Title:
Golf game and method
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A portable golf game utilizing a rollable game piece. The game piece has a plurality of flat sides, so that upon rolling the game piece it will come to a resting position, displaying to the player(s) information on one of the flat sides. That information includes scoring information for golf holes that are being played in a simulated fashion, and may also include information concerning clubs, hazards, weather, and risks/rewards. Preferably, a scorecard is also provided, so that scores may be recorded. It is further preferred that the game piece be hollow, so that the scorecard may be stored therein.



Inventors:
Curlett, Walter G. (San Lorenzo, CA, US)
Application Number:
10/934961
Publication Date:
03/09/2006
Filing Date:
09/07/2004
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F1/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
LAYNO, BENJAMIN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
WEISS & MOY PC (4204 NORTH BROWN AVENUE, SCOTTSDALE, AZ, 85251, US)
Claims:
I claim:

1. A golf game comprising, in combination: a rollable game piece having a plurality of flat sides therearound; and information relevant to the play of a round of golf located on said plurality of flat sides.

2. The golf game of claim 1 further comprising a scorecard.

3. The golf game of claim 2 wherein said game piece is hollow and wherein said scorecard may be stored therein.

4. The golf game of claim 3 further comprising a writing implement utilizable with said scorecard and storable within said hollow game piece.

5. The golf game of claim 1 wherein said information is organized into a plurality of bands arranged side-by-side along said game piece, and wherein each said band contains a different type of information relevant to the play of golf.

6. The golf game of claim 5 wherein one said band contains information relevant to the play of a par 3 golf hole.

7. The golf game of claim 5 wherein one said band contains information relevant to the play of a par 4 golf hole.

8. The golf game of claim 5 wherein one said band contains information relevant to the play of a par 5 golf hole.

9. The golf game of claim 5 wherein one said band contains information relevant to weather conditions.

10. The golf game of claim 5 wherein one said band contains information relevant to hazards.

11. The golf game of claim 5 wherein one said band contains information relevant to club selection.

12. The golf game of claim 5 wherein one said band contains information relevant to risks and rewards.

13. The golf game of claim 5 wherein: one said band contains information relevant to the play of a par 3 golf hole; one said band contains information relevant to the play of a par 4 golf hole; and one said band contains information relevant to the play of a par 5 golf hole.

14. A golf game comprising, in combination: a rollable game piece having a plurality of flat sides therearound; information relevant to the play of a round of golf located on said plurality of flat sides; a scorecard; wherein said game piece is hollow and wherein said scorecard may be stored therein; and a writing implement utilizable with said scorecard and storable within said hollow game piece; wherein said information is organized into a plurality of bands arranged side-by-side along said game piece, and wherein each said band contains a different type of information relevant to the play of golf; wherein one said band contains information relevant to the play of a par 3 golf hole; wherein one said band contains information relevant to the play of a par 4 golf hole; wherein one said band contains information relevant to the play of a par 5 golf hole; wherein one said band contains information relevant to weather conditions; wherein one said band contains information relevant to hazards; wherein one said band contains information relevant to club selection; and wherein one said band contains information relevant to risks and rewards.

15. A method for playing a golf game comprising the steps of: providing a rollable game piece having a plurality of flat sides therearound; providing information relevant to the play of a round of golf on said plurality of flat sides; rolling said game piece; and recording a score for a golf hole based on said information displayed on one of said plurality of flat sides.

16. The method of claim 15 wherein said information is organized into a plurality of bands arranged side-by-side along said game piece, and wherein each said band contains a different type of information relevant to the play of golf.

17. The method of claim 15 wherein one said band contains information relevant to the play of a par 3 golf hole.

18. The method of claim 15 wherein one said band contains information relevant to the play of a par 4 golf hole.

19. The method of claim 15 wherein one said band contains information relevant to the play of a par 5 golf hole.

20. The method of claim 15 further comprising: wherein one said band contains information relevant to the play of a par 3 golf hole; wherein one said band contains information relevant to the play of a par 4 golf hole; wherein one said band contains information relevant to the play of a par 5 golf hole; wherein one said band contains information relevant to weather conditions; wherein one said band contains information relevant to hazards; wherein one said band contains information relevant to club selection; and wherein one said band contains information relevant to risks and rewards.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention relates generally to indoor games and, more particularly, to a game of chance that simulates the play of a round of golf.

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

The game of golf is enormously popular world wide. There is often a desire on the part of golfers and fans of golf to simulate the play of golf in an indoor setting. Computerized golf games are an example of this phenomenon.

The present invention is directed to an indoor golf game that is simple to use, portable, and low-tech.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

In accordance with one embodiment of the present invention, a golf game is provided. The game comprises, in combination: a rollable game piece having a plurality of flat sides therearound; and information relevant to the play of a round of golf located on the plurality of flat sides.

In accordance with another embodiment of the present invention, a golf game is provided. The game comprises, in combination: a rollable game piece having a plurality of flat sides therearound; information relevant to the play of a round of golf located on the plurality of flat sides; a scorecard; wherein the game piece is hollow and wherein the scorecard may be stored therein; and a writing implement utilizable with the scorecard and storable within the hollow game piece; wherein the information is organized into a plurality of bands arranged side-by-side along the game piece, and wherein each the band contains a different type of information relevant to the play of golf; wherein one the band contains information relevant to the play of a par 3 golf hole; wherein one the band contains information relevant to the play of a par 4 golf hole; wherein one the band contains information relevant to the play of a par 5 golf hole; wherein one the band contains information relevant to weather conditions; wherein one the band contains information relevant to hazards; wherein one the band contains information relevant to club selection; and wherein one the band contains information relevant to risks and rewards.

In accordance with still another embodiment of the present invention, a method for playing a golf game is disclosed. The method comprises the steps of: providing a rollable game piece having a plurality of flat sides therearound; providing information relevant to the play of a round of golf on the plurality of flat sides; rolling the game piece; and recording a score for a golf hole based on the information displayed on one of the plurality of flat sides.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a side view of a game piece portion of a golf game consistent with an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 1A is a perspective view of a cap for the game piece of FIG. 1.

FIG. 1B is an end view of the game piece of FIG. 1, showing the end opposite the capped end.

FIG. 1C is a perspective view of a game piece consistent with an embodiment of the present invention

FIG. 1D is a perspective view of a game piece consistent with an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a top view of a scorecard component of a golf game consistent with an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view illustrating the rolling of a game piece consistent with an embodiment of the present invention.

FIG. 4 is an exemplary set of game instructions for a golf game consistent with an embodiment of the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Referring first to FIGS. 1-1D, a game piece 10 consistent with an embodiment of the present invention is depicted. It can be seen that the game piece 10 preferably has an elongated, cylindrical configuration, with a plurality of flat surfaces 12 extending the length thereof. As herein described, information relevant to the play of the golf game is presented on the flat surfaces 12. The flat surfaces 12 should have sufficient width so that, upon rolling of the game piece 10 (see FIG. 3), it will come to rest with one flat surface 12 flush against the surface (e.g., a table or floor) upon which the game is being played, with an opposing flat surface 12 being substantially parallel thereto, being readily viewable by players, and being identifiable by the players as the flat surface 12 that has been produced as a result of the rolling of the game piece 10.

Referring now to FIGS. 1C and 1D, examples of the type of information that may be presented on the flat surfaces 12 of the game piece 10 are provided. It can be seen that, in the preferred embodiment, the information is organized into seven columns or bands 14. While the order, number and content of the columns can be varied without departing from the spirit or scope of the present invention, it is preferred that the columns be arranged in the following order and that they have the following general content, moving from left to right in the drawing figures: (a) club; (b) par 3; (c) hazard; (d) par 4; (e) weather; (f) par 5; and (g) risk/reward.

Referring now to FIG. 2, an embodiment of a scorecard 20 is shown. The scorecard 20 is, preferably, an integral component of the golf game of the present invention. As can be seen in FIG. 2, it is preferred that the scorecard 20 have the appearance of a traditional scorecard of the type used in the play of live golf at a golf course. Indeed, it may be desired to utilize a scorecard 20 corresponding to a particularly well-known actual golf course, such as Augusta National or St. Andrews. It may be desired to provide with the golf game a plurality of scorecards 20, so as to add variety.

Referring now to FIGS. 1-1A, it can be seen that the game piece 10 is preferably hollow, and preferably has a cap 16 at one end thereof. The length of the game piece 10 should be sufficient to accommodate the insertion of a rolled-up scorecard 20, as shown in FIG. 1. Also, preferably, a marker 18 should be capable of being inserted therein, also as shown in FIG. 1. While the game piece 10 need not be hollow and while these other game components could be provided separately, the configuration shown in FIG. 1 is advantageous because it enhances the portability and convenience of the game.

Preferably, the marker 18 is of the dry erase type, and the scorecard 20 has a surface that permits the permits the erasable use of a dry erase marker thereon, so that the scorecard 20 can be re-used.

Preferably, a set of game instructions, such as those shown in FIG. 4, are also provided as part of the golf game. Preferably, these are printed on the reverse side of the scorecard 20, so that they too can be retained within the game piece 10 when the game is not being played.

STATEMENT OF OPERATION

A golf game utilizing different embodiments of the game components described herein can take a variety of forms. An exemplary set of rules describing different game versions is provided in FIG. 4, and incorporated herein by reference.

In one version, referred to in the rules as the “Duffers Game,” players take turn rolling the game piece 10. In this version, players only pay attention to the second, fourth and sixth columns shown in FIGS. 1C-1D; i.e., those columns concerning the score on a par 3, par 4, or par 5 hole. Each player, after rolling, is permitted to select the best of the three displayed scores, to the extent that there is an unplayed hole on the scorecard having that hole value. For example, if player one rolls the game piece 10 and the flat surface 12 that comes out on top shows a par on a par 3 hole, a par on a par 4 hole, and a birdie on a par 5 hole, the player will want to select the birdie on the par 5 hole, and he/she may write in that score on any par 5 hole that has not yet been filled in. In other words, the players can play the holes out of order.

It can be seen that it may be desired to provide a simplified game piece 10 having only three columns, with scores for par 3, par 4 and par 5 holes. (Indeed, if the game piece 10 is to be used to simulate the play of an executive type golf course, two columns, with scores for par 3 and par 4 holes, may be sufficient.) It may desired to provide a set of game pieces 10 of varying column number and complexity suitable for the play of different variations of the golf game of the present invention.

In another version of the game, called Mulligan play in the exemplary instructions, the same columns used in the play of the Duffers game are also the only columns used. What distinguishes Mulligan play from the Duffers Game is that, in Mulligan play, the scorecard is completed in order. For example, since hole 1 on the scorecard 20 is a par 4, the player must accept the score for the par 4 that appears on game piece 10, and may not select the par 3 or par 5 scores even if these are better.

For both the Duffers play and Mulligan play versions, it can be seen that there are several results which can require a second roll of the game piece 10. These are an ace (hole-in-one) on a par 3, an eagle on a par 4, or an eagle on a par 5. If a second roll yields the same score, the player receives that score. If not, the player receives a score that is one stroke worse than the first-rolled score (i.e., a birdie instead of an ace or an eagle).

In another version of a golf game consistent with an embodiment of the present invention, referred to in the instructions as “Tournament Play,” play proceeds similarly to the Mulligan play version, in the sense that the holes are played in order and no use is made of weather, hazard, or risk reward information. However, players are given the opportunity, through an additional roll of the game piece, to better certain scores. For example, a player playing a par 3 and rolling a par or a bogie with the first roll can better his/her score by one by rolling a second time and coming up with “putter” or any “wild” in the club column. A player playing a par 4 and rolling a par or a bogie with the first roll can better his/her score by one by rolling a second time and coming up with “wedge” or any “wild” in the club column. A player playing a par 5 and rolling a par or a bogie with the first roll can better his/her score by one by rolling a second time and coming up with “driver” or any “wild” in the club column.

The final version of a golf game consistent with an embodiment of the present invention is referred to in the instructions as “Championship Play.” In this version, additional variables are added to the play, which proceeds in the normal hole order. Preferably, prior to the start of the round, the game piece 10 is rolled to determine weather—i.e., perfect, windy, gusty, wind and rain. Additionally, it may be desired to allow each player to roll the game piece 10, to determine if that player will be affected by the weather condition. For example, if the first roll is “rain” and the player also rolls “rain,” that player will not be affected by weather in his/her scoring. However, if the two weather conditions do not match, the player will be affected by the first rolled weather condition.

If the weather is “perfect,” players should be given the opportunity to improve their score for each hole played, when they score a par or a bogie, by making a second role—as described above.

As an added element of difficulty, “challenges” can be incorporated into the game. For example, as shown in FIG. 4, the number of challenges can be a function of the weather conditions—with no challenges for perfect weather, 1 for gusty, 2 for windy, 3 for rain, and 4 for wind and rain. The challenge holes can be set in advance of the game, or players can be randomly challenged by their opponents.

A player rolling in response to a challenge must take into account not only the score for the hole being played (par 3, par 4 or par 5), but also the score shown in the hazard column (the third column from the left). In this embodiment, a stroke is added if the player has rolled OB (out of bounds), UPL (unplayable lie), or water. If the player rolls rough or sandtrap, the player rolls again. If he/she rolls the a putter for a par 3, a wedge for par 4, or a driver for par 5, no extra stroke is added—if not, a single stroke is added to the player's score.