Title:
Putting training system and methods of using the same
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A putting training system of the present application includes a removable laser sighting device attached to a bottom end of a shaft, above a club head of a golf club. The removable laser sighting device includes: a clamp mechanism attached to a bottom end of the shaft above the club head, a bracket attached to the clamp mechanism extending behind a plane defined by a ball striking surface of the club head, an adjustment mechanism attached to the bracket, a frame attached to the adjustment mechanism, a laser unit axially attached to the frame, a planar body positioned over the laser unit, and a wire extending from the laser unit to a switch unit attached at a top end of the shaft. Advantageously, a top portion of the switch unit is attached to the handle thereby easily accessible by a golfer while addressing a golf ball. Furthermore, the removable laser sighting device is made from electrically conductive materials, so the laser unit is activated by contacting a bottom portion of the switch unit to the shaft. Also, the adjustment mechanism of the removable laser sighting device has a beveled disk. The adjustment mechanism allows for adjusting an orientation of a beam of light emitted from the laser unit. The planar body positioned over the laser unit is void of any structural or cosmetic linear feature that is collinear, parallel, or perpendicular with the beam of light emitted from the laser unit. Methods of utilizing the putting training system are also disclosed.



Inventors:
Khananayev, Grigory (Bethesda, MD, US)
Application Number:
11/433291
Publication Date:
11/16/2006
Filing Date:
05/12/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B69/36
View Patent Images:
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20060063622BladderMarch, 2006Nurnberg et al.
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Primary Examiner:
LEGESSE, NINI F
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Grigory Khananayev (9722 Holmhurst Rd., Bethesda, MD, 20817, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A putting training system, comprising: a laser unit of a removable laser sighting device; a switch unit of a removable laser sighting device; and wherein the laser unit is activated by contacting at least a portion of the switch unit to a shaft of a golf club.

2. The putting training system of claim 1, wherein the removable laser sighting device comprises electrically conductive materials.

3. The putting training system of claim 1, wherein the switch unit is attached to a top end of the shaft thereby easily accessible by a golfer in a golf ball addressing position.

4. The putting training system of claim 1, wherein the removable laser sighting device further comprises a planar body positioned over a frame and the laser unit being void of any one of structural and cosmetic linear feature that is one of collinear, parallel, and perpendicular with a beam of light emitted from the laser unit.

5. The putting training system of claim 1, wherein the removable laser sighting device further comprises a beveled disk adjustment mechanism.

6. The putting training system of claim 1, wherein the removable laser sighting device further comprises: a clamp mechanism rotatably attached to a bottom end of the shaft; a bracket attached to the clamp mechanism; an adjustment mechanism attached to the bracket; a frame attached to the adjustment mechanism; the laser unit attached to the frame; a wire extending from the laser unit to the switch unit; and the switch unit attached to a top end of the shaft.

7. The putting training system of claim 5, wherein the removable laser sighting device comprises electrically conductive materials.

8. The putting training system of claim 1, wherein upon activation the laser unit emits a beam of light extending substantially perpendicular to a plane defined by a ball striking surface of a club head of the golf club.

9. The putting training system of claim 1, further comprising: the golf club, comprising: the shaft, a handle attached at a top end of the shaft; a club head attached to a bottom end of the shaft below the removable laser sighting device; the club head having a ball striking surface; the removable laser sighting device, comprising: a clamp mechanism attached to a bottom end of the shaft above the club head; a bracket attached to the clamp mechanism extending behind a plane defined by the ball striking surface; a beveled disk adjustment mechanism attached to the bracket; a frame attached to the adjustment mechanism; the laser unit axially attached to the frame; a wire extending from the laser unit to the switch unit; a top portion of the switch unit attached to the handle; and wherein the laser unit is further activated by contacting the bottom portion of the switch unit to the shaft.

10. The putting training system of claim 1, further comprising: an alignment strip; and a target.

11. A putting training system, comprising a beveled disk adjustment mechanism of a removable laser sighting device.

12. The putting training system of claim 11, wherein the beveled disk adjustment mechanism being means for adjusting an orientation of a beam of light emitted from a laser unit of the removable laser sighting system.

13. The putting training system of claim 11, wherein the beveled disk adjustment mechanism further comprises a beveled disk having a planar body extending laterally from an edge of the disk.

14. The putting training system of claim 11, further comprising: a laser unit of the removable laser sighting device; a switch unit of the removable laser sighting device; and wherein the laser unit is activated by contacting at least a portion of the switch unit to a shaft of a golf club.

15. The putting training system of claim 14, wherein the switch unit is attached to a top end of the shaft thereby easily accessible by a golfer in a golf ball addressing position.

16. The putting training system of claim 11, wherein the removable laser sighting device further comprises electrically conductive materials.

17. The putting training system of claim 11, wherein the removable laser sighting device, further comprises: a clamp mechanism rotatably attached to a bottom end of a shaft; a bracket attached to the clamp mechanism; the adjustment mechanism attached to the bracket; a frame attached to the adjustment mechanism; the laser unit attached to the frame; a wire extending from the laser unit to a switch unit; the switch unit attached to a top end of the shaft; and wherein the laser unit is activated by contacting at least a portion of the switch unit to the shaft of a golf club.

18. The putting training system of claim 17, wherein the removable laser sighting device comprises electrically conductive materials.

19. The putting training system of claim 11, wherein upon activation a laser unit emits a beam of light extending substantially perpendicular to a plane defined by a ball striking surface of a club head of a golf club.

20. The putting training system of claim 11, further comprising: a golf club, comprising: a shaft, a handle attached at a top end of the shaft; a club head attached to a bottom end of the shaft below the removable laser sighting device; the club head having a ball striking surface; the removable laser sighting device, comprising: a clamp mechanism attached to a bottom end of the shaft above the club head; a bracket attached to the clamp mechanism extending behind a plane defined by the ball striking surface; the beveled disk adjustment mechanism attached to the bracket; a frame attached to the adjustment mechanism; the laser unit axially attached to the frame; a wire extending from the laser unit to a switch unit; a top portion of the switch unit attached to the handle; and wherein the laser unit is activated by contacting a bottom portion of the switch unit to the shaft.

21. The putting training system of claim 11, further comprising: an alignment strip; and a target.

22. A method of putting training, comprising: installing a removable laser sighting device to a shaft of a golf club; and performing one of a golf ball addressing drill and a stroke trajectory drill.

23. The method of claim 22, wherein installing further comprises: placing a golf ball striking surface of a club head of the golf club squarely against an end of an alignment strip; activating the laser unit by contacting at least a portion of a switch unit of the removable laser sighting device to the shaft; and observing whether a projection of the beam of light emitted by the laser unit is aligned with a target.

24. The method of claim 22, wherein performing comprises the golf ball addressing drill further comprising: aligning a ball striking surface of a club head of the golf club perpendicular to a specified point on a target at a distance away from the target; activating a laser unit of the removable laser sighting device by contacting at least a portion of a switch unit of the removable laser sighting device to the shaft; and observing whether a projection of a beam of light emitted by the laser unit is aligned with the target.

25. The method of claim 24, wherein the golf ball addressing drill further comprises: wherein aligning further comprises placing the ball striking surface squarely against an end of an alignment strip; and wherein the target being aligned with an end of the alignment strip.

26. The method of claim 24, wherein the golf ball addressing drill further comprises: repeating, at a variable distance, one of once and a plurality of times, aligning, activating, and observing.

27. The method of claim 25, wherein the golf ball addressing drill further comprises: repeating, at a variable distance, one of once and a plurality of times, aligning, activating, and observing.

28. The method of claim 22, wherein performing comprises the stroke trajectory drill comprising: aligning a ball string surface of a club head of the golf club perpendicular to a specified point on a target at a distance away from the target; activating a laser unit of the removable laser sighting device by contacting at least a portion of a switch unit of the removable laser sighting device to the shaft; swinging the club; and observing, during the swing, whether a projection of a beam of light emitted by the laser unit is aligned with the target.

29. The method of claim 28, wherein the stroke trajectory drill further comprises: prior to aligning, addressing a golf ball at the distance away from the target.

30. The method of claim 28, wherein the stroke trajectory drill further comprises: wherein aligning further comprises placing the ball striking surface squarely against an end of an alignment strip; and wherein the target being aligned with an end of the alignment strip.

31. The method of claim 28, wherein the stroke trajectory drill further comprises: repeating, at a variable distance, one of once and a plurality of times, aligning, activating, swinging, and observing.

32. The method of claim 29, wherein the stroke trajectory drill further comprises: repeating, at a variable distance, one of once and a plurality of times, addressing, aligning, activating, swinging, and observing.

33. The method of claim 30, wherein the stroke alignment drill further comprises: repeating, at a variable distance, one of once and a plurality of times, aligning, activating, swinging, and observing.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATION

This application claims priority to a U.S. provisional patent application entitled “A putting system and method of using the same” having U.S. Ser. No. 60/680,448 and a filing date of May 12, 2005, hereby incorporated by reference herein.

BACKGROUND

1. Field of the Application

The present application relates generally to a putting training device, and more particularly to a removable laser sighting device attached to a golf club that aids in attaining proper putting technique.

2. Description of the Related Art

One problem that many golfers face is inaccurate alignment of the golf club striking surface with a target at the time of impact of the golf club with the golf ball. This causes the golf ball to go in a path that the golfer did not intend. Alignment problems are particularly troublesome in the putting and chipping portions of the game of golf.

The direction a golf ball travels after the ball is hit depends on many factors including the area of contact of the club on the ball, and the angle of the ball striking surface of the club in relation to the golf ball at the moment of contact. Most golfers prefer to hit a golf ball so that the golf ball travels perpendicular to the ball striking surface of the golf club towards a selected target. If a golf ball is not hit so that the ball will travel perpendicular to the ball striking surface, other corrections will have to be made to the stroke to compensate.

Many conventional systems exist for improving a golfer's putting game. These include practice holes or cups, target devices for the holes, and pieces of carpet that simulate putting greens. There are also conventional optical systems that visually indicate the proper alignment of a golfer's stroke. Many of these conventional optical systems require special training clubs equipped with optical devices, or else require permanent modifications to be made to the training clubs. Such clubs cannot be used in tournament play. Also, many of these conventional systems are not easily accessible by the golfer when in a golf ball addressing position. Furthermore, many of these conventional systems have inefficient adjustment mechanisms, as well as, features which detract from the device effectiveness in putting training. Finally, many of these conventional systems lack disclosure of methods for effectively utilizing them.

What are needed are putting training systems which do not require permanent club modifications, are easily accessible, have efficient adjustment mechanisms, do not have features which detract from the system effectiveness, and have methods for effectively utilizing the putting training system so as to overcome deficiencies of conventional putting training systems.

SUMMARY

A putting training system of the present application includes a removable laser sighting device attached to a bottom end of a shaft, above a club head of a golf club. The removable laser sighting device includes: a clamp mechanism attached to a bottom end of the shaft above the club head, a bracket attached to the clamp mechanism extending behind a plane defined by a ball striking surface of the club head, an adjustment mechanism attached to the bracket, a frame attached to the adjustment mechanism, a laser unit axially attached to the frame, a planar body positioned over the laser unit, and a wire extending from the laser unit to a switch unit attached at a top end of the shaft. Advantageously, a top portion of the switch unit is attached to the handle thereby easily accessible by a golfer while addressing a golf ball. Furthermore, the removable laser sighting device is made from electrically conductive materials, so the laser unit is activated by contacting a bottom portion of the switch unit to the shaft. Also, the adjustment mechanism of the removable laser sighting device has a beveled disk. The adjustment mechanism allows for adjusting an orientation of a beam of light emitted from the laser unit. The planar body positioned over the laser unit is void of any structural or cosmetic linear feature that is collinear, parallel, or perpendicular with the beam of light emitted from the laser unit. Methods of utilizing the putting training system are also disclosed.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

Embodiments of present application will now be described by way of example with reference to attached figures, wherein:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a golf club having a removable laser sighting device of a putting training system of the present application;

FIG. 2 is an enlarged perspective view of a lower portion of the golf club having the laser sighting device of a putting training system of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is an enlarged perspective view of an upper portion of the golf club having the laser sighting device of a putting training system of FIG. 1;

FIG. 4 is an enlarged perspective view of an attachment mechanism of the removable laser sighting device;

FIG. 5 is a wiring diagram of the present application with an electrical circuit diagram of the present application; and

FIG. 6 is perspective view of a golfer using the putting training system of the present application by employing one of the disclosed methods of putting training.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

A putting training system of the present application includes a removable laser sighting device attached to a bottom end of a shaft, above a club head of a golf club. The removable laser sighting device includes: a clamp mechanism attached to a bottom end of the shaft above the club head, a bracket attached to the clamp mechanism extending behind a plane defined by a ball striking surface of the club head, an adjustment mechanism attached to the bracket, a frame attached to the adjustment mechanism, a laser unit axially attached to the frame, a planar body positioned over the laser unit, and a wire extending from the laser unit to a switch unit attached at a top end of the shaft. Advantageously, a top portion of the switch unit is attached to the handle thereby easily accessible by a golfer in a golf ball addressing stance. Furthermore, the removable laser sighting device is made from electrically conductive materials, so the laser unit is activated by contacting a bottom portion of the switch unit to the shaft. Also, the adjustment mechanism of a removable laser sighting device has a beveled disk having a planar body extending laterally from an edge of the disk. The adjustment mechanism allows for adjusting an orientation of a beam of light emitted from the laser unit. Another advantage relates to the planar body. The planar body positioned over the laser unit is void of any structural or cosmetic linear feature that is collinear, parallel, or perpendicular with the beam of light emitted from the laser unit.

A method of putting training, utilizing the putting training system of the present application includes the steps of: installing properly the removable laser sighting device to the shaft of the golf club; and performing either a golf ball addressing alignment drill or a stroke trajectory alignment drill. The step of installing includes: placing a golf ball striking surface of the club head squarely against a first end of an alignment strip; activating the laser unit by contacting at least a portion of the switch unit to the shaft; and observing a projection of the beam of light emitted by the laser unit on a target being aligned with a second end of the alignment strip. The step of performing a golf ball addressing alignment drill includes: aligning the ball striking surface perpendicular to a specified point on a target at a distance away from the target; activating the laser unit by contacting at least a portion of the switch unit to the shaft; and observing the projection of the beam of light emitted by the laser unit on the target. The step of performing the stroke trajectory alignment drill includes the steps of: aligning the ball striking surface perpendicular to a specified point on the target at a distance away from the target; activating the laser unit by contacting at least a portion of the switch to the shaft; swinging the club; and observing, during the stroke, the projection of the beam of light emitted by the laser unit.

The following description is the best embodiment presently contemplated for carrying out the present invention. This description is made for the purpose of illustrating the general principles of the present invention and is not meant to limit the inventive concepts claimed herein.

Referring now to the drawings wherein like reference numerals designate like or similar parts throughout the several views, FIG. 1 is a perspective view of a golf club 12 having a removable laser sighting device 100 of a putting training system of the present application for a golfer.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged perspective view of a lower portion of golf club 12 having portions of removable laser sighting device 100 of the putting training system of FIG. 1. Removable laser sighting device 100 is shown attached to a bottom end 16a of a shaft 16 of golf club 12, above a club head 18. Removable laser sighting device 100 includes: a clamp mechanism 22 attached to bottom end 16a of shaft 16 above club head 18; a bracket 23 attached to clamp mechanism 22 extending behind a plane defined by a ball striking surface 20 of club head 18; an adjustment mechanism 24 attached to bracket 23; a frame 25 attached to adjustment mechanism 24, a laser unit 26 axially attached to frame 25; a planar body 27 positioned over the laser unit and attached to frame 25; and a wire 38 (as shown in FIG. 3) extending from laser unit 26 to a switch unit 28 attached by an elastic strip 34 at a top end 16b of shaft 16.

Clamp mechanism 22, in conjunction with bracket 23, makes a first connection point of removable laser sighting device 100 to shaft 16 by use of a slot and hook design. Clamp mechanism 22 has a hook portion 22a. Hook portion 22a has a main plate 22e, a planar body 22f extending laterally from a first edge of main plate 22e, a hole 22g formed in a central location of main plate 22e, an arcuate hook body 22h extending from a second edge of main plate 22e, and hook plates 22i extending axially from arcuate hook body 22h Bracket 23 has a main plate 23e, a planar body 23f with an arcuate edge 23j extending at an angle from a first edge of main plate 23e, a hole 23g formed in a central location of main plate 23e, an arcuate body 23h extending from a second edge of main plate 23e, and slots 23i formed in arcuate body 23h.

At the first connection point of removable laser sighting device 100, arcuate body 23h of bracket 23 is placed over shaft 16. Hook plates 22i are placed in slots 23i, whereby shaft 16 is surrounded by arcuate body 22h and arcuate body 23h. An edge of planar body 22f rests against a side of main plate 23e. A screw 22d of clamp mechanism 22 is threaded through hole 23g and hole 22g. A washer 22b is placed on the exposed portion of screw 22d adjacent to main plate 22e and a wing nut 22c is threaded over screw 22g and through washer 22b to tighten the slot/hook design around shaft 16.

Clamp mechanism 22 is preferably made from suitable electrically conductive materials, such as steel, aluminum (Al), or titanium (Ti), with a thickness of 1/16 inches. These materials and thickness also aid in reducing the overall weight of removable laser sighting device 100. Bracket 23 is preferably made from suitable electrically conductive materials, such as steel, aluminum (Al), or titanium (Ti), with a thickness of 1/16 inches. Preferably the first connection is made at bottom end 16a of shaft 16 above club head 18. A distance from a top surface of club head 18 to bottom surfaces of clamp mechanism 22 and bracket 23 may be between about 1 inch and 12 inches. Preferably the distance from the top surface of club head 18 to the bottom surfaces of clamp mechanism 22 and bracket 18 is about 6 inches. The slot/hook design of clamp mechanism 22, in conjunction with bracket 23, allows for secure and still connection to shaft 16 when wing nut 22c is tightened. Also, when wing nut 22c is loosened slightly, the slot/hook design is free to rotate around shaft 16 for course adjustment of the orientation of planar body 23f and thus laser unit 26. Advantageously the slot/hook design allows for removal from shaft 16 without the aid of tools.

Planar body 23f with arcuate edge 23j (as shown in FIG. 4) of bracket 23 extends at an angle behind the plane defined by ball striking surface 20 of club head 18, from main plate 23e. When clamp mechanism 22, in conjunction with bracket 23, is attached properly to shaft 16, planar body 23f with arcuate edge 23j is oriented perpendicular to a plane defined by ball striking surface 20. Planar body 23f with arcuate edge 23j serves as a first connection point for adjustment mechanism 24.

Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5, adjustment mechanism 24 of removable laser sighting device 100 has a beveled disk 24a with a planar body 24g extending laterally from an edge of the disk. Beveled disk 24a also has a hole formed in a central location. Beveled disk 24a rests adjacent planar body 23f on a first side and adjacent a first side 25a of frame 25 on a second side.

At a connection point of adjustment mechanism 24 to planar body 23f and frame 25, a screw 24b is threaded through a spring washer 24c, hole formed in first side 25a of frame 25, through the hole formed in beveled disk 24b, and through a hole formed in a central location of planar body 23f. At least one spring washer 24d is placed over the exposed portion of screw 24b proximate to planar body 23f and at least one nut 24e is threaded on screw 24b over spring washer 24d to tighten the adjustment mechanism to planar body 23f and frame 25.

The beveled design of adjustment mechanism 24, allows for secure and still connection to planar body 23f and frame 25. Advantageously, by utilizing planar body 24g to rotate beveled disk 24a around screw 24b fine adjustment of laser unit 26 in the horizontal orientation is achievable. Adjustment mechanism 24 is capable of precision up to ⅛ inches per four feet of beam of light emitted from laser unit 26. As is evident in FIG. 4, when a thinnest edge of beveled disk 24 is farthest from a front end 26a of laser unit 26, corresponding to planar body 24g being oriented down, front end 26a is oriented at an angle greater than perpendicular to ball striking surface 20. When the thinnest edge of beveled disk 24 is closest to front end 26a of laser unit 26, corresponding to planar body 24g being oriented up, front end 26a is oriented at an angle less than perpendicular to ball striking surface 20. When a mean edge of beveled disk 24 is farthest from a front end 26a of laser unit 26, corresponding to planar body 24g being oriented neither up or down, front end 26a is oriented at an angle perpendicular to ball striking surface 20. Adjustment mechanism 24 is means for adjusting an orientation of beam of light 29 (as shown in FIG. 5) emitted from laser unit 26.

Adjustment mechanism 24 is preferably made from suitable electrically conductive materials, such as steel, aluminum (Al), or titanium (Ti). At its thickest edge, beveled disk 24a preferably has a thickness of 0.078 inches. At its thinnest edge, beveled disk 24a preferably has a thickness of 0.055 inches. Planar body 24g extending laterally from beveled disk 24 preferably has a thickness of 0.078 inches. These thicknesses merely serve as guidelines and any suitable thickness will do.

Referring now to FIGS. 4 and 5, frame 25 has first side 25a with the hole formed in the central region, a front side 25b extending laterally from a front end of first side 25a, a back side 25c extending laterally from a back end of first side 25a, and a cutout portion 25d extending laterally from first side 25a Front side 25b has a hole formed in a central region where front end 26a of laser unit 26 is located. Back side 25c has a hole in a central region where a back end 26e of laser unit 26 is located. First side 25a rests adjacent and is connected to beveled disk 24b as described above in relation to adjustment mechanism 24.

Frame 25 is a housing for laser unit 26. Laser unit 26 is attached as described above and is free to rotate along an axis defined by front end 26a and back end 26e. Cutout portion 25d acts as a mechanism for depressing an on/off button 26b of laser unit 26. When laser unit 26 is rotated such that on/off button 26b is depressed by cutout portion 25d, laser unit 26 is capable of being activated by switch unit 28 of FIG. 3. Otherwise, laser unit 26 is not capable of being activated.

Frame 25 is preferably made from suitable electrically conductive materials, such as steel, aluminum (Al), or titanium (Ti). The various components of frame 25 have a thickness of 0.0625 inches.

Referring now to FIGS. 2 and 5, laser unit 26 has a housing 26f, front end 26a, back end 26e, and a retaining mechanism 26e on its exterior. A laser diode 26g is electrically connected to on/off button (permanent switch) 26b when on/off button is depressed. When depressed, on/off button 26b is electrically connected to a first end of battery source 26c. A second end of battery source 26c is electrically connected to an end 39 of wire 38 that is held in place by and attached to a non-conductive body 26h. Body 26h is sealed inside housing 26f near back end 26e. Also, back end 26e is electrically connected to housing 26f and housing 26f is electrically connected to laser diode 26g.

Housing 26f is preferably cylindrical in shape. Front end 26a is preferably conical in shape and is attached to housing 26f on the front. Body 26h is a circular disk. Back end 26e is preferably cylindrical in shape and is attached to housing 26f. Laser unit 26 is held in frame 25 by retaining mechanism 26d attached to back end 26e. Retaining mechanism 26d is a pin which has a dimension larger than that of the hole in back side 25c of frame 25.

Front end 26a is the location in which a beam of light 29 is emitted from laser unit 26. Laser diode 26g is the mechanism in which beam of light 29 is produced. When on/off button 26b is depressed by cutout portion 25d of frame 25 the laser has the present ability to operate. When on/off button 26b is not depressed, laser unit does not have the present ability to operate. On/off button 26b completes an internal laser unit electrical circuit, whereby in a standard laser unit with no modification, the laser unit would emit a beam of light 29. However, laser unit 26 is a standard laser unit with modification. This modification will be discussed further later. Battery source 26c is at least one standard 1.5 volt (V) watch-type battery. In the present embodiment, battery source 26c includes three such batteries. Necessary conductive components of laser unit 26 are preferably made from suitable electrically conductive materials, such as steel, aluminum (Al), or titanium (Ti).

Upon activation, laser unit 26 emits beam of light 29 extending substantially perpendicular to a plane defined by ball striking surface 20 of club head 18 of golf club 12 which passes at least through a point of impact between a golf ball to be struck and ball striking surface 20. Laser unit 26 is positioned behind ball striking surface 20 so as not to obstruct the view of club head 18 by a golfer 50 when removable laser sighting device 100 is being used (see FIG. 6).

Referring back to FIG. 2, a planar body 27 is shown connected to frame 25 and positioned over laser unit 26. Planar body 27 is a body being void of any structural or cosmetic linear feature either collinear, parallel, or perpendicular with beam of light 29 emitted from laser unit 26. In other words, body 27 is irregularly shaped to conceal any and all edges of the various constituents of removable laser sighting device 100 golfer 50 may utilize in aligning a putt. Advantageously, as compared to conventional optical putting training systems, body 27 does not have geometric features which detract from the effectiveness of the current putting training system. Body 27 does not interfere with the view of club head 18 by golfer 50 while in a golf ball addressing position 51. Body 27 may be made from any suitable material, such as plastic, steel, aluminum (Al), or titanium (Ti).

Referring back to FIGS. 2 and 3, in reference with FIG. 5, wire 38 extends from back end 26e of laser unit 26 to a switch unit 28. Wire 38 is electrically connected to switch unit and further extends adjacent to and is wrapped around shaft 16. Wire 38 is made from any suitable electrically conductive material such as copper (Cu), and the electrically conductive material is encased in any suitable non-conductive material, such as plastic.

Switch unit (temporary switch) 28 is a strip having a top portion 28a extending at an angle from the strip. Top portion rests flatly against handle 14 of golf club 12 when attached by a non-electrically conductive elastic strip 34. Switch unit 28, as shown, is attached to top end 16b of shaft 16 thereby easily and comfortably accessible by golfer 50 when in golf ball addressing position 51 (as shown in FIG. 6). Switch unit 28, as shown, also has a bottom portion 28b which extends laterally from the strip towards shaft 16. Bottom portion 28b, as shown, has an arcuate edge such that when depressed contacts shaft 16. Switch unit 28 is spring-loaded such that when depressed is able to make contact to shaft 16 to activate laser unit 16. In essence, laser unit 26 is activated by contacting at least a portion of switch unit 28 to shaft 16 of golf club 12 when on/off button 26b is depressed by cutout portion 25d of frame 25.

Generally, switch unit 28 is attached to handle 14 of golf club 12 in a comfortable place for golfer 50 to depress when in golf ball addressing position 51. However, switch unit 28 may be attached to any suitable location of golf club 12 per the desires of golfer 50. Switch unit 28 is made from any suitable electrically conductive material, such as steel, aluminum (Al), or titanium (Ti) or brass. Switch unit 28, as shown, has a thickness of 0.313 inches and a length of 3 inches, but may have any suitable dimensions.

Referring to FIG. 5 and other FIGS. as necessary, evidenced by the dark line, a unique electrical circuit 60 is created in the present application. Laser diode 26g is electrically connected to on/off button (permanent switch) 26b when depressed by cutout portion 25d of frame 25. When depressed, on/off button 26b is electrically connected to battery source 26c. Battery source 26c is electrically connected to end 39 of wire 38. Wire 38 is electrically connected to switch unit 28 (temporary switch). When depressed by golfer 50, switch unit 28 is electrically connected to shaft 16 of golf club 12. Shaft 16 of golf club 12 is electrically connected to clamp mechanism 22 and bracket 23. Bracket 23 is electrically connected to adjustment mechanism 24. Adjustment mechanism 24 is electrically connected to frame 25. Frame 25 is electrically connected to back end 26e of laser unit 26. Back end 26e of laser unit 26 is electrically connected to housing 26f of laser unit 26. And housing 26f of laser unit 26 is electrically connected to laser diode 26g, thereby completing unique electrical circuit 60.

In general, unique electrical circuit 60 for activating laser diode 26g includes housing 26f, frame 25, bracket 23, wire 38, switch unit 28, and shaft 16 used as conductors. To activate laser diode 26g, on/off button 26b (permanent switch) and switch unit 28 (temporary switch) are simultaneously depressed. On/off button 26b, when depressed, connects internal components of laser unit 26, while switch unit 28 activates laser diode 26g when contacted to shaft 16. To avoid battery loss while transporting, on/off button 26b should not be depressed.

Referring now to FIG. 6, golfer 50 in golf ball addressing position 51 is shown. Removable laser sighting device 100 is attached to golf club 12. As shown, beam of light 29 is emitted in a direction parallel to a ground surface 70. FIG. 6 shows an alignment strip 200 on ground surface 70. Alignment strip 200 has a first end 217 and a second end 218. A line 215 oriented perpendicular to first and second ends 217 and 218 runs centrally down the length of alignment strip 200. In this embodiment, alignment strip 200 also has additional guidelines 216 adjacent first end 217. Target stand 212 is placed adjacent alignment strip 200 such that vertical line 211 on target stand 212 is collinear with central line 215 of alignment strip 200. Target stand 214 further has a simulated golf hole 213 adjacent a base of target stand 212 and aligned with line 215 of alignment strip 200.

Alignment strip is made from any suitable material such as cardboard or synthetic materials, and may be folded up for easy transport. In this embodiment, alignment strip has a length of 4 feet, a width of 4 inches, and a thickness of ⅛ inches. The dimensions of length and width may alternatively be any suitable dimension. The height dimension must be suitable for placing ball striking surface 20 squarely against first end 217 of alignment strip 200. Target stand 212 and simulated golf hole 213 may be made from any suitable material such as cardboard or synthetic materials. Dimensions of target stand 212 and simulated hole 213 are variable.

Advantageously, the putting training system of the present application requires no permanent club modification and is easily attached without the use of tools. Furthermore, the beveled disk mechanism simplifies adjustment of the beam of light. Also, Additionally, the putting training system of the present application conceals all geometric features a golfer may use to aid in aligning his putt. Also, the present application discloses effective methods for utilizing the putting training system.

The putting training system aids in teaching the golfer correct: ball addressing position; feet, body, and head alignment; putting stoke trajectory; and orientation of the ball striking surface at impact by developing lasting vision and muscle memory. Conventional optical putting training systems fail in developing lasting vision and muscle memory effectively because they require the golfer to disengage himself from the golf ball addressing position to activate and deactivate the beam of light. Whereas the putting training system of the present application allows the golfer to activate and deactivate the beam of light while comfortably in his golf ball addressing position, This attribute creates a synergy between practice and execution unachievable with conventional systems.

Methods of utilizing the putting training system of the present application will now be discussed. In all of the forthcoming disclosed methods of utilizing the golf putting training system of the present application, note that a golfer's feet must be substantially parallel to the intended path of the golf ball and thus perpendicular to the ball striking surface.

Referring to all applicable FIGS., initial installation of a fully assembled removable laser sighting device 100 on to golf club 12 may include the following steps: unscrewing wing nut 22c from screw 22d; removing clamp mechanism 22 from bracket 23; joining arcuate body 23h to bottom end 16a of shaft 16; placing hook plates 22i of clamp mechanism 22 into slots 23i of bracket 23 thereby surrounding shaft 16 with arcuate body 22h of clamp mechanism 22 and arcuate body 23h of bracket 23; tightening wing nut 22c slightly; wrapping wire 38 around shaft 16 a sufficient number of times; attaching switch unit 28 to top end 16b of shaft 16 by elastic strip 34; and checking operation of laser sighting device 100.

Adjustment and proper installation of laser sighting device 100 may include the following steps: orienting approximately beam of light 29 perpendicular to ball striking surface 20; laying alignment strip 200 on ground surface 70; arranging target stand 212 adjacent to alignment strip 200 such that line 215 of alignment strip 200 at second end 218 is collinear to line 211 on target stand 212; placing, while in golf ball addressing position 51, ball striking surface 20 squarely against first end 216 of alignment strip 200; positioning front end 26a of laser unit 26 directly above guidelines 216; activating laser unit 26 by contacting at least a portion of switch unit 28 of removable laser sighting device 100 to shaft 16; observing whether projection 214 of beam of light 29 emitted by laser unit 26 is aligned with line 211 of target 212; rotating slot and hook design, as well as, beveled disk adjusting mechanism to effectuate projection 214 of beam of light 29 emitted by laser unit 26 to onto line 211 of target 212; tightening wing nut 22c substantially; and repeating, if necessary, the step of rotating.

A representative golf ball addressing drill will now be discussed. One embodiment may involve the following steps: aligning the ball striking surface of the club head of the golf club perpendicular to a specified point on a target at a distance away from the target; activating the laser unit of the removable laser sighting device of the present application by contacting at least a portion of the switch unit of the removable laser sighting device to the shaft; and observing whether the projection of the beam of light emitted by the laser unit is aligned with the target. The steps of aligning, activating, and observing may be repeated once or a plurality of times. Note that the greatest benefit is achieved when the golfer steps away before each subsequent aligning. Furthermore, the steps of aligning, activating, and observing may be performed at various distances, such as 5, 7, 9, and 11 feet along a straight line and with golf balls to simulate real putts. These embodiments may also be done with the alignment strip and target stand as aids. By aligning, activating, and observing numerous times, at various distances, and with different tools, the golfer engrains the proper way to address a ball into their mind. A representative stroke trajectory drill will now be discussed. One embodiment may involve the following steps: aligning the ball striking surface of the club head of the golf club perpendicular to a specified point on a target at a distance away from the target; activating the laser unit of the removable laser sighting device by contacting at least a portion of a switch unit of the removable laser sighting device to the shaft; swinging the club; and observing, during the swing, whether a projection of a beam of light emitted by the laser unit is aligned with the target. Prior to the step of aligning, the golfer may address a golf ball at the distance away from the target. These embodiments may also be done with the alignment strip and target stand as aids. The steps of addressing, aligning, activating, and observing may be repeated once or a plurality of times. Note that the greatest benefit is achieved when the golfer steps away before each subsequent aligning (in one case) and (addressing in another case). Furthermore, the steps of addressing, aligning, activating, and observing may be performed at various distances, such as 5, 7, 9, and 11 feet along a straight line. Note that these methods may also be employed on a putting green.

The above-described embodiments of the present application are intended to be examples only. Those of skill in the art may effect alterations, modifications and variations to the particular embodiments without departing from the scope of the application. The invention described herein in the recited claims intends to cover and embrace all suitable changes in technology.