Title:
Multi-use earth auger
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
An earth auger has a central shaft with proximal and distal ends. Spiral earth-engaging flights are mounted on the distal end and a fitting is formed on the proximal end for engagement by an electric drill to enable rotation of the auger to bore into the earth. A ring is formed in the shaft adjacent the fitting and has an aperture for receiving a rope or other securement device. This versatile augur can be used to drill holes, till earth, or serve as a tent or pet tether or as a plant stake.



Inventors:
Tuller, David B. (Columbus, OH, US)
Application Number:
11/290716
Publication Date:
06/01/2006
Filing Date:
11/30/2005
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
175/323
International Classes:
E21B10/44
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
COY, NICOLE A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
DAVID A. GREENLEE (P.O. BOX 340557, COLUMBUS, OH, 43234, US)
Claims:
1. An earth auger comprising a central shaft having proximal and distal ends, a plurality of spiral earth-engaging flights mounted on the distal end, a fitting formed on the proximal end for engagement by a twisting device to enable rotation of the auger to bore into the earth, and a ring formed in the shaft adjacent the fitting, the ring having an aperture for receiving a securement device.

2. The earth auger of claim 1, wherein the fitting is configured for attachment to an electric drill.

3. The earth auger of claim 1, wherein the flights have a maximum diameter of 1.5 inches.

4. The earth auger of claim 1, wherein the ring aperture center is located on the centerline of the shaft.

5. The earth auger of claim 1, wherein the shaft and ring have the same cross-sectional area.

6. The earth auger of claim 1 wherein the auger is made of steel.

7. The earth auger of claim 1, wherein the auger is made of plastic.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

This invention relates to earth augers and, more particularly, to an earth augur that is configured to have multiple uses.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Earth augers, or anchors, have long been used to burrow into the earth (dirt or sand) to tether, mount or support many objects, including tents, animals on a leash, beach umbrellas, plants, and trees, and have been used as stakes to secure plastic or other sheeting on the ground. Augers have also been used for earth excavation, bulb planting, post hole digging and myriad other tasks.

These augers usually have several common physical characteristics, including a central solid or hollow shaft which mounts a helical flight on one end that functions to auger into the earth when the shaft is rotated. The other end of the shaft can mount, or be configured for connection to, a manual handle or lever or power means to rotate the shaft to screw the auger into the earth.

Examples of such earth augers are disclosed in the following U.S. Pat. No. 3,903,626—Ford; U.S. Pat. No. 4,796,566—Daniels: U.S. Pat. No. 5,088,681—Procaccianti et al; U.S. Pat. No. 6,361,861—Leichter; U.S. Pat. No. 6,675,918—Chou; and U.S. Pat. No. 6,702,239—Boucher. Other augers include or are adapted to mount a ring or hook on the exposed end of the auger, for attaching a securement device, such as a line, cable, rope or chain. Examples of these augers are disclosed in these U.S. Pat. No. 930,792—Perry; U.S. Pat. No. 4,702,047—Stokes; U.S. Pat. No. 5,662,304—McDaniel; and U.S. Pat. No. 6,370,827—Chalich. Those augers with must use a lever or detachable handle to manually insert them into the ground.

It would be desirable to provide an earth auger that includes an integral ring and can be driven by a power appliance, such as a drill.

It would be further desirable to provide an earth auger that is configured for multiple uses.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is therefore an object of this invention to provide an earth auger that includes an integral ring and can be driven by a power appliance, such as a drill.

It is another object of this invention to provide an earth auger that is configured for multiple uses.

In one aspect this invention features an earth auger that has a central shaft that mounts an earth-engaging flight on one end and a fitting for attachment by a twisting device to enable rotation of the auger. A ring is formed integrally with the shaft adjacent the fitting to enable attachment to a securement device.

In another aspect this invention features such an auger in which the fitting is configured for attachment to a common electric drill.

These and other objects and features of this invention will become more readily apparent upon reference to the following detailed description of a preferred embodiment, as illustrated in the accompanying drawings, in which:

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

The single FIGURE is a plan view of an earth auger according to this invention.

DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

The FIGURE depicts an earth auger, or anchor, 10 that has a central shaft 12. At its distal end 14, shaft 12 is pointed, and a plurality of flights 16 spiral part way up shaft 12, beginning just above pointed distal end 14.

The other, or proximal end 18 of shaft 12 is faceted or otherwise formed to be received in the end of, and be driven by, any common electric drill. It may also be adapted for attachment to a manual lever for rotation. An attachment ring 20 is carried by shaft 12 adjacent proximal end 18. Ring 20 has a central aperture 22 that has a center c preferably located along the axis x-x of shaft 12. Ring 20 and aperture 22 are sized for receiving any conventional securement device, such as a rope, cable, hook, chain or line.

In operation, for use as an anchor, auger 10 proximal end 18 is inserted into an electric drill, which is operated to rotate shaft 12 and drive auger 10 into the earth any desired distance. The drill is then removed and a rope or guy wire is inserted through aperture 22 to secure a tree, tent or other device. Another use is to dig a hole for inserting plan bulbs or posts by boring into the earth and then lifting auger 10 when a desired depth is reached.

Auger 10 can also be used to till soil by manually reciprocating it and moving laterally as it is rotated. Another use for this auger 10 is as a paint or other liquid mixer by inserting the rotating auger into the mixture and allowing it to churn as in the manner of a kitchen mixer. Dry materials, such as cement, sand and gravel can also be mixed, by moving it laterally through the materials being mixed to obtain a homogeneous dry concrete mix.

Although designed primarily to be driven by an electric drill, auger 10 can be manually driven if a drill is not available. Auger 10 can easily be manually driven by inserting a lever through aperture 22 and twisting the auger to drive it into the earth or remove it. These multiple uses add to the versatility of the earth auger of this invention, enabled by its unique construction.

In its preferred embodiment, shaft 12 is cylindrical, ring 20 has the same cross-sectional area as shaft 12 and is formed integrally therewith, although it can be welded onto shaft 12. The preferred material is steel, with a painted or other anti-rust coating or plating, such as galvanized. Alternatively, auger 10 can be made of a durable plastic.

While only a preferred embodiment has been described and shown, obvious modifications are contemplated within the scope of this invention, as defined by the following claims.