Title:
Miniature comic book kit
Kind Code:
A1
Abstract:
An educational kit for children to encourage reading through the play value of the kit and which may also improve hand-eye coordination. The kit includes a miniature comic book having very small printing, a magnifying lens which facilitates the reading of the small printing, a stand and a case for the comic book. The kit may also include a mirror for reading backwards text printed on the comic book, micro stickers and micro trading cards.


Inventors:
Fromm, Wayne G. (Toronto, CA)
Application Number:
10/984242
Publication Date:
05/11/2006
Filing Date:
11/09/2004
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
206/223
International Classes:
B65D71/00
View Patent Images:
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Attorney, Agent or Firm:
John, Thompson C. (69 Grayton Road, Tonawanda, NY, 14150, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A miniature comic book kit comprising: a magnifying lens; and a miniature comic book containing artwork and stories, the stories being printed in such a small text size that it would be difficult to read by a child without the use of a magnifying lens.

2. The miniature comic book kit as set forth in claim 1 wherein the magnifying lens has a shaped handle which corresponds to a character depicted in the artwork of the comic book.

3. The miniature comic book kit as set forth in claim 1 wherein the comic book has a size of about 1.5 inches by 1 inch.

4. The miniature comic book kit as set forth in claim 1 wherein the text is printed in a size of 4 point or less.

5. The miniature comic book kit as set forth in claim 1 wherein the kit further includes a stand or base for the receipt of the comic book to facilitate its reading.

6. The miniature comic book kit as set forth in claim 1 wherein the kit further includes a small plastic case for carrying the comic book, the case being provided with a flip-up top.

7. The miniature comic book kit as set forth in claim 1 wherein the flip-up top is transparent.

8. The miniature comic book kit as set forth in claim 7 wherein the kit further includes a stand or base for the receipt of the small plastic case so that the comic book can be displayed.

9. The miniature comic book kit as set forth in claim 1 wherein the text is printed backwards, and wherein the kit further includes a mirror to facilitate the reading of the backwards text.

10. The miniature comic book kit as set forth in claim 1 wherein the kit further includes micro trading cards and micro stickers.

Description:

TECHNICAL FIELD

The present invention relates to an educational kit for children, and more particularly to a miniature comic book kit which encourages reading through the play value of the kit.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Comic books are well known, but as a general rule they are printed in at least 12 point text. There is no inherent play value in a comic book per se.

It is also well know that small text can be produced which requires the use of a magnifying lens or glass. Thus, it has been reported that biblical passages have been engraved on the head of a pin, which required the use of a magnifying glass to read them. However, such an item was not designed for children to use.

It is also believed that Cracker Jacks™ used to offer mini books. However, a magnifier was not provided nor required.

Marvel Comics™ has had free mini-comic book inserts in cereals, etc. as premiums. One measured 2.25 inches by 3.5 inches and was called “Marvel Mini Comic Book Keychain Ultimate Spiderman”.

Where's Waldo in Hollywood was sold in a Mini hardcover edition with a free Magnifying Lens The purpose was to locate mini images of Waldo with the magnifier. Each page is 6¼ inches long by 4¼ inches wide. The pages are primarily mini illustrations of people with various backgrounds. The text that does appear is small but is a size that can be read by most children or reading age without the need of a magnifying glass.

It has also been reported that in the 1960's there were mini comic books in gum ball machines. However, none came with magnifying glasses.

Finally, mini Bibles have been sold.

OBJECTS AND SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

It is an object of the present invention to provide a kit which will, through it play value, encourage children to read.

It is a further object of the present invention to provide a kit which will, through it play value, develop a child's hand-eye coordination.

The foregoing objects are achieved by providing a kit which includes a magnifying glass, a miniature comic book with micro text which requires the use of the magnifying glass to read. In a preferred embodiment the comic book comes in a small plastic case, which only receives the comic book. The case with the enclosed comic book may be worn about the neck as each case has a small hole though which a bead chain may pass. In addition, a stand is provided to facilitate the reading of the comic book. The kit may also include a mirror for reading text which has been printed backwards on the comic books. Other items which may be included in the kit are micro-trading cards and micro stickers.

The foregoing objects and other objects and advantages of the present invention will be become more apparent after a consideration of the following detailed description taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE FIGURES

FIG. 1 is an overall view of a preferred form of the kit of this invention, the components of the kit having been removed from their initial packaging.

FIG. 2 is an enlarged view of the miniature comic book of the present invention, the book being shown open to facing pages.

FIG. 3 is a view of a magnifying glass which may be used with the miniature comic book shown in FIG. 2, this glass differing from the glass shown in FIG. 1 in that it has a handle which may resemble a character in the comic book.

FIG. 4 is a view of a case in which the comic book is normally stored when not in use, the case being closed in this view whereas it is open in FIG. 1. While the case is transparent, interior lines have not been shown for purposes of clarity.

FIG. 4A is a section taken generally along the lines 4A-4A in FIG. 4.

FIG. 5 is a view of a stand or base which may receive the comic book.

FIG. 6 is an exploded perspective view of the comic book, the case which receives the comic book, the key chain by which the comic book and case may be carried, and also the stand which receives the case and comic book.

FIG. 7 is a view of accessory items which may be included in the kit of this invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

With reference initially to FIG. 1 it can be seen that a preferred form of the kit of this invention includes miniature comic book indicated generally at 10, a magnifying glass indicated generally at 20, a case for the miniature comic book, the case being indicated generally at 30, a stand or base indicated generally at 40, and a key chain indicated generally at 50. When the kit is sold it will be packaged together, for example in a blister back. As the packaging of this invention is conventional, it is not illustrated. In this FIG. the cover of the comic book is illustrated. The comic book has a size of about 1 inch in width by about 1.4 inches in height. The writing 12 on the cover is fairly large and may be read without a magnifying glass.

FIG. 2 shows inside facing pages of the mini-comic book of this invention. As can be seen the text 14 of the inside pages is quite small and most children will require a magnifying glass to read it.

FIG. 3 shows a suitable magnifying glass 20 for use with the comic book shown in FIG. 2. As can be seen the glass includes a frame 22, a magnifying lens 24, and a handle 26. The handle may be in any form, and differing forms are shown in FIGS. 1 and 3. The gens may be made of glass, plastic, or any other suitable material.

FIG. 4 shows the comic book case 30 of this invention in a closed position. The case is made from transparent polypropylene or the like and includes a living integral hinges 31 (best shown in FIG. 1) between a front cover 32, a spine 33, and a back cover 34. Each of the covers have inwardly extending sides 32.1 and 34.1 which are used to retain a comic book within the case. The sides 32.1 of the front cover 32 are provided with lips 35 which are adapted to extend into the sides 34.1 of the back cover 34. The lips are further provided with detents 36 which are adapted to pass over cooperating detents (not shown) on the sides 34.1, all detents being on the inside. Thus, when the front cover is brought into its closed position shown in FIG. 4 the detents will hold the case closed. However, the front and back sides are provided with cooperating recessed portions 32.2 and 34.2 which may be engages by fingers to cause the covers to be opened. The top of each of the covers 32 and 34 is provided with a suitable aperture 32.3 or 34.3 for the reception of a key chain 50. Stops 32.4 and 34.4 are provided on the inside of each of the covers 32, 34 to hold the comic book below the key chain apertures 32.3 and 34.4 so that a key chain 50 may easily be inserted into the apertures without interference from the mini comic book. The inner portion of the recess 32.2 or 34.2 serves the same purpose.

The stand or base 40 is best shown in FIGS. 1, 5, and 6. This base may receive the case 30 or it may receive the mini comic book 10. Thus the user of the comic book may place it directly in the stand and read it when in the stand. Alternatively, the user may place the comic book in the case 30 and read it through the transparent material of the case.

FIG. 7 shows various accessory items which may be sold with the kit of this invention, or which may be sold separately. These accessories include a mirror 60, micro trading cards indicated generally at 64, which cards which feature characters found in the miniature comic books, and also micro stickers indicated generally at 66. The mirror may be used to read text which has been printed backwards.

While the books 10 shown in the drawings are typically conventionally printed, other forms of printing may be employed. Some books may be printed in 3D. Others may be printed with secret messages in red reveal ink for example. If this is done, the kit may also include as an accessory an appropriately colored reading glass.

Various games may be played with the miniature comic book kit of this invention. Thus, children may place the micro comic books into the small cases 30, and then play games such as throwing them against a wall. The display stands 40 are also used for displaying the comics on a shelf or to stand the comic book up to allow other children to try and knock over the book and stand. The winner of the game would be rewarded with the comic book that was on the stand. There are a number of games like this too numerous to mention.

While a preferred form of this invention has been described above and shown in the accompanying drawings, it should be understood that applicant does not intend to be limited to the particular details described above and illustrated in the accompanying drawings, but intends to be limited only to the scope of the invention as defined by the following claims. In this regard, the term “means for” as used in the claims is intended to include not only the designs illustrated in the drawings of this application and the equivalent designs discussed in the text, but it is also intended to cover other equivalents now known to those skilled in the art, or those equivalents which may become known to those skilled in the art in the future.