Title:
Exercise core bar
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The invention relates to a versatile exercise device and a method for using the device. The device is comprised of a bar having a handle on one end while the other end provides for attaching a weight. The method for using the device broadly ranges from attaching multiple different weights and using the bar in various positions.



Inventors:
Tumminello, Dominic Nathen (Lutherville, MD, US)
Application Number:
11/286830
Publication Date:
12/14/2006
Filing Date:
11/23/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
482/109
International Classes:
A63B21/06; A63B15/00
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Primary Examiner:
LONG, ROBERT FRANKLIN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Curtis Sherrer (1301 Woods Hole Rd, Towson, MD, 21286, US)
Claims:
Having described the invention, what is claimed as new and secured by Letters Patent is:

1. An exercise apparatus comprising a rod, having at least two ends, a first end having handle means and a second end having at least one weight retention means.

2. The apparatus as set forth in claim 1 further comprising the handle means is in a shape selected from the group consisting of a T, an L, a D, an O or an I.

3. The apparatus as set forth in claim 1 further comprising weight retention means is selected from the group consisting of a swivel, a sleeve or a combination thereof.

4. The apparatus as set forth in claim 1 further comprising that said apparatus is constructed using a material selected from the group consisting of metal, plastic, wood, or combinations thereof.

5. The apparatus as set forth in Claim further comprising attaching the handle in a detachable manner.

6. The apparatus as set forth in claim 1 further comprising the rod is expandable or collapsible.

7. The apparatus as set forth in claim 1 further comprising providing grasping means on the bar selected from the group consisting of knurling, foam, rubber or combinations thereof.

8. The apparatus as set forth in claim 1 further comprising the handle means and/or weight retention means are rotatably mounted on the rod.

9. The apparatus as set forth in claim 1 further comprising utilizing bushings adjacent to the handle means and/or weight retention means.

10. The apparatus as set forth in claim 1 further comprising the weight retention means is a sleeve on which weights can be attached.

11. A method of exercising using the exercise apparatus of claim 1 comprising an user gripping the handle means with one hand and gripping the rod at a point in between the handle means and the at least one weight retention means and moving it in any direction relative to the user.

12. The method of exercising of claim 11 further comprising attaching the weight retention means to a type of external resistance selected from the group consisting of a machine, a person, free weights or combination thereof.

Description:

PRIORITY

This application claims the benefit of priority of Provisional Application 60/630,211.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates generally to exercise equipment and more particularly to an improvement in exercise equipment which provides an improved approach to physical fitness, sports conditioning, training, rehabilitation, etc.

Heretofore, exercise equipment tended to be specialized and limited in their use. For example, a solid bar with suitable collars located at the two opposite ends is typically used only for working out with only free weights. Equipment that provided for increased resistance to certain movement was limited, with a series of devices needed for a complete body workout.

The present invention is an exercise core bar that, as will be explained, permits the user greater flexibility in selecting the particular exercises and further provides the opportunity to work with different muscle groups when compared to known equipment.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 is an illustration of an exercise bar with a weight retaining collar removed for clarity;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged illustration of the handle end of the exercise bar shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 2A is a further enlarged illustration of the handle end of the exercise bar;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged illustration of the second end of the exercise bar shown in FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is a further enlarged illustration of the second end of the exercise bar including a weight retention collar;

FIG. 4A is a further enlarged illustration of the second end of the exercise bar including a weight retention collar; and

FIG. 5 is an enlarged view of the second end of the exercise bar with a free weight held in place on the second end by the removable collar.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The exercise core bar will now be described in greater detail. As illustrated in the FIG. 1, the exercise bar includes an elongated rod 1 having at least two ends, made of material selected from fiberglass, plastic, wood, rubber, or metal, for example, steel, iron, chromoly, aluminum, magnesium, titanium, die cast metal, etc.

It may have length from one end to the other end that can range from, for example, one foot (30 cm) to four feet (180 cm). It can have a circular cross-section diameter of about 1 inch, but can range from ½ inch (2.5 cm) to 2 inches (5 cm). The foregoing measurements, together with other measurements, shapes and dimensions that will be discussed, are to be considered illustrative and not limiting.

The core bar can be covered with a layer of rubber, leather, or plastic or be completely exposed. It can be given a textured surface, such as knurling. The bar can be hollow or solid. The bar can vary in size over its width. Its shape can be straight, or curved, for example, in zigzags or curved. The cross sectional geometry of the bar can include a circle, a triangle, a rectangle, or other multi-sided pattern.

The core bar can be collapsible from a fully extended position to modify its length or taken apart for ease of transportation. The means for extending and collapsing of the bar includes well known means, such as twist-locking, screw-on, etc. See U.S. Pat. No. 6,925,686, or Heathcock, et al. or U.S. Pat. No. 5,372,558, Perry et al., which are hereby incorporated by reference.

A first end of the exercise bar can have an integral or separate handle 2. The handle can be various shapes including a rod, a sphere, an “L,” a “T,” an “O,” and “I,” a “D” or any type typically found on shovels. The handle can be constructed using webbing, chain, metal, plastic, wood, rubber, etc. FIG. 2 illustrates one example of a desired handle. The handle can be removable or permanent. The handle includes a first portion to be gripped by the hand of the user and a second portion which attaches to the rod.

The means used to attach the handle to the rod can include any known method for attaching two objects together. Preferably the second portion of the handle is in the form of a hollow socket for receiving a first end of the rod. When the handle is attached to the rod, the socket on the handle surrounds the first end of the rod such that the handle is rotatably mounted onto the rod. The first end of the rod can include an interior threaded socket which receives a bolt. The bolt extends through the first portion of the handle and is threaded into the socket in the rod first end.

The handle shape can be similar to a letter “D” with the curved portion attached to both ends of the straight portion, such as by screws or alternatively welded to the straight portion of the “D” portion of the handle. The straight portion of the handle may be covered by a replaceable grip made of padding, rubber or other non-slip material. The length (axial dimension) of the handle is not considered part of the length of the bar, as set forth above.

Referring next to FIGS. 3, 4, 4A and 5, the second end of the bar includes weight retention means 3 that can include a weight retention sleeve 4. The size of the sleeve can range from about is approximately 2 inch diameter which is compatible with standard Olympic size weight plates 7, and can range from ½ inch (1.75 cm) to 2 inches (5 cm). It can also have a conventional removable collar 5.

One end of the sleeve terminates in a flange of preferably 3 inch diameter which serves as a retention and support for any weight plates placed on the bar. When a weight is placed on the weight retention sleeve and the collar thereafter inserted onto the sleeve, the weights do not slide along the bar toward the first end. The weight retention sleeve and collar may have a total axial length of about 6.25 inches, but can have a range of between 4 inches (10 cm) to 24 inches (60 cm).

At the free end of the weight retention sleeve can be a swivel lift ring 6 or swivel hook that can rotate a full 360 degrees relative. The swivel lift ring can be generally “U” shaped in configuration with the legs of the “U” pivotally attached to opposite sides of a first enlarged nut. A threaded nut extends through this first enlarged nut and into a complementary threaded socket in the second end of the rod.

A bushing can be located next to the handle or sleeve to reduce friction and noise. Also, padding can be added next to the collar for the user's comfort.

The exercise bar may be used in numerous ways for fitness, conditioning, rehabilitation, aerobics, stretching, etc. Weights may be placed on the second end of the bar. The bar may be used with an exercise machine, free weights, an exercise apparatus, such as an inflated ball, trampoline, balancing board, sports band, spring, etc., or by itself. The swivel ring may be attached to cable columns (to which weight plates may be attached) or to rubber cord resistance, etc.

The exercise bar may be used by more than one person, for example, two persons simultaneously using the bar as when partner training. It can be utilized by the user in any stance, including standing, sitting, prone (belly up), supine (belly down), squatting, etc.

The bar is used generally by gripping the first end with one hand and a point in between the first and second ends with the other hand. When attached to a weight machine or some type of external resistance, the first end remains substantially motionless while the weighted end is in motion. The motion is generally in an angular or horizontal or vertical fashion. This would include exercises such as pushing, pulling, jumping, squatting, twisting, lunging, bending, etc.

When using the bar in the supine position it is used in a pushing, pulling, rotating fashion. While in a prone position the bar can be manipulated by rolling it over a surface or in a static manner while pushing or pulling the bar.

It is also to be understood that the following claims are intended to cover all of the generic and specific features of the invention as described herein, and all statements of the scope of the invention which, as a matter of language, might be said to fall therebetween.