Sign up
Title:
Mobile computer security cabinet
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
A mobile computer security cabinet configured to prevent theft of computer equipment and includes a monitor enclosure that contains a computer monitor, allows viewing the monitor without accessing it, and prevents unauthorized entry; a central processing unit (“CPU”) enclosure that contains CPU, printer and other computer related equipment and prevents unauthorized entry; a keyboard enclosure coupled to the monitor and CPU enclosure and prevents unauthorized entry; and a wheel assembly coupled to the CPU enclosure. The keyboard enclosure further includes a drawer, which slides out of the keyboard enclosure and exposes an interior portion of the keyboard enclosure without providing access to the monitor and CPU enclosures.


Inventors:
Goldberg, Mark A. (Lido Beach, NY, US)
Application Number:
11/024117
Publication Date:
06/29/2006
Filing Date:
12/28/2004
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A47B97/00
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:
20090153005CABINET FOR ELECTRONIC DEVICESJune, 2009Sun et al.
20090026900Apparatus for in-wall storage of bathroom implementsJanuary, 2009Destefano
20070176525Foldable toy paper organizerAugust, 2007Yoon
20070120451Medicine cabinetMay, 2007Lamar
20020105253Color interchangeable side panels mounting plugsAugust, 2002Diaz et al.
20030222554Reversible wardrobe sliding door arrangementDecember, 2003Wang
20020017520External locking mechanismFebruary, 2002Smith
20060119234Easy to open refrigeratorJune, 2006Gu et al.
20060290248Table with electric hidden storageDecember, 2006Chandler
20030222551Residential fire extinguisher cabinetDecember, 2003Toussaint
20080001511WALL CABINET ARRANGEMENT WITH A FRAME CONSTRUCTIONJanuary, 2008Amlang et al.
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
GIBBONS, DEL DEO, DOLAN, GRIFFINGER & VECCHIONE (1 RIVERFRONT PLAZA, NEWARK, NJ, 07102-5497, US)
Claims:
What is claimed:

1. A computer security cabinet having a front, a back, sides, a top and a bottom, comprising: a first enclosure having a first interior cavity and a top first door and a top second door enclosing said first interior cavity; a second enclosure having a second interior cavity and a bottom first door and a bottom second door; a middle enclosure spaced between said first and second enclosures and defining a third interior cavity; a channel connecting said first, second and third interior cavities, wherein said channel is defined by a plurality of openings in said first, second and third interior cavities; wherein said first top door further comprises a see-through window; and wherein said third interior cavity further includes a drawer configured to slide out from said third interior cavity.

2. The cabinet of claim 1, wherein said first top door further includes a lock securing said first top door in the front of the cabinet; said second top door further includes a lock securing said second top door in the back of the cabinet; said first bottom door further includes a lock securing said first bottom door in the front said second bottom door further includes a lock securing said second bottom door in the back of the cabinet.

3. The cabinet of claim 1, further comprising at least one wheel assembly attached to the bottom of the cabinet, wherein said at least one wheel assembly is configured to assist in moving the cabinet.

4. The cabinet of claim 1, further comprising air circulation openings in the sides of the cabinet.

5. The cabinet of claim 1, wherein said see-through window is configured to prevent access to said first interior cavity when said first top door is locked.

6. The cabinet of claim 1, wherein said first interior cavity is configured to hold a computer monitor and wherein said computer monitor is viewable through said see-through window.

7. The cabinet of claim 1, wherein said second interior cavity is configured to hold a computer's central processing unit.

8. The cabinet of claim 1, wherein said third interior cavity is configured to hold a computer keyboard.

9. The cabinet of claim 1, wherein said drawer further comprises a lock configured to lock said drawer to the cabinet.

10. The cabinet of claim 1, wherein said first enclosure further comprises two top first doors.

11. The cabinet of claim 1, wherein said top second door and said bottom second door further comprise a single door in the back of the cabinet.

12. The cabinet of claim 1, wherein said second enclosure further comprises two bottom first doors.

13. The cabinet of claim 1, said second enclosure further comprises two bottom second doors.

14. A computer security cabinet having a front, back, sides, top and a bottom, comprising: a first enclosure including a top first door; a second enclosure including a bottom first door; a middle enclosure spaced between said first enclosure and said second enclosure; a second door; wherein said first enclosure includes a first interior cavity; said top first door and said second door enclose said first interior cavity; wherein said second enclosure includes a second interior cavity; said bottom first door and said second door enclose said second interior cavity; wherein said middle enclosure includes a third interior cavity that further includes a drawer configured to slide out from said third interior cavity; said second door encloses said third interior cavity in the back of the cabinet; a channel connecting said first, second and third interior cavities, wherein said channel is defined by a plurality of openings in said first, second and third interior cavities; and wherein said first top door further comprises a see-through window.

15. The cabinet of claim 14, wherein said first top door further includes a lock securing said first top door in the front of the cabinet; said first bottom door further includes a lock securing said first bottom door in the front of the cabinet; and said second door further includes a lock securing said second door in the back of the cabinet.

16. The cabinet of claim 14, further comprising at least one wheel assembly attached to the bottom of the cabinet, wherein said at least one wheel assembly is configured to assist in moving the cabinet.

17. The cabinet of claim 14, further comprising air circulation openings in the sides of the cabinet.

18. The cabinet of claim 14, wherein said see-through window is configured to prevent access to said first interior cavity when said first top door is locked.

19. The cabinet of claim 14, wherein said first interior cavity is configured to hold a computer monitor and wherein said computer monitor is viewable through said see-through window.

20. The cabinet of claim 14, wherein said second interior cavity is configured to hold a computer's central processing unit.

21. The cabinet of claim 14, wherein said third interior cavity is configured to hold a computer keyboard.

22. The cabinet of claim 14, wherein said drawer further comprises a lock configured to lock said drawer to the cabinet.

23. A computer security cabinet, having a front and a back, configured to prevent theft of computer equipment, comprising: a monitor enclosure having a first door and a second door and configured to contain computer monitor equipment; wherein said first door further comprises a see-through window to allow viewing of the computer monitor equipment without accessing said computer monitor equipment; a central processing unit (“CPU”) enclosure having a third door and a fourth door and configured to contain computer related equipment; a keyboard enclosure spaced between said monitor enclosure and said CPU enclosure; a channel defined by a plurality of openings in said monitor enclosure, said CPU enclosure, and said keyboard enclosure and configured to interconnect said monitor enclosure, said CPU enclosure, and said keyboard enclosure; wherein said keyboard enclosure further comprises a drawer configured to slide out from said keyboard enclosure and expose an interior portion of said keyboard enclosure without providing access to said monitor enclosure and said CPU enclosure.

24. The cabinet of claim 23, wherein said first door further includes a lock securing said first door in the front of the cabinet; said second door further includes a lock securing said second door in the back of the cabinet; said third door further includes a lock securing said third door in the front of the cabinet; and said fourth door further includes a lock securing said fourth door in the back of the cabinet.

25. The cabinet of claim 23, further comprising at least one wheel assembly attached to the bottom of the cabinet, wherein said at least one wheel assembly is configured to assist in moving the cabinet.

26. The cabinet of claim 23, further comprising air circulation openings in the sides of the cabinet.

27. The cabinet of claim 23, wherein said see-through window is configured to prevent access to said monitor enclosure when said first door is locked.

28. The cabinet of claim 23, wherein said drawer further comprises a lock configured to lock said drawer to the cabinet.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention generally relates to a field of theft prevention of office equipment. Specifically, the present invention relates to a mobile computer security cabinet that is designed to prevent theft of computers or components of computers.

In today's world, computers are an essential part of almost every business. Computers control, manage, operate, and assist individuals in many different tasks. For example, computers assist in generating a marketing analysis, monitoring readout signals, displaying results of analysis, allowing individuals to modify operations of other machines. A lot of times, computers are left unattended by their operators and are subject to theft. Theft may happen anywhere, including, offices, factories, homes, and other facilities. For example, a computer, controlling or monitoring operation of a conveyer belt on a factory floor, may be subject to being stolen by an unauthorized intruder. Theft results in additional expenditures in connection with replacement of the computer equipment. More importantly, computer theft often results in a loss of valuable data that may be difficult or impossible to replace.

Current computer security systems are designed to tie computer components to a wall, a floor, or other immovable object. However, such systems can be easily circumvented. Further, computer equipment can be vandalized. Other security systems provide safe-like systems, where the entire computer equipment is locked away. Even though this prevents theft it also denies any access to the equipment until locked.

Therefore, there is a need for a mobile computer security system capable of providing mobility yet substantially total security for the computer equipment, allowing partial view of the equipment and partial access to the equipment when necessary. The present invention provides a solution to the above problem.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates to a mobile computer security cabinet designed to prevent full access to computer equipment contained in its interior portion. At the same time, the cabinet allows authorized partial and/or total access from its front and/or back. The cabinet also allows monitoring of the computer equipment without accessing it. Further, the computer cabinet provides mobility for the computer equipment.

In an embodiment, the mobile computer security cabinet includes a monitor enclosure configured to contain monitor computer equipment and having doors in the front and back of the cabinet. The cabinet also includes a central processing unit (“CPU”) or a computer equipment enclosure configured to contain a CPU, a printer and other computer related equipment. The enclosure also includes doors in the front and back of the cabinet. The cabinet also includes a keyboard and/or mouse enclosure spaced between the monitor enclosure and the CPU enclosure. The keyboard enclosure further includes a drawer, which slides out of the keyboard enclosure and exposes its interior portion without providing access to the monitor and the CPU enclosures. The monitor enclosure further includes a see-through window placed in its front door to allow a user to view the monitor without opening the door. The three enclosures communicate with each other through a channel. The channel is composed of a plurality of openings made in the enclosures. Wires connecting the computer equipment can pass through the channel. The cabinet also includes at least one wheel assembly coupled to the CPU enclosure, hence, providing mobility to the cabinet.

Further features and advantages of the invention, as well as structure and operation of various embodiments of the invention, are disclosed in detail below will reference to the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

The present invention is described with reference to the accompanying drawings. In the drawings, like reference numbers indicate identical or functionally similar elements. Additionally, the left-most digit(s) of a reference number identifies the drawing in which the reference number first appears.

FIG. 1 is a front view of an exemplary mobile computer security cabinet, according to the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a rear view of an exemplary mobile computer security cabinet, according to the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a side view of an exemplary mobile computer security cabinet, according to the present invention.

FIG. 4 is a rear view of another exemplary mobile computer security cabinet, according to the present invention.

FIG. 5 is a front view of an exemplary mobile computer security cabinet exposing an interior portion of the cabinet's top enclosure, according to the present invention.

FIG. 6 is a front view of an exemplary mobile computer security cabinet exposing an interior portion of the cabinet's bottom enclosure, according to the present invention.

FIG. 7 is a top view of an exemplary mobile computer security cabinet exposing an interior portion of the cabinet's middle enclosure, according to the present invention.

FIG. 8 is a front view of another exemplary mobile computer security cabinet, according to the present invention.

FIG. 9 is a front view of yet another exemplary mobile computer security cabinet, according to the present invention.

FIG. 10 illustrates an exemplary embodiment of the mobile computer security cabinet, according to the present invention.

FIG. 11 illustrates another exemplary embodiment of the mobile computer security cabinet exposing an interior portion of the cabinet's middle enclosure, according to the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is a mobile computer security cabinet. The computer cabinet includes three enclosures. The enclosures accommodate a computer or other computer related equipment and paraphernalia. A first enclosure accommodates a monitor. A second enclosure accommodates keyboard and a mouse. A third enclosure accommodates a central processing unit, printer, computer manuals, and other things. The second enclosure is spaced between the first and the third enclosures. The three enclosures communicate with each other using a channel composed of a plurality of openings made in interior portions of the three enclosures. Wires connecting the computer equipment can be placed in the channel. Such arrangement provides greater security to the computer equipment placed in the cabinet. In an alternate embodiment, the enclosures can be designed so that one enclosure can be accessed through another. This arrangement provides lesser security and may be suitable for locations where maximum security of computer equipment is not absolutely necessary.

The first and third enclosures include doors in the front and back of the cabinet. The doors are attached to the cabinet using hinges, clips, or other methods. Locks are placed on the doors to further secured them to the cabinet. The locks can be placed anywhere on the doors and the cabinet. When the doors are locked, the access to the interior portion of the cabinet is restricted.

The front door of the first enclosures includes a see-through window. The see-through window allows a user to view the monitor's screen.

The second enclosure includes a drawer that slides out. The drawer accommodates the keyboard and mouse. The drawer can be locked to the cabinet using a lock.

The computer cabinet can be manufactured from steel, metal, plastic, or any other material that can provide enough security to substantially prevent theft of computer components contained inside. In an embodiment, the computer cabinet can be manufactured from heavy steel or other metal to prevent it from being easily rolled away by unauthorized persons. The front's see-through window can be manufactured from thick plastic, glass, or other material. It allows a user to observe the monitor's screen and prevents breaking the glass to steal or damage the monitor. FIGS. 1-11 describe the present invention in more detail. However, it should be understood by one having ordinary skill in the relevant art, the present invention is not limited to the embodiments shown.

FIG. 1 is a front view of an exemplary embodiment of a mobile computer security cabinet 100. The cabinet 100 includes an outer shell 130 that encloses a top enclosure 102, a middle enclosure 104, a bottom enclosure 106, and at least one wheels assembly 108. The middle enclosure 104 is coupled or spaced between the top enclosure 102 and the bottom enclosure 106. Further, at least one wheels assembly 108 is coupled to the bottom enclosure 106.

The cabinet 100 further includes a top 111, a bottom 113, a first side 115, a second side 117, and a front 119. The top 111, a portion of the first side 115, a portion of the second side 117 and a portion of the front 119 enclose the top enclosure 102. The bottom 113, a further portion of the first side 115, further portion of the second side 117, and further portion of the front 119 enclose the bottom enclosure 106. The middle enclosure 104 is enclosed by a yet further portion of the front 119, yet further portion of the first side 115, yet further portion of the second side 117, the top enclosure 102 and the bottom enclosure 106.

The wheels assembly 108 is attached to the bottom 113 of the cabinet 100, as shown in FIG. 1. The wheels assembly 108 can include a wheel holder attached to the bottom 113, a wheel rod attached to the wheel holder, and a wheel secured to the wheel holder and the wheel rod. As can be understood by one having ordinary skill in the relevant art, other configurations of the wheel assembly 108 are possible.

The top enclosure 102 further includes a top door 110. The top door 110 further includes a window 122 and a locking mechanism 116. As shown in FIG. 1, the top door 110 is coupled to the second side 117 and has the locking mechanism 116 interacting with a locking mechanism attached to the first side 115 (not shown in FIG. 1). In an embodiment, the top door 110 is hinged to the second side 117. As can be understood by one having ordinary skill in the relevant art, other ways of coupling the top door 110 to the second side 117 are possible.

The window 122 is placed in a center portion of the top door 110. It is sized so that when a computer monitor is placed in an interior cavity of the top enclosure 102, the monitor's screen is visible through the window 122. The window 122 may be manufactured from a break-resistant glass, bullet proof glass or any other material capable of providing any level of security.

The bottom enclosure 106 includes a bottom door 114 and a locking mechanism 118. The bottom door 114 is coupled to the second side 117 and has the locking mechanism 118 interacting with a locking mechanism attached to the first side 115 (not shown in FIG. 1). In an embodiment, the bottom door 114 is hinged to the second side 117. As can be understood by one having ordinary skill in the relevant art, other ways of coupling the bottom door 110 to the second side 117 are possible.

The middle enclosure 104 includes a middle door 112 and a locking mechanism 120. The middle door 112 is sized to fit between the top door 110 and the bottom door 114. In an embodiment, the middle door 112 can be attached to a drawer that fits inside the middle enclosure 104. In an alternate embodiment, the middle door 112 is hinged to the one of the first or second sides 115, 117, respectively. As shown in FIG. 1, the locking mechanism 120 is placed in a center portion of the middle door 112. The locking mechanism 120 interacts with a locking mechanism attached to the interior of the middle enclosure 104. In an alternate embodiment, the locking mechanism 120 can be attached to the first or second sides 115, 117, respectively.

FIG. 2 is a rear view of the mobile computer security cabinet 100 shown in FIG. 1. In addition to the top 111, the bottom 113, the first side 115, the second side 117, and the front 119 (not shown in FIG. 2), the cabinet 100 includes a back 221. As shown in FIG. 2, the back 221 is enclosed by the top 111, the bottom 113 and the first and second sides 115, 117. The back 221 further includes the back top door 225 and the back bottom door 231.

The back top door 225 further includes a locking mechanism 227. In an embodiment, the back top door 225 hinges to the first side 115 of the cabinet 100. Then, the locking mechanism 227 interacts with a corresponding locking mechanism located in the interior portion of the top 102 and attached to the second side 117.

In an embodiment, the middle portion 104 is sealed off in the back 221, as shown in FIG. 2. This prevents any access to the interior of the middle enclosure 104 from the back 221. In an alternate embodiment, a door may be attached allowing access to the interior of the middle enclosure 104.

Similar to the back top door 225, the back bottom door 231 is hinged to the first side 115 of the cabinet 100. The back bottom door 231 further includes a locking mechanism 229. In an embodiment, the locking mechanism 229 interacts with a corresponding locking mechanism attached to the second side 117 in the interior of the bottom 106.

The back 221 of the cabinet 100 further includes wheel assemblies 108(c, d). In an embodiment, the wheel assemblies 108 can be stationary support structures, thus, preventing roll of the cabinet.

FIG. 3 is a side view of the mobile computer security cabinet 100 having the top front door 110 and the middle section 112 open. FIG. 3 illustrates second side 117 of the computer cabinet 100. In an embodiment, the second side 117 includes top air openings 304 located in the top enclosure 102 and bottom air openings 306 located in the bottom enclosure 106. These openings allow air circulation inside the cabinet 100 and cool off the computer components placed inside. The first side 115 can include similar air openings (not shown in FIG. 3).

The middle enclosure 104 includes a drawer 302. The drawer 302 slides out of an interior portion 310 of the middle enclosure 104. The drawer 302 can use conventional sliding mechanisms used for drawers of this type. The interior portion 310 is shown in dashed lines in FIG. 3.

FIG. 3 illustrates a channel 381 (shown by the dashed lines) that is defined by openings 361 and 362. The opening 361 is made in the top enclosure 102's bottom and the middle enclosure 104's top. The opening 362 is made in the middle enclosure 104's bottom and the bottom enclosure 106's top. Other openings can be made in the enclosures. The channel 381 along with the openings 261 accommodates computer wires connecting computer equipment contained within the cabinet. As can be understood by one having ordinary skill in the art, the openings can have different shapes, sizes and locations. The channel 361 can extend to the bottom of the bottom enclosure 106. As shown in FIG. 3, the bottom enclosure 106 can include another opening 363 made in the bottom 113. As can be understood by one having ordinary skill in the art, the opening 363 can have a different size, shape, and location.

In an embodiment, the drawer 302 can be partial length of the middle enclosure 104 (as shown in FIG. 3 by the dashed lines 371). In an alternate embodiment, drawer 302 can be a full length of the middle enclosure 104.

FIG. 4 is back view of a mobile computer security cabinet 400, according to another embodiment of the present invention. The cabinet 400 includes back 421 that is coupled to the top 111, bottom 113, and first and second sides 115, 117, respectively. The back 421 further includes a back door 401 having a locking mechanism 402. Similarly to the embodiments shown in FIGS. 1-3, the back door 401 hinges to the first side 115. The locking mechanism 402 interacts with a locking mechanism (not shown in FIG. 4) attached to the second side 117 in the interior portion of the cabinet 100.

FIG. 5 illustrates the front 119 of the mobile computer security cabinet, with the top front door 110 open. FIG. 5 further illustrates computer 501 being placed in an interior cavity 510 of the top enclosure 102. In an embodiment, the computer 501 (or just a computer monitor) can be placed on a shelf, contained within the interior portion 510 of the computer cabinet 100. The shelf can be stationary or configured to slide out of the cabinet top enclosure's interior cavity 510. In an alternate embodiment, the computer 501 can be placed on a divider 520 that divides the top enclosure 102 and the middle enclosure 104. The interior portion 510 is defined by the top 111, portions of first and second side 115, 117, respectively, a portion of the back 221 (not shown) and top of the middle enclosure of the 104.

The door 110 is coupled to the first side 115 using two hinges 503 and 505. As can be understood by one having ordinary skill in the relevant art at least one hinge can be used to attach the door 110 to the first side 115. The door 110 also includes a locking mechanism 516, which interacts with a locking mechanism 507 coupled to the second side 117. In an embodiment, the locking mechanisms 507 and 516 can be a male and a female part of a single lock. A key would be used to secure the two locking mechanisms together to lock the top enclosure 102. As can be understood by one having ordinary skill in the relevant art, the locking mechanisms 507 and 516 can be oppositely charged magnets, electronic locks, combination safe locks, or any other locking structures capable of preventing unauthorized access to the interior portion 510 of the top enclosure 102 when locked.

Further, the locking mechanisms 507 and 516 can be attached to the first side 115 or the top 111 or the section where the middle enclosure 104 contacts the top enclosure 102. The hinges 503 and 505 can be attached in a similar fashion.

FIG. 10 illustrates an alternate embodiment of the computer cabinet 100 having the door 110 attached to the top enclosure 102 using a sliding mechanism 1010. The door 110 slides in and out of the interior of the top enclosure 102. As can be understood by one having ordinary skill in the relevant art, the sliding mechanism 1010 can be attached to the top 111, sides 115 and 117, and at the junction of the top enclosure 102 and middle enclosure 104. FIG. 10 illustrates the sliding mechanism 1010 attached to the top 111.

FIG. 10 illustrates the top enclosure 102 of the mobile computer security 100. The top portion includes the sliding mechanism 1010, which further includes door 110 attachment hinges 1012(a, b), rollers 1014(a, b, c, d), and rails 1016(a, b). The door 110 attachment hinges 1012(a, b), rollers 1014(a, b, c, d), and rails 1016(a, b) are attached adjacent the top 111 and in the interior of the top enclosure 102 of the computer cabinet 100. As can be understood by one having ordinary skill in the relevant art the door 110 attachment hinges 1012(a, b), rollers 1014(a, b, c, d), and rails 1016(a, b) can be attached adjacent sides 115, 117 or the junction of the top and middle enclosures 102, 104, respectively. Further, the door 110 attachment hinges 1012(a, b), rollers 1014(a, b, c, d), and rails 1016(a, b) can be attached outside the interior of the top enclosure 102 and adjacent either top 111, side 115, side 117, or junction of the top and middle enclosures.

To open the door 110 and expose the interior of the top enclosure 102, a user pulls the bottom of the door 110 in an upward direction (or downward, or rightward, or leftward, depending on the arrangement of the sliding mechanism 1010), as shown in the upper portion of FIG. 10. Then, the user slides the door 110 on the rollers 1016(a, b, c, d) to place the door on rails 1014(a, b). The door 110 can have sliding mechanisms that can mate with the rollers 1016 and rails 1014 to allow the door 110 smoothly slide inside the interior of the top enclosure 102. The user then can push the door 110 into the interior of the top enclosure 102, so that the door 110 is substantially parallel to the top 111, as illustrated in the bottom portion of FIG. 10.

To remove the door from, the user repeats the above steps in reverse. In other words, the user pulls on the door 110 to slide it out of the interior of the top enclosure 102 and lower it to close the interior. As can be understood by one having ordinary skill in the relevant art, the door 110 can be a single piece panel, as shown in FIGS. 1-10, or it can be composed of several sections to assist in placement of the door inside the interior of the top compartment 102. Further, similar mechanisms can be arranged for the back of the top enclosure 102, as well as, the bottom enclosure 106's front and back. Also, the sliding mechanism 101 can be substituted with any other conventional mechanism.

FIG. 6 is a front view of the mobile computer security cabinet 100 with a bottom front door 114 being open. When the door 114 is open, an interior portion 610 of the bottom enclosure 106 is exposed. The interior portion 610 is defined by the portions of first and second sides 115, 117, respectively, the bottom 113, a portion of the back 221 (not shown) and a bottom portion of the middle enclosure 104.

FIG. 6 further illustrates computer components 601 being placed in the interior cavity 610 of the bottom enclosure 106. In an embodiment, the computer components 601 are placed on a shelf 621, contained within the interior portion 610 of the computer cabinet 100. In an alternate embodiment, the computer components 601 can be placed on a slidable shelf (not shown). In an embodiment, the shelf slides out from the interior portion 610, when the door 114 is open.

The door 114 is coupled to the first side 115 using hinges 623 and 625. As can be understood by one having ordinary skill in the relevant art at least one hinge can be used to attach the door 114 to the first side 115. The door 114 also includes a locking mechanism 618, which interacts with a locking mechanism 620 coupled to the second side 117. In an embodiment, the locking mechanisms 618 and 620 can be a male and a female part of a single lock. A key would be used to secure the two locking mechanisms together to lock the bottom enclosure 106. As can be understood by one having ordinary skill in the relevant art, the locking mechanisms 618 and 620 can be oppositely charged magnets, electronic locks, combination safe locks, or any other locking mechanisms capable of preventing unauthorized access to the interior portion 610 of the bottom enclosure 106, when locked.

Further, the locking mechanisms 618 and 620 can be attached to the first side 115 or the bottom 113 or the section where the middle enclosure 104 contacts the bottom enclosure 106. The hinges 623 and 625 can be attached in a similar fashion.

FIG. 7 is a top view of the computer cabinet 100 that illustrates the drawer 302 being open and exposing interior portion 701 of the middle enclosure 104. As stated above, the middle enclosure 104 contains a keyboard 710 and/or a mouse (mouse is not shown in FIG. 7). The keyboard 710 is placed on a bottom 703 of the drawer's 302's interior portion 701. The drawer 302 further includes a first locking mechanism 740 that interacts with a second locking mechanism 750 coupled to the interior 310 (not shown in FIG. 7, but refer to FIG. 3 for illustration) of the middle enclosure 104.

Similarly to the top and bottom enclosures 102, 106, in an embodiment, the locking mechanisms 740 and 750 can be a male and a female part of a single lock. A key would be used to secure the two locking mechanisms together to lock the middle enclosure 104. As can be understood by one having ordinary skill in the relevant art, the locking mechanisms 740 and 750 can be oppositely charged magnets, electronic locks, combination safe locks, or any other locking structures capable of preventing unauthorized access to the interior portion 310 of the middle enclosure 104 when locked.

FIG. 11 illustrates an alternate embodiment of the interior of the middle enclosure 104. The interior of the middle enclosure 104 can include a keyboard tray 1110 and a mouse tray 1120. The keyboard tray 1110 can be used for placement of keyboard 710. The mouse tray 1120 can be used for placement of a mouse 1122. The trays 1110 and 1120 can be attached anywhere in the interior 701 of the middle enclosure 104, including sides and bottom of the enclosure 104. Further, the trays can be elevated or placed on top of the bottom of the enclosure. In an embodiment, the mouse tray 1120 can be placed to the left of the keyboard tray 1110. As can be understood by one having ordinary skill in the relevant art, other trays can be placed in the interior 701 of the middle enclosure 104.

FIG. 8 is another exemplary embodiment of a mobile computer security cabinet 800. The cabinet 800 is capable of accommodating two computers. The cabinet 800 includes a top 811, a bottom 813, a front 819, a first side 815, a second side 817, and a back (not shown in FIG. 8). The top 811, bottom 813, front 819, back, and the first and second sides 813, 815 form a top enclosure 802, a middle enclosure 804, and a bottom enclosure 806. The middle enclosure 804 is spaced between the top enclosure 802 and the bottom enclosure 806. The cabinet 800 also includes a set of wheel assemblies 808 coupled to the bottom 813.

The top enclosure 802 includes two interior portions subdivided by a top plate 831. Similarly, the bottom enclosure 806 includes two interior portions subdivided by a bottom plate 832. In an embodiment, the middle enclosure 804 also can be subdivided by a plate. However, FIG. 8 illustrates an undivided middle enclosure 804. Yet, in an alternate embodiment, the top enclosure 802 can have an undivided interior portion. Similarly, the bottom enclosure 804 can have an undivided interior portion as well.

The front portion of the top enclosure 802 includes two top front doors 810a and 810b covering the two sections of the top enclosure 802. Each top front door 810(a, b) includes a corresponding locking mechanism 816(a, b) and a corresponding window 822(a, b).

Similar to the embodiments shown in FIGS. 1-9, the middle enclosure 802 includes a locking mechanism 820. The locking mechanism 820 interacts with a corresponding locking mechanism coupled to the interior of the middle enclosure 802 (not shown in FIG. 8).

The front portion of the bottom enclosure 806 includes two bottom front doors 814a and 814b covering the two sections of the bottom enclosure 806. Each bottom front door 814(a, b) includes a corresponding locking mechanism 818(a, b).

The cabinet 800 can also include a channel or channels similar to the channel 361, shown in FIG. 3. The channel(s) includes a plurality of openings made in the top enclosure 802, middle enclosure 804, and bottom enclosure 806. The openings allow wires, connecting the computer equipment, to pass through them between the enclosures. The channel(s) can extend to the bottom of the bottom enclosure 806, i.e., an opening can be made in the bottom enclosure's bottom to accommodate wires going outside the cabinet 800.

FIG. 9 shows yet another embodiment of the computer security cabinet 900. The computer cabinet 900 is similar to the computer cabinet 100 with the exception of the bottom enclosure 106's doors. The bottom enclosure 106 of the cabinet 900 includes two bottom doors 951 and 952. The doors are separated by a divider 960. The doors 951 and 952 further include locking mechanisms 955 and 956, respectively. The locking mechanisms 955 and 956 interact with respective locking mechanisms attached to the divider 960 in the interior portion of the bottom enclosure 106.

As can be understood by one having ordinary skill in the relevant art, other arrangements of doors 951 and 952 are possible. Further any number of doors can be used in the top, bottom and/or middle enclosures whether in the front or the back of the mobile computer security cabinet. Further, the computer cabinet is not limited to the size and shape shown in FIGS. 1-9.

In order to place computer equipment into the cabinet, the user would access the cabinet from the front. A front door in the top enclosure would be opened (and unlocked, if previously locked) and a monitor and/or CPU would be placed. Wires from the monitor and/or CPU would be running in the back of the monitor and/or CPU. The drawer in the middle enclosure can be slid out to expose the interior cavity and a keyboard/mouse would be placed in it. The wires from the keyboard/mouse would run in the back. A front door of the bottom enclosure would be opened and various computer equipment would be placed inside.

A user would then access the interior cavities of the enclosures from the back by opening the back doors of the cabinet and connecting the computer equipment. Then, the cabinet doors would be locked. The middle enclosure's drawer can also be locked, thus, preventing access to the keyboard. However, the drawer can remain open if entry of date is desired.

The above computer equipment can be placed into the cabinet at a first location. Then, the cabinet can be rolled to a second location and connected to other equipment. A user can observe the monitor of the computer equipment through the see-through window placed in the top enclosure.

Example embodiments of the methods, and components of the present invention have been described herein. As noted elsewhere, these example embodiments have been described for illustrative purposes only, and are not limiting. Other embodiments are possible and are covered by the invention. Such embodiments will be apparent to persons skilled in the relevant art(s) based on the teachings contained herein. Thus, the breadth and scope of the present invention should not be limited by any of the above-described exemplary embodiments, but should be defined only in accordance with the following claims and their equivalents.