Title:
Chair adapted to facilitate the performance of various exercises
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A disclosed chair is adapted to facilitate the performance of various exercises. The chair includes a seat having opposed top and bottom surfaces, a base assembly attached to the bottom surface of the seat and adapted to support the seat, and a resistance cable having two opposed ends. One end of the resistance cable is connected to a component of the chair, and the other end is connected to a handle. In one embodiment, one end of the resistance cable is connected to the base assembly, and the other end is connected to the handle.



Inventors:
Kellogg, David L. (Irvine, CA, US)
Application Number:
10/935050
Publication Date:
03/09/2006
Filing Date:
09/07/2004
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
482/123
International Classes:
A63B21/02; A63B21/04
View Patent Images:
Related US Applications:



Primary Examiner:
CHHABRA, ARUN S
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Law Offices of Eric Karich (Eric Karich 20 Crestview, Aliso Viejo, CA, 92656, US)
Claims:
What is claimed is:

1. A chair adapted to facilitate various exercises, the chair comprising: a seat; a base assembly adapted to support the seat; and a resistance cable having two opposed ends, wherein one of the ends is anchored by the base assembly.

2. The chair as recited in claim 1, wherein the other end of the resistance cable is connected to a handle.

3. The chair as recited in claim 1, wherein the resistance cable comprises a piece of elastic tubing.

4. The chair as recited in claim 1, wherein when a first force is applied to the resistance cable via the handle that stretches the resistance cable, the resistance cable exerts a second force that opposes the first force.

5. The chair as recited in claim 1, further comprising a low friction port positioned adjacent an edge of the bottom surface of the seat, wherein the resistance cable passes through the low friction port.

6. The chair as recited in claim 5, wherein the low friction port is adapted to minimize abrasion of the resistance cable.

7. The chair as recited in claim 5, wherein the low friction port comprises a plurality of rollers positioned about an opening, and wherein the resistance cable passes through the opening.

8. The chair as recited in claim 1, further comprising a back support positioned adjacent the seat and attached to the base assembly.

9. The chair as recited in claim 1, further comprising a pair of arm supports pivotally connected to the base assembly.

10. A chair adapted to facilitate various exercises, the chair comprising: a seat having opposed top and bottom surfaces; a base assembly attached to the bottom surface of the seat and adapted to support the seat; a back support positioned adjacent the seat, attached to the base assembly, and having opposed front and back surfaces; and a resistance cable having two opposed ends, wherein one of the ends is connected to the back surface of the back support and the other end is connected to a handle.

11. The chair as recited in claim 10, wherein the resistance cable comprises an elastic material.

12. The chair as recited in claim 10, wherein the resistance cable comprises a piece of elastic tubing.

13. The chair as recited in claim 10, wherein when a first force is applied to the resistance cable via the handle that stretches the resistance cable, the resistance cable exerts a second force that opposes the first force.

14. The chair as recited in claim 10, further comprising a low friction port positioned adjacent an upper edge of the back surface of the back support, wherein the resistance cable passes through the low friction port.

15. The chair as recited in claim 14, wherein the low friction port is adapted to minimize abrasion of the resistance cable.

16. The chair as recited in claim 14, wherein the low friction port comprises a plurality of rollers positioned about an opening, and wherein the resistance cable passes through the opening.

17. The chair as recited in claim 14, wherein the a back support is attached to the base assembly via a hinge assembly.

18. The chair as recited in claim 10, further comprising a pair of arm supports pivotally connected to the base assembly.

19. A method for exercising comprising the steps of: providing a chair; operably attaching a resistance cable to the chair; sitting in the chair; and applying a force to the resistance cable for the purpose of exercise.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

Not Applicable

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH

Not Applicable

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

1. Field of the Invention

This invention relates generally to chairs, and more particularly to chairs adapted to facilitate the performance of exercises.

2. Description of Related Art

Office workers typically spend many hours a day sitting in a chair. At the same time, it is well known that physical activity is required to develop and maintain physical fitness. Many different types of exercise machines are available that are designed to force one or more muscles to push or pull against a mechanical resistance. However, such exercise machines are so bulky and/or expensive that they are typically found only in health clubs or gymnasiums. Office workers often complain that they have too little time during the work day, and are too tired by the end of the work day, to travel to a health club or gymnasium to use one or more exercise machines. It would thus be beneficial to have a chair suitable for office use that facilitates the performance of various exercises.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

A disclosed chair is adapted to facilitate the performance of various exercises. The chair includes a seat having opposed top and bottom surfaces, a base assembly attached to the bottom surface of the seat and adapted to support the seat, and a resistance cable having two opposed ends. One end of the resistance cable is anchored by a component of the chair, and the other end is connected to a handle. In one embodiment, one end of the resistance cable is connected to the base assembly, and the other end is connected to the handle. In another embodiment, the chair also includes a back support positioned adjacent the seat, attached to the base assembly, and having opposed front and back surfaces. One end of the resistance cable is connected to the back surface of the back support, and the other end is connected to the handle.

Other features and advantages of the present invention will become apparent from the following more detailed description, taken in conjunction with the accompanying drawings, which illustrate, by way of example, the principles of the invention.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWING

The accompanying drawings illustrate the present invention. In such drawings:

FIG. 1 is a side view of one embodiment of a chair adapted to facilitate the performance of various exercises, wherein the chair includes two pairs of resistance cables exiting a bottom surface of a seat and a base assembly adapted to support the seat;

FIG. 2 is a rear view of the chair of FIG. 1;

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of an underside portion of one embodiment of the chair of FIG. 1 wherein the chair includes a single pair of resistance cables exiting the bottom surface of the seat, and wherein components of the base assembly have been removed to facilitate viewing;

FIG. 4 is a front elevation view of the chair of FIG. 3 wherein a user positioned in the chair is using the pair of resistance cables to perform a lifting exercise;

FIG. 5 is a side elevation view of the chair of FIG. 3 wherein the user is positioned in the chair and is using a resistance cable exiting a back surface of a back support to perform stomach crunches; and

FIG. 6 is a side view of the chair of FIG. 1 wherein the user is positioned in the chair and is using the pair of resistance cables to perform curls.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

FIG. 1 is a side view of one embodiment of a chair 10 adapted to facilitate the performance of various exercises. The chair 10 is suitable for use in an office, and such chairs are commonly referred to as office chairs. Moreover, in the embodiment of FIG. 1 the chair 10 has a high back, and such chairs are often referred to as executive or managerial office chairs.

In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the chair 10 includes a seat 12 having a top surface 14 and an opposed bottom surface 16, and a base assembly 18 attached to the bottom surface 16 of the seat 12. In general, the base assembly 18 is adapted to support the seat 12 at a user-selected elevation above a floor surface.

In general, the chair 10 also includes at least one resistance cable having two opposed ends, wherein one of the ends is anchored by the base assembly 18 and the other end is connected to a handle. While we specify that the resistance cable is anchored by the base assembly, this should be expressly defined to include any manner of attachment to the chair 10 so that the resistance cable is anchored to facilitate the exercises described below. The specific point of attachment is not critical, and the primary connection of the resistance cable may be to the seat, or some other element of the chair, but is supported by the base assembly, this should be considered within the scope of the invention as claimed. Furthermore, the “handle” element should be broadly construed to include any form of element that can be grasped for the purpose of exercising, as described below or as otherwise known in the art or to one skilled in the art. The term “handle” should also be construed to include a clip of other form of attaching mechanism that would enable the attachment of a separate handle, strap, or other element to the resistance cable.

In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the chair 10 includes two pairs of low friction ports, each positioned adjacent a side edge of the bottom surface 16 of the seat 12. A right side pair of the low friction ports are visible in FIG. 1 and labeled 20A and 20B. The low friction ports 20A and 20B are positioned adjacent a right side edge 22 of the bottom surface 16 of the seat 12. A resistance cable 24A passes through the low friction port 20A, and another resistance cable 24B passes through the low friction port 20B. Ends of the resistance cables 24A and 24B extending from the respective low friction ports 20A and 20B are attached to a handle 26A.

A similar left side pair of low friction ports are positioned adjacent a left side edge of the bottom surface 16 of the seat 12. A resistance cable passes through each of the left side pair of low friction ports, and ends of the resistance cables attached to a handle similar to the handle 26A.

In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the handles can be removably attached to the bottom surface 16 of the seat 12 adjacent the corresponding side edges. In FIG. 1 the handle 26A is shown in a stowed position wherein the handle 26A is removably attached to the bottom surface 16 of the seat 12 adjacent the right side edge 22. In the stowed position, the handle 26A is out of the way and significantly less visible.

In general, each of the resistance cables, including the resistance cables 24A and 24B, offers a mechanical resistance to a force applied to the cable via the attached handle. In preferred embodiments, the resistance cables 24A and 24B are made from an elastic material. Suitable elastic materials include natural rubber (e.g., latex) and/or synthetic rubber materials. In other embodiments, the resistance cables may include cables mounted on (e.g., wrapped around) a resistance device that provides mechanical resistance in a manner other than elasticity of the cable.

In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the resistance cables 24A and 24B are pieces of elastic tubing. When a force (i.e., a first force) is applied to the resistance cables 24A and 24B via the attached handle 26A that stretches the resistance cables 24A and 24B, the resistance cables 24A and 24B exert a force (i.e., a second force) that opposes the first force. For example, the first force may be applied by upper body muscles of a user of the chair 10. As a result of the opposing second force exerted by the resistance cables 24A and 24B, the upper body muscles of the user are advantageously exercised. Multiple resistance cables can be used in tandem, as are resistance cables 24A and 24B, to increase a magnitude of the opposing second force.

In general, the low friction ports are adapted to minimize abrasion of the resistance cables passing therethrough. In the embodiment of FIG. 1, each of the low friction ports, including the low friction ports 20A and 20B, has multiple rollers positioned about an opening, wherein the corresponding resistance cable passes through the opening. Other types of low friction ports are possible and contemplated.

In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the chair 10 also includes a back support 28 positioned adjacent a rear portion of the seat 12 and attached to the base assembly 18. The back support 28 has a front surface 30 and a back surface 32. A resistance cable 34 passes through a low friction port 36 adjacent an upper edge 38 of the back surface 32 of the back support 28. The resistance cable 34 has two opposed ends. One of the ends of the resistance cable 34 is connected to the back surface 32 of the back support 28, and the other end is connected to a handle 40.

In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the handle 40 is a looped portion of the resistance cable 34 and an end of the resistance cable 34 extending from a knot. In other embodiments, the handle 40 may be, for example, a bar, and the end of the resistance cable 34 connected to the handle 40 may be connected to a center portion of the bar.

In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the resistance cable 34 is a piece of elastic tubing. In other embodiments, the resistance cable 34 may be, for example, an elastic band. Further, the resistance cable 34 may include a cable mounted on (e.g., wrapped around) a resistance device that provides mechanical resistance in a manner other than elasticity of the cable. In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the low friction port 36 includes multiple rollers positioned about an opening, and wherein the resistance cable 34 passes through the opening. In general, the low friction port 36 is adapted to minimize abrasion of the resistance cable 34 passing therethrough. As described above, other types of low friction ports are possible and contemplated.

When a force (i.e., a third force) is applied to the resistance cable 34 via the attached handle 40 that stretches the resistance cable 34, the resistance cable 34 exerts a force (i.e., a fourth force) that opposes the third force. For example, the third force may be applied by upper body muscles of the user of the chair 10. As a result of the opposing fourth force exerted by the resistance cable 34, the upper body muscles of the user are advantageously exercised. Multiple resistance cables can be used in tandem with the resistance cables 34 to increase a magnitude of the opposing fourth force.

In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the base assembly 18 includes a vertical column 42 connected between a support structure 44 and a frame. The support structure 44 has 5 radial arms, and each of 5 casters 46 is attached to an end of a corresponding one of the 5 radial arms. The vertical column 42 passes through, and extends upward from, a center portion of the support structure 44. In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the vertical column 42 includes a pneumatic cylinder and an associated vertical height adjustment mechanism. An upper end of the vertical column 42 is attached to the frame, and the bottom surface 16 of the seat 12 is also attached to the frame.

In the embodiment of FIG. 1, the back support 28 is attached to the frame of the base assembly 18 via a hinge assembly 48. The chair 10 also includes a pair of arm supports 50A and 50B pivotally connected to the frame of the base assembly 18. During the performance of exercises using the resistance cables 24A and 24B, the arm support 50A can advantageously be pivoted up and back to a raised position wherein the arm support 50A is out of the way. The arm support 50B can similarly be pivoted up and back to a raised position wherein the arm support 50B is out of the way during the performance of exercises using the pair of resistance cables on the other side of the chair 10.

FIG. 2 is a rear view of the chair 10 of FIG. 1. In the embodiment of FIG. 2, the arm support 50A is connected to the frame of the base assembly 18 via a pivot joint 60A adjacent the hinge assembly 48, and the arm support 50B is connected to the frame of the base assembly 18 via a pivot joint 60B.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view of an underside portion of one embodiment of the chair 10 of FIG. 1 wherein the chair 10 includes two low friction ports, each positioned adjacent a side edge of the bottom surface 16 of the seat 12, and wherein components of the base assembly 18 including the support structure 44 have been removed to facilitate viewing. The frame of the base assembly 18, described above, is labeled 70 in FIG. 3. An upper end of the vertical column 42 is attached to the frame 70, and the bottom surface 16 of the seat 12 is also attached to the frame 70.

As described above, the back support 28 is attached to the frame 70 of the base assembly 18 via the hinge assembly 48. The arm support 50A is connected to the frame 70 via the pivot joint 60A adjacent the hinge assembly 48, and the arm support 50B is connected to the frame 70 via the pivot joint 60B.

A low friction port 66A is positioned adjacent the right side edge 22 of the bottom surface 16 of the seat 12, and a resistance cable 68A passes through the low friction port 66A. One end of the resistance cable 68A is attached to the frame 70, and the other end of the resistance cable 68A is attached to the handle 26A.

Another low friction port 66B is positioned adjacent a left side edge of the bottom surface 16 of the seat 12, and a resistance cable 68B passes through the low friction port 66B. One end of the resistance cable 68B is attached to the frame 70, and the other end of the resistance cable 68B is attached to a handle similar to the handle 26A.

In the embodiment of FIG. 3, the low friction ports 66A and 66B are attached to the frame 70, and each includes multiple rollers positioned about an opening. The resistance cable 66A passes through the opening in the low friction port 66A, and the resistance cable 66B passes through the opening in the low friction port 66B. As described above, other types of low friction ports are possible and contemplated.

In FIG. 3, the resistance cables 66A and 66B are in retracted positions. A ball 72 positioned along the resistance cable 66A is larger than the opening in the low friction port 66A, ensuring a portion of the resistance cable 66A attached to the handle 26A extends from the low friction port 66A when the resistance cable 66A is in the retracted position. A similar ball positioned along the resistance cable 66B ensures a portion of the resistance cable 66B attached to the corresponding handle extends from the low friction port 66B when the resistance cable 66B is in the retracted position.

FIG. 4 is a front elevation view of the chair 10 of FIG. 3 wherein a user 80 positioned in the chair 10 is using the resistance cables 66A and 66B to exercise. In FIG. 4, the arm supports 50A and 50B are advantageously pivoted up and back to the raised positions wherein the arm supports 50A and 50B are out of the way. The handle attached to the end of the resistance cable 66B is labeled 26B.

While performing the exercise, the user 80 uses his or her upper body muscles to stretch the resistance cables 66A and 66B, thereby applying a force “F1” to the resistance cable 66A via the attached handle 26A and a similar force to the resistance cable 66A via the attached handle 26B. In response, the resistance cable 66A exerts a force “F2” that opposes the force F1, and the resistance cable 66B exerts a similar opposing force. As a result of the opposing force F2 exerted by the resistance cable 66A and the similar opposing force exerted by the resistance cable 66B, the upper body muscles of the user 80 are advantageously exercised.

FIG. 5 is a side elevation view of the chair 10 of FIG. 3 wherein the user 80 is positioned in the chair 10 and is using the resistance cable 34 to exercise. In FIG. 5, the arm supports 50A and 50B are shown pivoted up and back to the raised positions. The user 80 uses his or her upper body muscles to stretch the resistance cable 34, thereby applying a force “F3” to the resistance cable 34 via the attached handle 40. In response, the resistance cable 34 exerts a force “F4” that opposes the force F3. As a result of the opposing force F4 exerted by the resistance cable 34, the upper body muscles of the user 80 are advantageously exercised.

FIG. 6 is a side elevation view of the chair 10 of FIG. 3 wherein the user 80 is positioned in the chair 10 and is using the resistance cable 66A to exercise. The arm supports 50A and 50B are shown pivoted up and back to the raised positions, although this is not necessarily required. The user 80 uses his or her bicep muscles to stretch the resistance cable 66A, thereby applying a force “F5” to the resistance cable 66A. In response, the resistance cable 66A exerts a force “F6” that opposes the force F5. As a result of the opposing force F6 exerted by the resistance cable 66A, the bicep muscles of the user 80 are advantageously exercised.

While the invention has been described with reference to at least one preferred embodiment, it is to be clearly understood by those skilled in the art that the invention is not limited thereto. Rather, the scope of the invention is to be interpreted only in conjunction with the appended claims.