Title:
REMOTE GAME DEVICE FOR DVD GAMING SYSTEMS
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A wireless remote game controller is presented for playing video games with a DVD player assembly. The controller may be adapted to receive data and commands in the form of audio tones generated by the DVD player assembly as well as to send commands to the DVD player assembly. The DVD player assembly may include a DVD player and a television. The game controller may use received commands to select data from memory and display the data for the player as part of game play. Alternatively, the received data may be saved into the controller memory to configure the controller for use in a specific game. Data received by the controller may include values saved to DVD player memory during game play. Data transmitted from the controller to the DVD player may be coded so the DVD player can identify the transmitting controller. Similarly, signals received concurrently by multiple remote game controllers may be coded so that only one device responds to the signal.



Inventors:
Maciver, Peter (Huntington, CA, US)
Zielinski, James (Hawthorne, CA, US)
Thorne, Matt (Culver City, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/383124
Publication Date:
12/21/2006
Filing Date:
05/12/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F9/24
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
WILLIAMS, ROSS A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
KOLISCH HARTWELL, P.C. (520 SW YAMHILL STREET, SUITE 300, PORTLAND, OR, 97204, US)
Claims:
We claim:

1. A remote game device to be used with a DVD player assembly comprising: a microphone configured to receive one or more sonic signals from the DVD player assembly; memory including a lookup table with data for game play; a display; and a processor configured to: select data related to game play from the lookup table, the selection based at least in part on a first received sonic signal; and send the selected data to the display.

2. The remote game device of claim 1 wherein the processor is further configured to modify memory contents based on a second received sonic signal.

3. The remote game device of claim 1 where data is written into memory through a communication link between the DVD player assembly and the remote game device.

4. The remote game device of claim 1 wherein the memory includes a smart card.

5. The remote game device of claim 1 wherein the memory includes at least one dual inline memory module.

6. The remote game device of claim 1 further comprising at least one input key and a transmitter configured to send output signals to the DVD player assembly in response to the operation of the at least one input key.

7. A DVD gaming system comprising: a DVD player; a DVD media disk including scenes and game commands; a television, including a speaker, operatively connected to the DVD player; and at least one remote game device including: a display; and memory including a lookup table; the at least one remote game device configured to: receive one or more sonic signals generated by the television speaker; select data related to game play from the lookup table, the data selection based at least in part on a first received sonic signals; and display a representation of the selected data.

8. The DVD gaming system of claim 7 wherein the at least one remote game device is further configured to convert a second received sonic signal to digital data and save the data to the memory.

9. The DVD gaming system of claim 7 where data is written into the lookup table through a communication link between the television and the remote game device.

10. The DVD gaming system of claim 7 where data is written into the lookup table through a communication link between the DVD player and the remote game device.

11. The DVD gaming system of claim 7 wherein the sonic signals are duotone signals.

12. The DVD gaming system of claim 7 where the remote game device further includes an LED and at least one input key operably connected so the LED transmits a signal when an input key is pressed.

13. The DVD gaming system of claim 12 where the DVD player selects a scene from the DVD media disk based on the transmitted signal.

14. The DVD gaming system of claim 7 further comprising a plurality of the remote game devices, where the plurality of remote game devices is configured to receive a sonic signal and at least one but not all of the plurality of remote game devices displays data based on the received signal.

15. The DVD gaming system of claim 7 further comprising first and second remote game devices, where the first and second remote game device receive a sonic signal from the television speaker, and the data displayed on the first remote game device as a result of the received signal is different than data displayed on the second remote game device.

16. A DVD gaming method comprising: transmitting from a remote game device a command to a DVD player; transmitting from the DVD player an electronic signal; converting the transmitted electronic signal to a sonic signal; receiving the sonic signal at the remote game device; selecting data related to game play from a memory on the remote game device in response to the received sonic signal; and displaying the selected data on the remote game device.

17. The DVD gaming method of claim 16 wherein the remote game device is used in conjunction with a remote control configured to operate the DVD player.

18. The DVD gaming method of claim 16 wherein transmitting an electronic signal includes transmitting an electronic signal including identifying one or more remote game devices among a plurality of remote game devices to respond to the received sonic signal.

19. The DVD gaming method of claim 16 wherein transmitting a command includes transmitting a command identifying uniquely the remote game device among a plurality of remote game devices transmitting the command.

20. A remote game device to be used with a DVD player assembly comprising: a microphone configured to receive sonic signals transmitted by the DVD player assembly and convert the signals to electronic signals; memory configured to store program instructions and data; a display configured to display data stored in memory; and a processor that receives the electronic signals from the microphone, the processor operably connected to the memory, display and microphone; where the remote game device in a first mode is configured to: convert a first received signal to data at the processor; and save the converted data from the processor into the memory; and the remote game device in a second mode is configured to: convert a second received signal to a command at the processor; select data from memory based at least in part on the command; and display the selected data on the display.

21. The remote game device of claim 20 where the data displayed is related to game play.

22. The DVD gaming system of claim 20 where the remote game device further includes an LED and at least one input key operably connected to the processor so the LED transmits a signal when an input key is pressed.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCES

This application claims priority to U.S. Provisional Application Ser. No. 60/683,897, filed May 23, 2005, and entitled “DVD Gaming System Remote Gaming Device,” incorporated herein by reference.

BACKGROUND

The present disclosure relates generally to video games and more specifically to remote game devices that send signals to control execution and flow of video games on a DVD player assembly and receive signals originating from the DVD player assembly.

Examples of DVD gaming systems and remote game devices are found in the following patents and patent application publications: EP1,400,267; WO2004/010389; WO2004/081765; US2004/0048642; US2004/0054826; US2004/0140997; US2004/0140998; US2005/0215324; US2005/026699; U.S. Pat. No. 4,807,031; U.S. Pat. No. 5,213,337; U.S. Pat. No. 6,692,358 and U.S. Pat. No. 6,773,349. The disclosures of these references are hereby incorporated by reference in their entirety for all purposes.

SUMMARY

A remote game device is provided for use with a conventional DVD player configured to play DVD-Video discs. The remote game device is used to control game flow and execution in conjunction with DVD media having scripts recorded thereon. A preferred embodiment of the remote game device includes the ability to receive game signals from a DVD player assembly that includes the DVD player and a television as well as sending game commands to the DVD player assembly for game execution.

The remote game device may receive specific audio tones, sounds or sonic signals before and during play. The received signals may be used to program memory and functions in the device. The received signals may be used to select and display information for the user. The information displayed may be used by a player to control game flow by implementing logical decisions based on the information displayed. Such decisions may include implementing other scripts, setting or changing values of game variables and playing audiovisual content as part of game play.

Some embodiments of the device include the ability of the DVD player to distinguish among remote game devices to determine which of a plurality of players provides game input. Some embodiments of the remote game device include memory and a display that shows game information specific to the individual player as well as general information. The DVD player assembly may have the ability to address one game device among several in use, so the information displayed on the screen of the device may be available only to the one user.

Because DVD gaming systems utilize a standard DVD player, a user who has already purchased and set up such a DVD player may play games without having to purchase a separate gaming console or connect additional equipment to the user's television, which may not have the appropriate inputs for connecting such equipment. This feature of the DVD gaming system may be advantageous to game developers and retailers, because more individuals have access to DVD players than to proprietary game consoles. Thus, games played on a DVD player may appeal to a broader demographic, including individuals who may be unable to, or do not desire to, play games on proprietary gaming consoles.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a DVD gaming system showing two remote game devices in use, a DVD player, a DVD media disk, a standard remote control and a television.

FIG. 2 is a block diagram of the remote game device of FIG. 1, showing device features and functionality.

FIG. 3 is a block diagram of a multiplayer DVD gaming system with three remote game devices, a DVD player and a television showing exemplary communication functionality between the DVD player, television and one of the remote game devices.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of a word game played on a DVD gaming system with two players using two remote game devices, and showing a DVD player assembly including a DVD player, a DVD media disk and a television, with the game displayed on the television screen.

FIG. 5 is a flow chart of the implementation of the word game of FIG. 4 with notations of communication between the remote game devices and the DVD player assembly related to each step.

FIG. 6 is a block diagram of a DVD gaming system showing a DVD player assembly, including a DVD player and a television, and a remote game device in a programming mode, the DVD player assembly sending sonic signals to the remote game device which receives the signals and uses the signal to store data in memory.

FIG. 7 is a block diagram of a DVD gaming system showing a DVD player assembly, including a DVD player and a television, and a remote game device in a programming mode, the television and remote game device connected by a cable and the DVD player assembly sending sonic signals to the remote game device which are received and used to store data in memory.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Referring to FIG. 1, a DVD game system is shown generally at 10, and may include a DVD player assembly 12, which may include a DVD player 13, at least one DVD media disk 14 and a television 16 with a speaker 18 and a screen 19. DVD game system 10 is shown with remote game devices 20 and 20′. DVD game system 10 may be adapted to play games on DVD player 12 and display them on television 16. DVD media disk 14 stores information corresponding to one or more games. While DVD player 13 is typically a standard DVD player, it could also be a computer or gaming system configured to work with the DVD media disk 14.

Referring to FIG. 2, a block diagram of an example of remote game device 20 as illustrated in FIG. 1 is shown. Remote game device 20 may have an audio receiver or microphone 22, functional logic or processor 24, memory 26, and a display 28. Processor 24 is operatively connected to microphone 22, memory 26 and display 28. Memory 26 may hold information in the form of commands and data, including data to be displayed on remote game device display 28.

As shown in FIG. 1, remote game device 20 may send command signals CS0 to DVD player assembly 12. Remote game device 20 may also receive sonic or audio signals AS0 from DVD player assembly 12, such as sonic or audio signals broadcast from television speaker 18 as part of game configuration and game execution. Game system 10 may also include a standard DVD or television remote control 30. DVD remote 30 may send signals to DVD player assembly 12 as part of game play and game configuration. Remote game device 20 may send a command RS0 to remote game device 20′.

As part of one example of game execution, DVD player 13 may access DVD media disk 14 and transmit an electronic signal to television 16, which signal includes an audio signal. The television then broadcasts the audio signal as a sonic signal AS0 via audio speaker 18. Tone or sonic signal AS0 may be received by remote game device 20 via microphone 22. Processor 24 may decode the received sonic signal by correlating it with an address of data stored in memory to generate a value or command. In some embodiments, the command will then be used to select specific text, scenes or graphics related to game play from memory 26 and display it on remote game device display 28.

In some examples, several players, each with a remote game device 20, may play a game at once. Signals CS0 sent from each device may be coded so DVD player assembly 12 can determine the source remote game device that produced the signal. Similarly, DVD player assembly 12 may code audio or sonic signals AS0 so only one device responds to the tone signal. That is, each remote game device may be configured to respond to a sonic signal having a given code. This may allow a single user to get specific game play information or commands. However, other signals may also be coded more generally, so that all the players may get the same information displayed on their remote game device displays 28.

Sonic signals AS0 generated by speaker 18 may be a series of individual tones or multiple simultaneous tones. Individual and multiple simultaneous tones are widely used and well developed technologies as are known in the art. The most common example of multiple simultaneous or dual tones is Touch-Tones or DTMF (Dual Tone Multi-Frequency) signals used in phone dialing. The following table gives some possible dual tone signals and the corresponding remote game device display results that could be used:

Frequency (Hz)Display
697 and 1209Begin Play
697 and 1336Score 100
770 and 1209Score 200
770 and 1336Score 500
770 and 1477Incorrect Answer
852 and 1209Correct Answer
941 and 1447You Win

The display values may be specific to one game and may be reprogrammed in memory for a different game. These dual tone signals, display characters and frequency values are examples only. Other signals, characters and frequencies may be used.

Sonic signals AS0 may be decoded or converted to system commands or digital data by processor 24. Remote game device 20 may respond to system commands by selecting data from memory 26. In one embodiment of this device, data is transferred to remote game device memory 26 from DVD player assembly 12 using single or dual tones. Remote game device 20 may be put into a programming mode where remote game device memory 26 is configured to receive data. DVD player assembly 12 may be simultaneously set to download specific information from DVD media disk 14 to remote game device 20. DVD player assembly 12 may then generate a series of dual tones at speaker 18. Remote game device 20 receives the tones and processor 24 may convert the tones to digital values.

The values generated may be saved in remote game device memory 26. The memory data may be configured as a lookup table with index values and content values. Additional signals AS0 transmitted from DVD player assembly 12 may reference an index value and the content corresponding to that index value may be displayed.

Audio data communications methods other than the use of dual tones could be used as well, such as a Bell 103. The Bell 103 standard uses two tones that correspond to ones and zeroes transmitted in sequence to communicate or transfer bits.

Using tones, a set of display values may be programmed into remote game device memory 26 that is specific to a game or a set of games without requiring a new memory device or a new remote game device 20 for each game. Each game implementation may use tones to transfer game specific information from DVD game media 14 to remote game device memory 26, which information may then be accessed during game execution.

Memory 26 may be in the form of dual inline memory or a removable media such as a conventional smart card or minidrive. Instead of being programmed by sonic signals AS0, memory 26 may be preprogrammed with game data. Alternately, memory 26 may be preprogrammed and may not be modified or removed. Similarly, processor 24 may be an integrated circuit such as an application specific integrated circuit or a processor having the data as part of the hardware or firmware.

Returning to FIG. 2, remote game device 20 may include a transmitter or LED 32 and one or more input key or control inputs 34. LED 32 is operatively connected to control inputs 34. Transmitter or LED 32 may emit a coded IR signal which is received by DVD player assembly 12 causing functions to be implemented on DVD player 13. Control inputs 34 may be remapped or reprogrammed to implement game functions instead of DVD functions using the same coding protocols as a standard remote. Functions that can be implemented from keys or control inputs 34 include play start, play stop, play pause, cursor movement and item selection.

Command button configurations shown in all figures are examples. Remote game device 20 may have more or fewer control inputs 34 than shown and control inputs 34 may be in a different configuration than shown.

While the illustrated remote game device 20 may include an LED 32 for communicating signals, other embodiments may utilize other communication modes such as radio, visible light or any other suitable mode for sending a signal to a DVD player.

In some configurations, remote game device 20 may not have LED 32 or control inputs 34. In order to execute functions in game play where remote game device 20 does not have control inputs 34, DVD player assembly 12 may accept input from standard remote control 30 as part of game play. DVD remote control 30 typically has an infrared based communication system as is known in the art. Standard remote 30 may have an LED similar in function to LED 32 and DVD player 13 may have a detector 35 that works in conjunction with the LED.

DVD player 13 does not need to be specially configured to play games stored on DVD media disk 14. DVD media disk 14 may include information instructing DVD player 13 to store variables in register memory of player 13. DVD player 13 may implement logical decisions based on the values of the variables to enable a user to play a game or games with system 10. Gaming system 10 may also store information and variables on remote game device 20. Various DVD game media may be used to play different games on DVD player assembly 12 with remote game device 20.

To facilitate the use of remote game device 20 with a variety of different DVD players, the command functionality may include universal remote control circuitry, which allows LED 32 functionality to be programmed to communicate with DVD player 13. If configured with universal remote control circuitry, LED 32 functionality may be programmed by entering a code corresponding to a particular DVD player.

In some embodiments, remote game device 20 may be programmed by directing a signal from another remote to an optional signal detector (not shown) of remote game device 20. LED 32 functionality may additionally or alternatively be programmed by running an automatic detection query in which remote game device 20 transmits different signals until a signal corresponding to a particular DVD player is found.

Typical commands from a remote such as “Play,” “Pause,” “Stop,” “Fast Forward,” “Rewind,” “Menu,” “Enter,” etc. may be mirrored or remapped by remote game device 20 and used by the game as other commands. For example, where DVD player 12 would receive a command that would normally be “Rewind,” may be used by the game as “Select”. These commands may be labeled on remote game device 20 so the user sees a “Select” function rather than having to translate “Rewind” to “Select”.

Contents of remote game device memory 26 may be specific to the game being played or it may be general data that is used in multiple games. In some embodiments, remote game device 20 will be delivered to the customer with data already installed in memory 26. In other embodiments, device memory 26 may be partially or wholly plug-in memory cards.

In some embodiments, a plurality of remote game devices 20 may be provided to play multiplayer games, where each player uses their own remote game device 20. Referring to FIG. 3, a block diagram of a multiplayer DVD game 50 shows DVD player assembly 12 including DVD player 13 with LED detector 35 and television 16 with speaker 18 along with multiple remote devices 20a, 20b and 20c similar to FIG. 2. Similar numbering used in previous figures is used here and in subsequent figures for clarity.

Each of these remote game devices may function in substantially the same manner as remote game device 20. Each remote game device may have a display 28a, 28b, or 28c. Typically, a liquid crystal display (LCD) will be used, but any display device that will show text and graphics, such as an LED display, may be used. Remote game devices 20a, 20b and 20c may have logic control and memory for storing display information and for other game play information such as scores and counts.

Remote game devices 20a, 20b, and 20c are shown to include control inputs 34a, 34b, and 34c, which may correspond to various commands associated with a particular game. The buttons may be mapped by the universal remote circuitry to correspond to signals readable by a conventional DVD player 13, such as “Up,” “Down,” “Enter,” and “Menu” signals, to generate a specific response from DVD player 13.

In one configuration, the command button signals may be encoded so DVD player 13 recognizes which remote game device 20 transmitted the signal. Remote game device 20 may automatically send an identifying signal with each command signal to differentiate the source of the command. DVD player 13 may then identify the source remote game device for the command. Other alternative methods may be used as well in conjunction with the command system to differentiate the command source. The signals may be generic in that DVD player 13 cannot tell which device sent the signal.

DVD player assembly 12 may be able to send a signal which is coded so only one remote game device responds to the signal. Again from FIG. 3, remote gaming device 20b sends signal CS0 to DVD player assembly 12 through LED 32b and LED detector 35. DVD player 13 may identify the remote game device sending the signal. In response to the received signal, DVD player assembly 12 may send a dual tone sonic signal AS0 through speaker 18 that is received by remote gaming device 20b.

Remote gaming device 20b may determine it is the target device for the tone signal and generate a function in the device, such as to display data from memory 26. Remote gaming device 20c may determine from the same tone signal that it is not the target device for the command and not respond to the tone signal depending on how the game is programmed to function.

Some embodiments of this invention may include the ability of one remote gaming device to send signal or command function RS0 to another remote gaming device. Remote game device 20a may send a signal to remote game device 20b that causes a configuration change in device 20b. Remote game device 20a may send signal RS0 received by both 20b and 20c that results in configuration changes to both devices.

Remote game device 20 may be configured for one game, or it may be configured to work with several different games without being reprogrammed. For example, the remote game devices may include removable faceplates that are designed for use with specific games. When a particular game is played, a faceplate corresponding to that game may be attached to each remote game device. The faceplates may indicate what the different buttons are used for, as well as provide visual continuity with the game to improve the user's experience.

DVD player assembly 12 may be configured to alter how game devices 20a, 20b, and 20c function in game system 10 upon the occurrence of an event, such as an input by a player using a remote game device, receipt of a signal as discussed below, or some other event associated with game play. When the event occurs, DVD player assembly 12 may affect the functionality of remote game devices 20a, 20b, or 20c, or may affect a combination of two or more remote game devices, by changing the signals that the buttons on the remote game devices are mapped to generate.

For example, when a first player “buzzes in” on remote game device 20a, DVD player assembly 12 may only respond to signals from remote game device 20a, thereby temporarily “locking out” the other players from game play. Alternately, DVD player assembly 12 may send sonic signal AS0 to other remote game devices reconfiguring them to disable the sending of signals CS0.

The first player may then interact with the game without the interference of the remaining players. After the first player has finished interacting with the game, a subsequent event may cause DVD player assembly 12 to respond to signals from additional remote game devices, such that the remaining player's are no longer “locked out” of game play.

Alternately, remote game devices 20a, 20b and 20c may include speakers or LED detectors similar to LED detector 35. Processor 24 in remote game device 20a may disable other remote game devices from sending additional signals when device 20a “buzzes in” by sending a signal directly to the other device that reconfigures the other devices. Remote game device 20a may use a sonic signal similar to signal AS0 or a command signal similar to CS0 to send signals directly received by other remote game devices.

While FIG. 3 shows three remote game devices, it is within the scope of this disclosure to include more or fewer remote game devices, depending on the requirements of a particular game.

To play a game, a user may obtain a DVD media disk 14 and a remote game device 20. DVD media disk 14 may contain code readable by a conventional DVD player 13 that generates scripts as described above. Remote game device 20 may have game specific information in memory 26. Remote game device 20 may work with a removable media device specific to the game. Remote game device 20 may receive and store data in device memory 26 from sonic signals AS0.

When played in DVD player 13, the audiovisual portion of the scripts may be presented to the players on television 16. The audiovisual portion of the game may present game players with a gaming environment. For example, the gaming environment may be a game show with a virtual game show host, player's turns, a scoring scheme, game rounds, or other game-related information. Information related to the progress of the game, such as the score, the current round of the game, which player's turn it is, or other game-related information, may be stored in the onboard memory of DVD player 13 or memory 26 of remote game device 20.

DVD media 14 may include an interactive game. This interactive game may include randomly selected or pre-selected scripts presented to the players as scenes. The scenes may prompt players to provide input at remote game device 20. The players may have the option to request information during game play that may be displayed on remote game device display 28. The players may be sequentially provided with their own turn, or the players may all participate in each scene at the same time.

Referring to FIG. 4, an example of a multiplayer game 100 is shown. This example is a word game played by two players. Similar numbering to the previous figure is used here and in subsequent figures for clarity. DVD player assembly 12 including DVD player 13, DVD media disk 14, television 16, speaker 18 and screen 19 is shown with two remote game devices 20 and 20′ which include displays 28 and 28′, LEDs 32 and 32′ and control inputs 34 and 34′.

Game 100 in this example is a word scramble game. Play is initiated when DVD player 13 accesses DVD media 14. Television screen 19 displays a series of letters which represents a word with the letters in a random order. Simultaneously, DVD player assembly 12 sends a sonic signal AS0 from speaker 18 to remote game devices 20 and 20′ that results in the same letters being shown on display 28 and 28′ of the remote game devices. The players may then be able to initiate play and rearrange the letters on remote game device displays 28 and 28′ using control inputs 34 and 34′ to put the letters into the correct order to spell out the original word. When a player thinks they have the correct order, the player may generate a signal CS0 using LED 32 and transmit the word to DVD player assembly 12.

DVD player 13, using memory onboard DVD player 13, may compare the word transmitted by the player against the original word. If the words match, DVD player assembly 12 may display an appropriate response and a score. If the word does not match, DVD player assembly 12 may display an appropriate response, play may continue and the player may be penalized with a reduced score. As each scrambled word is correctly guessed, a new scrambled word may be displayed and play may continue.

In another example of this game, a player may ask for a clue or hint from DVD player assembly 12. DVD player assembly 12 may indicate the first letter of the word on television screen 19 so both players have the same information. Alternatively, DVD player assembly 12, using sonic tones AS0, may send to at least one player's remote game device an indication of the first letter or letters of the word. The hint may be shown on display 28. The score of the player or players may be adjusted according to how many hints are provided by DVD player assembly 12.

In some embodiments of game play, where it is not a player's turn or when another player has sent their word to the DVD player, the game execution may lock that player out from being able to provide any input. This may be implemented by having signals from each remote game device 20 coded so different commands received by DVD player assembly 12 may be differentiated at DVD player 13 as to the source device. In other embodiments, simultaneous input from multiple players may be part of the game execution.

Referring to FIG. 5, a flow chart 200 of steps in executing an example word scramble game is shown. The game begins with DVD player 13 accessing DVD media 14 at 202. Players may select the number of players and play level at 204. DVD player assembly 12 transmits a scrambled word to the remote game devices 20 at 206. At 208 the players may rearrange the letters on their remote game device displays 28. When a player thinks they have solved the puzzle, they may send the word they have unscrambled to the DVD player assembly 12 at 210. Then DVD player 13 may determine if the unscrambled word is correct at 212. If the word is correct at 214, a new word may be transmitted to all players at 206. If the word is not correct at 214, players may continue to unscramble the letters at 208.

Remote game device 20 may have a first and a second mode. In a first mode, remote game device 20 may receive sonic signals AS0 and display data selected from memory 26 based on the received signal AS0.

As previously described, remote game device 20 may be put into a second programming mode that will allow DVD player assembly 12 to use sonic tones AS0 to transfer information that may be stored in device memory 26.

FIG. 6 shows game system 300 similar to game system 10 of FIG. 1. Game system 300 includes DVD player assembly 12, including DVD player 13 and television 16 with speaker 18. Game system 300 also includes remote game device 20 shown with microphone 22, memory 26, display 28, LED 32 and control inputs 34 all of which are operably connected to processor 24.

Audio tones, sounds or sonic signals AS0 may be emitted at television speaker 18 and received by microphone 22. Microphone 22 generates electrical signals in response to signals AS0 which may be received by processor 24. Data generated by processor 24 as a function of microphone electrical signals may be saved in memory 26.

Alternately, remote game device 20 may be programmed through a hard wire or cable connection. FIG. 7 shows game system 400 similar to game system 10 of FIG. 1. Game system 400 again includes DVD player assembly 12, including DVD player 13 and television 16 with speaker 18, and remote game device 20. Remote game device 20 is shown with microphone 22, memory 26, display 28, LED 32 and control inputs 34 all operably connected to processor 24. Game system 400 also includes remote game device cable port 36, television cable port 38 and cable 40.

Cable 40 may operably connect television 16 to remote game device 20 when cable 40 is plugged into ports 36 and 38. Cable 40 may carry data signals originating at DVD player assembly 12 to remote game device 20 and processor 24. Data generated by processor 24 as a function of microphone electrical signals may be saved in memory 26.

Alternatively, television cable port 38 could be located on and operably connected to DVD player 13. Cable 40 plugged into ports 36 and 38 in this case may carry signals directly from DVD player 13 to remote game device 20.

It is believed that this disclosure encompasses multiple distinct inventions with independent utility. While each of these inventions has been described in its best mode, numerous variations are contemplated. All novel and non-obvious combinations and subcombinations of the described and/or illustrated elements, features, functions, and properties should be recognized as being included within the scope of this disclosure. Applicant reserves the right to claim one or more of the inventions in any application related to this disclosure. Where the disclosure or claims recite “a,” “a first,” or “another” element, or the equivalent thereof, they should be interpreted to include one or more such elements, neither requiring nor excluding two or more such elements.