Title:
Contrasting patterns on golf balls
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The invention is imprinting a selected shape onto a golf ball in a repeating and symmetrical arrangement to form at least one perceptible contrasting pattern upon viewing any part of the ball's surface. This improvement is based on an application of findings in the sciences of visual perception and human engineering. The function of contrasting patterns is to hold a golfer's focus on a golf ball through impact. Since the innovation does not violate any rule of golf (USGA or R&A), a golfer's concentration and ball striking ability will be enhanced for all shots in all playing situations.



Inventors:
Chapman, Curtis Lee (Madisonville, TN, US)
Application Number:
10/914671
Publication Date:
02/16/2006
Filing Date:
08/10/2004
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63B37/00
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
GORDEN, RAEANN
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Curtis, Lee Chapman (520 Meadow View Lane, Madisonville, TN, 37354, US)
Claims:
What I claim as my invention is:

1. Imprinting a selected shape onto a golf ball in a repeating and symmetrical arrangement to form at least one perceptible contrasting pattern upon viewing any part of the ball's surface.

2. The imprinting of the shape in claim 1 to appear repeatedly having an outline and/or filling of any one color or any combination of colors different from the predominant color of the background of the golf ball.

3. The imprinting of the shape in claim 1 to appear repeatedly having an outline in any color different from the predominant color of the background of the golf ball when the filling of the shape is the same color as the background.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

“Not Applicable”

STATEMENT REGARDING FEDERALLY SPONSORED RESEARCH OR DEVELOPMENT

“Not Applicable”

REFERENCE TO SEQUENCE LISTING, A TABLE, OR A COMPUTER PROGRAM LISTING COMPACT DISC APPENDIX

“Not Applicable”

BACKGROUND OF THE INVENTION

Golf ball manufacturers have made great advances in the areas of materials and aerodynamics. If hit properly, today's balls fly farther and straighter than ever. These technological advances, however, mean nothing if the golfer has poor concentration and cannot strike the ball effectively. A need exists for an innovation that enhances a golfer's concentration and ball striking ability that can be used for all shots from tee to green in all playing situations [recreational and competitive].

One patent I discovered deals with placing a marker under the golf ball for the purpose of assisting a golfer's concentration. Schwab (U.S. Pat. No. 5,449,176) invented a “crescent shaped object” that can be placed under a ball in such a way to obscure it from a golfer's view. The object reappears in the golfer's field of vision at impact as he/she swings through the ball. The disadvantage is that the object can only be used as a training aid in practice sessions or recreational playing situations.

Two other patents I discovered involve placing marks on the surface of a golf ball to serve primarily as an aid for lining-up putts: Scott's “directional indicia” consisting of a line of arrows around a ball's diameter (U.S. Pat. No. 6,739,980) and Tyler's device for drawing lines to indicate a golf ball's “equatorial regions” (U.S. Pat. No. 6,676,544). Golfers, however, can use marks on a ball to determine alignment only when it is permissible to touch and place the golf ball-i.e. driving and putting. Between the tee and green in competitive playing situations, when the rule is to play the ball as it lies, the ball would rarely come to rest in a position where directional indicia would point to the next target.

My innovation for improving a golfer's concentration, with the emphasis on producing better ball-striking ability for every conceivable shot in any playing situation, that also conforms to United States Golf Association (USGA) and Royal and Ancient (R & A) Rules, will have great utility.

BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

My invention is imprinting a selected shape onto a golf ball in a repeating and symmetrical arrangement to form at least one perceptible contrasting pattern upon viewing any part of the ball's surface. The function of a contrasting pattern on a golf ball is to create a focal point that stimulates the brain at both conscious and subconscious levels. The brain in turn produces and maintains the concentration the golfer needs to keep his/her “eye on the ball” through impact. Simply put, a pattern on a golf ball makes it more interesting to look at.

This innovation will improve the ball-striking ability of golfers at all levels of ability, which means they can take advantage of technological advances in materials and aerodynamics. Contrasting patterns on golf balls are not limited as a training aid that can only be used in practice or recreational situations. Because a contrasting pattern is visible regardless of the lie of the ball, the positive effects on a golfer's concentration occur for every shot from tee to green. Contrasting patterns do not violate the rules of golf because improvements in distance and accuracy happen as a result of stimulating a player's unique abilities. Contrasting patterns conform to USGA Rule 5-2/“The Ball” because there is no effect on playing characteristics in terms of movement as neither the ball's shape nor materials are altered.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE SEVERAL VIEWS OF THE DRAWING

FIG. 1 is a front view of a golf ball for use in the present invention.

FIG. 2 is a back view of a golf ball for use in the present invention.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

The invention of imprinting a selected shape onto a golf ball in a repeating and symmetrical arrangement to form at least one perceptible contrasting pattern upon viewing any part of the ball's surface is based on applying the principles of visual perception and human engineering. The findings of these sciences reveal an approach for improving a golfer's performance. Objects with contrasting patterns, defined as a symmetrical juxtaposition of dissimilar elements, attract and hold a person's attention demonstrably better compared to objects with isolated markings or solid colors. The visual elements of today's golf ball—a few letters and numbers on an otherwise white void—provide only a minimal visual appeal.

Child development experts concur that infants are instinctively attracted to and captivated by objects with contrasting patterns (e.g. Gurian, 2004). Research in human engineering has shown that adults also intuitively respond to sharp contrasts—

    • The visual difficulty of a task is affected by . . . the contrast between the luminance of the critical visual details and the luminance of the background. Generally, decreasing task difficulty by increasing . . . the amount of contrast will result in improved performance (Boyce, 1981; Cushman & Crist, 1987).

Inherent in the idea of “contrasting” is the juxtaposition of dissimilar elements. In the case of a golf ball, each imprint of the selected shape is set off by the outline and/or filling having a color different from the predominant color of the ball's background. Inherent in the idea of “pattern” is a symmetry of repeating shapes. In the case of a golf ball, each imprint of the selected shape is equidistant from the ones adjacent. The intent is to create a balanced and proportional symmetry over the surface area of the ball as far as the human eye is able to discern at distances associated with attempting a golf shot. Not only is there symmetry in the form of the shape itself but also in the forms created by the way the shapes are positioned in relation to each other.

The shape used to form a contrasting pattern on a golf ball can be selected from a wide variety of items: for example, triangles, diamonds, hearts, flowers, business or sport logos, etc. The size and number of shapes can correspond to a golfer's skill level-bigger and fewer shapes for high handicappers; smaller and more numerous shapes for better golfers. To suit the golfer's priority for performance or style, various shapes and colors could be combined to create a virtually infinite number of designs. Hence, each ball can have a unique contrasting pattern.

The improvement is for a golfer to be able to perceive a contrasting pattern upon viewing any part of the surface of a golf ball. The outcome will be enhancing the golfer's ability to keep his/her eye on the ball, resulting in a consistent swing that produces solid contact with the clubface and directs the ball toward the target.

REFERENCES

  • Boyce, P. R. (1981). Human Factors in Lighting. Essex, England: Applied Science.
  • Cushman, W. H. and Crist, B. (1987). “Illumination.” In G. Salvendy (Ed.), Handbook of Human Factors (pp. 670-695). New York: John Wiley and Sons.
  • Gurian, Anita. (2004). Getting a Good Start: Expectations, Challenges and Fostering Growth in the Child's First Year of Life. New York University Child Study Center. Available: www.aboutourkids.org/aboutour/articles/good_start1.html





 
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