Title:
Wheel exercise apparatus and method
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A wheel exercise apparatus comprises a single wheel, preferably air-inflated, that has an axle passing through it. Foot rests for receiving the feet of a user are connected to the opposing ends of the axle. Each foot rest has a toe cup. The foot rests have cable attachment points for optionally connecting a weight sled to the apparatus or connecting foot plates having fixed heel rests. The foot plates allow exercises where the the user's body is facing upward. One method of using the apparatus includes the steps of the user kneeling; placing a wheel exercise apparatus behind the user; placing the toes of the user in the toe cups of the wheel exercise apparatus; stretching out the body of the user away from the wheel exercise apparatus; and, walking forward with the hands while balancing II the body on the wheel exercise apparatus.



Inventors:
Roberts, Patrick (Keller, TX, US)
Application Number:
11/441469
Publication Date:
01/11/2007
Filing Date:
05/26/2006
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
482/92, 482/141, 482/148
International Classes:
A63B21/00; A63B23/00; A63B26/00; A63B71/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
BAKER, LORI LYNN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
John A. Thomas (14801 Quorum Drive, Suite 500, Dallas, TX, 75254, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A wheel exercise apparatus comprising: a single wheel; the wheel having an axle; the axle having first and second opposing ends; a first foot rest mounted on the first end of the axle; the first foot rest having a first toe cup; a second foot rest mounted on the second end of the axle; the second foot rest having a second toe cup; the first and second foot rests having cable attachment points.

2. The wheel exercise apparatus of claim 1, where the wheel is an air-filled tire.

3. The wheel exercise apparatus of claim 1, where foot rests are removable from the axle.

4. A wheel exercise apparatus comprising: a single wheel; the wheel having an axle; the axle having first and second opposing ends; first and second foot rests mounted on the first and second ends of the axle; a first foot plate mounted on the first foot rest; the first foot plate having a first fixed heel rest; a second foot plate mounted on the second foot rest; the second foot plate having a first fixed heel rest.

5. The wheel exercise apparatus of claim 4, where the wheel is an air-filled tire.

6. The wheel exercise apparatus of claim 1, where foot plates are removable from the foot rests.

7. A wheel exercise apparatus comprising: a single wheel; the wheel having an axle; the axle having first and second opposing ends; a first foot rest mounted on the first end of the axle; the first foot rest having a first toe cup; a second foot rest mounted on the second end of the axle; the second foot rest having a second toe cup; the first and second foot rests having cable attachment points; a sled; a cable; the cable connecting the sled to the cable attachment points of the foot rests.

8. The wheel exercise apparatus of claim 7, where the wheel is an air-filled tire.

9. The wheel exercise apparatus of claim 7, where foot rests are removable from the axle.

10. The wheel exercise apparatus of claim 7 where the sled further comprises a post for holding weights.

11. A method of exercising by a user, comprising: the user kneeling; placing a wheel exercise apparatus behind the user; placing the toes of the user in the toe cups of the wheel exercise apparatus; stretching out the body of the user away from the wheel exercise apparatus; and, walking forward with the hands while balancing the body on the wheel exercise apparatus.

12. The method of claim 11 further comprising: connecting a sled to the wheel exercise apparatus.

13. The method of claim 1 1 further comprising attaching a belt post to the body of the user.

14. A method of exercising by a user, comprising: placing the feet of the user on the foot plates of a wheel exercise apparatus; the foot plates having heel rests; resting the heels in the heel rests of the foot plates; lying back from the wheel exercise apparatus with the knees bent; lifting the midsection off the floor until the midsection is approximately straight; rolling the wheel exercise apparatus away from the body, keeping the buttocks off the floor; and, returning the legs to the starting position of knees bent.

15. A method of exercising by a user, comprising: the user kneeling; placing the hands on the handgrips of a wheel exercise apparatus; placing the wheel exercise apparatus near the knees; rolling the wheel exercise apparatus away from the user's knees; and, rolling the wheel exercise apparatus back to the starting position.

Description:

CLAIM FOR PRIORITY

This application claims the priority of U.S. Provisional Patent Application, Ser. No. 60/697,024, filed Jul. 6, 2005.

TECHNICAL FIELD

This disclosure relates to the field of exercise apparatus.

BACKGROUND

So-called “core” training is an essential part of increasing muscle strength. The superficial and deep muscles of the trunk area work together to keep the body in an upright, stable position as we stand or shift weight while walking. These muscles layer, overlap and connect to the skeletal system. Strengthening these hard-to-reach muscles gives numerous benefits to physical fitness and strength.

The “abdominal bridge” is a well-known core exercise that targets not just the core muscles, but all muscle groups as they tighten and strain to hold the body's weight. The longer the moves can be held, the stronger the abdominal, chest, back, arm, gluteus, and leg muscles become.

There is a need for an exercise apparatus that accommodates many different body positions while the person exercising executes an abdominal bridge type of exercise.

DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 shows a perspective of the assembled preferred embodiment.

FIG. 2 shows front and back plan views of the assembled core wheel of the preferred embodiment.

FIG. 3 shows the core wheel of the preferred embodiment connected to various optional accessories.

FIGS. 4-6 show different exercise methods with the core wheel of the preferred embodiment.

DESCRIPTION

As shown in FIGS. 1 and 2, the preferred embodiment has a single wheel (110), preferably an air-inflated tire (110). An axle (120) passes through the axis of the wheel (110). The axle is rotatably received into foot rests (140). Optionally, foot plates (160), may be attached to the foot rests (140). The foot rests (140) have toe cups (150) for comfortably holding the toes of the user's feet. The axle (120) and foot rests (140) are preferably made of steel.

FIG. 3 shows optional attachments for the basic core wheel apparatus (100). Flat foot plates (160) are attached to the foot rests (140) at attachment points (145) by any convenient means, such as removable pins or bolts (not shown) The flat foot plates (160) have fixed heel rests (170) to support an exerciser's feet as he or she performs exercises in the back-down position. It is important that the heel rests (170) be relatively rigid, to accommodate without shifting the loads placed upon them by the user's body.

A sled (180) for holding weights (220) may be connected to the foot rests (140) by a cable (200), as shown in FIG. 3. The cable (200) attaches to the foot rests (140) at attachment points (145) on either side of the wheel (110). The sled (180) preferably has an upward curve as shown in FIG. 3, to avoid catching on rugs or flooring. Optionally, the sled (180) may have texture on its bottom to increase friction with the floor and thus resistance. FIG. 3 also shows a belt waist post (190) for attachment about a user's waist.

FIGS. 4-6 show different methods of using the preferred embodiment. FIG. 4 shows an exercise that may be called the “walking ab bridge,” intended to strength the core abdominal muscles. In FIG. 4, the user starts by kneeling and placing the wheel apparatus (100) behind him or her. The user places the toes of his shoes in the toe cups (150) of the foot rests (140), and stretches out his body as straight as possible. Then, the user walks forward with his hands while balancing the body on the wheel (110). In keeping the body straight, the muscles of the arms, chest, back, abdominals, gluteus and legs are strongly engaged.

FIG. 5 shows an exercise that may be called the “lying leg curl.” The user starts by placing the flat foot plates (160) on the foot rests (140), allowing his or her heels to rest in the heel rests (170) of the foot plates (160). The user lies back, keeping the knees bent, and lifts his or her midsection off the floor until it is as straight as possible. The weight should be on the feet on the wheel and on the shoulders. The user then slowly rolls the wheel (110) out as far as he can, keeping the buttocks off the floor, then returns the legs to the starting position.

FIG. 6 shows an exercise that may be called the “kneeling ab roll.” The user starts by kneeling and placing his or her hands on the portion of the foot rests (140) that rest on the axle (120) of the wheel (110), these portions effectively being handgrips. Starting with the wheel (110) near the knees, the user rolls forward as far as possible and rolls back to the starting position.

The intensity of the walking ab bridge exercise shown in FIG. 4 may be increased as shown in FIGS. 7 and 8. In FIG. 7, the sled (180) bears a weight (220), and the sled (180) is attached by the cable (200) to the wheel (110). In FIG. 8, the user straps the belt post (190) over his or her back and places weights (220) on it.

Since those skilled in the art can modify the specific embodiments described above, I intend that the claims be interpreted to cover such modifications and equivalents.