
Application Number:
11/255230
Publication Date:
04/26/2007
Filing Date:
10/21/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B69/36
View Patent Images:
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Armand, Moscovici (84 PECK HILL ROAD, WOODBRIDGE, CT, 06525, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A new method to make arm braces that will prevent all sections of the arms on which they are applied including the forearms from pivoting inside the device, will prevent the arms from bending at the elbow and will maintain the arms straight and fully extended, by providing the said arm braces with an outer layer and an inner cushioning lining layer wherein the inner cushioning lining layer has a nonuniform thickness and its inside surface is contoured.

2. A new method to make arm braces that will be comfortable to wear even in hot weather, by providing the said arm braces with an inner cushioning lining layer and an outer layer, wherein a plurality of holes that penetrate through the inner cushioning lining layer are aligned with a plurality of holes that penetrate through the outer layer to create direct ventilating channels that will allow air to circulate directly between the users' arms and outside the device in order to prevent the arms from overheating and being uncomfortable even in hot weather.

3. A new method to make arm braces that will be comfortable to wear even in hot weather and will prevent all sections of the arms on which are applied including the forearms from pivoting inside the device, will prevent the arms from bending at the elbow and will maintain the arms straight and fully extended, by providing the said arm braces with an outer layer and an inner cushioning lining layer wherein the inner cushioning lining layer has a nonuniform thickness and its inside surface is contoured and wherein a plurality of holes that penetrate through the inner cushioning lining layer are aligned with a plurality of holes that penetrate through the outer layer to create direct ventilating channels that will allow air to circulate directly between the users' arms and outside the device in order to prevent the arms from overheating and being uncomfortable even in hot weather.

4. An embodiment of the arm braces made as of the claim 1, used as a golf swing training device, said device could be described as a tubular clamshell device comprising two partially tubular sections which are hinged lengthwise of the arm, of which at least one section is inflexible lengthwise of the arm, said device being used by golfers by opening the device along its hinge, inserting their lead arm inside, closing the two sections of the device over the arm and then fastening the device on the arm using fastening systems.

5. An embodiment of the arm braces made as of the claim 2, used as a golf swing training device, said device could be described as a tubular clamshell device comprising two partially tubular sections which are hinged lengthwise of the arm, of which at least one section is inflexible lengthwise of the arm, said device being used by golfers by opening the device along its hinge, inserting their lead arm inside, closing the two sections of the device over the arm and then fastening the device on the arm using fastening systems.

6. An embodiment of the arm braces made as of the claim 3, used as a golf swing training device, said device could be described as a tubular clamshell device comprising two partially tubular sections which are hinged lengthwise of the arm, of which at least one section is inflexible lengthwise of the arm, said device being used by golfers by opening the device along its hinge, inserting their lead arm inside, closing the two sections of the device over the arm and then fastening the device on the arm using fastening systems.

7. An embodiment of the arm braces made as of the claim 1, used as a golf swing training device, said device could be described as a wrappable sheet device which the golfers apply by wrapping it on their lead arm until the sheet device becomes inflexible lengthwise of the arm and then fastening the device on the arm using fastening systems.

8. An embodiment of the arm braces made as of the claim 2, used as a golf swing training device, said device could be described as a wrappable sheet device which the golfers apply by wrapping it on their lead arm until the sheet device becomes inflexible lengthwise of the arm and then fastening the device on the arm using fastening systems.

9. An embodiment of the arm braces made as of the claim 3, used as a golf swing training device, said device could be described as a wrappable sheet device which the golfers apply by wrapping it on their lead arm until the sheet device becomes inflexible lengthwise of the arm and then fastening the device on the arm using fastening systems.

10. An embodiment of the arm braces made as of the claim 1, used as a golf swing training device, said device could be described as a partially tubular device that is inflexible lengthwise of the arm, said device being used by golfers by inserting their lead arm inside the device and then fastening the device on the arm using fastening systems.

11. An embodiment of the arm braces made as of the claim 2, used as a golf swing training device, said device could be described as a partially tubular device that is inflexible lengthwise of the arm, said device being used by golfers by inserting their lead arm inside the device and then fastening the device on the arm using fastening systems.

12. An embodiment of the arm braces made as of the claim 3, used as a golf swing training device, said device could be described as a partially tubular device that is inflexible lengthwise of the arm, said device being used by golfers by inserting their lead arm inside the device and then fastening the device on the arm using fastening systems.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The objective of this invention is to provide new arm braces that will maintain the users' arms straight and fully extended and are comfortable to wear even in hot weather. The main potential applications of this invention is in the field of golf playing, where embodiments of this invention can be used by golfers as golf swing training devices that are comfortable to wear even in hot weather and maintain the their lead arms straight and fully extended during their golf swing, in order to achieve an optimum swing and consequently an optimum golf stroke.

2. Technical Background

The lead arm is the arm that leads the golfer's swing. It is the left arm for a right-handed golfer or the right arm for a left-handed golfer.

Golf instructing literature, including those published by renown golf instructors and players, identifies the need of maintaining the lead arm straight and fully extended during the golf swing, as one of the most important requirements for achieving an optimum golf swing that will result in a golf stroke with maximum efficiency and accuracy. Most of the golfers, especially beginners but also advanced golfers have difficulty in their attempt to maintain their lead arm straight and fully extended during the golf swing. There is a need for golf swing training devices that will aid the golfers to maintain their lead arm straight and fully extended during their golf swing and that are also comfortable to wear even in hot weather.

3. Description of the Prior Art

A search of the prior art patent search have revealed several patents which proposed golf swing training devices that are relevant to this invention, such as U.S Pat. Nos.: 802,623, 1,414,012, 2,468,580, 3,074,723, 3,658,345, 3,884,478, 3,900,199, 3,990,709, 4,070,027, 4,504,054, 4,582,325, 5,048,837, 5,069,457, 5,150,901, 5,303,927, 5,425,539, 5,445,385, 5,704,846, 5,743,806, 5,788,582, 6,645,084.

The reviewed prior art patents that are most relevant to this invention are as follows:

  • Camp in U.S Pat. No. 802,623 dated Oct. 24,1905 shows a device that is strapped onto the arm. This device has no inner cushioning layer and it is not provided with any means to make it comfortable to wear even in hot weather, for example it has no ventilating channels penetrating throughout its walls that will allow air to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device.
  • Flint in U.S Pat. No. 1,414,012 dated Apr. 25, 1922 shows a rigid device that is applied on the arm. This device has no inner cushioning layer and it is not provided with any means to make it comfortable to wear even in hot weather, for example it has no ventilating channels penetrating throughout its walls.
  • Weis in U.S Pat. No. 2,468,580 dated Apr. 26, 1949 discloses a device that wraps on the arm that is made of an elastic material, in which rigid strips that resist bending are inserted in order to keep the arm straight. This device's thickness is uniform and it is not provided with any means to make it comfortable to wear even in hot weather, for example it has no ventilating channels penetrating throughout its walls.
  • Esty in U.S Pat. No. 3,074,723 dated Jan. 22,1963 presents a device that involves two parts that are laced together and wraps around the arm. The device does not have any cushioning layer, its thickness is uniform and it is not provided with any means to make it comfortable to wear even in hot weather, for example it has no ventilating channels penetrating throughout its walls.
  • Siggson in U.S Pat. No. 3,658,345 dated Apr. 25,1972 describes a lined U-shaped device that is strapped onto the arm. The device has a liner that is uniform in thickness. This device is not provided with ventilating channels that will penetrate throughout their walls including through the lining layer, therefore air is not allowed to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device in order to prevent the overheating of the arm, especially in hot weather.
  • Buzan in U.S Pat. No. 3,884,478 dated May 20,1975 discloses a device that rather than prohibiting the arm from being bent, is producing a noise that helps the golfer to realize when he has bent his arm.
  • McGonagle in U.S Pat. No. 3,900,199 dated Aug. 19,1975 shows a strap-on rigid device, which has no inner cushioning layer. This rigid device has only one central located triangular hole, which is not for ventilation purposes and the device is not provided with any means to make it comfortable to wear in warm weather, for example it has no ventilating channels penetrating throughout its walls.
  • Kifferstein in U.S Pat. No. 4,070,027 dated Jan. 24,1978 discloses a brace made of a single length of non-elastic material of an open lattice pattern, which wraps around the arm. The device does not contain an inner cushioning layer and it is not provided with any means to make it comfortable to wear even in hot weather, for example it has no ventilating channels penetrating throughout its walls.
  • Steffes in U.S Pat. No. 5,425,539 dated Jun. 20,1995 and Brooks in U.S Pat. No. 5,445,385 dated Aug. 29,1995 present devices that can be applied on the arm. The devices' thickness is uniform and they are not provided with any means to make them comfortable to wear in hot weather, for example they have no ventilating channels penetrating throughout their walls.
  • Johnson's device in U.S Pat. No 5,704,846 dated Jan. 6,1998 involves an inflatable unit that wraps around the arm whose scope is not to prevent the bending of the arm, but to emit an “alarm” that alerts the user if he has bent his arm.
  • Also Brennan in US Pat. 5,743,806, dated Apr. 28,1998 describes a tubular sleeve that does not restrict the bending of the arm, but rather emits a clicking sound when a flexion of the elbow occurs.

The following are some of the most important deficiencies of the prior art's devices:

    • They are inefficient in maintaining the lead arm straight and fully extended during the golf swing. The main reason is the fact while these devices have walls that are uniform in thickness and the shape of their inside surfaces is uniform, they are applied over arms whose sections are not uniform in shape, for example the forearms are tapered in shape. Therefore, these devices are not able to prevent entirely the arm's sections such as the forearm from pivoting inside the devices and the arm from bending at its elbow and consequently they are not be able to maintain the arm straight and fully extended during the golf swing.
    • Uncomfortable to wear. One main reason is again the fact that while these devices' walls are of uniform thickness and the shape of their inside surfaces is uniform, they are applied over arms whose sections are nonuniform in shape. Therefore a user will need to apply relatively high force over certain areas of the arms over which these devices are placed in order to ensure that the device is properly tightened and consequently will create some high pressure points on the arm that can be uncomfortable. Another main reason that these devices are not comfortable to wear especially in hot weather is the fact that they have not been provided with means to prevent the overheating of the arm on which they are applied, such as ventilating channels that will penetrate throughout their walls in order to allow air to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device.
    • Some of these devices are bulky and heavy
    • Some are complicated and difficult to use; some are difficult to attach and remove
    • Some are expensive to fabricate

Based on the above-described background and prior art description, a need has been identified for new golf swing training devices that must be efficient in preventing all sections of the arm on which they are applied including the forearm from pivoting inside the device, preventing the bending of the arm at the elbow, and consequently maintaining the golfer's lead arm straight and fully extended during the golf swing. Also, these devices have to be comfortable to wear even in hot weather and therefore they need to be provided with special means to prevent the arm from overheating, such as ventilating channels that will penetrate throughout their walls in order to allow air to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device. It is desirable that these devices will be also: light weight, non-bulky, simple to attach and remove, easy to use, relatively inexpensive to manufacture, etc.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The objective of this invention is to provide new arm braces that will maintain the arm straight and fully extended and are comfortable to wear even in hot weather.

This invention proposes three new methods to make these arm braces. In the first method, the arm braces of this invention are made by being provided with an outer layer and an inner cushioning lining layer whose thickness is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured in order to prevent all sections of the arm on which they are applied including the forearm from pivoting inside the device, to prevent the arm from bending at its elbow, and consequently being able to maintain the arm straight and fully extended. In the second method, the arm braces of this invention are made by being provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the arm brace's walls to make them comfortable to wear even in hot weather. The brace has a plurality of holes penetrating through its inner cushioning liner which are aligned with a plurality of holes penetrating through its outer layer to create direct ventilating channels that will allow air to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device in order to prevent the arm from overheating and from being uncomfortable in hot weather.

In the case that additional covering layers are placed over the outside of the outer layer and/or over the inside of the cushioning layer, the plurality of holes in the inner cover is aligned with the plurality of the holes penetrating through the inner cushioning layer and with the plurality of holes penetrating through the outer layer and also with the plurality of holes in the outer cover, in order to provide ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the walls of the device that will allow air to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device to prevent the arm from overheating and therefore to be comfortable even in hot weather.

In the third and the preferred method of this invention, the arm braces are made by combining the two above-described methods. They comprise an outer layer and an inner cushioning lining layer whose thickness is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured, and they are also provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the arm brace's walls to allow air to circulate directly between the arm and outside the device. They prevent all sections of the arms on which they are applied including the forearm from pivoting inside the device, prevent the arms from bending at the elbow and consequently maintain the arms straight and fully extended, and are also comfortable to wear even in hot weather.

The principal potential application of the arm braces made by the new methods proposed by this invention is the field of golf playing, where golfers can apply them on their lead arms and use them as golf swing training devices. The preferred embodiments of this invention are comfortable to wear even in hot weather and maintain the golfers' lead arms straight and fully extended during their golf swing in order to achieve an optimum swing and consequently an optimum golf stroke by preventing all sections of the arm on which they are applied including the forearm from pivoting inside the device and preventing the lead arm from bending at its elbow. The golfers place theses devices on and around their lead arms positioned straight, from below the armpit to above the wrist and then fasten them on the arms using fastening systems.

This invention's devices are light and not bulky and therefore do not have a negative effect on the smoothness of the golf swing. They are also easy to use and golfers will have an easy task to attach these devices on their arms, as well as removing them.

There are three main embodiments of the arm braces made by the methods proposed by this invention that can be used as golf-training devices. These golf-training devices can be made by using any of the three methods that were described above.

    • in the first main embodiment used as a golf swing training device, the device can be described as a clamshell tubular device comprising two partially tubular sections which are hinged longitudinally and applied lengthwise of the arm, of which at least one section is inflexible lengthwise of the arm, said device being used by golfers by opening the device along its hinge, inserting their lead arm inside, closing the two sections of the device over the arm and then fastening the device on the arm using fastening systems,
    • in the second main embodiment used as a golf swing training device, the device can be described as a wrappable sheet device, which the golfers apply by wrapping it on their lead arm until the sheet device becomes inflexible lengthwise of the arm and then fastening the device on the arm using fastening systems,
    • in the third main embodiment used as a golf swing training device, the device can be described as a partially tubular device that is inflexible lengthwise of the arm, said device being used by golfers by inserting their lead arm inside the device and then fastening the device on the arm by using fastening systems.

Other objectives, advantages and salient features of this invention will become apparent from the following descriptions, which, taken in conjunction with the annexed drawings, discloses several embodiments of the invention, including some preferred.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a golfer who is addressing the golf ball and is ready to start his golf swing. The arm brace that the golfer has placed on his lead arm is a general representation of all of this invention's embodiments that can be used as golf training devices, and are shown in the following figures. The golfers place theses devices on and around their lead arms positioned straight from below the armpit to above the wrist and then fasten them on the arms using fastening systems in order to prevent the device from sliding during the golf swing and from being uncomfortable on the arm. The devices' fastening systems contain various types and numbers of fastening components, such as straps, buckles and slides. This figure exemplifies a fastening system using three fastening straps.

The golf training devices embodiments of this invention can be made using any of the three methods that were described above in details. The golf swing training devices made by using the first method comprise an outer layer and an inner cushioning lining layer whose thickness is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured. The golf swing training devices made by using the second method of this invention are provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the arm brace's walls to make them comfortable to wear even in hot weather. Golf swing training devices can also be made using the third and the preferred method of this invention that is a combination of the first two approaches described before. They comprise an outer layer and an inner cushioning lining layer whose thickness is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured, and are also provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the arm brace's walls to allow air to circulate directly between the arm and outside the device.

FIG. 2A is a perspective view of the first of the three main embodiments of this invention, which can be used as golf training devices. FIG. 2B is the left to right view of the side cross section of the same device. FIG. 2C is the right to left view of the vertical cross section of the same device. The device can be described as a clamshell tubular device. When is closed, the device is oval or circular in a cross-section view and tubular in a perspective view. The device is composed of two sections that are joined longitudinally through a hinge along one of their edges. These two sections can open and close similarly to a clamshell along this longitudinal hinge. One of the sections-typically the bottom section where the elbow is placed—is inflexible lengthwise of the arm, while the other section can be either inflexible or flexible lengthwise of the arm. Due to the clamshell construction of the device, the golfer will be able to open the device along the longitudinal hinge and insert his or her lead arm positioned straight inside it, from below the armpit to above the wrist, and then to close the device over the arm. Next, the golfer can use fastening systems to fasten the device around the arm in order to prevent the device from sliding during the golf swing. The device can be built with fastening systems containing various numbers and various types of fastening components, such as: straps, buckles, slides, etc. The figure exemplifies a system based on three “hooks and loops” type straps.

The golf training devices of this invention's embodiment can be made by using any of the three methods of this invention that were described above in details:

The devices that are made by using the first method comprise an outer layer and an inner cushioning lining layer whose thickness is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured. The devices that are made by using the second method are provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the arm brace's walls to allow air to circulate directly between the arm and outside atmosphere. Golf swing training devices can also be made using the third and the preferred method of this invention which is a combination of the first two method described above. They comprise an outer layer and an inner cushioning lining layer whose thickness is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured, and are also provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the arm brace's walls and allow air to circulate directly between the arm and outside the device.

FIG. 3A is a perspective view of the second of the three main embodiments of this invention, which can be used as golf training devices. It can be described as a flexible sheet, which can be wrapped around the golfer's lead arm up to several times until it is inflexible lengthwise of the arm. FIG. 3B is the left to right view of the side cross section of the device after being wrapped on the arm. FIG. 3C is the longitudinal perspective view of the sheet before is being wrapped on the golfer's arm and FIG. 3D is the top to bottom view of the longitudinal cross section of the sheet before is being wrapped on the golfer's arm. The golfer will wrap the flexible sheet around his or her lead arm-positioned straight, from below the armpit to above its wrist. Next, the golfer can use fastening systems to fasten the device around the arm in order to prevent the device from sliding during the golf swing and from being uncomfortable on the arm. The device can be built with fastening systems containing various numbers and various types of fastening components, such as: straps, buckles, slides, etc. The figure exemplifies a system based on three “hooks and loops” type straps.

The golf training devices of this invention's embodiment can be made using any of the three methods of this invention that were described before in details. The devices that are made by using the first method comprise an outer layer and an inner cushioning lining layer whose thickness is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured. The devices that are made by using the second method are provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the arm brace's walls to allow air to circulate directly between the arm and outside atmosphere. Golf swing training devices of this embodiment can also be made using the third and the preferred method of this invention which is a combination of the first two methods described above. They comprise an outer layer and an inner cushioning lining layer whose thickness is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured, and are also being provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the arm brace's walls to allow air to circulate directly between the arm and outside the device.

FIG. 4A is a perspective view of the third of the three main embodiments of this invention, which can be used as golf training devices. FIG. 4B represents the right to left view of the side cross section of this device. FIG. 4C represents the left to right view of the vertical cross section of the same device. The device contains a bottom section that is partial oval or partial circular as seen in a side cross sectional view and partial tubular as seen in a perspective view. This bottom section is inflexible lengthwise of the arm. After placing his or her lead arm positioned straight, from below the armpit to above the wrist, inside the bottom section, the golfer can apply fastening systems to fasten this bottom section on and around the arm in order to prevent the device from sliding during the golf swing and from being uncomfortable on the arm. The device can be built with fastening systems containing various numbers and various types of fastening components, such as: straps, buckles, slides, etc. The figure exemplifies a system based on three “hooks and loops” type straps.

The golf training devices of this invention's embodiment can be made using any of the three methods of this invention that were described before in details. The devices that are made by using the first method comprise an outer layer and an inner cushioning lining layer whose thickness is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured. The devices that are made by using the second method are provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the arm brace's walls to allow air to circulate directly between the arm and outside the device. Golf swing training devices of this embodiment can also be made using the third and the preferred method of this invention which is a combination of the first two methods described above. They comprise an outer layer and an inner cushioning lining layer whose thickness is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured, and are also provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the arm brace's walls to allow air to circulate directly between the arm and outside atmosphere.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The objective of this invention is to provide new arm braces that will maintain the users' arms straight and fully extended and are comfortable to wear even in hot weather.

This invention proposes three new methods to make these kinds of arm braces. In the first method of this invention, the arm braces of this invention are made by being provided with an outer layer and an inner cushioning lining layer whose thickness is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured in order to prevent all sections of the arm on which they are applied including the forearm from pivoting inside the device, to prevent the arm from bending at its elbow, and consequently being able to maintain the arm straight and fully extended. In the second method of this invention, the arm braces of this invention are made by being provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the arm brace's walls to make them comfortable to wear even in hot weather. The brace has a plurality of holes penetrating through its inner cushioning liner, which are aligned with a plurality of holes penetrating through its outer layer to create direct ventilating channels that will allow air to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device in order to prevent the arm from overheating and from being uncomfortable in hot weather. Additional covering layers can be placed over the outside of the outer layer and/or over the inside of the cushioning layer to provide additional comfort and/or special visual effects, such as certain colors. In this case, the plurality of holes in the inner cover are aligned with the plurality of the holes penetrating through the inner cushioning layer and with the plurality of holes penetrating through the outer layer and also with the plurality of holes in the outer cover, in order to provide ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the walls of the device that will allow air to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device to prevent the arm from overheating and therefore to be comfortable even hot weather.

In the third and the preferred method of this invention, the arm braces are made by combining the two above-described methods. They comprise an outer layer and an inner cushioning lining layer whose thickness is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured, and they are also provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the arm brace's walls to allow air to circulate directly between the arm and outside the device. They prevent all sections of the arms on which they are applied including the forearm from pivoting inside the device, prevent the arms from bending at the elbow and consequently maintain the arms straight and fully extended, and are also comfortable to wear even in hot weather.

The principal potential application of the arm braces of this invention is the field of golf playing, where golfers can apply them on their lead arms and use them as golf swing training devices. It should be noted that this invention's golf swing training devices could be used by golfers whose lead arm is the left arm as well as by golfers whose lead arm is the right arm. The devices that are the preferred embodiments of this invention are comfortable to wear even in hot weather and maintain the golfers' lead arms straight and fully extended during their golf swing in order to achieve an optimum swing and consequently an optimum golf stroke by preventing all sections of the arm on which they are applied including the forearm from pivoting inside the device and preventing the lead arm from bending at its elbow. The golfers place theses devices on and around their lead arms positioned straight, from below the armpit to above the wrist and then fasten them on the arms using fastening systems. The devices proposed by this invention are not restricted dimensionally. However, this invention recommends the devices should be 3-7 inches shorter than the length of the lead arm as measured from armpit to the wrist, and they should be placed on the lead arm from 2-5 inches below armpit to 1-2 inches above the wrist.

The following text describes in details the attached drawings, which represent this invention's main embodiments that are golf training devices.

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a golfer who is addressing the golf ball and is ready to start his golf swing. The training device attached to the golfer's arm and identified in this figure as part 1 is a general representation of all of this invention's embodiments that can be used as golf training devices and are shown in the following figures. The golfers place theses devices on and around their lead arms positioned straight from below the armpit to above the wrist and then fasten them on the arms using fastening systems. The devices proposed by this invention are not restricted dimensionally. However, this invention recommends the devices should be 3-7 inches shorter than the length of the lead arm as measured from armpit to the wrist, and they should be placed on the lead arm from 2-5 inches below armpit to 1-2 inches above the wrist. The devices' fastening systems contain various types and numbers of fastening components, such as straps, buckles and slides. They are used by the golfer to fasten the device around his or her lead arm and also to adjust and to tighten it in order to prevent the device from sliding during the golf swing and from being uncomfortable on the arm. This figure exemplifies a fastening system using three fastening straps.

This invention's embodiments that can be used as golf training devices can be made using any of the following three methods. The golf swing training devices made by using the first method, comprise an outer layer and an inner cushioning lining layer whose thickness is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured in order to ensure that the device fits snugly over the entire length of the arm on which they are applied, in order to prevent all sections of the arm on which they are applied including the forearm from pivoting inside the device, to prevent the arm from bending at its elbow and consequently able to maintain the arm straight and fully extended, and are also comfortable to wear. The golf swing training devices made by using the second method are provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the arm brace's walls in order to make them comfortable to wear even in hot weather. The device has a plurality of holes penetrating through its inner cushioning liner which are aligned with a plurality of holes penetrating through its outer layer to create direct ventilating channels that will allow air to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device in order to prevent the arm from overheating and being uncomfortable. Additional covering layers can be placed over the outside of the outer layer and/or over the inside of the cushioning layer to provide additional comfort and/or special visual effects, such as certain colors. In this case, the plurality of holes in the inner cover are aligned with the plurality of the holes penetrating through the inner cushioning layer and with the plurality of holes penetrating through the outer layer and also with the plurality of holes in the outer cover, in order to provide ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the walls of the device, that will allow air to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device to prevent the arm from overheating and therefore being comfortable even in hot weather.

Golf swing training devices can be also made using the third and preferred method of this invention that is a combination of the first two approaches described before. They comprise an outer layer and an inner cushioning lining layer whose thickness is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured, and are also provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the arm brace's walls to allow air to circulate directly between the arm and outside atmosphere. These devices prevent all sections of the arms on which they are applied including the forearm from pivoting inside the device, prevent the arms from bending at the elbow and consequently maintain the arms straight and fully extended, and are also comfortable to wear even in hot weather.

The following figures describe the three main embodiments of this invention that can be used as golf swing training devices.

FIG. 2A is a perspective view of an embodiment of this invention that can be used as a golf-training device, that was made by using the third and preferred method of this invention that was described before in details. It can be described as a clamshell tubular device. FIG. 2B is the left to right view of the side cross section of the same device. FIG. 2C is the right to left view of the vertical cross section of the same device. When is closed, the device is oval or circular in a cross-section view and tubular in a perspective view. The device is composed of two sections that are joined longitudinally through a hinge along one of their edges and applied on the arm lengthwise of the arm. These two sections can be opened and closed similarly to a clamshell along this longitudinal hinge. One of the sections—typically the bottom section in which the elbow is placed—is inflexible longitudinally lengthwise of the arm, while the other section can be either inflexible or flexible longitudinally lengthwise of the arm. The shape of each of the two sections is partial oval or partial circular (for instance semi circular) in a cross-sectional view. After opening the clamshell device along the longitudinal hinge, the golfer will then insert his or her lead arm—positioned straight, from below the armpit to above the wrist, inside one section of the device, and will close the other section of the device over the arm. Next, the golfer can use fastening systems to fasten the device around the arm.

In the FIGS. 2A, 2B and 2C, the part 3 represents the bottom half section that is inflexible lengthwise of the arm. This section can be made of, but not limited to fabricates made of polymeric materials, such as: polyethylene, polypropylene, polybutylene, polyvinyl, and also fiber based composites, leather, wood, metals, etc.

In the FIGS. 2A, 2B and 2C, the part 2 represents the top half section that can be either inflexible or flexible lengthwise of the arm. It can be made of, but not limited to polymer based materials, such as: polyethylene, polypropylene, polybutylene, polyvinyl, and also fiber based composites, leather, wood, metals, as well as fabrics, sheets, laminates, nets.

The longitudinal hinge where the two sections are joined and which allows the opening of the clamshell device is identified in the figures as part 4.

These devices are lined inside with a cushioning lining layer, identified in these figures as part 5 made of cushioning materials, such as: foams, felts, fleece, soft cloth, etc., in order to help the device to feel comfortable on the arm. The thickness of the inner cushioning lining layer is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured in order to ensure that the device fits snugly over the entire length of the arm on which they are applied, including the forearm that is tapered in shape, in order to prevent all sections of the arm on which they are applied including the forearm from pivoting inside the device, preventing the arm from bending at its elbow and consequently maintaining the arm straight and fully extended.

After closing the two half sections together over his or her lead arm positioned straight inside the device, the golfer will use fastening systems to fasten and also to adjust and tighten the device around the arm in order to prevent the sliding of the device during the golf swing and from being uncomfortable on his or her arm. The device can be built with fastening systems containing various numbers and various types of fastening components, such as: straps, buckles, slides, etc. The figure exemplifies a system based on three “hooks and loops” type straps, identified in the FIGS. 2A, 2B and 2C as part 6. These golf swing-training devices are also provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout their walls with the goal of ensuring that they are comfortable to wear even in hot weather. The device is provided with a plurality of holes penetrating through its inner cushioning liner which are aligned with a plurality of holes penetrating through its outer layer to create direct ventilating channels that will allow air to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device in order to prevent the arm from overheating and being uncomfortable. Additional covering layers can be placed over the outside of the outer layer and/or over the inside of the cushioning layer to provide additional comfort and/or special visual effects, such as certain colors. In this case, the plurality of holes in the inner cover are aligned with the plurality of the holes penetrating through the inner cushioning layer and with the plurality of holes penetrating through the outer layer and also with the plurality of holes in the outer cover, in order to provide ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the walls of the device, that will allow air to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device to prevent the arm from overheating and therefore being comfortable even hot weather. The holes are identified in these figures as part 7.

The devices proposed by this invention's embodiment are not restricted dimensionally. However, this invention recommends the devices should be 3-7 inches shorter than the length of the lead arm as measured from armpit to the wrist, and it recommends the golfer should follow this procedure to install the device:

    • first, the golfer should select the proper size device, after measuring the length of his or her lead arm, as described above
    • the golfer should open the two sections of the device along their longitudinal hinge
    • then, the golfer should insert his or her lead arm, positioned straight, inside the bottom section of the device, preferably from 2-5 inches below armpit to 1-2 inches above the wrist
    • after closing the top section of the device over the lead arm that had been placed inside the bottom section, the golfer should fasten and adjust the device using fastening systems to fasten the two half sections over his or her arm, to prevent the device from sliding during the golf swing and from being uncomfortable on the arm.

FIG. 3A is a perspective view of another embodiment of this invention that can be used as a golf-training device, that was made by using the third and preferred method of this invention that was described before in details. It can be described as a flexible sheet, which can be wrapped around the golfer's lead arm up to several times (preferably 1-2 times) until the device becomes inflexible lengthwise of the arm. FIG. 3B is the left to right view of the side cross section of the same device after being wrapped on the arm. FIG. 3C is a longitudinal perspective view of the flexible sheet before is being wrapped on the arm. FIG. 3D is a bottom to top view of the longitudinal cross section of the sheet before is being wrapped on the golfer's arm. The sheet, identified in the figures as part 8, is flexible enough to be able to be wrapped around the arm up to several times until the device becomes inflexible lengthwise of the arm. These special sheets can be made of, but not limited to: polymeric materials, such as: polyethylene, polypropylene, polyvinyl, polybutylene, and also nonwoven or woven sheets, fabrics, leather, nets, laminates, etc.

These wrappable sheets are lined inside with a cushioning lining layer, identified in these figures as part 9 made of cushioning materials, such as: foams, felts, fleece, soft cloth, etc., in order to help the device to feel comfortable on the arm. The thickness of the inner cushioning lining layer is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured in order to ensure that the device fits snugly over the entire length of the arm on which they are applied, including the forearm that is tapered in shape, in order to prevent all sections of the arm on which they are applied including the forearm from pivoting inside the device, preventing the arm from bending at its elbow, and consequently maintaining the arm straight and fully extended.

After finishing the wrapping the sheet around his or her straight lead arm, the golfer will fasten it using fastening systems, identified in these figures as part 10. The golfer can use the fastening systems to fasten the device and also to adjust and tighten the device around the arm in order to prevent the sliding of the device during the golf swing and from being uncomfortable on his or her arm. The device can be built with fastening systems containing various numbers and various types of fastening components, such as: straps, buckles, and slides. The figure exemplifies a fastening system that contains three “hooks and loops” type straps.

These golf swing-training devices are also provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout their walls with the goal of ensuring that they are comfortable to wear even in hot weather. The device has a plurality of holes penetrating through its inner cushioning liner which are aligned with a plurality of holes penetrating through its outer layer to create direct ventilating channels that will allow air to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device in order to prevent the arm from overheating and being uncomfortable. Additional covering layers can be placed over the outside of the outer layer and/or over the inside of the cushioning layer to provide additional comfort and/or special visual effects, such as certain colors. In this case, the plurality of holes in the inner cover are aligned with the plurality of the holes penetrating through the inner cushioning layer and with the plurality of holes penetrating through the outer layer and also with the plurality of holes in the outer cover, in order to provide ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the walls of the device, that will allow air to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device to prevent the arm from overheating and therefore being comfortable even hot weather. The holes are identified in these figures as part 11.

The devices proposed by this invention's embodiment are not restricted dimensionally. However, this invention recommends the devices' length should be 3-7 inches shorter than the length of the lead arm as measured from armpit to the wrist. Depending on the circumference of golfer's arm, the properties of the sheet's material and its thickness, this type of devices may need to be wrapped up to several times around the golfer's lead arm (preferably 1 to 2 times) until it becomes inflexible lengthwise of the arm.

This invention recommends the golfer should follow this procedure to install the device:

    • first, the golfer should select the proper size of the device, after measuring the length and circumference of his or her lead arm
    • after placing his or her lead arm, positioned straight, inside the wrappable sheet device, preferably from 2-5 inches below armpit to 1-2 inches above the wrist,
    • the golfer should wrap the sheet around his or her lead arm
    • after finishing the wrapping on the arm, the golfer can use fastening systems to fasten, adjust and tighten the device on the arm to prevent the device from the sliding during the swing and from being uncomfortable on the arm.

FIG. 4A is a perspective view of another embodiment of this invention that can be used as a golf-training device, that was made by using the third and preferred method of this invention that was described before in details. FIG. 4B represents the same device, but in a right to left view of the side cross-section of the device and FIG. 4C represents the same device, but in a left to right view of the vertical cross-section of the device.

It consists of a device that comprises a bottom section, identified in these figures as part 12, that looks partial oval or partial circular (for instance semicircular) in a side cross sectional view (FIG. 4B), and looks partially tubular (for instance semi tubular) in a perspective view (FIG. 4A).

This bottom section is inflexible lengthwise of the arm. It can be made of, but not limited to polymer based materials, such as: polyethylene, polypropylene, polybutylene, polyvinyl, and also fiber based composites, leather, wood, metals, etc. This bottom section is lined inside with a cushioning lining layer, identified in these figures as part 13 made of cushioning materials, such as: foams, felts, fleece, soft cloth, etc., in order to help the device to feel comfortable on the arm.

The thickness of the inner cushioning lining layer is nonuniform and its inside surface is contoured in order to ensure that the device fits snugly over the entire length of the arm on which they are applied including the forearm that is tapered in shape, in order to prevent all sections of the arm on which they are applied including the forearm from pivoting inside the device, preventing the arm from bending at its elbow, and consequently maintains the arm straight and fully extended.

The device also comprises a top section that consists of fastening systems. The fastening systems can contain various numbers and various types of fastening components, such as: straps, buckles, slides, etc. The golfer will use the fastening systems to fasten the bottom section of the device, to adjust and tighten the device on the lead arm in order to prevent the device from sliding during the golf swing and from being uncomfortable on the arm. The figures exemplify a system based on three “hooks and loops” type straps that is identified as part 14. These fastening straps can be lined inside with cushioning materials, in order to further help the arm to feel comfortable when the straps are tightened.

These golf swing-training devices are also provided with ventilating holes that penetrate throughout their walls with the goal of ensuring that they are comfortable to wear even in hot weather. The device has a plurality of holes penetrating through its inner cushioning liner which are aligned with a plurality of holes penetrating through its outer layer to create direct ventilating channels that will allow air to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device in order to prevent the arm from overheating and being uncomfortable. Additional covering layers can be placed over the outside of the outer layer and/or over the inside of the cushioning layer to provide additional comfort and/or special visual effects, such as certain colors. In this case, the plurality of holes in the inner cover are aligned with the plurality of the holes penetrating through the inner cushioning layer and with the plurality of holes penetrating through the outer layer and also with the plurality of holes in the outer cover, in order to provide ventilating holes that penetrate throughout the walls of the device, that will allow air to circulate directly between the user's arm and outside the device to prevent the arm from overheating and therefore being comfortable even hot weather. The holes are identified in these figures as part 15.

The devices proposed by this invention's embodiment are not restricted dimensionally. However, this invention recommends the devices should be 3-7 inches shorter than the length of the lead arm as measured from armpit to the wrist, and it recommends the golfer should follow this procedure to install the device:

    • first, the golfer should select the proper size device, after measuring the length of his or her lead arm, as described above
    • then, the golfer should place his or her lead arm positioned straight, inside the bottom section of the device, preferably from 2-5 inches below armpit to 1-2 inches above the wrist
    • the golfer should then apply the fastening systems over the top of the arm, in order to fasten the bottom section of the device around the lead arm, to adjust and tighten the device on the lead arm, and also to prevent the device from sliding during the golf swing and from being uncomfortable on the arm.