Title:
Catch basin apparatus and method of use for the same
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Apparatus for optimizing fluid flow while maximizing selective filtration of select debris and detritus functions as catch basin in conjunction with conventional sewers. Proximate to a curb inlet a diverter is located, and at least one sieve-member or element is disposed within the catch basin defining a primary and supplemental space for collecting solid materials, in combination with a drain access aperture allowing for ingress and egress to the supplemental space from the primary space to preclude blockage by facilitating access to the catch basin drain.



Inventors:
Marzett, Wayland (Los Angeles, CA, US)
Nino, Khalil Ibrahim (South Gate, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/110192
Publication Date:
10/19/2006
Filing Date:
04/19/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
210/164, 210/806
International Classes:
E03F5/14; E03F5/16
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
UPTON, CHRISTOPHER
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
GREENBERG TRAURIG LLP;ATTN: E. NAIR FLORES (SUITE 400E, 2450 COLORADO AVENUE, SANTA MONICA, CA, 90404, US)
Claims:
1. In a catch basin for selectively removing gross particulate matter of a predetermined dimension from a flow path, having a plurality of collection areas terminating in a drain opening, the improvement comprising, in combination: an inlet diverter; a supplemental collection area; and a sieve element for filtering matter disposed in a liquid medium flowing through the catch basin defining a border between at least a primary and the supplemental collection areas, wherein the sieve element further comprises an aperture and cover assembly located in proximal spaced relation relative to the drain opening.

2. An apparatus for filtering trash in a catch basin, wherein the catch basin has inner walls, a floor, an inlet opening, and a drain opening, and wherein said apparatus comprises: one or more conventional supports for securing one or more parts of the apparatus inside the catch basin; a trash collecting container located within the catch basin, wherein the container comprises: a filter sheet forming at least part of the bottom of the container, said filter sheet having a plurality of apertures through it, wherein the bottom of the container is located above the floor a sufficient amount to provide clearance for fluid and at least some of the trash to flow along the floor and into the drain opening; and an overflow wall, wherein the overflow wall is a wall of the container, is located between the filter sheet on the inside of the container and an overflow area on the outside of the container, and has a top that is low enough for excess fluid and excess trash to pass over the overflow wall into the overflow area, wherein said excess fluid and excess trash are the fluid and trash respectively that has accumulated in the container beyond a predetermined maximum capacity of the container; a diverter, wherein said diverter is located and oriented relative to the inlet opening for diverting at least some inbound fluid-borne trash away from entering the overflow area and toward entering the container.

3. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein the bottom of the container covers at least seventy percent of the floor area.

4. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein the overflow wall has a plurality of apertures through it.

5. The apparatus of claim 3, wherein the overflow wall has a plurality of apertures through it.

6. The apparatus of claim 2, wherein the diverter has a plurality of apertures through it.

7. The apparatus of claim 3, wherein the diverter has a plurality of apertures through it.

8. The apparatus of claim 4, wherein the diverter has a plurality of apertures through it.

9. The apparatus of claim 5, wherein the diverter has a plurality of apertures through it.

10. An apparatus for filtering trash in a catch basin, comprising: a trash collecting container located and supported by conventional supports within a catch basin, the catch basin having an inlet opening, one or more inner walls, a floor, and a drain opening, wherein the container comprises: one or more filter sheets, each of the filter sheets having a plurality of apertures through it, said apertures being of a size and shape that will allow fluid to pass through the filter sheet but block such passage of at least some trash; wherein the one or more filter sheets form at least part of the bottom of the container, and the one or more filter sheets are located above the floor and higher than the lowest part of the drain opening; container walls, wherein the container walls form the lateral bounds of the container and comprise an overflow wall, wherein the top of the overflow wall is lower than the tops of all the container walls that are not overflow walls, and wherein the top of the overflow wall is lower than the bottom of the inlet opening; a relief channel located within the catch basin but outside the container, wherein the relief channel encloses an overflow area and leads to the drain opening, wherein the overflow area is the area into which the fluid and the trash that overflows the overflow wall passes, and wherein the minimum inside dimensions of the relief channel are large enough to allow passage through the relief channel of at least some of the fluid and at least some of the trash that overflows the overflow wall; and a diverter located within the catch basin, wherein the diverter is connected to at least one of the inner walls at a location whereby the diverter will intercept at least some of the trash that enters the catch basin through the inlet opening at a point where it would fall outside the container if the diverter were not present, wherein the diverter is located higher than the top of the overflow wall, wherein at least part of the diverter extends within the lateral bounds of the container, and wherein the diverter is oriented to divert at least some of the trash into the container.

11. The apparatus of claim 10, wherein the bottom of the container covers at least seventy percent of the floor.

12. The apparatus of claim 10, wherein at least one of the container walls comprises at least a portion of one of the inner walls.

13. The apparatus of claim 11, wherein at least one of the container walls comprises at least a portion of one of the inner walls.

14. The apparatus of claim 10, wherein at least one of the container walls has a plurality of apertures through it, said apertures being of a size and shape that allows fluid to pass through said at least one container wall but blocks such passage of at least some trash.

15. The apparatus of claim 11, wherein at least one of the container walls has a plurality of apertures through it, said apertures being of a size and shape that allows fluid to pass through said at least one container wall but blocks such passage of at least some trash.

16. The apparatus of claim 12, wherein at least one of the container walls has a plurality of apertures through it, said apertures being of a size and shape that allows fluid to pass through said at least one container wall but blocks such passage of at least some trash.

17. The apparatus of claim 13, wherein at least one of the container walls has a plurality of apertures through it, said apertures being of a size and shape that allows fluid to pass through said at least one container wall but blocks such passage of at least some trash.

18. The apparatus of claim 10, wherein the diverter has a plurality of apertures through it, said apertures being of a size and shape that allows fluid to pass through the diverter but blocks such passage of at least some trash.

19. The apparatus of claim 11, wherein the diverter has a plurality of apertures through it, said apertures being of a size and shape that allows fluid to pass through the diverter but blocks such passage of at least some trash.

20. The apparatus of claim 12, wherein the diverter has a plurality of apertures through it, said apertures being of a size and shape that allows fluid to pass through the diverter but blocks such passage of at least some trash.

21. The apparatus of claim 13, wherein the diverter has a plurality of apertures through it, said apertures being of a size and shape that allows fluid to pass through the diverter but blocks such passage of at least some trash.

22. The apparatus of claim 14, wherein the diverter has a plurality of apertures through it, said apertures being of a size and shape that allows fluid to pass through the diverter but blocks such passage of at least some trash.

23. The apparatus of claim 15, wherein the diverter has a plurality of apertures through it, said apertures being of a size and shape that allows fluid to pass through the diverter but blocks such passage of at least some trash.

24. The apparatus of claim 16, wherein the diverter has a plurality of apertures through it, said apertures being of a size and shape that allows fluid to pass through the diverter but blocks such passage of at least some trash.

25. The apparatus of claim 17, wherein the diverter has a plurality of apertures through it, said apertures being of a size and shape that allows fluid to pass through the overflow wall but blocks such passage of at least some trash.

26. The apparatus of claim 10, also comprising a filter hole, wherein the filter hole passes through at least one of the filter sheets, wherein the filter hole is large enough to accommodate insertion through it of predetermined types of drain clean-out equipment, and wherein the filter hole location in the installed apparatus is close enough to the drain opening to enable the clean-out equipment to be inserted through the filter hole and into the drain opening.

27. The apparatus of claim 26, also comprising a filter hole cover, wherein the filter hole cover is movably connected to the container bottom, covers the filter hole, and can be moved by human power to uncover the filter hole enough to enable the clean-out equipment to be inserted through the filter hole and into the drain opening.

28. An apparatus for filtering trash in a catch basin, comprising: a trash collecting container located and supported by conventional supports within a catch basin, the catch basin having an inlet opening, one or more inner walls, a floor, and a drain opening, wherein the container comprises: one or more filter sheets, each of the filter sheets having a plurality of apertures through it, said apertures being of a size and shape that will allow fluid to pass through the filter sheet but block such passage of at least some trash; wherein the one ore more filter sheets form at least part of the bottom of the container, the one or more filter sheets are located above the floor and higher than the lowest part of the drain opening, and the bottom of the container covers at least seventy percent of the floor; container walls, wherein the container walls from the lateral bounds of the container and comprise an overflow wall, wherein the top of the overflow wall is lower than the tops of all the container walls that are not overflow walls, and wherein the top of the overflow wall is lower than the bottom of the inlet opening, wherein at least one of the container walls comprises a plurality of apertures through it, said apertures being of a size and shape that allows fluid to pass through said at least one container wall but blocks such passage of at least some trash, and wherein at least one of the container walls comprises at least a portion of one of the inner walls; a relief channel located within the catch basin but outside the container, wherein the relief channel comprises an overflow channel and a floor channel, wherein the overflow channel encloses an overflow area, the overflow area being the area into which the fluid and the trash that overflows the overflow wall passes, and leads downwardly and connects with the floor channel, wherein the floor channel runs between the floor and the bottom of the container from the overflow channel to the drain opening, and wherein the minimum inside dimensions of the relief channel are large enough to allow passage through the relief channel of the fluid in a volume needed to match a predetermined requirement for rate of drainage from the catch basin, and the trash of a size and shape that is within a predetermined requirement for trash to be permitted into the drain opening, wherein both of said predetermined requirements are limited by the maximum capacity of the drain opening and its associated drainage system; and a diverter located within the catch basin, wherein the diverter is connected to at least one of the inner walls at a location whereby the diverter will intercept at least some of the trash that enters the catch basin through the inlet opening at a point where it would fall outside the container if the diverter were not present, wherein the diverter is located higher than the top of the overflow walls and at least part of the diverter extends within the lateral bounds of the container, wherein the diverter is oriented to divert at least some of the trash into the container, and wherein the diverter has a plurality of apertures through it, said apertures being of a size and shape that allows fluid to pass through the diverter but blocks such passage of at least some trash.

29. The apparatus of claim 28, wherein the diverter is comprised of a diverter bottom and a diverter wall, wherein the diverter wall is connected to the diverter bottom to form a barrier against at least some trash crossing over the diverter bottom and falling into the catch basin outside the container.

30. A method for filtering trash in a catch basin, the method comprising the following steps: diverting fluid-borne trash into a trash collecting container located in a catch basin after the trash enters the catch basin through an inlet opening; retaining at least some of the trash in the container while permitting fluid to pass through apertures in at least part of the container; accumulating the retained trash and any back up fluid until the retained trash, backed up fluid, or any combination of them reaches the top of the overflow wall; channeling the trash and the fluid that overflows the overflow wall, via one or more channels that direct the overflowing trash and overflowing fluid through an overflow area downwardly to the floor of the catch basin and thence between the floor of the catch basis and the bottom of the container to a drain opening.

31. In a catch basin for selectively removing gross particulate matter of a predetermined dimension from a flow path, having at least one collection areas terminating in a drain opening, the improvement comprising, in combination: an inlet diverter; a supplemental collection area; and a sieve element for filtering matter disposed in a liquid medium flowing through the catch basin, wherein the sieve element further comprises a maintenance access hatch located within said sieve element.

Description:

FIELD OF THE DISCLOSURE

The present disclosure generally relates to novel catch basin constructions used in a sewer-type of apparatus which cost effectively make cleaning of the same easier, while being disposed simply without adding cost or time constraints.

The present disclosure further relates to catch basin improvements allowing for ongoing flow while selectively screening undesired elements from transmission to a drain.

BACKGROUND OF THE DISCLOSURE

Filtration systems have been known throughout history for blocking ingress and egress selectively. Sewer systems and their related drains are a product of modern society, often having a need to be disposed within, for example, city streets in a metropolitan area. Combinations of these two usually distinct types of systems have yet to adequately address the issues managed by way of the present disclosure.

SUMMARY

The present disclosure works in conjunction with conventional drainage systems, for example, sewers which drain from the street. While it is known for drainage systems to work in conjunction with such street based systems, a fluid drainage system according to the instant disclosure uses novel mechanisms to handle any number of types of detritus without compromise to the flow-rate in ways not available prior to the advent of the instant teachings.

For example, by using the combination of at least one diverter and a sieve-member or element to divide a primary and at least a secondary collection area, the present disclosure overcomes the longstanding need to be able to get between, behind under or in back of the sieve-member or element and remove debris and detritus by way of a specialized aperture permitting ingress and egress.

The present disclosure manages the issue of having a continuous flow-path while being able to stem the flow of large pieces of debris, and being able to render those pieces which may become lodged readily removable. This is done in straight-forward fashion, enabling those charged with removing potentially clogging pieces of debris to have ready access to the area proximate to the drain which is at the bottom of the system.

Likewise, those skilled in the art shall understand that such improved catch basin technology overcomes the longstanding issues associated with spaces too small for workers to reach into to remove pieces of debris which become difficultly lodged. An additional aspect of the present disclosure is that it does not require further attachments, assemblies or supplemental pieces at the ingress, or for example, at the “curb” in a conventional city-type of sewer inlet. This feature is useful and enhances industrial efficiency.

According to the teachings of the instant disclosure, the efficiency of a conventional sewer system is further improved in that the enhancements to the catch basis render the system such that it does not need to be manually monitored or emptied with as high a degree of frequency. Owing to the simple mechanical aspects of functionality of the instant disclosure the involved materials can be both strong and robust in addition to being acquired without tremendous capital outlay.

Further, since many conventional, for example, metropolitan sewer systems, have many different locations needing to be improved, ready installation capacity, ease-of-use and transport make the teachings of the present disclosure attractive to users. It is also known to artisans how the solution offered by the instant teachings can have a “universal” aspect, if it functions in conjunction with or is readily adaptable to many different related types of systems.

Finally, owing to the modularity of the components according to the instant teachings plethoric combinations and subcombinations are available. For example, for use with conventional metropolitan sewer systems those having a modicum of skill shall understand that at least one diverter is easily curb-mounted with most existing systems, as is a sieve member or element combination. Being modular provides for easy and facile transport, shipping, storage and related conveniences.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The present disclosure will be more clearly understood by reference to this specification in view of the accompanying drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of an embodiment of the apparatus, which embodiment is adapted for attachment to the inner walls of a street storm-water catch basin having a curb inlet opening and a left-located drain opening, as seen prior to installation.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of a catch basin in which the embodiment seen in FIG. 1 is installed, showing only the part of the apparatus that is visible from this view, said part being the diverter (a portion of it visible through the curb inlet opening), and showing a manhole cover that is located directly above the catch basin's drain opening.

FIG. 3 is a top view of the embodiment in FIG. 1 after it has been installed, as seen through horizontal cross-sectional cut I-I.

FIG. 4 is a back view of the embodiment in FIG. 1 after it has been installed, as seen through vertical cross-sectional cut II-II.

FIG. 5 is a left side view of the embodiment in FIG. 1 after it has been installed, as seen through vertical cross-sectional cut III-III.

FIG. 6 is a close up top view of a portion of the embodiment in FIG. 1 after it has been installed, as seen through horizontal cross-sectional cut I-I, showing the filter hole cover in an open position.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of an embodiment of the apparatus, which embodiment is adapted for attachment to the inner walls of a catch basin having a curb inlet opening and center-located drain opening, as seen prior to installation.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view of a catch basin in which the embodiment seen in FIG. 7 is installed, showing only the part of the apparatus that is visible from this view, said part being the diverter (a portion of it visible through the curb inlet opening), and showing a manhole directly above the location of the catch basin's drain pipe opening.

FIG. 9 is a back view of the embodiment in FIG. 7 after it has been installed, as seen through vertical cross-sectional cut IV-IV.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of a third embodiment of the apparatus, which embodiment is adapted for attachment to the inner walls of a catch basis having a top inlet opening and a left-located drain pipe opening, as seen prior to installation.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of a catch basis in which the embodiment seen in FIG. 10 is installed, showing only the part of the apparatus that is visible in this view, said part being the diverter (a portion of it is visible through the top inlet opening, with the surface grate that normally covers the opening lifted above its normal position), and showing the top inlet opening being large enough to eliminate the need for a manhole.

FIG. 12 is a left side view of the embodiment in FIG. 10 after it has been installed, as seen through vertical cross-sectional cut V-V. (Note that “left” is defined herein to be left when viewing from the center of the street).

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

Referring to the drawings, FIGS. 1-6 show one embodiment, referred to herein as a left-drain filter 1, as it would appear in an installation configuration but (as illustrated in FIG. 1) without being installed in any catch basin and (as illustrated in FIGS. 2-6) after being installed into a left-drain catch basin 2. The left-drain filter 1 is configured for installation into the left-drain catch basin 2, which has a floor 3 and a drain opening 4 in the left portion of the floor 3. The left-drain catch basin 2 is designed to allow fluid to enter through a curb-inlet opening 5 and to exit through the drain opening 4 located in the left portion of the catch basin.

FIGS. 7-9 show another embodiment, referred to herein as a center-drain filter 6, as it would appear in its installation configuration but (as illustrated in FIG. 7) without being installed in any catch basis and (as illustrated in FIGS. 8-9) after being installed into a center-drain catch basin 7, which is designed to allow fluid to enter through the curb-inlet opening 5 and to exit through its drain opening 4 located in the central portion of the catch basin.

And, FIGS. 10-12 show a further embodiment, referred to herein as a top-inlet filter 8, as it would appear in its installation configuration but (as illustrated in FIG. 10) without being installed in any catch basis and (as illustrated in FIGS. 11-12) after being installed into a top-inlet catch basin 9. The top-inlet filter 8 is configured for installation into the top-inlet catch basin 9, which is designed to allow fluid to enter through a top-inlet opening 10 and to exit through its drain opening 4 located, in this embodiment, in the back portion of the catch basin.

In FIGS. 2-6, 8-9, and 11-12, the installation environment is shown as comprising a street 11 connected to an inlet apron 12 and a gutter 13, with a curb 14 connecting the gutter to a sidewalk 15 supported on an earthen foundation 16. The inlet apron 12 shown in FIGS. 11-12 is part of the catch basin, whereas the inlet apron 12 can, alternatively, be a separate piece as shown in FIGS. 2-6 and 8-9. However, all inlet aprons 12 shown in the accompanying figures receive fluid (and any trash carried with the fluid) from the street and the gutter, and direct the fluid (and trash) into the catch basin by sloping downwardly toward the catch basin inlet opening.

Although the apparatus can be adapted to accommodate catch basins with a different number of inner walls, each catch basin shown in the accompanying figures has four inner walls 17. The apparatus is shown installed in each of those catch basins by using angle-iron supports 18 with support bolts 19 passing through bolt holes 20 in a flange of the support 18 and into anchors 21 that have been placed in three of the inner walls 17 if each catch basin. (It should be understood that, although the support bolts 19 and anchors 21 are shown only in FIG. 6, support bolt 19 and anchor 21 combinations are located approximately equally spaced apart along the flange of each installed support 18 that is in direct contact with an inner wall 17. Locations intended for said support bolt 19 and anchor 21 combinations are shown in the accompanying figures simply by showing the locations of the bolt holes 20 where practical to do so, on the scale of those figures. Due to the large quantity of them, only a few of the locations of the bolt holes 20 are identified by reference number. It is believed that those skilled in the art understand or can readily determine the appropriate number and locations for the bolts and their anchors, and the size and other characteristics of them, for securing supports within a catch basis.)

Filter sheets 22 can then rest upon the supports (or, may be secured by any conventional means such as screwing the filter sheets 22 into the supports 18), with the plane of each filter sheet 22 located at a predetermined appropriate level above the floor 3 and oriented substantially parallel to the part of the floor 3 that is directly beneath the filter sheet 22. The appropriate level can provide at least enough clearance to permit a sufficient volume of fluid to flow along the floor 3 into the drain opening 4 to match the capacity of the drain opening 4. The capacity of the drain opening 4 is limited by such things as its size and the characteristics of the drain pipe 23 being used. The appropriate level also can be based on other criteria as desired by the user. Such other criteria may include factoring in the volume and quantity of trash that is likely to overflow and pass with the fluid into the space between the floor 3 and the one or more filter sheets 22. Of course, any conventional means may be used for supporting and securing the filter sheets 22 in their positions.

As best seen in FIGS. 1, 3, 4-7, and 10, the filter sheets 22 have a plurality of apertures 24 through them, so that fluid will pass through while trash will be retained for subsequent removal. (Note that due to the large quantity of them, only a few of the apertures 24 shown in the accompanying figures are identified by reference number. And, of course, the apertures 24 are to be distinguished from the circles shown on the supports 18, which only illustrate that the support bolts 19 are located and in one embodiment, equally spaced along the vertical flange of the supports 18.) The size and shape, pattern, combination and other selectable features for the apertures 24 are contemplated by the present disclosure as being optional to the user, depending on the particular results he or she may desire. It is believed, however, that apertures 24 ranging in size (measured as the smallest dimension across the opening) from ¼ inch to 1½ inches work well for blocking the passage of trash into municipal street storm-water catch basins. Of course, larger or smaller apertures, or combinations of apertures, may be used without departing from the present disclosure.

FIG. 1 shows an overflow wall 25 and a curb-inlet diverter 26. As shown, the curb-inlet diverter 26 comprises two sheets secured together at right angles (by, for example, using screws to secure one edge of one sheet to one flange on a section of angle iron and to secure one edge of the other sheet to the other flange). When installed into the left-drain catch basin 2, the curb-inlet diverter 26 is oriented to form a channel that diverts incoming fluid and trash to the filter side of the overflow wall 25 (which is the side opposite the overflow area 28). As seen in FIG. 2, the curb-inlet diverter 26 is located against the inner wall 17 on the front side of the left-drain catch basis 2, generally by securing it in a manner similar to the one used for securing the filter sheets. And, the curb-inlet diverter 26 is the only part of the left-drain filter 1 that might be easily seen from the street 11. In one embodiment, the location for the curb-inlet diverter 26 is at or near the upstream end of the catch basin. Also, as is shown by a close look at FIGS. 1-2, 4, and 7-9, the curb-inlet diverter 26 is sloped slightly downwardly as it extends toward the filter side of the overflow wall 25, which helps keep the diverter clear of accumulated trash. Of course, the degree of the slope can, in other embodiments, vary depending on anticipated flow conditions and other criteria, as desired by the user. Note further, that the overflow wall 25 and the curb-inlet diverter 26 can be made of the same material as the filter sheets are made of, with apertures, so that the filtering process can occur at the diverter and overflow wall as well as at the filter sheets. Again, however, other embodiments may utilize other materials for construction of the overflow wall and/or the diverter without departing from the present disclosure.

FIG. 3 looks down through sectional cut I-I, which is a substantially horizontal cut immediately below the inside ceiling 27 of the left-drain catch basin 2. In FIG. 3, the curb-inlet diverter 26 is seen as being secured to the inner walls 17 on the front and right sides of the left-drain catch basin 2. The space between the overflow wall 25 and the inner wall 17 on the right side of the catch basin forms an overflow area 28, into which fluid and trash can overflow from the filter side of the overflow wall 25 when the capacity of the filter is exceeded. Under those circumstances, as seen in FIGS. 4, 5, 9, and 12, overflowing fluid and trash is able to flow along the floor 3 beneath the filter sheets 22 and enter the drain pipe 23.

FIG. 3 also illustrates the large area coverage of the filter sheets 22, which, in one embodiment, form a snug fit to the inner walls 17 on the front, left, and back sides of the catch basin. In this embodiment the filter sheets 22 are bounded by the three inner walls 17 and the overflow wall 25 and can cover approximately 80 percent of the floor 3, thereby providing a very large filtering and holding capacity. Although no top view of the other embodiments, which are the subject of FIGS. 7-12, is shown, FIG. 3 is illustrative of the capacity of the other embodiments provide by also having filter sheets 22 fully cover the floor area on the filter side of the overflow wall 25. Of course, additional embodiments not specifically described or shown herein may cover different proportions of the floor area without departing from the present disclosure.

FIG. 3 also shows a filter hole cover 29 in its closed position, which filter hole cover 29 has a pivot bolt 30 and a handle 31 to facilitate rotation of the filter hole cover 29 into its open position to expose a filter hole 32, as illustrated in FIG. 6. In one embodiment, the filter hole 32 is directly above the drain opening 4, where the drain pipe 23 commences. An embodiment having the filter hole 32 and the filter hole cover 29 is advantageous to an embodiment not having them, since the drain pipe 23 must occasionally be accessed and cleaned. To do this, maintenance personnel generally must gain access to the drain pipe 23 by removing the manhole cover 33 and introducing clean out equipment into the catch basin through the manhole 34. If there is a filter hole 32 and filter hole cover 29, maintenance personnel can easily access the drain pipe 23 by moving the filter hole cover 29 to an open position, whereas they would otherwise generally need to move an entire filter sheet 22. In one embodiment, the filter hole 32 and the manhole 34 are located directly above the drain opening 4. Although, the other embodiments described or shown herein also have filter holes 32 covered by filter hole covers 29, additional embodiments may have multiple filter holes or no filter hole at all, or may have the filter hole(s) located elsewhere within the catch basin, have no filter hole cover, or have any combination thereof, without departing from the present disclosure.

As seen in FIGS. 7-9, the center-drain filter 6 is quite similar to the left-drain filter 1. The difference lies in the fact that the center-drain filter 6 is adapted for installation into the center-drain catch basin 7 rather than the left-drain catch basin 2. For such adaptation, the center-drain filter 6 has its lowest point located over the centrally located drain opening 4, with one or more filter sheets 22 added on the left side of the drain opening 4, with one or more filter sheets 22 added on the left side of the drain opening 4. In one embodiment, the added filter sheets slope upward, substantially parallel to the slope of the floor 3, until they reach the inner wall 17 at the left end of the center-drain catch basin 7.

The top-inlet filter 8, as shown in FIGS. 10 and 12, has a top-inlet diverter 35 rather than a curb-inlet diverter 26. The top-inlet diverter 35 can extend from the inner wall 17 at the front of the top-inlet catch basin 9, inwardly into the top-inlet catch basin 9 while down sloping modestly to end at a point on the filter side of the overflow wall 25. (A 2 percent to 20 percent down slope is believed advantageous, but the present disclosure encompasses milder and steeper down slopes that may be deemed more suitable by the user.) In one embodiment, the top-inlet diverter 35 also extends laterally to cover the entire overflow area 28, with the top-inlet diverter 35 reaching several inches beyond the overflow wall 25 to help assure trash is not allowed to directly enter the overflow area 28. The top-inlet diverter 35 also is shown as being separated vertically from the top of the overflow wall 25 to provide sufficient space between the top-inlet diverter 35 and the overflow wall 25 for fluid and trash to overflow the top-inlet filter 8 via the overflow wall 25 without significant impediment by the top-inlet diverter 35.

Like the curb-inlet diverter 26, the top-inlet diverter 35 works to divert incoming trash away from the overflow area 28 to the filter side of the overflow wall 25. Also, the top-inlet diverter 35 of one embodiment is made using the same material, with apertures, as is used for making the filter sheets 22, so that the filtering process begins as the entering fluid and trash impact the top-inlet diverter 35. (The same preference for use of material with apertures applies to the overflow wall and the diverter in other embodiments. For example, this preference is discussed and applied above with respect to the left-drain filter 1, shown in FIGS. 1-6, and is also intended to apply to the center-drain filter 6, shown in FIGS. 7-9.

As shown in FIGS. 11 and 12, a large surface grate 36 can be located in the top-inlet opening 10, within the street environment, to facilitate handling large volumes of fluid and to allow access by maintenance personnel into the top-inlet catch basin 9 without need for a manhole.

The supports 18, filter sheets 22, the other parts of the apparatus, and the means for connecting them together and securing them to the inner walls 17 may be made of hot dipped galvanized steel, although they can be made of any other conventional material that is strong and durable in the presence of the fluids reasonably expected to pass through the catch basin in which they are installed, with due consideration to the potential for corrosion and/or electrolytes particularly when using more than one type of metal in the construction of the apparatus. Such other conventional materials include stainless steel, aluminum, plastics, carbon fibers, and composites. The means for connecting the parts of the apparatus to one another or to the catch basin can be any conventional connecting means such as, without limitation, bolts, screws, welds, clamps, and/or adhesives.

The supports 18 shown herein as angle irons may be installed with the vertical side of the angle iron pointed up or down. The accompanying figures show the vertical side point up on the supports 18 used to support the filter sheets 22. Nevertheless, an alternative embodiment with the vertical side of the supports 18 pointing down would appear helpful in order to cause less interference between the support bolts 19 and the filter sheets 22. (A sample of this alternative orientation of the vertical side of the supports is found in the curb-inlet diverter 26 shown in FIGS. 1, 3-5, 7 and 9, which has the vertical side of the supports 18 pointing down.)

Of course, catch basins may have designs with such things as their size, shape, and/or orientation, or the location, number, and/or size of their inlet openings or drain openings being different from any of those described or shown herein. It should be understood, however, that the present disclosure contemplates and includes all conventional adjustments in the embodiments described or shown herein (including such adjustments in the size, orientation, proportions, and relative positioning of parts) made to accommodate those differences in catch basin designs. For example, an alternative catch basin design may provide a shelf, ledge, or groove, or combination thereof, built into one or more of its inner walls as a resting place for the supports or even for the filter sheets without supports. An embodiment adapted for installation in such a catch basin design could be made with reduced, or without any, use of other means (such as the support bolt/anchor combinations) for securing the supports and/or filter sheets, without departing from the present disclosure.

While the apparatus and method have been described in terms of what are presently considered to be the most practical and preferred embodiments, it is to be understood that the disclosure need not be limited to the disclosed embodiments. It is intended to cover various modifications and similar arrangements included within the spirit and scope of the claims, the scope of which should be accorded the broadest interpretation so as to encompass all such modifications and similar structures. The present disclosure includes any and all embodiments of the following claims.