Title:
Word trivia board game using a points-matrix system
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
Knowledge helps but the art or persuasion is the key to this game. The respondent attempts to garner optimum points by persuading or deceiving the audience that the answer or choice given is either correct or incorrect. The audience also gets the chance to score points on the same word question by strategically agreeing or disagreeing with the respondent. The game includes a game board that provides a scoring system using a points-matrix, which award points to each participant based on whether the answer of correct or incorrect, and whether some or all of the audience agree or disagree with the answer. The game board also provide a brief explanation of the various scores. The points take into consideration factors such as knowledge, deception, cunning, and degree of difficulty and are awarded accordingly. The number of possible outcomes (points) also allows participants to devise various stratagems that will garner them the most points and prevent others from scoring likewise. Gaining a consensus generally works in the favor of the respondent.



Inventors:
Capellan, Ponciano Erum (Issaquah, WA, US)
Application Number:
10/814740
Publication Date:
10/06/2005
Filing Date:
04/01/2004
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A63F9/00; A63F9/18; (IPC1-7): A63F9/18
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
MENDIRATTA, VISHU K
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
PONCIANO E. CAPELLAN (4662 191ST AVENUE SE, ISSAQUAH, WA, 98027, US)
Claims:
1. A method of playing a word trivia game wherein all participants, including but not limited to the respondent, can score points on every word question. In addition, all participants, including the respondent, can score points whether or not the answer is correct. The respondent can score points with an incorrect answer by getting some or all of the other participants to agree with the incorrect answer, and the audience can also score points by either agreeing or disagreeing with the correct or incorrect answer. However, the respondent cannot score points by giving the wrong answer and no one agrees, and the audience cannot score points by agreeing with the incorrect answer or by disagreeing with the correct answer.

2. A method according to claim 1 wherein a game board displaying a Point-Matrix System is utilized in determining the points for both respondent and audience in each word question. The points are based on various possible outcomes (points) depending on whether or not the answer given is correct; whether or not there is consensus amongst the audience; and, whether or not the audience agree or disagree with the answer.

3. A method according to claim 1 wherein each participant takes a colored chip to identify their place in the scorecards/scoreboard, their place in the order of answering word questions, and to declare their agreement or disagreement with each answer by placing their colored chip in either the green (agree) bowl or the yellow (disagree) bowl.

4. A method according to claim 1 wherein each participant draws a card from a deck of cards that contains the word and 4 choices, one of which is the correct answer. The word represents a Person, Location, Thing (tangible), or Concept (non-tangible). The respondent, or the participant whose turn it is to answer, declares (read out loud) the word question, the 4 choices, and the choice of answer. The audience, or the other participants in the game, each declare their agreement or disagreement with the answer or choice as described in claim 3.

5. A method according to claim 3 wherein each participant get to answer a word question per round and scores are tallied on the score card. After each round, scores of participants are tallied on the scoreboard until 6 rounds are completed and the aggregate scores determines the winner.

Description:

DETAILED DESCRIPTION

This invention takes a simple word trivia game into another realm by allowing all participants to score points on the same word question. Another novel feature of this invention is the POINTS-MATRIX, which provides a scoring system where each participant not only can score points on every word question, but points for everybody can vary with each possible outcome as dictated in the matrix. The various outcomes (points) allow participants to devise various stratagems thereby adding greater player involvement and interest. The respondent (participant whose turn it is to answer a word question) can bluff knowledge and the audience (other participants) can strategically agree or disagree based on their own knowledge and possible outcomes (points for or against). The game board displays the POINTS-MATRIX and explanations on the various points for every combination. There are a total of 16 possible scoring combinations, including zero points. They will vary depending on whether:

    • Respondent's answer is correct and some or all agree (with or without consensus).
    • Respondent's answer is correct and some or all disagree (with or without consensus).
    • Respondent's answer is incorrect and some or all agree (with or without consensus)
    • Respondent's answer is incorrect and some of all disagree (with or without consensus).

Hence, there are 4 possible outcomes (combination points) for the respondent and 4 possible outcomes (combination points) for each of the other participants who either agree or disagree when the answer is correct. Likewise, there are 4 possible outcomes (combination points) for the respondent and 4 possible outcomes (combination points) for the other participants when the answer is incorrect.

The basic game is played with a minimum of 4 players, couples, or teams (“PCT”) and a maximum of 6 PCT. Playing as an individual, couple, or team depends on the total number of participants in the game. Each player is assigned a colored chip that corresponds to color-coded score cards and scoreboard. The chips are also used for declaring agreement or disagreement with the respondent's answer by placing the chip in either the green (agree) or yellow (disagree) bowls. Each PCT may have their own score cards but only one score board, which determines the overall winner.

Each PCT gets to answer a word trivia question per round and totals of each round is tallied in the score board. Winner is declared after 6 rounds.

Each word trivia question is in the form of an esoteric word, which refers to either a PERSON, LOCATION, THING, or CONCEPT. The word question and multiple choices can be found in the deck of cards and the correct choice is found in the Book of Choices where it is referenced. There is also a brief explanation on the correct choice to give the game an educational value. The respondent declares the word question and chooses an answer. The audience jointly or severally decides to agree or disagree with the choice and places their colored chip on the appropriate bowl. Points are awarded to the respondent and each audience based on the points-matrix.

In lieu of the deck of cards with the word questions and multiple choices, plus the Book of Choices that provide the correct choice and explanation, the game can also be developed using a DVD media format where the questions, answers, and explanations are displayed on TV using text, graphics, and streaming video. The game can also be adapted in a personal computer software format.

FIG. 1 is a view of the equipments needed to play the game as described.

FIG. 2a is a view of the left side of the game board that displays the point-matrix, which provides the scores of the participants if the answer or choice is correct.

FIG. 2b is a view of the right side of the game board that displays the point-matrix, which provides the scores of the participants if the answer or choice is incorrect.

Exhibit A is the designation and explanation of the various points for the participants if the answer or choice is correct. This text is displayed on the left side of the game board, adjacent to FIG. 2a.

Exhibit B is the designation and explanation of the various points for the participants if the answer or choice is incorrect. This text is displayed on the right side of the game board, adjacent to FIG. 2b.