Title:
Sandwich panel-type wall construction
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The invention relates to a sandwich panel-type wall construction comprising an upright framework (1). Two parallel lateral walls (57) are solidly connected to said upright framework (1) on either side thereof. The inventive construction is characterised in that the upright framework (1) is solidly connected to the lateral walls (57) by fitting said uprights (1) to said walls (57).



Inventors:
Roumagere, Louis (Lege Cap Ferret, FR)
Application Number:
10/491203
Publication Date:
08/04/2005
Filing Date:
09/26/2002
Assignee:
ROUMAGERE LOUIS
Primary Class:
International Classes:
E04B1/10; E04B1/35; (IPC1-7): E04B1/18
View Patent Images:



Primary Examiner:
HERRING, BRENT W
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Perman & Green, LLP (99 Hawley Lane, Stratford, CT, 06614, US)
Claims:
1. A wall construction of the sandwich panel type comprising a framework of studs (1) onto which are joined on either side of stud (1) two parallel lateral walls (57), characterized in that the framework of stud (1) and the lateral walls (57) are joined by fittings (10, 51) for joining studs (1) with lateral walls (57).

2. The wall construction of the sandwich panel type according to claim 1, further characterized in that the framework of studs (1) is made up of a set of studs (1) with the oblong shape of a post section, of a given stud height, and having along its top and bottom an upper stud face (Fs) and a lower stud face (Fi), of horizontal section of a generally parallelepiped shape and having two opposite and parallel stud wall faces (Fp), the stud wall faces (Fp) being provided with T-grooves (10) along which lateral walls (57), provided with wall ribs (51) complementary to T-grooves (10), are threaded, the studs being stacked vertically by fitting together, the upper stud faces (Fs) having a section and a relief (5, 6) complementary to the section and relief of the lower stud face (Fi).

3. The wall construction of the sandwich panel type according to claim 2, further characterized in that studs (1) are reinforced, that is to say, provided with a central perforation (20) in the block along the entire height and whose function is to allow the passage of reinforcement (21).

4. The wall construction of the sandwich panel type according to claim 3, further characterized in that reinforcement (21) is a metal shaft threaded at both of its ends, of length equal to the height of stud (1) that it passes through, the shaft being coupled to a double-entry connector sleeve (23), connector sleeve (23) being positioned before the vertical fitting of upper stud (1) and lower stud (1), leveling with upper face (Fs) of an upper stud (1), the screwing of sleeve (23) onto shaft (21) becoming a means of joining by fitting upper stud (1) onto lower stud (1) and connecting reinforcement (21).

5. The wall construction of the sandwich panel type according to claim 2, further characterized in that the horizontal section of stud (1) has a cross face (Fe) provided with means (34, 35) permitting lateral fitting with other cross faces (Fe, 34, 35) of other studs (1).

6. The wall construction of the sandwich panel type according to claim 2, further characterized in that lateral walls (57) are made up of a set of lap-boards (50) and lap-board cross-pieces (51), lap-board cross-pieces (51) are connected perpendicularly to lap-boards (50) and lap-board cross-pieces (51) have a section with a shape complementary to T-grooves (10) so as to serve as a means for fitting lateral walls (57) and the framework of studs (1).

7. The wall construction of the sandwich panel type according to claim 6, further characterized in that lap-boards (50) are provided longitudinally on a first section with male ribs (53) and longitudinally on their second section with female ribs (54) so as to be fitted to one another and so as to contribute to making the construction rigid longitudinally.

8. The wall construction of the sandwich panel type according to claim 2, further characterized in that, for a specific height of stud (1), a set of studs (1) are joined to wall panels (57), which then constitute a particular form of sandwich panel called wall section (56), the construction being then successively erected by layers of wall section (56), the wall layers (56) being able to be fitted together both laterally and vertically.

9. The wall construction of the sandwich panel type according to claim 8, further characterized in that during construction, alignment plates (Pa) are positioned under the first wall layer (56), these plates being metal plates perforated with holes, through which passes the lower end of reinforcements (21) and whose function is to preserve the rigorous horizontal levelness of the first layer of wall section (56).

10. A construction process with a sandwich assembly for construction of bearing walls or partition walls, characterized in that it comprises the successive steps: design of the construction placement of base plate, capping or joist, with reserved space for the tip of the reinforcements erection of the first layer of wall section placement of the first reinforcement layer adjustment for horizontal levelness and squaring of the first layer of wall section sealing the reinforcements in the spaces reserved for this successive erection of different layers of wall section with their reinforcement placement of opening frames framing placement of the self-supporting roof trussing, roofing

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

The present invention concerns an improved wall construction of the sandwich panel type. The invention notably permits the construction of wood buildings, individual homes, chalets, offices, garages, and pools. The assemblies are delivered as a kit and assembled on site according to a particularly efficacious and rapid construction process.

PRIOR ART

Sandwich wall assemblies for the construction of bearing walls or partition walls are known in the prior art. These assemblies comprise two walls, an outer wall and an inner wall, both walls being parallel, set apart and separated by studs. The inner volume between the walls is currently used for sound and/or thermal insulation or for the passage of service shafts. These assemblies are built and erected on the work site. The studs are often posts or frames and are joined together with joining devices of the corner brace or screw type. The inner and outer walls are then screwed or nailed onto the studs.

A first problem in the prior art is that the placement of insulation and the passage of service shafts inside the sandwich panel must be conducted in a precise phase on the work site wherein the first wall is erected on the studs while the second wall is not yet erected. This involves a coordination of the different tradespeople, with increases in building time and inherent costs.

A second problem is that after construction, houses rapidly show aging flaws with the appearance of cracks and structural deformation. These problems, which are particularly visible with wood structures, originate notably from structures that warp or shrink, as well as due to a loosening of the devices for joining the different constituent elements together, which is caused by aging.

Another problem posed in the prior art originates from the fact that since the walls are joined to studs by screws, the head of the screw is visible in the wall. In addition to the fact that these screws are often visible, upon aging and notably under the effect of rain, these screws rust and leave disfiguring trails on the walls.

In the prior art, the majority of assembly elements, studs, walls, joists, and beams are worked and arranged on the site with a variety of sawing, screwing and planing machines. The construction very often requires, moreover, the use of heavy transport means, cranes and gantries. The work to be provided on site is therefore costly in terms of time and in equipment.

DESCRIPTION OF THE INVENTION

An object of the invention is to maximally decrease on-site labor. The invention thus proposes assembly elements which are assembled with great ease, requiring scarcely any screwing or sawing work on site. The construction is thus designed in a blueprint, then machined, piece by piece in the factory. The pieces are then assembled into assembly modules on an assembly line. The pieces are delivered in the form of a kit to the work site. The on-site phase only requires simple assembly.

Another object of the invention is to deliver assembled elements to the site that incorporate insulation and finishing and even, possibly, painting. The on-site labor requires virtually no assembly work and almost no finishing work.

Another object of the invention is to propose modules manufactured in the factory on an assembly line in a repetitive manner with very simple manufacturing means. These pieces are designed so that it is possible to erect a house with a minimum of component pieces, which are manufactured in the factory.

The assembly according to the invention can be made of wood, composite materials or any other materials, as long as they are structural materials.

Within the scope of embodiments in wood, an object of the invention is to be able to create these assembly pieces with mostly short pieces of wood or wood scraps. The creation of these pieces permits drastically reducing the proportion of wood waste when compared to the design of the prior art for the creation of wood houses.

Another object of the invention is to propose assembly elements that have an optimal volume for transport and storage. The invention thus permits making up an industrial package, as well as storage and transport that are separated according to the nature of the pieces. All of the pieces can then be assembled on the work site or on the site of a contractor just before construction of the house. It is possible, for example, to create one specific package for the studs and another specific package for the lateral walls. It becomes possible with the invention to transport the elements of the house not erected but ready to assemble in a transport truck which is of traditional size and not subject to regulations on unusual [oversize] transports.

Purely by way of indication, the invention permits foundations to be constructed, from the foundation up to the final finishing, of a house of 100 m2 in less than fifteen days by two people who are not specialists in wood-working or house-building.

Another object of the invention is to propose a sandwich assembly that has technical characteristics superior to those of the prior art. The wall design according to the invention has a mechanical resistance to earthquakes greater than the designs now on the market. This is due to the fact that the structure, by its design, is self-supporting. The sound and thermal characteristics are equal to the highest performances found on the market.

Another object of the invention is to propose a construction that can be taken apart and then reconstructed. According to the invention, recycling of part or all of the building is possible.

Another objective of the invention is to be able to build in areas thought to be difficult with regard to accessibility of the work site, space around the site, or noise problems in the surroundings. The only constraint is to have available a solid but rudimentary setting and the building can be erected on piles.

Another object of the invention is to build partition walls or bearing walls without any visible screws.

The invention proposes an improved sandwich wall assembly. Construction is carried out with these assemblies which notably comprise a set of studs and a set of lateral walls. One specific feature of the studs according to the invention is a simultaneous assembly by superimposition, by fitting together with other studs, and also by lateral setting into the panels of the walls making up the exterior and interior walls.

In one aspect of the invention, the studs have a roughly oblong parallelepiped shape, with an upper face and a lower face, and four lateral faces. The upper face of the stud is inserted into the lower face of any other stud. From a set of studs, one can therefore make up a room-length upright stud. In the current aspect, a stud has a length of approximately 50 cm so that the height of one story of traditional size can be created with five studs. Obviously, depending on the embodiment, the height of the studs can be designed at a length which can be specific.

In another aspect of the invention, the stud has lateral faces called wall faces that have the function of serving for attachment support for the panels of lateral walls on the stud. This attachment is conducted preferentially by a clever fit between a first rib or groove arranged on the lateral face of the wall and a second complementary groove or rib created on the lateral wall panel.

In another aspect of the invention, the stud has lateral faces called lateral cross-piece faces which have the function of serving for attachment support between the studs when in certain arrangements these latter are mounted side-by-side [as cross-pieces]. This attachment is preferentially carried out by a clever fit between a first rib (male or female) arranged on the lateral cross-piece face of a first stud and a second complementary rib (male or female) made on another lateral cross-piece face of a second stud. This arrangement is useful for situations of angle breaking and angle joining, for example the joint between two walls that defines the zone called the corner of the wall, or for situations of structural reinforcement, for example, to increase the carrying capacity of a specific place on a wall.

In another aspect of the invention, the lateral walls of the sandwich wall assembly according to the invention are designed in a particular manner. These lateral walls comprise wall panels. The width of the wall panels can be equal to the width of the wall assembly, the wall panels being then fitted into one another, for example along the vertical for a vertical wall, in order to constitute the height of the wall assembly once assembled.

In another aspect of the invention, the wall panels are made up of wall lap-boards and wall cross-pieces. We designate as lap-boards a form of board with an improved appearance that currently decorates the façade of houses. The panels are made up of identical lap-boards, four lap-boards in the standard model according to the invention, the lap-boards being fitted into one another along their entire length. The lap-boards according to the invention have ribs and grooves that fit together along their long side. The panels are then created by screwing cross-pieces perpendicularly to the lap-boards. The section of these cross-pieces forms a rib of complementary form to the groove created on the wall faces of the studs. The cross-pieces are arranged on the lap-boards at distances then corresponding to the distances separating the studs onto which the lateral walls will be fitted.

In another aspect of the invention, the studs are fitted into the wall panels. They thus make up a wall section equal to the length of the constituent wall panel and of a height equal to the height of the stud and the panel of the constituent wall. The construction will then by erected by layers. Each layer is made up of one wall section. The wall layers are stacked on top of one another and thus make up one floor of wall layers.

In another aspect of the invention, a construction process is also covered. The first phase of the process consists of a bottom plate, capping or joist, onto which the construction is erected. The second phase of the process consists of positioning the metal reinforcements. The third phase of the process consists of erecting the first floor of the wall-layer sections. The fourth phase of the process consists of elevating the construction by successively stacking the different stories of wall-layer sections. The fifth phase of the process consists of erecting the roof.

In another aspect of the invention the studs are perforated along their length by a perforation along a vertical axis joining the upper face to the lower face. This perforation functions to allow passage of a metal shaft which has the function of serving as a structural reinforcement for the stud. One can refer to this stud as a reinforced stud.

In another aspect of the invention, the reinforcement is a metal shaft threaded on its ends and having a height equal to the height of a stud. The shaft is coupled to an equivalent shaft by means of a coupling socket. This arrangement permits easily erecting the wall sections without having difficulties in aligning the shafts on the holes made in the studs. The invention therefore permits first of all fitting the wall sections to one another in order to then easily thread the reinforcements. The socket is ready to receive the threaded shaft which will be screwed from the top.

In another aspect of the invention, the fitting of the wall sections to one another is improved. For obvious reasons of a tight seal, the wall sections must be perfectly hermetically fitted to one another. Fitting according to the invention is performed by force without deterioration of the constituent materials. It is conducted by the action of sockets mounted on the threaded shafts. By means of an improved wrench, the operator screws the socket onto the shaft, the socket and the wrench supporting the stud, which brings about locally laying down the upper wall section onto the lower wall section. In one aspect, the wrench is a motorized impact-type driver and in one version has an axial fitting mounted on a screw gun.

Other objects, characteristics and advantages of the present invention will appear more clearly from the description that follows of one example of embodiment given by way of illustration, in reference to the attached drawings in which:

FIG. 1 shows a top view of the stud.

FIG. 1a shows a bottom view of the of the stud made up of several pieces.

FIGS. 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e and 1f show several particular embodiments of the stud.

FIGS. 1g, 1h show the studs of FIGS. 1b and 1d with finishing insulation and service shafts.

FIG. 2 shows a side view of the stud.

FIG. 3 shows a side view of a reinforcement provided with a sleeve

FIG. 3a shows a perspective view of a connector sleeve.

FIG. 4 shows a side view of the vertical fitting of studs.

FIGS. 5a, 5b, 5c, and 5d show several modes of assembly of studs.

FIGS. 6a, 6b, 6c, 6d show attachment plates corresponding to the modes of assembly of FIGS. 5a, 5b, 5c, and 5d.

FIG. 7 shows a profile view of a lap-board.

FIG. 8 shows a profile view of a lap-board cross-piece.

FIG. 9 shows a surface view of a wall panel.

FIG. 10 shows a top view of a wall panel.

FIG. 11 shows a perspective view of a wall section.

FIG. 12 shows an arrangement of rows of studs for transport on palettes.

FIG. 13 shows an arrangement of rows of wall panels for the transport phase.

FIGS. 14a, 14b, 14c show different phases of construction.

FIGS. 1 and 2 show a stud (1) in its most standard version, in a top view and a side view. In the top view, the section of stud (1) is inscribed in a square. This square section is fundamental for studs (1) positioned at wall angles or corners and for coordinating the junction between studs (1) which are laterally fitted together, as shown in FIG. 5a. Studs (1) that are not positioned at angles can be, for example, of roughly rectangular section. According to FIG. 1, the stud has four faces, two lateral wall faces (Fp) that have a female rib or groove in the shape of a T. Other rib sections can be envisioned, such as rounded ribs or beveled ribs. The function of these ribs is to permit assembly with the lap-board cross-pieces (51), shown in FIG. 8, which constitute the attachment means for the lateral walls. Stud (1) is perforated along its entire height by a hole (20), and the function of this perforation is to allow a passage for threading in a reinforcement which, as shown in FIG. 3, is a threaded metal shaft (21). The length of threaded shaft (21) is equal to the length of stud (1), as shown in FIG. 2. A side view of stud (1), which has a generally oblong parallelepiped shape, is shown in FIG. 2. It has an upper face (Fs) and a lower face (Fi) having complementary shapes so that the upper face (Fs) of a first stud can be fitted with the lower face (Fi) of a second stud (1). The rigidity of the installation is obtained by means of a setback over a section of the upper face (Fs), lower face (Fi) having an equivalent reinforcement over an equivalent part. In the example of FIGS. 1 and 2, these setbacks have a square or rectangular section when viewed from the top. This shape is particularly interesting since, as FIG. 1a illustrates, it permits making stud (1) with pieces of very simple form since it is simply a matter of cleverly grooved sections carefully assembled according to a very precise arrangement. A stud (1) module erected by cleverly assembling two first identical outer grooved pieces (5) is shown in FIG. (1a), whose function is to make up the grooving (10) for holding the lap-board cross-pieces and second identical inner grooved boards (6) whose function is to make up the grooving for passage of reinforcement (21). Reinforcement (21) is shown in FIG. 3, which is a metal shaft threaded at both of its ends with a washer (22) and a connector sleeve (23). Washer (22) will be positioned in a complementary reserved space created on upper face (Fs) which will be perforated in the format of washer (22) around the reinforcement perforation hole (20). Connector sleeve (23) as shown in FIG. 4 will receive the upper part of a first threaded shaft (21) on its lower part and the lower part of a second threaded shaft (21) on its upper part. In the assembled mode, threaded shaft (21) will be erected to a height roughly equal to half the height of sleeve (23) and projects above stud (1). This placement permits easily positioning the shafts and especially permits fitting studs (1) with one another by force by activating sleeve (23), for example by means of an impact wrench.

FIG. 3a shows a perspective view of connector sleeve (23), which in this particular aspect is a hexagonal socket. The threading is notched at midway to define the course of shafts (21).

FIGS. 1b, 1c, 1d, 1e, and 1f represent particular forms of studs (1) having a specific function on one of their cross faces (Fe). These particular forms can then be combined with one another according to the targeted objective to create a stud that positions these functions over several of these cross faces (Fe). A stud (1) is shown in FIG. 1b having a lateral cross face (Fe) having an intermediate groove (30) to receive a panel (31), as shown in FIG. 1h. This stud (1) is shown in FIG. 1h with an example of insulation (32) of sprayed polyurethane foam. Panel (31) separates out a space for service shafts (33). FIGS. 1d and 1g represent another model for stud (1) having a lateral cross face that has a setback. As shown in FIG. 1g, the function of this setback is to hold a block of insulating material (32). A stud (1) is shown in FIG. 1c that has a male rib (34) on the lateral cross face for attachment. A stud (1) is shown in FIG. 1f that has a female attachment rib (35) on the cross face (Fe) which has a T shape. The function of the cross attachment male and female ribs (34, 35) is to be able to join two studs (1) together laterally. The function of this rib and groove joining (34, 35) is particularly shown in FIG. 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d, in which a breaking of angles in bearing walls as well as in partition walls is particularly shown. FIG. 1e represents a positioning of a large central groove (36) which functions to hold a block of insulation of the fiberglass type or equivalent.

FIG. 4 shows a side view of the vertical fitting of the studs. In this figure, a sealing plate Ps is shown on the joist or the capping with a first stud (1) for the first layer of wall section. A threaded shaft (21) is also shown through a beam (38), notably for construction of a ceiling for a story. The figure shows the stud holding up the self-supporting roof or structure (37), attachments being made with a beam of solid wood (39) and its connection nut.

FIGS. 5a, 5b, 5c, 5d show in top view various modes of assembly: FIG. 5a shows mounting at a 90° angle employing three studs (1); FIG. 5b shows mounting in a cross with five studs (1); FIG. 5c shows a T assembly with two studs (1); FIG. 5d shows an assembly on the bias with two studs (1) of traditional form and a stud with a section, when viewed from the top, of general triangular shape, which is positioned in the middle of two other studs, thus constituting the break of a wall angle.

FIGS. 6a, 6b, 6c, and 6d represent alignment plates corresponding to the modes of assembly of FIGS. 5a, 5b, 5c, and 5d.

FIG. 7 shows a profile view of a lap-board (50). A lap-board is a wood board with an improved appearance. In the figure, two grooves (52) are shown whose purpose is to interrupt the thread of the wood to allow for wood warping over the long term. Lap-board (50) also has a male fitting rib (53) whose function is to be fitted in a female fitting rib (54) of the upper lap-board. FIG. 8 shows a profile view of a lap-board cross-piece (51). This cross-piece has a T-shaped section that complements the female groove (10) created in stud (1). FIG. 9 shows a face view of wall panel (57). This wall panel (57) is made up of four stacked lap-boards (50). In the present case, two lap-board cross-pieces (51) are visible which are fitted into two studs (1). Cross-pieces (51) are joined by screwing or nailing, perpendicularly to lap-boards (50). In another version of the invention, the lap-board cross-pieces (51) can be fitted with lap-boards (50). FIG. 10 shows a top view of a wall panel. FIG. 11 shows a perspective view of wall section (56) that can be installed. This wall section (56) simply comprises two* cross-pieces (51) and two** studs (1). Of course, it is possible to manufacture wall sections having n studs (1) and n lap-board cross-pieces (51) (in the most standard version without forming another angle).
* sic; three cross-pieces (51) are shown in FIG. 9.—Trans. Note. ** sic; again three studs are shown in FIG. 11—Trans. Note.

FIG. 12 shows an arrangement of rows of studs (1) for transport on palettes. FIG. 13 shows an arrangement of rows of wall panels (57) ready for the transport phase. In this version, as shown in FIGS. 12 and 13, the wall compositions are delivered unassembled and the builder will assemble wall panels (57) and studs (1) on-site or beforehand, to form wall sections (56).

FIGS. 14a, 14b, 14c show different phases of construction according to the invention. FIG. 14a shows phase 1 of the process which consists of erecting a construction base plate, capping or joist with spaces reserved for the placement of the tip of threaded shaft (21) of the first wall section, this shaft (21a), shown in FIG. 4, having the characteristic of having a length greater than the length of the stud of the first wall section (56a), so that its end provided with an attachment plate reaches inside the reserved spaces. The operator erects the first layer of wall section, shown in FIG. 14b, and then verifies and adjusts the horizontal levelness with a square. Alignment plates Pa, shown in FIG. 4, then contribute to strictly preserving the vertical straightness of reinforcements (21). The operator then pours concrete into the reserved spaces. First wall section (56a) is therefore perfectly positioned spatially. In FIG. 14b, a first solid facade (60) appears, without opening, made of wall sections equal in length to the total width of the facade. A facade (61) appears in FIG. 14b, having an opening which is a door, illustrating here, juxtaposed to the first wall section, a wall (61), with two wall sections making up the first layer and the space between them defining the space for the door. FIG. 14c shows the facades erected with two layers of wall section. The operators have successively erected the second layer of wall section, and then the reinforcements.

The invention concerns a wall construction of the sandwich panel type comprising a framework of studs (1) onto which are joined on either side of stud (1) two parallel lateral walls (57), characterized in that the framework of studs (1) and lateral walls (57) are joined by fitting (10, 51) studs (1) with lateral walls (57).

The invention also concerns a wall construction of the sandwich panel type, characterized in that the framework of studs (1) is made up of a set of studs (1) of oblong shape of post section, of specific height and having on the top and bottom an upper stud face (Fs) and a lower stud face (Fi), of horizontal section of a generally parallelepiped shape having two opposite and parallel upright stud wall faces (Fp); the upright stud wall faces (Fp) are provided with T-grooves (10) along which lateral walls (57), provided with wall ribs (51) complementary to stud T-grooves (10), are threaded, the studs being stacked vertically by fitting together, the upper stud faces (Fs) having a section in relief (5, 6) complementary to the section and the relief of the lower stud face (Fi).

The invention therefore concerns a wall construction of the sandwich panel type characterized in that studs (1) are reinforced, i.e., provided with a central perforation (20) in the block along the entire height and whose function is to allow the through passage of a reinforcement (21).

The invention therefore concerns a wall construction of the sandwich panel type characterized in that reinforcement (21) is a metal shaft threaded at both ends, of length equal to the height of stud (1) through which it passes, the shaft being coupled to a double-entry connector sleeve (23), connector sleeve (23) being positioned before the vertical fitting of an upper stud (1) and a lower stud (1), leveling with the upper face (Fs) of an upper stud (1), the screwing of sleeve (23) onto shaft (21) becoming a means of joining upper stud (1) onto a lower stud (1) and connecting with reinforcement (21).

The invention therefore concerns a wall construction of the sandwich panel type characterized in that the horizontal section of stud (1) has a cross face (Fe) provided with means (34, 35) permitting being laterally fitted with other cross faces (Fe, 34, 35) of other studs (1).

The invention therefore concerns a wall construction of the sandwich panel type characterized in that lateral walls (57) are made up of a set of lap-boards (50) and lap-board cross-pieces (51), lap-board cross-pieces (51) are connected perpendicularly to lap-boards (50), and lap-board cross-pieces (51) have a section of a shape complementary to stud T-grooves (10) so as to serve as a fitting means between lateral walls (57) and the framework of studs (1).

The invention therefore concerns a wall construction of the sandwich panel type characterized in that lap-boards (50) are provided with male ribs (53) longitudinally on a first section and with a female groove (54) longitudinally on their second section, so as to be fitted into one another and so as to contribute to making the construction rigid longitudinally.

The invention therefore concerns a wall construction of the sandwich panel type characterized in that, for a specific height of studs (1), a set of studs (1) are joined to wall panels (57), which then constitute a particular form of sandwich panel called wall section (56), the construction then being erected successively by layers of wall section (56), the wall layers (56) being able to be fitted into one another both laterally and vertically.

The invention also concerns a wall construction of the sandwich panel type characterized in that during construction, under the first wall layer (56), alignment plates (Pa) are positioned, which are metal plates perforated with holes, which are traversed by the lower end of reinforcements (21) and whose function is to rigorously preserve the horizontal levelness of the first layer of wall section (56).

The invention therefore concerns a construction process with a sandwich assembly for the construction of bearing walls or partition walls characterized in that it comprises the successive steps:

    • design of the construction
    • placement of a base plate, capping or joist, with reserved space for the tip of the reinforcements
    • erection of the first layer of wall section
    • placement of the first reinforcement layer
    • adjustment for horizontal levelness and squaring of the first layer of wall section
    • sealing the reinforcements in the spaces reserved for this
    • successive erection of different layers of wall section with their reinforcement
    • placement of opening frames
    • framing
    • placement of the self-supporting roof
    • trussing, roofing

It is therefore clearly seen that numerous possible variants that can be combined can be introduced here without ever exceeding the scope of the invention such as defined above.