Title:
Marine forest structure
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The present invention is to provide a marine forest structure by which many kinds of fishes and shellfishes can gather and inhabit and to which useful seaweeds such as of Laminariaceae and the like can adhere to propagate when the structure is submerged and disposed on the bottom of the sea. Provided is a marine forest structure 1 which is composed of a base 2 in which legs 5 are protruded from a peripheral edge of a flat plate 4 in which plural holes 6 are provided in a central part and a peripheral part thereof and two kinds of pillar bodies 3a, 3b whose lengths are different. The marine forest structure is constructed such that a plurality of pillar bodies 3a which has a predetermined height are raised from and fixed to the holes 6 of the flat plate 4 and that pillar bodies 3b which has a height lower than that of the pillar bodies 3a with the predetermined height are raised from and fixed to the plural holes 6 of the periphery of the flat plate 4.



Inventors:
Arai, Shogo (Fukuoka-ken, JP)
Application Number:
11/222015
Publication Date:
03/16/2006
Filing Date:
09/08/2005
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E02B3/06
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
SWIATEK, ROBERT P
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
TOWNSEND & BANTA (Suite 900, South Building 601 Pennsylvania Ave., N.W., Washington, DC, 20004, US)
Claims:
1. A marine forest structure characterized by being constructed in such a way that a plurality of holes are provided in parallel in a central part of a base, that a plurality of holes are provided with a predetermined space in a peripheral part of said base, that pillar bodies with a predetermined height are raised from and fixed to the plural holes of the central part of said base, and that pillar bodies whose height is lower than that of the pillar bodies of said central part are raised from and fixed to the holes of the peripheral part of said base.

2. The marine forest structure according to claim 1, characterized by being constructed in such a way that a plurality of legs are allowed to protrude from an outer peripheral edge of a flat plate arranged in the central part of said base.

3. The marine forest structure according to claim 1, characterized by being constructed in such a way that the pillar bodies raised from the central part of said base and the pillar bodies raised from the peripheral part of the base are respectively mutually coupled through a frame which is coupled with the base or that the respective pillar bodies are accommodated in a frame body which is fixed to the base.

4. The marine forest structure according to claim 1, characterized by being constructed in such a way that said pillar bodies are constituted by variety of materials such as scrap wood of telegraph poles, thinning wood of mountains and forests, or the like.

5. A marine forest structure characterized by being constructed in such a way that pillar bodies with a predetermined height are raised from and fixed to a central part of a base, and that pillar bodies whose height is lower than that of the pillar bodies of said central part are raised from and fixed to a peripheral part of said base.

6. The marine forest structure according to claim 5, characterized by being constructed in such a way that a plurality of legs are allowed to protrude from an outer peripheral edge of a flat plate arranged in the central part of said base.

7. The marine forest structure according to claim 5, characterized by being constructed in such a way that the pillar bodies raised from the central part of said base and the pillar bodies raised from the peripheral part of the base are respectively mutually coupled through a frame which is coupled with the base or that the respective pillar bodies are accommodated in a frame body which is fixed to the base.

8. The marine forest structure according to claim 2, characterized by being constructed in such a way that the pillar bodies raised from the central part of said base and the pillar bodies raised from the peripheral part of the base are respectively mutually coupled through a frame which is coupled with the base or that the respective pillar bodies are accommodated in a frame body which is fixed to the base.

9. The marine forest structure according to claim 2, characterized by being constructed in such a way that said pillar bodies are constituted by variety of materials such as scrap wood of telegraph poles, thinning wood of mountains and forests, or the like.

10. The marine forest structure according to claim 3, characterized by being constructed in such a way that said pillar bodies are constituted by variety of materials such as scrap wood of telegraph poles, thinning wood of mountains and forests, or the like.

11. The marine forest structure according to claim 6, characterized by being constructed in such a way that the pillar bodies raised from the central part of said base and the pillar bodies raised from the peripheral part of the base are respectively mutually coupled through a frame which is coupled with the base or that the respective pillar bodies are accommodated in a frame body which is fixed to the base.

Description:

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

The present invention relates to a marine forest structure which makes seaweeds grow thickly, in which fishes and shellfishes can settle and propagate, and which is to improve an environment in the sea, and more particularly to a technique of a marine forest structure for which scrap wood can be effectively utilized, which can be installed in a stable state in the sea without being influenced by waves, and which can be assembled easily near the sea where the structure is installed.

2. Description of the Related Art

Conventionally, as techniques developed for this type of purpose, for example, well known are Japanese Patent No. 2824232, Japanese Patent No. 2905432, Japanese Patent Application Laid-Open (JP-A) No. 9-65795, JP-A No. 2000-69878, JP-A No. 7-317042, and the like.

The technique of Japanese Patent No. 2824232 described above is of a preparation method of a marine forest which is constructed by raising a plurality of pillar bodies from a concrete base, by allowing a carrying base to protrude from sides of these pillar bodies to be plate-shaped, and by allowing at least one of spores, larva, and fully grown body such as of stolonifera of Laminariaceae, or grape root to adhere to this carrying base.

The technique of Japanese Patent No. 2905432 discloses a preparation method of a three dimensional marine bed which is constructed by raising a plurality of stick-like bodies or pillar bodies, like a forest, from a block-like base and by protruding a carrying base created by allowing seaweed species fungi to adhere to these stick-like bodies or pillar bodies in advance in a horizontal direction in a branching manner. Although this technique of JP-A is similar to the technique of Japanese Patent No. 2824232 described above, this preparation method is a technique characterized in that a preparation structure constructed by raising the stick-like bodies or pillar bodies from the block-like base is loaded on a barge and that after a carrying piece to which seaweed species fungi are allowed to adhere is attached to the stick-like bodies or pillar bodies on the barge, the carrying piece is submerged into the sea to be placed on the bottom of the sea.

The technique of JP-A No. 9-67595 relates to a marine forest preparation structure in which lower end portions of a plurality of pillar bodies independently standing by buoyancy through a swingable coupling means are mounted to a base made of stone in a state in which they are spaced apart from one another so that the structure is submerged to the bottom of the sea.

The technique of JP-A No. 2000-69878 relates to a preparation method of a marine forest in which pillar bodies are respectively allowed to stand on a central portion of concrete formed into a cross-shape and on the distal ends thereof and in which seaweed species fungi are allowed to adhere only to a pillar body standing on the central portion by a predetermined means so as to spread spores discharged from seaweed species fungi of this pillar of the central portion to other pillar bodies around it to make seaweeds grow thickly.

The technique of JP-A No. 7-317042 relates to a block body for a sea bottom facility which is by a combination of a heavy base that is made of concrete blocks each of which has a plurality of apertures to have a shape of two stacked rectangles and a unit constructed by mutually coupling a plurality of pillar bodies by means of horizontal materials. In the sea bottom facility block body, lower end portions of the respective units are inserted into the plurality of apertures of concrete block heavy base so that the units are fixed and extended upwardly.

In the techniques of Japanese Patent Nos. 2824232 and 2905432, since the carrying bases to which seaweed species fungi are allowed to adhere in advance have to be attached and fixed to the pillar bodies and to the stick-like bodies, respectively, in a branching manner, problems arise in that the workability is extremely poor and that the cost becomes high. Further, in the technique of JP-A No. 2000-69878, since seaweed species fungi have to be planted on the pillar body standing at the central portion of the concrete base formed into the cross-shape by a predetermined means, similarly to Japanese Patent Nos. 2824232 and 2905432, problems arise in that the work is complicated and that the cost becomes high.

The technique of JP-A No. 2000-69878 has problems that the plurality of special pillar bodies independently standing by buoyancy have to be employed, that the lower ends of these pillar bodies have to be swingably attached and fixed to the base made of stone, employing the extremely complicated coupling means, that the structure thereof is complex, and that the work is troublesome in the case where this structure is realized.

The technique of JP-A No. 7-317042 has problems that the plural pillar bodies, after being coupled mutually through horizontal cross pieces to construct a unit, have to be extended upwardly from the apertures in the concrete heavy base so that the work is complex, although there is a merit that a large number of pillar bodies can be allowed to stand together. Further, there is one more problem that as the base which supports a large number of units, an extremely heavy concrete base has to be employed.

In the techniques of Japanese Patent Nos. 2824232 and 2905432 and JP-A Nos. 9-65795, 2000-69878 and 7-317042, since pillar bodies or stick-like bodies which respectively have approximately the same height are extended upwardly from the base such as made of concrete or the like, in the case where it is submerged and placed in the sea, it is easily influenced by waves. Accordingly, there is a problem that a base which has a weight heavier than necessary has to be employed and that this base, the pillar bodies upstanding therefrom, and the like have to be securely coupled together.

Further, in the case of a marine forest in which the pillar or stick-like bodies having approximately the same height are raised from the base, there is a problem that shadow portions formed in the sea by these pillar bodies and the like are uniform and lack variety.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

The present invention is a totally novel invention which has been developed in consideration of the above described many conventional problems, and is to present a technique of a structure in which particularly in a case where the structure is installed in the sea, shadow portions formed by a plurality of pillar bodies are suitable for growing vegetation of Laminariaceae and a structure in which even when Laminariaceae vegetation is not transplanted, naturally Laminariaceae vegetation sticks thereto and propagates itself so that a marine forest can be formed by Laminariaceae vegetation.

An object of the invention is to provide a technique of a marine forest structure constructed in that a plurality of pillar bodies can make long shadow in a vertical direction so that attenuation in the amount of light due to the depth of water is related, so that shadow continuously changes in the vertical direction including an adjacent region of the pillar body part, so that fishes and shellfishes swarm in accordance with this shadow's continuous change.

The marine forest structure of the invention is to provide a technique of a structure which can be constructed in a simple structure in which pillar bodies are raised only, and in which pillar bodies having different, heights are arranged in a predetermined order so that physical-chemical, biological continuity of an inhabiting place/space and an external space is ensured by a moderate shifting zone of a bright part and a shadow part formed by the pillar bodies, so that the volume of the inhabiting place/space of fishes and the like can be made large.

In the case where the marine forest structure of the invention is installed on the bottom of the sea of a sandy soil, since the marine forest structure has a structure described above, the bottom of the sea adjacent to the place where this marine forest structure is installed is rarely changed, and thus it is possible to allow Gammaridea, Mysidacea, and the like which can be main feed for fishes to be inhabited on the sandy soil sea bottom. Further, an object of the invention is to provide a structure in which many fishes can be swarmed due to a light intensity difference between brightness of a sandy soil sea bottom and a dark part due to the shadow of the marine forest structure of the invention which can be interspersed thereon.

Further, an object of the invention is to provide a marine forest structure in which a shadow part where seaweeds hardly get feeding damage by fishes that mainly eat algae is formed to reduce feeding damage by fishes so that change of a sandy soil sea bottom can be reduced and further a marine forest structure which can be assembled and constructed easily on the spot.

A marine forest structure according to the invention is a totally novel technique that fundamentally improves the above-described conventional many problems, and the gist of a first invention thereof is a marine forest structure characterized by being constructed in such a way that a plurality of holes are provided in parallel in a central part of a base, that a plurality of holes are provided with a predetermined space in a peripheral part of said base, that pillar bodies with a predetermined height are raised from and fixed to the plural holes of the central part of said base, and that pillar bodies whose height is lower than that of the pillar bodies of said central part are raised from and fixed to the holes of the peripheral part of said base.

The gist of a second invention of a marine forest structure according to the invention is a marine forest structure of the first invention, characterized by being constructed in such a way that a plurality of legs are allowed to protrude from an outer peripheral edge of a flat plate arranged in the central part of said base.

The gist of a third invention of a marine forest structure according to the invention is the marine forest structure of the first or second invention, characterized by being constructed in such a way that the pillar bodies raised from the central part of said base and the pillar bodies raised from the peripheral part of the base are respectively mutually coupled through a frame which is coupled with the base or that the respective pillar bodies are accommodated in a frame body which is fixed to the base.

The gist of a fourth invention of a marine forest structure according to the invention is the marine forest structure of the first, second, or third invention, characterized by being constructed in such a way that said pillar bodies are constituted by variety of materials such as scrap wood of telegraph poles, thinning wood of mountains and forests, or the like.

The gist of a fifth invention of a marine forest structure according to the invention is a marine forest structure, characterized by being constructed in such a way that pillar bodies with a predetermined height are raised from and fixed to a central part of a base, and that pillar bodies whose height is lower than that of the pillar bodies of said central part are raised from and fixed to a peripheral part of said base.

The gist of a sixth invention of a marine forest structure according to the invention is the marine forest structure of the fifth invention, characterized by being constructed in such a way that a plurality of legs are allowed to protrude from an outer peripheral edge of a flat plate arranged in the central part of said base.

The gist of a seventh invention of a marine forest structure according to the invention is the marine forest structure of the fifth or sixth invention, characterized by being constructed in such a way that the pillar bodies raised from the central part of said base and the pillar bodies raised from the peripheral part of the base are respectively mutually coupled through a frame which is coupled with the base or that the respective pillar bodies are accommodated in a frame body which is fixed to the base.

In the above-described first invention according to the invention, since plural holes are respectively provided in the central part of the base and in the peripheral part thereof, by allowing the lower end portions of the pillar bodies which are raised from the base to be inserted into the holes to be fixed thereto, it is possible to raise and fix them in a simple and stable state. Accordingly, a structure according to the invention can be assembled and constructed simply even on a pontoon on the spot. In the present invention, in order to strengthen the structure, three parties, that is, pillar bodies, legs, and base are constructed integrally. Further, in the present invention, since the entire body is constituted by pillar bodies which have different heights, when this is submerged into the sea, Laminariaceae plants can be allowed to naturally adhere to the periphery of the pillar bodies to be propagated.

In the first and fifth inventions, since plural pillar bodies which have a high height are raised from the central part of the base, and since pillar bodies which have a low height are raised from the periphery of the base to be arranged, maintaining a predetermined space, the entire body can be an extremely stable structure. In the structure of the invention, since the bearing area thereof is small for the large space volume thereof, change on a sandy soil sea bottom can be reduced.

In the present invention, the pillar bodies which have a high height are raised from and fixed to the central part, and these pillar bodies which have a high height can be formed by coupling, in a vertical direction, two pillar bodies which are raised from and fixed to the periphery of the base and which have a low height.

In the first and fifth inventions, since plural pillar bodies which have a high height are concentratedly raised from the central part of the base, and since plural pillar bodies which have a low height are raised from the periphery of the base sparsely, when the structure is submerged into the sea to be placed therein, a shadow which is long in a vertical direction can be formed by the plural pillar bodies. Related to an attenuation of the light amount due to the water depth, the shadow can be continuously varied in the vertical direction including the periphery of the pillar body part, and fishes and shellfishes can be enormously gathered.

In a marine forest structure of the first and fifth inventions, since plural pillar bodies which have different heights are arranged in a predetermined order, physical, biological continuity of an inhabiting place/space and the external space is ensured by a moderate shifting zone of a bright part and a shadow part formed by the pillar bodies, so that the volume of the inhabiting place/space of fishes and the like can be made large.

In the case where the marine forest structure of the first invention and the fifth invention of the present application is installed on the bottom of the sea of a sandy soil, since the marine forest structure has a structure described above, the bottom of the sea adjacent to the place where this marine forest structure is installed is rarely changed, and thus it is possible to allow Gammaridea, Mysidacea, and the like which can be main feed for fishes to be inhabited on the sandy soil sea bottom. Further, many fishes can be concentrated due to a light intensity difference between brightness of a sandy soil sea bottom and a dark part due to the shadow of the marine forest structure of the invention which can be interspersed thereon.

In the second and sixth inventions of the invention, since the central part of the base is constituted by a flat plate, the entire base can be reduced in weight. Further, since a plurality of stable legs are protruded from an outer peripheral edge of this flat plate, the structure, when being submerged into the sea to be disposed therein, can be stable. This flat plate and stable legs can be integrally formed of a steel material, concrete material, or the like.

In the third and seventh inventions of the invention, as described above, since the pillar bodies raised from the central part of the base and the pillar bodies raised from the peripheral part of the base are respectively mutually coupled through a frame which is coupled with the base, or since the respective pillar bodies are accommodated in a frame body which is fixed to the base, the respective pillar bodies can be attached to the base securely. Accordingly, in addition to making the entire structure strong, the pillar bodies can be prevented from being slipped off from the base when a large external pressure is applied thereto or even when the structure becomes old.

In the fourth invention of the invention, as described above, since the pillar bodies raised from the base are constituted by scrap wood of telegraph poles, or thinning wood of mountains and forests, scrap wood can be effectively utilized, and a large amount of structures can be produced at extremely low cost. Particularly, scrap wood of telegraph poles are suitable for growing of seaweeds, and seaweeds can be allowed to grow thickly only by making the structure submerge into and disposed in the sea for a predetermined period of time if natural seaweeds are growing thickly in the vicinity thereof. Thinning wood can be utilized as an inhabiting place of a small animals such as Gammarid and the like which become feed for fishes, and swarming effect of fishes can be expected.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a perspective explanatory view showing a first embodiment of a marine forest structure according to the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a plan view showing structural parts of FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of a state in which a frame is mounted to the marine forest structure of the first embodiment.

FIG. 4 is a perspective explanatory view showing a second embodiment of a marine forest structure.

FIG. 5 is a perspective explanatory view showing a third embodiment of a marine forest structure according to the present invention.

FIG. 6 is a plan view showing structural parts of FIG. 5.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view of a state in which a frame is mounted to the marine forest structure of FIG. 5.

FIG. 8 is a perspective explanatory view showing a fourth embodiment of a marine forest structure.

FIG. 9 is a perspective explanatory view showing a fifth embodiment of a marine forest structure.

FIG. 10 is a perspective explanatory view showing a sixth embodiment of a marine forest structure.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

In specifically describing embodiments of the present invention with reference to the drawings, FIG. 1 is a perspective explanatory view showing a first embodiment of a marine forest structure according to the invention, FIG. 2 a plan view showing structural parts of FIG. 1, FIG. 3 a perspective view of a state in which a frame is mounted to the marine forest structure of the first embodiment, and FIG. 4 a perspective explanatory view showing a second embodiment of a marine forest structure.

FIG. 5 is a perspective explanatory view showing a third embodiment of a marine forest structure according to the invention, FIG. 6 a plan view showing structural parts of FIG. 5, FIG. 7 a perspective view of a state in which a frame is mounted to the marine forest structure of FIG. 5, FIG. 8 a perspective explanatory view showing a fourth embodiment of a marine forest structure, FIG. 9 a perspective explanatory view showing a fifth embodiment of a marine forest structure, and FIG. 10 a perspective explanatory view showing a sixth embodiment of a marine forest structure.

Referring to FIGS. 1 to 3, the first embodiment of a marine forest structure according to the invention will be described. This marine forest structure 1 is basically composed of a base 2 and a plurality of pillar bodies 3 raised from this base 2.

The base 2 is composed of a rectangular flat plate 4 formed of steel, concrete, or the like and legs 5 protruding from respective corners of this flat plate 4. These legs 5 are formed integrally with the flat plate 4 in advance. These legs 5 plays a role of making the base 2 stable on the bottom of the sea when the marine forest structure 1 is submerged and placed in the sea.

Holes 6 for raising the pillar bodies 3 respectively are provided in a central part A (central part of the base) and corner parts B (peripheral parts of the base) of the flat plate 4. In the present embodiment, four holes 6 are provided in the central part of the flat plate 4, and one hole 6 is provided on each corner part.

Steel, concrete, telegraph poles which have been scrap wood, or the like are employed as the pillar bodies 3, and prepared are two kinds of pillar bodies, that is, pillar bodies 3a whose height is approximately 8 m and pillar bodies 3b whose height is approximately 4 m. Respective lower end portions of four pillar bodies 3a are inserted into the respective holes 6 of the central part A of the flat plate 4 of the base 2. Respective lower end portions of the pillar bodies 3b are inserted into the respective holes 6 to be raised and fixed thereon in the corner parts B of the flat plate 4.

Steel tube caps 7 are attached to the distal end portions of the pillar bodies 3a, 3b. Reference numeral 8 denotes a frame body through which the respective distal end portions of the pillar bodies 3a, 3b are fixed. This frame body 8 is fixed also on parts of the base 2, and through this frame body 8, the plural pillar bodies 3a, 3b and the base 2 are mutually coupled to be fabricated as a unit.

In the marine forest structure 1 of the first embodiment described above, in total, eight pillar bodies made of steel, concrete, scrap telegraph poles, or the like can be employed. The height of the entire structure is set to approximately 8.5 m obtained by adding the heights of the base 2 and the cap 7 to the height of the pillar body 3a, the bottom side width approximately 10 m, the space volume approximately 254 m3, and the entire weight approximately 30.8 t.

In the above embodiment, although the respective pillar bodies 3a, 3b and the base 2 are mutually coupled through the frame body 8, these pillar bodies 3a, 3b and the base 2 can be mutually coupled employing a simple frame or rope (not shown) or the like, without using such a frame body 8. The frame body 8, frame, rope, caps 7, and the like described above are not required components of the invention, and can be omitted as the need arises.

Referring to FIG. 4, a marine forest structure 9 of the second embodiment according to the invention will be described. The basic structure of this marine forest structure 9 is the same as that of the marine forest structure 1 of the first embodiment. In this second embodiment, employed are pillar bodies 3 constituted by steel, concrete, scrap telegraph poles, or the like whose height is higher than that of the marine forest structure 1 of the first embodiment, so that the entire structure is bigger, and the space volume formed by the marine forest structure 9 is made larger.

In this second embodiment, pillar bodies 3a raised from the central part of the base 2 have a height of approximately 12 m, and pillar bodies 3b approximately 4 m. Accordingly, the entire height of the marine forest structure 9 is approximately 12.5 m, the bottom side width approximately 12 m, the space volume approximately 330 m3, and the entire weight approximately 36.7 t. This marine forest structure 9 can be effectively employed in a sea area which has a deep depth.

Referring to FIGS. 5 to 7, a marine forest structure 10 of the third embodiment according to the invention will be described. Although scrap telegraph poles are effectively utilized for the pillar bodies 3 in the above-described first and second embodiments, in the marine forest structure 10 of this third embodiment, thinning wood of mountains and forests is effectively utilized instead of scrap telegraph poles.

In describing the marine forest structure 10 of the third embodiment with reference to the drawing, pillar bodies 11a are thinning wood whose height is approximately 12 m, and pillar bodies 11b are thinning wood whose height is approximately 4 m. A plurality of pillar bodies 11a are respectively raised from four holes 6 of a central part A (central part of the base) of a flat plate 4 of a base 2, and pillar bodies 11b are raised from holes 6 of corner parts B (peripheral parts of the base) of the flat plate 4. The pillar body 11a raised from the central part A can be constructed by coupling the pillar bodies 11b which has a low height.

Although the number of pillar bodies 11a, 11b raised from the respective holes 6 changes depending on the diameters of the pillar bodies, generally approximately four to twelve pillar bodies 11a, 11b can be inserted into the respective holes 6 to be raised therefrom. The positions of the lower end portions of the plural pillar bodies 11a, 11b which are inserted into the respective holes 6 can be defined and lined up by means of these holes 6 and the caps 7.

Since the basic structure of the marine forest structure 10 of the third embodiment is the same as that of the marine forest structure 1 of the first embodiment or the marine forest structure 9 of the second embodiment, description of the base 2, flat plate 4, legs 5, frame body 8, and the like will not be described.

The entire height of the constructed marine forest structure 10 in the third embodiment is approximately 8.5 m, the bottom side width approximately 10 m, the space volume approximately 254 m3, and the entire weight approximately 36.9 t.

Referring to FIG. 8, a marine forest structure 12 of the fourth embodiment will be described. In the case of this marine forest structure 12, thinning wood is employed for the pillar bodies 11a, 11b, similarly to the marine forest structure 10 of the third embodiment. In this marine forest structure 12, the pillar bodies 11b whose height is approximately 4 m are coupled with the upper ends of the pillar bodies 11a whose height is approximately 8 m to form approximately 12 m. Accordingly, the height of the marine forest structure 12 is approximately 12.5 m, the bottom side width approximately 12 m, the space volume approximately 330 m3, and the entire weight of the marine forest structure 12 43.1 t. This marine forest structure 12 also can be effectively utilized in a sea area which has a deep depth, similarly to the marine forest structure 9 of the second embodiment.

In the above-described embodiments, the pillar bodies 3 constituted by steel, concrete, scrap telegraph poles, or the like are alone employed in the marine forest structures 1, 9 of the first and second embodiments, and the pillar bodies 11 constituted by thinning wood are alone employed in the marine forest structures 10, 12 of the third and fourth embodiments. On the other hand, in fifth and sixth embodiments described below, steel, concrete, scrap telegraph poles, or the like and thinning wood are both employed to construct pillar bodies.

In FIG. 9, reference numeral 13 designates a marine forest structure of the fifth embodiment, and the basic structure thereof is totally the same as that of the marine forest structure 10 of the third embodiment. The difference between the marine forest structure 13 and the marine forest structure 10 is that the pillar bodies 3 constituted by steel, concrete, scrap telegraph poles, or the like are disposed in a central part of plural pillar bodies 11 which are constituted by thinning wood employed in the marine forest structure 10 so that the pillar bodies are constructed by employing both steel, concrete, scrap telegraph poles, or the like and thinning wood. In the case where the pillar bodies are constituted by both steel, concrete, scrap telegraph poles, or the like and thinning wood, the pillar bodies can be strengthened.

The basic structure of a marine forest structure 14 of the sixth embodiment shown in FIG. 10 is totally the same as that of the marine forest structure 12 of the fourth embodiment. The difference between them is that the pillar bodies of the case of the marine forest structure 14 are constructed by employing both steel, concrete, scrap telegraph poles, or the like and thinning wood while the pillar bodies 11 of the marine forest structure 12 are constituted only by thinning wood. Particularly in a marine forest structure which has a high height, such as the marine forest structures 12, 14, the pillar bodies thereof are needed to be strengthened, and by employing both steel, concrete, scrap telegraph poles, or the like and thinning wood, the pillar bodies can be strengthened.

INDUSTRIAL APPLICABILITY

A marine forest structure according to the present invention can be employed in many fields not only as a habitat of fishes and shellfishes of many kinds but also as a growing place of useful seaweeds such as Laminariaceae.