Title:
Smart bell
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A hand held weight lifting device with a finger grip system attached to a resistance mechanism that is visually located in the middle of the handle and is designed to target the hands, wrist and forearms. The handles may be removed allowing a person to perform all dumbell related exercises. When using a collar, that safely and securely stabilizes the weights in a stationary form, the device can transform from solo or single status, to a dual, unilateral exercise experience. The device can be adjusted from 10″ to 20″ depending on the type of exercise required. The device, coupled with ankle straps and shin pads, provides a person the ability to perform lower body exercises targeting the hamstrings (rear thighs), quadriceps (thighs), lower abs (leg raises) and calfs. In regards to the upper body, the handles provide a comfort grip while performing exercises targeting all major muscles associated with the torso as well as biceps (arms) and trapezius (shoulders). This device is equipped with a resistance bar. When attached to both handles and the handles are squeezed together, it in turn targets the pectoral (chest) muscle.



Inventors:
Nasir, Hakim (San Diego, CA, US)
Application Number:
11/343601
Publication Date:
08/03/2006
Filing Date:
01/31/2006
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B21/072; A63B21/075
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GANESAN, SUNDHARA M
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Hakim Nasir (APT#7 4544 Oregon St., San Diego, CA, 92116, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A hand held weight lifting device comprising: (A) A handle housing a grip system that is attached to a resistance mechanism (B) A plurality of handles interlocking with a plurality of bars (C) A plurality of bars interlocking with said handles (D) A plurality of pads attached to said bars (E) A plurality of straps attached to said bars (F) A bar housing a resistance mechanism (G) A plurality of bars interlocking with said bars

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of provisional patent application Ser. No. 60/649,335, Filed 2005 Feb. 1 by the present inventor.

FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH

Not Applicable

SEQUENCE LISTING OF PROGRAM

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF INVENTION

1. Field of Invention

This invention relates to an exercise device specifically used for lifting weights and is designed to target major muscle groups.

2. Prior Art

Exercise and weight lifting equipment can be very expensive, take up too much space or just be too time consuming. In order to perform different exercises, people would have to constantly switch from one machine to another. Monthly rates and enrollment fees at gyms can be very expensive as well as time consuming when travelling back and forth. In most gyms, a great amount of your time will be spent waiting to use the equipment.

Inventors have created several devices designed for home use and portability. While these devices fulfill their particular objectives and requirements, no portable device on the market today targets every major muscle group. Known prior art include, U.S. Pat. No. 4,029,312 Forrest Wright (1975). Showing a combination of a barbell and a dumbell. The length of the barbell cannot be adjusted and because of the limited space available inside of its hollow shell shape design, the device can only hold a limited amount of weight in the form of water or sand. You would also have to constantly fill and refill the shell shaped device in order to receive the weight you desired. Also, it does nothing to target the fore-arms, hands, and wrist.

U.S. Pat. No. 6,234,934B1 Joseph U. Gorczyca (2001) targets only the forearms. No other body part can be exercised.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,334,113 Ronald W. Roepka (1994) is designed to target barbell related exercises only. Which limits its range of effectability as it relates to other major muscle groups.

In these respects, the aforementioned patents do not disclose a device that targets all major muscle groups. There are hundreds of types of exercising and weight lifting devices on the market today, but none that combine forearm exerciser, barbell, curl bar and a dumbell into one portable yet effective device.

Today's weight lifting devices must be designed to keep pace with the ever changing needs of its users. Those users have many different shapes and sizes as well as capabilities. This world we live in is rapidly changing. So are the products we use.

The most widely used weight lifting device on the market is the dumbell and barbell. These devices employ large, ungainly, unsightly, masses which which are relatively, non-portable and inconvenient to use and store. While these types of devices may have been convenient for use in building huge muscles by professional body builders, and the like. They do not appear to meet the needs of most modern day people that are engaged in the fitness process.

Today's exercisers use dumbells and barbells to keep the body in shape and maintain muscle tone without trying to develop the over muscled physique previously associated with weight lifting. When exercising with barbells and dumbells, the weight lifter performs many different types of exercises and assumes many different postures requiring balance. Many exercisers, particularly the most inexperienced novices, attempt to lift excessive amounts of weight which in turn can cause major bodily harm to themselves as well as others around them.

OBJECTS AND ADVANTAGES

The principal objects and advantages of the present invention include:

    • (a) to provide a comfortable, compact and portable way in which one can easily transport present invention to and from.
    • (b) to provide the option and convenience of home use or gym use
    • (c) to provide a simple way to develop muscle tone without having to use multiple pieces of equipment
    • (d) to provide such a system that allows present invention to extend from its original dumbell size to a curl bar size to a barbells size
    • (e) to provide a means in which both standard and universal weight plates can be used
    • (f) to provide resistance mechanisms inside the finger grips for forearm developing
    • (g) to provide such a system that allows present invention to seperate for unilateral use
    • (h) to provide pads for use as either hand grips or as shin pads
    • (i) to provide ankle straps allowing for quadriceps and hamstring exercises

Regarding prior art, U.S. Pat. No. 6,234,934 B1 Joseph J. Gorczyca (2001) has a device that targets only the forearm muscle. The remaining body parts are left untouched.

U.S. Pat. No. 5,334,113 Ronald W. Roepka (1994) his invention is limited to exercises that are performed with a barbell only. Mainly the upper body. U.S. Pat. No. 4,029,312 Forrest Wright (1975) is limited to the amount of weight it can possess. Once a body gets accustomed to lifting a certain amount of weight, the body will constantly need to lift additional weight in order to maintain the muscle growth accumulated.

Monthly membership fees at gyms are expensive and the cost keeps rising. Too much time is wasted in traffic just travelling back and forth to the gym. Most gyms are always crowded and full of the smell of sweating bodies. And, most of all, people spend a considerable amount of time waiting for the most used, most popular exercise equipment to become available.

Home gyms are not portable and they take up lots of space and cannot easily be stored. Most people do not have the time or patience it takes to assemble and disassemble a home gym for storage purposes.

Further objects and advantages of my invention will become apparent from a consideration of the drawings and ensuing description.

SUMMARY

In view of the foregoing disadvantages inherent in the known types of exercise equipment now present in the prior art, the present invention provides a new hand, wrist, and forearm exerciser, combined with a barbell, dumbell as well as a curl bar. Attached are shin pads and or hand grips along with ankle straps.

DRAWINGS—FIGURES

FIG. 1 shows an exploded view of the present invention.

FIG. 2 shows two bars with different widths than bars in the FIG. 1

FIG. 3 shows Five 1′ bars that interlock inside each other.

FIG. 5 shows the present invention with weight plates, shin pads and ankle straps added.

FIG. 4 shows a 10″ bar that harbors a resistance mechanism inside.

FIG. 6 shows a number of different exercises that can be performed while using the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION—PREFERRED EMBODIMENT—FIGS

With reference to the drawings, FIG. 1 illustrates an exploded view of a device with two handles that attaches to two bars that interlock, one inside the other and can be adjusted from 10″ to 20″.

In FIG. 1, 20 R is a handle that slides inside of 24 R. 23 R is a locking mechanism that fits inside the hole 25 R, locking the handle 20 R and and bar 24 R in place. 24 R is a bar that interlocks inside of bar 24 L. 26 R is a locking mechanism that fits inside holes 26 L locking the bar 24 R locking the bar 24 R and bar 24 L together. 25 L is a hole allowing mechanism 23L to lock in place attaching handle 20 L to bar 24 L. 21 L and 21 R are finger grips. 22 L and 22 R are resistance mechanisms attached to the finger grips 21 R and 21 L. Preferably resistance mechanisms 22 R and 22 L are resistance springs.

In FIG. 1, 20 R is a handle preferably 5″ in width, 5″ in length and is preferably made of a hollow magnetic material. The outer shell surrounding handle 20 R is preferably made of polyurethane foam. 23 R is a locking mechanism that slides inside hole 25 R attaching handles 20 R to bar 24 R.

In FIG. 1, finger grip 21 R is preferably made of a magnetic material. Its width is preferably 3″ and length preferably 3½″. The outer shell surrounding finger grips 21 R is preferably made of a poly urethan foam. Attached to finger grip 21 R is a resistance mechanism, preferably a resistance spring.

In FIG. 1, 24 R is a bar preferably 10″ in length and width ¾″. Bar 24 R is preferably made of a hollow magnetic material. 26 R is a locking mechanism that slides inside of bar 26 L allowing the connection of bars 24 R and 24 L to lock in place. 25 R is a hole that allows locking mechanism 23 R to lock in place connecting handle 20 R to bar 24 R.

In FIG. 1, 20 L is a handle preferably 5″ in length and 5″ in width and is preferably made of a hollow magnetic material. The outer shell surrounding handle 20 L is preferably made of a polyurethane foam. 23 L is a locking mechanism that slides inside hole 25 L attaching handle 20 L to bar 24 L.

In FIG. 1, 21 L is a finger grip. Preferably made of a magnetic material. Its width is preferably 3″ and length preferably 3½″. The outer shell surrounding finger grip 21 L is preferably made of a polyurethane foam. Attached to finger grip 21 L is a resistance mechanism. Preferably a resistance spring.

In FIG. 1, locking mechanisms 23 R and 23 L fit inside holes 25 R and 25 L connecting and locking handles 20 R and 20 L together. The locking mechanism 26 R fits inside the holes of 26 L connecting bars 24 R and 24 L together.

In FIG. 2, 30 R is a hollow bar preferably 10″ in length and 2″ in width and is preferably made of a magnetic material. 32 R is a locking mechanism that locks inside holes 32 L on bar 30 L connecting the two bars together. 31 R is a hole designed for locking mechanism 23 R (FIG. 1) allowing the connection of bar 30 R to handle 20 R (FIG. 1).

In FIG. 2, 30 L is a hollow bar preferably 10″ in length and 2″ in width and is preferably made of a magnetic material. 32 L are holes allowing locking mechanism 32 R to slide inside and lock in place. 31 L is a hole designed for locking mechanism 23 L (FIG. 1) allowing the connection of bar 30 L to handle 20 L (FIG. 1).

In FIG. 2 locking mechanism 32 R slides inside Bar 30 L locking in place inside the holes of 32, L creating a bar designed for universal weight plates and can be preferably adjusted from 10″ to 20″. Bars 24 R and 24 L (FIG. 1) are designed to fit standard weight plates.

In FIG. 3 it shows five 1′ bars preferably the width is ¾″ when connected together they create a 5′ barbell. 50 L is a hole designed for locking mechanism 23 L (FIG. 1) allowing the attachment of handle 20 L (FIG. 1) to bar 50 L. Holes 44 A attaches to locking mechanism 45 B, holes 45 A attaches to locking mechanism 46 B. Holes 46 A attaches to locking mechanism 47 B. Holes 47 A attaches to locking mechanism 48 B. 50 R is a hole designed for locking mechanisms 23 R (FIG. 1) allowing the attachment of handle 20 R (FIG. 1) to bar 50 R. Bars 40 L, 41, 42, 43 and 40 R are preferably made of a magnetic material and are hollow on the inside.

FIG. 4 shows a bar, length preferably 20″, width 2″ made of magnetic material. This device is preferably one bar with a resistance mechanism inside its hollow frame. Preferably a resistance spring. When 70 R is pushed inside of 70 L the resistance mechanism makes it difficult to do so causing the body to use a considerable amount of strength targeting the chest muscles. 60 R is a hole designed to fit locking mechanism 23 R (FIG. 1) connecting handle 20 R (FIG. 1) to bar 70 R. 60 L is a hole designed to fit locking mechanism 23 L (FIG. 1) connecting handle 20 L (FIG. 1) to bar 70 L. 65 is the resistance mechanism residing inside 70 L.

FIG. 5 shows present invention along with straps and pads. 80 R and 80 L are straps designed to fit around a persons ankles. For a number of different leg exercises. 90 R and 90 L are poly urethane foam pads. Slightly curved to fit a persons thighs, shins and rear ankles during leg exercises. Pads 90 R and 90 L (FIG. 5) can also be used as hand grips when doing many upper body exercises.

FIG. 6 shows a number of different ways in which a body can exercise its major muscle groups.

Operation—FIGS

The overall operation of present invention is to provide the body an effective way of toning major muscle groups with only one portable device, as it is demonstrated in FIG. 6.

In FIG. 1, when handles 20 R and 20 L are held at the upper most section in a overhanded position. Standing up, the body can lift the device to its chest, then bring it back down to its legs, thus targeting the forearm muscle. In FIG. 1 when handles 20 R and 20 L are held by the sides, the fingers gripping and squeezing finger grips 21 R and 21 L the resistance springs attached to finger grips 21 R and 21 L allow for a different muscle of the forearm to be targeted as well as the hands and wrist of the body.

In FIG. 6 H when gripping poly urethane foam pads 90 R and 90 L (FIG. 5), in a underhanded position, the body lifts the device up to its chest, then back down parallel to the abdomen targeting the bicep muscles.

In FIG. 6 I when gripping pads 90 R and 90 L (FIG. 5) in a overhanded position bringing the device from its legs, to a stiffed arm outstretched position parellel to the chest, then back down to the legs. It targets the front delts and upper back muscles.

In FIG. 6 C, while standing straight, the hands of the body are gripping pads 90 R and 90 L (FIG. 5), with only the elbows, then returns the device back above the head targeting the triceps.

In FIG. 6 K when placing one poly urethane foam pad 90 R (FIG. 5) in the middle of bars 24 R and 24 L (FIG. 1) then placing weight plates to the left and right of pad 90 R (FIG. 5), the body bends its back and lifts the device from the floor, until the elbow is parallel with the back. Thus targeting the rear delts.

In FIG. 6 F, in a sitting position, hands gripping pads 90 R and 90 L (FIG. 5) with an underhanded grip, the body bends over with head toward the knees, then back to its original upright sitting position targeting upper abs and biceps.

In FIG. 6 A with the body lying on its back, ankle straps 80 R and 80 L (FIG. 5) are strapped to the ankle of the body, pads 90 R and 90 L (FIG. 5) resting on the shins of the body. The legs will rise off the floor then come back to rest on the floor targeting lower abs.

In FIG. 6 B, the body lying on its stomach, pads 90 R and 90 L (FIG. 5) resting on the rear ankles. Strips 60 R and 60 L (FIG. 4) are strapped around the body's ankles. The body lifts the device from off the floor bending the knees as far as it will go. Targeting the hamstrings or rear thigh muscles.

In FIG. 6 E in a sitting position, pads 90 R and 90 L in (FIG. 5) resting on the thighs and knees of the body, legs outstretched, the body lifts its toes up and down, targeting the calf muscles.

In FIG. 6 D, in a sitting position the body places the present invention, in its dumbell form, on one knee. Pad 90 R (FIG. 5) resting on the knee. Weight plates on the left and right of pad 90 R (FIG. 5). The body lifts its leg upward as far as it can then back to the floor thus targeting the quadriceps or the front thigh muscle.

In FIG. 6 C, while standing straight up, hands gripping pads 90 R and 90 L (FIG. 5), in an overhanded position, the device is parallel to the neck. Then lifting the device back up above the head to its starting position, targeting the back muscle.

In FIG. 6 G, while standing straight, hands gripping pads 90 R and 90 L (FIG. 5) in an underhanded position, the body bends its knees to a squatting position until the thighs are parallel to the floor, then the body stands up with the back straight. Thus targeting the biceps, the buttocks and the upper hamstrings or upper rear thigh muscle.

In FIG. 6 J, while standing straight, hands gripping pads 90 R and 90 L (FIG. 5), the device held in an overhand grip and resting lightly on the thighs, the body lifts only its shoulders up and down thus targeting the trapezius or shoulder muscle.

In FIG. 6 L, the body is shown using resistance bar 70 (FIG. 4). The body, grips handles 20 R and 20 L (FIG. 1) and squeezes handles 20 R and 20 L together. Targeting the pectoral or chest muscles.

Conclusions, Ramifications and Scope of Invention

Thus the reader will see that the present invention provides a highly effective, reliable, compact and portable device that can be utilized by people of almost any age. Even if a person still wanted to visit the gym, the present invention is hollow therefore light weight. Its portability allows for anyone to transport it back and forth to the gym which would solve the problem of waiting in line for a turn on certain popular machines.

While my above description contains many specificities, these should not be construed as limitations on the scope of the invention, but rather as an exemplification of one preferred embodiment thereof. Many other variations are possible. For example, all magnetic material associated with the manufacturing of the present invention, could also be replaced by utilizing materials such as plastic, wood or even fiberglass. The present inventions resistance mechanisms can be manufactured utilizing rubber materials, magnetic materials, bungee cord materials or other forms of elastic. All polyurethane foam associated with the manufacturing of the present invention could also be replaced by utilizing leather, vinyl, rubber, cotton or other types of foam.

Accordingly, the scope of the invention should be determined not by the embodiments illustrated, but by the appended claims and their legal equivalents.

Ommitted from the drawings are adaptors designed to fit inside the 2″ hollow insides of bars 30L, 30 R (FIG. 2) and bars 70 L and 70 R (FIG. 4).

The adaptor for bar 30 L (FIG. 2) is located inside the hollow tip of bar 30 L (FIG. 2) and directly under hole 31 L (FIG. 2). The adaptor for bar 30 R (FIG. 2) is located inside the hollow tip of bar 30 R (FIG. 2) and directly under hole 31 R (FIG. 2). The adaptors for resistance bars 70 L and 70 R (FIG. 4) and directly under holes 60 R and 60 L (FIG. 4).

The purpose for these adaptors are to ensure that they are compatible with the standard size handles 20 L and 20 R (FIG. 1) which have a width of ¾″. The universal size bars 30 R, 30 L (FIG. 2) and universal size bar 70 (FIG. 4) have a 2″ width rendering them incompatible with handles 20 R and 20 L (FIG. 1) without adaptors.

Also omitted from the drawings are two standard size collars and two universal size collars. The collars are needed to keep the weight plates tightly secured in one place on the bar without worrying about the weight plates moving. The two standard size collars fit around bars 24 R and 24 L (FIG. 1). The universal size collars fit around bars 30 R and 30 L (FIG. 2). When the collars are on there perspective bars and tightly in place, the present invention transforms from a single device, into a dual device allowing the body the alternative of a unilateral workout. Bars 24 R and 24 L (FIG. 1) point toward the floor and what used to be the sides of handles 20 R and 20 L (FIG. 1) are now the tops.