Title:
Portable Infant Swing
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A portable infant swing for use with an infant car seat. The infant swing comprises a combination of a swing frame connected to a seat-receiving frame, and securing elements for securely coupling the infant car seat to the seat-receiving frame.



Inventors:
Grossman, Matthew (Toronto, CA)
Kaufman, Matthew (Toronto, CA)
Application Number:
11/532438
Publication Date:
03/15/2007
Filing Date:
09/15/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63G9/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
NGUYEN, KIEN T
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
BLAKE, CASSELS & GRAYDON LLP (COMMERCE COURT WEST 199 BAY STREET, SUITE 4000, TORONTO, ON, M5L 1A9, CA)
Claims:
1. A portable infant swing for detachable coupling with an infant car seat, the infant swing comprising: a standing frame including a supporting element; and a pivoting holding element depending from the supporting element for securing a carrying handle of the infant car seat to the standing frame, wherein the holding element comprises spaced first and second ends, the first end attached to the support element and the second end releasably attachable to the carrying handle.

2. The infant swing of claim 1 wherein the second end includes a hook, orifice, molded orifice, or clamp for receiving the carrying handle.

3. The infant swing of claim 1 wherein the first end is releasably attached to the support element.

4. The infant swing of claim 1 wherein the first end is integral with the support element.

5. The infant swing of claim 1 wherein the first end pivots around the support element.

6. The infant swing of claim 1 wherein the holding element comprises a pivot between the first and second ends.

7. A manually operated portable infant swing, the infant swing comprising; a swing frame, a collapsible or foldable seat-receiving frame connected to the swing frame by a plurality of suspending elements, wherein at least one securing element is attached to the seat-receiving frame for coupling of an infant car seat to the portable infant swing, and wherein the seat-receiving frame is manually actuated.

Description:

This application claims priority from U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/716,980 filed on Sep. 15, 2005.

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to portable swings for infants, and more particularly to an infant swing that may be detachably coupled to an infant car seat.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PRIOR ART

Infant swings are known in the art and are disclosed in, for example, the following U.S. Pat. Nos. 3,256,016; 5,531,656; 5,562,548; and 5,803,817.

U.S. Pat. No. 3,256,016 teaches a combination swing and car seat for a child. The combination swing consists of three main components, specifically, a frame, a seat, and a bracket mechanism. The frame is collapsible and comprises a pair of U-shaped supports which extend from removable legs. The seat is removable and can be secured to the bracket mechanism which is in turn attached to the swing frame by hanger-pieces. A problem with this swing is that the child car seat used must have a shape which allows for coupling with the bracket mechanism in order to facilitate attachment to the swing. As such, only certain seats can be used with the bracket mechanism.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,562,548 teaches a convertible child swing consisting of a frame and a seat that may be used as a child safety seat in an automobile. The frame comprises two pairs of pillars connected by a cross member. The frame also comprises a pair of hanger arms, which hang down from the cross member, and which are attached to a pivotable base. A car seat may be attached to the pivotable base by latches in the base that lock the seat in place. A problem with this swing is that the child car seat must be fitted with latches in its base in order to allow for connection to the pivotable base of the frame. As such, only seats having latches on their base are compatible with the bracket mechanism.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,531,656 discloses a portable baby swing. The baby swing includes a frame comprising a pair of telescoping leg sections connected by a cross member. The swing also includes a removable bag for receiving and cradling a baby. The bag can be connected to the cross member by a pair of support straps which can be looped around the cross member. The support straps further include latches which are used to secure the support straps once looped around the cross member. This swing requires that the baby be held in a bag.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,803,817 teaches an infant swing comprising a frame, a swing arm, and a seat releasably mounted on the swing by a coupling assembly. The coupling assembly consists of a pivot plate mounted to the back of the seat, and a T-shaped connector mounted to the lower end of the swing arm. The pivot plate allows the seat to pivot between reclining and upright positions. This invention requires the seat to include a pivot plate in order to facilitate coupling with the swing arm, and therefore is limited to specifically designed infant automobile seats.

The present invention seeks to obviate or mitigate at least some of the above-mentioned problems.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In one embodiment the present invention provides a portable infant swing for detachable coupling with an infant automobile seat, the infant swing comprising:

    • a frame including a support shaft; and
    • a pivoting holding element depending from the support shaft for securing a carrying handle of the infant automobile seat to the frame.

In another embodiment of the present invention the support shaft has first and second ends, a first leg and a second leg connected to the first end of the support shaft, and a third leg and a fourth leg connected to the second end of the support shaft.

In another aspect, a manually operated portable infant swing is provided, the infant swing comprising; a swing frame, a collapsible or foldable seat-receiving frame connected to the swing frame by a plurality of suspending elements, wherein the seat-receiving frame comprises a securing element for coupling of an infant car seat to the portable infant swing.

In another aspect, a portable infant swing is provided wherein a collapsible seat-receiving frame is used to couple an infant car seat to a swing frame. The seat-receiving frame may, for example, be in the form of a sling having supports and restraints to securely hold the infant car seat in the seat-receiving frame as described further below. In this embodiment, the seat-receiving frame should be at least partially constructed of a strong, flexible, and durable material, for example nylon, which can support the weight of the car seat. The use of material such as nylon allows the seat-receiving frame to be folded or rolled into a compact storage position when not in use.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The features of the invention will become more apparent in the following detailed description in which reference is made to the appended drawings wherein:

FIG. 1 is an example of an infant car seat that may be used in conjunction with the present invention.

FIG. 2 shows a perspective view of an example of one embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 3 shows a perspective view of the embodiment of the present invention shown in FIG. 2 coupled to an infant car seat.

FIG. 4 shows a perspective view of an example of the holding element component of the present invention.

FIG. 5 shows a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the holding element shown in FIG. 4.

FIG. 6 shows a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the holding element shown in FIG. 4.

FIG. 7 shows a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the holding element shown in FIG. 4.

FIG. 8 shows a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the holding element shown in FIG. 4.

FIG. 9 shows top view of an infant car seat that may be used in conjunction with the present invention.

FIG. 10 shows a cross-sectional view of a swivel mechanism for a holding element according to the present invention.

FIG. 11 shows a perspective view of a swivel mechanism for a holding element according to the present invention.

FIG. 12 shows a plan view of an alternate embodiment of the holding element shown in FIG. 4.

FIG. 13 shows a partial perspective view of stops that included in an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 14 shows a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the present invention shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 15 shows a perspective view of an alternate embodiment of the present invention shown in FIG. 2.

FIG. 16 shows a cross-sectional view of a base pole.

FIG. 17 shows a perspective view of the underside of a base element included in the embodiment of the present invention shown in FIG. 15.

FIG. 18 shows a plan view of the underside of the base element shown in FIG. 17.

FIG. 19 shows a perspective view of a collapsing mechanism as it appears in a non-collapsed state of the embodiment of the present invention shown in FIG. 15.

FIG. 20 shows a perspective view of a collapsing mechanism as it appears in a collapsed state of the embodiment of the present invention shown in FIG. 15.

FIG. 21 shows a cross-sectional view of the collapsing mechanism in a first position.

FIG. 22 shows a cross-sectional view of the collapsing mechanism in a second position.

FIG. 23 shows a plan view of the underside of the top piece of the present invention shown in FIG. 15.

FIG. 24 shows a perspective view of the embodiment of the present invention shown in FIG. 15 in a collapsed state.

FIG. 25 shows a perspective view of an additional embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 26 shows a perspective view of a further additional embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention provides an infant swing that can be detachably coupled to the carrying handle of infant car seats known in the art. An example of a typical infant car seat that could be used in conjunction with the present invention is shown in FIG. 1. The infant car seat 10 has a carrying handle 12 which can be used to pick up and carry the car seat when not installed in an automobile. In FIG. 1, the infant car seat has a U-shaped carrying handle 12, however, the present invention is not limited to use with infant car seats having this specific carrying handle shape or configuration, as will be described in further detail below.

An example of one embodiment of the present invention is shown in FIGS. 2 and 3. A portable infant swing 14 is set up in a ready-to-use position. The infant swing comprises a frame 14 including a rigid support shaft 16 having spaced first and second ends (18, 20). It is preferred that the support shaft 16 is collapsible or foldable in order to increase portability.

The first and second ends (18, 20) of the support shaft 16 are each attached to one of a pair of leg sections (22). Each leg section (22) includes a first leg (24) and a second leg (26). In one embodiment of the present invention, the first and second legs of each leg section are adjustable in length or telescoping. Legs that are adjustable in length allow the infant swing 14 to be erected over uneven terrain. Infant swings comprising telescoping legs are known in the art and are described, for example, in U.S. Pat. No. 5,531,656. The legs, however, are not required to be adjustable in length. For example, legs that are adjustable in length may be replaced by non-adjustable legs or foldable legs. Infant swings having rigid, non-adjustable legs are also known in the art and are described, for example, in U.S. Pat. No. 3,256,016. The legs are preferably collapsible in order to increase the portability of the infant swing.

Depending from the support shaft 16, between the first and second ends (18, 20), is a holding element 28. As shown in FIG. 3, the holding element 28 is used to detachably couple the infant car seat 10 to the support shaft 16. In use, the holding element 28 is securable to the carrying handle 12 of the infant car seat 10. Examples of suitable holding elements are those which include a hook or a clamp for coupling with the carrying handle. The portion of the holding element designed for coupling with the carrying handle may be molded to receive carrying handles from specific models of infant car seats.

As shown in FIG. 4, in one embodiment, the holding element 28 includes a loop section 34 positioned proximal to a first end 35 of the holding element, for surrounding the support shaft. By the phrase “surrounding the support shaft” it is meant that the loop section 34 completely or partially engages the shaft so that the holding element 28 is supported from the shaft. Thus, to accomplish this, the loop 34 may constitute an orifice or hook through which the shaft extends. This arrangement permits the holding element 28 to pivot around the support shaft and pivot the infant car seat relative to the support shaft. The holding element also includes at a second end 36, a hinged loop section 37 for receiving the carrying handle. The hinged loop section includes a hinged base 38 having one or more hinges 39. The hinged loop section also includes a lock 41 for locking the hinged base in place after a carrying handle has been inserted into the hinged loop section.

An alternate embodiment of the holding element is shown in FIG. 5. The holding element 228 includes spaced first 235 and second 236 ends. Located at the first end of the holding element is a loop section 234 for surrounding the support shaft, thereby permitting the holding element 228 to pivot around the support shaft and pivot the infant car seat relative to the support shaft. Located at the second end 236 of the holding element 228 is a clamp 240 for securable receipt of the carrying handle of the infant car seat. The jaws 242 of the clamp are actuated between open and closed positions by a spring-loaded lever 244.

Another embodiment of the holding element is shown in FIG. 6. The holding element 328 includes spaced first 335 and second 336 ends. Located at the first end 335 of the holding element 328 is a loop section 334 for surrounding the support shaft, thereby permitting the holding element 328 to pivot around the support shaft and pivot the infant car seat relative to the support shaft. Located at the second end 336 of the holding element 328 is a ring 330 that is adjustable in order to receive carrying handles having a range of diameters.

Another embodiment of the holding element is shown in FIG. 7. The holding element 428 includes spaced first 435 and second 436 ends positioned on opposite ends of a shaft 437. Located proximal to the first end 435 of the holding element 428 is an orifice or opening 434 through which the support shaft 16 can be inserted, thereby permitting the holding element 428 to pivot around the support shaft and pivot the infant car seat relative to the support shaft. Located at the second end 436 of the holding element 428 is a hook 440 for supporting the carrying handle of an infant car seat.

Another embodiment of the holding element is shown in FIG. 8. The holding element 428 includes spaced first 435 and second 436 ends positioned on opposite ends of a shaft 437. Located proximal to the first end 435 of the holding element 428 is a loop section 434. Located at the second end 436 of the holding element 428 is a hook 440 for supporting a carrying handle of an infant car seat. Attached to the hook 440 is a hinged arm 442. Once the carrying handle is received by the hook 440, the hinged arm 442 can be manoeuvred across the top of the carrying handle. The hinged arm 442 has a first end 436 which is attached to the hook 440 via a hinge 438, and a second end 450 which includes a clamp 452. When the arm 442 is manoeuvred across the carrying handle, the clamp 452 of the arm 442 can be locked into a groove 454 on the shaft 437 thereby preventing the carrying handle from slipping out of the hook 440. A number of variations of clamps could be used on the hinged arm provided that the clamps secure the hinged arm in place and prevent the carrying handle from slipping free of the hook 440.

In another alternate embodiment (not shown) of the present invention, the holding element may be coupled to a spring or other such dampening means. Such dampening means serves to provide resiliency in order to achieve a smoothly oscillating swinging action and eliminate any jerking motions especially at the end of a movement in one direction and the start of the return movement in the opposite direction.

In another embodiment, the holding element such as shown in the various examples above, may also include a swivel mechanism that permits one section of the holding element to be swivelled with respect to the other in order to facilitate attachment to different configurations of carrying handles other than the typical U-shaped handle shown in FIG. 1. For example, the holding element incorporating such swivelling mechanism allows for securing infant seats having various carrying handle configurations such as those that permit the palm of the hand of a carrier to face inwardly towards the carrier. One example of this type of carrying handle is shown in FIG. 9 which is a carrier seat described in U.S. Pat. No. 5,324,094. The handle 40 comprises two legs (42, 44) that are connected to the car seat 50. The distal ends (46, 48) of the legs (42, 44) are connected by a handgrip 52. This handle has a Z-configuration with the central portion of the “Z” comprising the handgrip, wherein the palm of the hand of a person carrying the seat would face inwardly towards the person.

An example of a holding element having a swivel mechanism is shown in greater detail in FIGS. 10 and 11. The swivel mechanism 260 can be located between the first and second ends, for example, of the shaft 437 of the holding element depicted in FIGS. 7 and 8. In this example, the shaft 437 is divided into an upper section 437a and a lower section 437b. The upper section fits within the lower section and is permitted to swivel around the axis y as shown in FIG. 11. The upper section preferably includes a locking mechanism such as one or more spring-loaded buttons 480 which extend through a corresponding aperture 482 in the lower section 437b when in a first position. The spring-loaded buttons 480 serve to lock the upper section in place with respect to the lower section. It will be understood that similar swivel mechanisms can be provided with other embodiments of the holding element including those described herein. Similarly, various alternatives to the optional locking mechanism will also be apparent to persons skilled in the art.

In order to swivel the holding element, the spring loaded buttons are depressed so they no longer extend through the corresponding aperture when in the first position. The lower section 437b can then be swivelled from the first position relative to the upper section 437b until the spring-loaded buttons emerge through apertures 484 required for a second position.

Although FIGS. 10 and 11 depict one example of a suitable swivel mechanism, the present invention is not limited to this embodiment. An individual of skill in the art will recognize a number of variations to the swivel mechanism which may be included with the holding element of the present invention.

An alternate embodiment of the holding element according to the present invention is shown in FIG. 12. In this embodiment the holding element 460 includes spaced first 462 and second 464 ends positioned on opposite ends of the holding element 460. Located proximal to the first end of the holding element is a connection 466 for attaching the holding element to the support shaft. The holding element may be constructed as either a separate component (as shown in FIG. 12) which surrounds the support shaft or may be integrated with the support shaft (not shown). Located at the second end of the holding element is a hook 468 for receipt of the carrying handle of an infant car seat. Positioned between the first and second ends of the holding element is pivot 470 which permits the swinging of the infant car seat relative to the swing frame. The pivot may be manually operated, or the pivoting action may be generated by a battery-operated motor.

It will be understood that although the embodiment of the holding element shown in FIG. 12 includes a hook for receipt of the carrying handle of an infant car seat, similar components for receipt of the carrying handle could be used for this purpose, including those described herein.

The support bar of the swing frame, when used with any of the holding elements described above may include one or more stops 47 as shown in FIG. 13. The stops 47 prevent the loop sections surrounding the support shaft 16 from slipping laterally along the support shaft.

FIG. 14 shows another alternate embodiment of the present invention. In this embodiment the swing frame consists of a curved support shaft 100 having spaced first and second ends (110, 120). A holding element (130) is attached to the first end 110, wherein the holding element is used to secure the infant car seat to the swing frame.

Connected to the second end of the support shaft 100 is a base 140 having first and second feet 150, 160 for stabilizing the swing frame. The feet (150,160) and the support shaft 100 are preferably foldable in order to increase the portability of the infant swing. Although the base 140 of the swing frame shown in FIG. 12 has a semi-circular orientation, the present invention is not limited to the semi-circular base construction.

An individual of skill in the art will recognize alternate configurations for the swing frame which could be used in conjunction with the holding element, and the swing frame is therefore not limited to the examples shown.

In another embodiment, the present invention provides a collapsible swing frame for use with an infant car seat. FIG. 15 shows the collapsible swing frame 500 set up in a ready-to-use position. The swing frame 500 includes a base 502, a plurality of base poles 504 locked into the base 502, a plurality of legs 506 coupled with the base poles 504, and a support disc 507 from which depends a holding element 508 for the carrying handle 510 of an infant car seat 512.

The base 502 for the collapsible swing frame is shown in further detail in FIGS. 16 and 17. The base 502 consists of an outer ring wall 514 including a plurality of guide slots 516. The base poles 504 are inserted into the guide slots 516 as shown in FIG. 17. The base also comprises a inner ring wall 518. The inner ring wall 518 includes a plurality of pin-slots 520, wherein each pin-slot 520 is aligned with a corresponding guide slot 516.

An example of a base pole is shown in further detail in FIGS. 15 and 18. Each base pole 504 has a first end 522 and a second end 524. Within the first end 522, is a spring loaded pin 526 having inner 528 and outer ends 530. The inner end 528 is coupled to a spring element 532 and is maintained within the hollow first end 522 of the base pole 504. The outer end 530 extends beyond the first end 522 of the base pole 504. Preferably, the base poles are hollow aluminium tubes to allow for ease of transportation. Each base pole 504 also includes an aperture 531 through which passes a portion of a connector ring 525. Connector ring 525 links the plurality of base poles 504 together. The connector ring 525, as shown in FIGS. 16 and 17 is held within a housing 529 and the connector ring passes through a channel in the housing. The housing 529 includes a plurality of gaps 531 in which the base poles are located. The combination of the connector ring 525 and the housing 529 ensure that the base poles are integrated into the base 502.

Housed within the inner ring wall 518 of the base 502 is a collapsing mechanism 535 shown in FIGS. 19 and 20. The collapsing mechanism 535 comprises a plurality of leaves 536 attached to a ring 538 via hinges 540. The collapsing mechanism 535 also includes a base plate 542 having a pull handle 544 attached to the center of the base plate 542. When the swing frame is in set up position, the collapsing mechanism 535 appears as shown in FIG. 19. When the swing frame is in collapsed position, the collapsing mechanism appears as shown in FIG. 20.

Each leg 506 has a first end 537 and a second end 538. Preferably, the legs are hollow aluminum tubes to allow for ease of transportation. The first end 537 of each leg is coupled to a corresponding base pole via an elbow joint 553. In the set up position, as shown in FIG. 15, each leg 506 is locked in an upright position at an angle relative to its corresponding base pole 504. The locking of each leg in an upright position can be accomplished using a variety of locking mechanisms known in the art.

The support disc 507 shown in FIGS. 15 and 23 includes a support ring 555 for holding the second ends of the plurality of legs together. Each leg 506 also includes an aperture 557 at its second end 538 which allows the support ring 555 to pass therethrough. The support disc 507 also includes a channel 562 through which each leg passes in order to hold the legs together at the top of the swing frame.

The support ring 555 includes a support shaft 556 to which can be attached a holding element such as the ones shown in the preceding figures. Alternatively, the support shaft 556 may be configured as shown in FIGS. 9 and 10 wherein the holding element can be detachably coupled to the support shaft.

In order to collapse the swing frame 500, the handle 544 attached to the base plate 542 is pulled vertically, which in turn lifts the base plate 542 (see FIGS. 21 and 22). As the base plate 542 rises, it forces the plurality of leaves 536 of the collapsing mechanism into an open configuration. The opened leaves 536 push the spring-loaded pins 526 of the base poles 504, which are projecting through the pin-slots 520, back through the pin-slots into the space between the inner ring 518 and the outer ring 514. As a result, the base poles 504 are unlocked. The locking mechanisms which maintain the plurality of legs in the upright position are then also released thereby allowing the plurality of legs and base poles to be folded together. Continued upwards pulling of the handle 544 urges the base poles to pivot on the connector ring, causing the first ends of the base poles to press against the interior surface of the space between the inner ring and the outer ring. The swing frame 500 continues to collapse until it reaches the position shown in FIG. 24, wherein the base poles and legs hang downwards and adjacent to one another.

Although the collapsible swing frame shown in FIGS. 15 to 24 includes a collapsing mechanism for pushing the spring loaded pins of the base poles from the pin slots, it will be understood that alternate mechanisms for retracting the pins from the slots could be provided with other embodiments. For example, each base pole may include a trigger or lever mechanism which permits the spring-loaded pin to be retracted from the pin slots in order to facilitate the collapsing of the swing frame.

In a preferred embodiment, the base poles 504 and legs 506 are telescoping in order to provide greater portability.

In another aspect, a portable infant swing is provided wherein a collapsible seat-receiving frame is used to couple an infant car seat to a swing frame. The seat-receiving frame may, for example, be in the form of a sling having supports and restraints to securely hold the infant car seat in the seat-receiving frame as described further below. In this embodiment, the seat-receiving frame should be at least partially constructed of a strong, flexible, and durable material, for example nylon, which can support the weight of the car seat. The use of material such as nylon allows the seat-receiving frame to be folded or rolled into a compact storage position when not in use.

Referring now to FIG. 25, there is shown a collapsible seat receiving frame 600 suspended from a swing frame having an overhead support 610. The seat-receiving frame is connected to the overhead support at connection site 611. Various swing frames previously referred to in the description may be used in conjunction with the seat-receiving frame 600. The seat-receiving frame 600 comprises a pair of elongate generally parallel crossbars 612 which are positioned at opposite ends (614, 616) of a receiving pocket 621. The receiving pocket, as mentioned above, is the portion of the seat receiving frame that should be constructed of a material such as nylon. The receiving pocket 621 may include one or more fasteners for securely attaching an infant car seat to the seat-receiving frame. For example, the receiving pocket may include a security belt 650 which is used to fasten the infant car seat to the seat-receiving frame. The security belt fits into seat belt holder slots which are located on the infant car seat. Additional fasteners which clip directly to the infant car seat may also be incorporated into the seat-receiving frame.

The seat receiving frame is connected to the overhead support by a plurality of suspending elements 620, for example a plurality of cords, cables or straps. As shown in FIG. 25 the plurality of suspending elements connect the connection site 611 with the pair of crossbars 612 at attachment sites 624.

The sides (626, 628) of the receiving pocket may be elasticized to allow them to be drawn tightly against the sides of the car seat.

The pair of crossbars may be adjustable in length to allow for the adjustment of the width of the seat receiving frame in order to securely fit different models of car seats.

Referring now to FIG. 26, there is shown a collapsible seat receiving frame 700 suspended from a swing frame having an overhead support 710. The seat receiving frame 700 works in generally the same way as the embodiment shown in FIG. 25, however, in this embodiment the seat-receiving frame comprises a pair of generally parallel side bars 712 and a pair of generally parallel crossbars 714 that transversely interconnect the side bars to provide a quadrilateral shape. The lengths of individual side bars and crossbars may be adjusted be adjustable in order to accommodate a variety of sizes and shapes of infant cars seats.

In this embodiment, the seat-receiving frame may comprise a latching mechanism for releasably engaging a complementary locking system on the base of an infant car seat. In addition, the seat-receiving frame may also include a security belt which is used to fasten the infant car seat to the seat-receiving frame. The security belt connects to the infant car seat as described above.

The seat receiving frame is connected to the overhead support by a plurality of suspending elements 720, for example a plurality of cords, cables or straps. As shown in FIG. 26 the plurality of suspending elements connect the connection site 711 with the seat-receiving frame at attachment sites 724.

The seat-receiving frame as shown in FIG. 26 may be constructed from light weight, durable materials such as aluminum or plastic.

The embodiments shown in FIGS. 25 and 26 are designed to allow for manual actuation of the seat-receiving frame in order to swing the seat-receiving frame in relation to the swing frame. As such, the infant swing does not require drive means to mechanically cause the motion of the seat-receiving frame, thereby providing a lightweight and portable infant swing.

Although the invention has been described with reference to certain specific embodiments, various modifications thereof will be apparent to those skilled in the art without departing from the spirit and scope of the invention as outlined herein. The entire disclosures of all references recited above are incorporated herein by reference.