Title:
Twist bit for drilling mortar and for optimizing dissipation of heat and dust created by the drilling
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A twist bit for drilling mortar and for optimizing dissipation of heat and dust created by the drilling. A shaft has a flute therein configured in a spiral configuration therealong leaving a flute land thereon also configured in a spiral configuration therealong, a tip, and a head including the tip and a portion of the flute land coextensive with the tip. Diamond dust is disposed only on the flute land and the head. To optimize the dissipation of the heat and the dust created by the drilling, the twist drill operates via a drill motor in a range of approximately 25,000 RPMs to approximately 26,000 RPMs. The flute has a width of approximately ¼″ and the flute land has a width of approximately ¼″ and a height of approximately 1/16″.



Inventors:
Switzer, Bruce D. (McAfee, NJ, US)
Application Number:
11/171777
Publication Date:
01/04/2007
Filing Date:
06/30/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E21B10/44
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
COY, NICOLE A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Richard L. Miller (12 Parkside Drive, Dix Hills, NY, 11746-4879, US)
Claims:
The invention claimed is:

1. A twist bit for drilling mortar and for optimizing dissipation of heat and dust created by the drilling, comprising: a) a shaft; and b) diamond dust; wherein said diamond dust is disposed on said shaft.

2. The bit as defined in claim 1, wherein said shaft has a flute therein.

3. The bit as defined in claim 2, wherein said flute in said shaft is configured in a spiral configuration therealong so as to leave a flute land thereon that is also configured in a spiral configuration therealong.

4. The bit as defined in claim 3, wherein said shaft has a tip.

5. The bit as defined in claim 4, wherein said flute land of said shaft extends therealong up to, and is coextensive with, said tip of said shaft so as to form a head.

6. The bit as defined in claim 5, wherein said head of said shaft includes said tip of said shaft and a portion of said flute land of said shaft that is coextensive with said tip of said shaft.

7. The bit as defined in claim 4, wherein said tip of said shaft is pointed.

8. The bit as defined in claim 5, wherein said diamond dust is disposed only on said flute land of said shaft and said head of said shaft.

9. The bit as defined in claim 3, wherein said flute in said shaft has a width; wherein said flute land of said shaft has a width; wherein said flute land of said shaft has a height; and wherein said twist bit operates via a drill motor in a range of approximately 25,000 RPMs to approximately 26,000 RPMs, said width of said flute in said shaft is approximately ¼″, said width of said flute land of said shaft is approximately ¼″, and said height of said flute land of said shaft is approximately 1/16″, all for optimizing the dissipation of the heat and the dust from a hole in mortar created by the drilling.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention:

The present invention relates to a twist bit for drilling mortar, a and more particularly, the present invention relates to a twist bit for drilling mortar and for optimizing dissipation of heat and dust created by the drilling.

2. Description of the Prior Art:

Numerous innovations for drill bits have been provided in the prior art that will be described. Even though these innovations may be suitable for the specific individual purposes to which they address, however, they differ from the present invention.

A FIRST EXAMPLE, U.S. Pat. No. 3,692,127, Issued on Sep. 19, 1972, to Hampe et al. teaches an improved rotary diamond core bit offering longer life in dry and in chip flush drilling. Grade AAAA dodecahedron diamonds within the range of 18 to 22 diamonds per carat size, each having a select rectangular pyramid point region free of internal flaws and with an included angle of 100 degrees to 120 degrees, are anchored in a bit matrix to project such select point regions outwardly a distance of 0.015±0.003 inch from a semi-round angular bit face in hard-vector face-set orientation in the rotary cutting direction of the bit and with a negative rake angle of nominally 4½ degrees. Such bit-face diamonds are arranged in circumferentially spaced-apart rows extending radially outward and backward with respect to rotary motion of the bit. Such “snow-plow” linear arrays of bit-face diamonds are disposed on respective discrete similarly snow-plow-oriented land areas or cutting segments of the annular bit face, and chip release face grooves extend from inner to outer diameter of the annular bit face between all cutting segments. The diamonds on the annular segmented cutting face are arranged with the tips of their projecting cutting portions at equal radial intervals of 0.010±0.001 inch along concentric line circles. Thirty-seven line circles cover the full annular segmented bit face region, and two diamonds are employed in all but the innermost and outermost line circles, which each have four. Axially extending chip release grooves at the inner and outer diameters of the bit register with opposite ends of the bit-face grooves, and axially extending rows of reaming diamonds continue from opposite ends of the rows of bit-face diamonds. A curvature of 0.050±0.005 inch at the intersection of each cutting segment surface and the inner and outer diameter portions of the bit enable proper non-girth-exposing anchoring and the 0.015 inch projection of the diamonds in the transition region between the bit-face diamonds and the reaming diamonds at the interior and exterior surfaces of the bit. The axially extending chip release grooves in the outer diameter portion of the bit feed into auger grooves formed in a continuing shank portion of the bit for dry or wet chip removal.

A SECOND EXAMPLE, U.S. Pat. No. 3,736,995, Issued on Jun. 5, 1973, to Salter teaches a masonry core drilling bit for cutting through cast concrete into preplaced utility conduit cells beneath the surface. The bit has two concentric, axially offset, end cutting faces on a unitary cutter head arranged at the end of a hollow shank for simultaneously cutting through concrete and through the metal cover of the embedded cell while, at the same time, providing an enlarged hole in the concrete to accept an insert for a utility outlet. The cutter head of the bit contains 5 to 60 volume per cent uniformly dispersed diamonds in a matrix of substantially pure iron powder, or an iron powder containing 20-80 vol. percent WC, infiltrated during fabrication with a relatively low-melting alloy. Spaced diamonds are provided along the internal and exterior cylindrical surfaces of the cutter head of the bit.

A THIRD EXAMPLE, U.S. Pat. No. 5,022,801, Issued on Jun. 11, 1991, to Anthony et al. teaches a twist drill which is coated with a layer of CVD diamond and which has slots in its head which are filled with CVD diamond. The invention twist drill is made by forming slots in the head of the twist drill and then subjecting the slotted twist drill to a CVD diamond deposition process for coating the twist drill with a layer of CVD diamond and for filling the slots with CVD diamond. The performance of CVD diamond-coated twist drills does not depend on retaining the diamond film over most of the areas of the drill; but, rather, drill performance is dependent upon retaining a layer of diamond on the cutting edge of the drill. The diamond-filled slots in the head of the twist drill function as wear stops and additional cutting edges as the surrounding drill material is worn away during use.

A FOURTH EXAMPLE, U.S. Pat. No. 5,716,170, Issued on Feb. 10, 1998, to Kammermeier et al. teaches a diamond coated elongate rotary cutting member and method of making the same. The cutting member includes an axially forward cutting surface, a flute and a fluted land. The cutting member comprises a substrate with hard grains bonded together with a metallic binder. The substrate has a first substrate region that presents an irregular surface so as to define the axially forward cutting surface and the fluted land. The first substrate region contains relatively large hard grains near the surface thereof that are larger in size than the hard grains in the interior of the substrate. A diamond coating is on the surface of the first substrate region. The substrate has a second substrate region that defines the flute.

A FIFTH EXAMPLE, U.S. Pat. No. 6,196,908 B1, Issued on Mar. 6, 2001, to Adams teaches a diamond coated drill capable of drilling large holes in composite materials and then reaming the holes to their correct size that includes a pair of prongs extending from a shank. Each of the prongs has a tip, a grinder, and a reamer. The tips initiate a hole, the grinders gradually grind the hole to the proper size, and the reamers control the final diameter of the hole. The tips have a coarse grit diamond coating. The grinders also have a coarse grit diamond coating and are axially tapered toward the tips. The reamers have a fine grit diamond coating and are disposed axially above the grinders and the shank of the drill. The grinders apply a radial load to the composite material resulting in no fiber breakout or splintering. The composite material drilled by the drill naturally falls out of the drill during drilling.

It is apparent that numerous innovations for drill bits have been provided in the prior art that are adapted to be used. Furthermore, even though these innovations may be suitable for the specific individual purposes to which they address, however, they would not be suitable for the purposes of the present invention as heretofore described.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

ACCORDINGLY, AN OBJECT of the present invention is to provide a twist bit for drilling mortar and for optimizing dissipation of heat and dust created by the drilling that avoids the disadvantages of the prior art.

ANOTHER OBJECT of the present invention is to provide a twist bit for drilling mortar and for optimizing dissipation of heat and dust created by the drilling that is simple to use.

BRIEFLY STATED, STILL ANOTHER OBJECT of the present invention is to provide a twist bit for drilling mortar and for optimizing dissipation of heat and dust created by the drilling. A shaft has a flute therein configured in a spiral configuration therealong leaving a flute land thereon also configured in a spiral configuration therealong, a tip, and a head including the tip and a portion of the flute land coextensive with the tip. Diamond dust is disposed only on the flute land and the head. To optimize the dissipation of the heat and the dust from a hole created by the drilling, the twist bit operates via a drill motor in a range of approximately 25,000 RPMB to approximately 26,000 RPMs. The flute has a width of approximately ¼″ and the flute land has a width of approximately ¼″ and a height of approximately 1/16″.

The novel features which are considered characteristic of the present invention are set forth in the appended claims. The invention itself, however, both as to its construction and its method of operation, together with additional objects and advantages thereof, will be best understood from the following description of the specific embodiments when read and understood in connection with the accompanying drawing.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

The figures of the drawing are briefly described as follows:

FIG. 1 is a diagrammatic cross sectional view through the mortar showing of the twist bit of the present invention drilling an axial hole in the mortar and optimizing dissipation of heat and dust created by the drilling;

FIG. 2 is a diagrammatic cross sectional view through the mortar showing the twist bit of the present invention drilling a lateral hole in the mortar and optimizing dissipation of heat and dust created by the drilling;

FIG. 3 is a diagrammatic side elevational view of the twist bit of the present invention identified by ARROW 3 in FIGS. 1 and 2; and

FIG. 4 is an enlarged diagrammatic cross sectional view taken along LINE 4-4 in FIG. 3.

LIST OF REFERENCE NUMERALS UTILIZED IN THE DRAWING

  • 10 twist bit of present invention for drilling mortar 12 and for optimizing dissipation of heat 14 and dust 16 created by drilling
  • 11 hole in mortar
  • 12 mortar
  • 13 drill motor for rotating twist bit 10
  • 14 heat from hole 11
  • 16 dust form hole 11
  • 18 shaft of twist bit 10
  • 20 diamond dust of the twist bit 10
  • 22 flute in shaft 18
  • 24 flute land of shaft 18
  • 26 tip of shaft 18
  • 28 head of shaft 18

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Referring now to the figures, in which like numerals indicate like parts, and particularly to FIGS. 1 and 2, which are, respectively, a diagrammatic cross sectional view through the mortar showing the twist bit of the present invention drilling an axial hole in the mortar and optimizing dissipation of heat and dust created by the drilling, and, a diagrammatic cross sectional view through the mortar showing the twist bit of the present invention drilling and cutting a lateral hole in the mortar and optimizing dissipation of heat and dust created by the drilling, the twist bit of the present invention is shown generally at 10 for drilling holes 11 in mortar 12 via a drill motor 13 and for optimizing dissipation of heat 14 and dust 16 from the hole 11 created by the drilling.

The configuration of the twist bit 10 can best be seen in FIGS. 3 and 4, which are, respectively, a diagrammatic side elevational view of the twist bit of the present invention identified by ARROW 3 in FIGS. 1 and 2, and, an enlarged diagrammatic cross sectional view taken along LINE 4-4 in FIG. 3, and as such, will be discussed with reference thereto.

The twist bit 10 comprises a shaft 18 and diamond dust 20. The diamond dust 20 is disposed on the shaft 18. The shaft 18 has a flute 22 therein.

The flute 22 in the shaft 18 is configured in a spiral configuration therealong so as to leave a flute land 24 thereon that is also configured in a spiral configuration therealong. The shaft 18 further has a tip 26.

The flute land 24 of the shaft 18 extends therealong up to, and is coextensive with, the tip 26 of the shaft 18 so as to form a head 28. The head 28 of the shaft 18 includes the tip 26 of the shaft 18 and a portion of the flute land 24 of the shaft 18 that is coextensive with the tip 26 of the shaft 18.

The tip 26 of the shaft 18 is pointed.

The diamond dust 20 is disposed only on the flute land 24 of the shaft 18 and the head 28 of the shaft 18.

The flute 22 in the shaft 18 has a width, and the flute land 24 of the shaft 18 has a width and a height.

To optimize the dissipation of the heat 14 and the dust 16 from the hole 11 created by the drilling, the twist bit 10 operates via a drill motor 13 in a range of approximately 25,000 RPMs to approximately 26,000 RPMs. The width of the flute 22 in the shaft 18 is approximately ¼″, the width of the flute land 24 of the shaft 18 is approximately ¼″, and the height of the flute land 24 of the shaft 18 is approximately 1/16″.

It will be understood that each of the elements described above, or two or more together, may also find a useful application in other types of constructions differing from the types described above.

While the invention has been illustrated and described as embodied in a twist bit for drilling mortar and for optimizing dissipation of heat and dust created by the drilling, however, it is not limited to the details shown, since it will be understood that various omissions, modifications, substitutions and changes in the forms and details of the device illustrated and its operation can be made by those skilled in the art without departing in any way from the spirit of the present invention.

Without further analysis, the foregoing will so fully reveal the gist of the present invention that others can, by applying current knowledge, readily adapt it for various applications without omitting features that, from the standpoint of prior art, fairly constitute characteristics of the generic or specific aspects of this invention.