Title:
Uniquely-disposed cup-holder strap
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
A box and cup-holder strap capable of having the strap being disposed in a connected-corner section of the box and/or one or more of the walls of the box being disposed at an oblique angle to the bottom panel and the strap being disposed level, or parallel, to the bottom panel.



Inventors:
Correll, John D. (Canton, MI, US)
Application Number:
10/754324
Publication Date:
07/14/2005
Filing Date:
01/09/2004
Assignee:
CORRELL JOHN D.
Primary Class:
Other Classes:
229/113, 229/906
International Classes:
B65D5/50; B65D25/04; (IPC1-7): B65D25/04
View Patent Images:
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Primary Examiner:
ELKINS, GARY E
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
John, Correll D. (8459 HOLLY DRIVE, CANTON, MI, 48187, US)
Claims:
1. A box having a uniquely-disposed cup-holder strap disposed in a connected-corner section of the box, said box comprising: a bottom panel, a double-panel wall structure comprising an outer panel and an inner panel disposed substantially parallel to said outer panel, and another wall structure disposed adjacent said double-panel wall structure and comprising a wall and a corner flap attached to an end of said wall and at least partially enclosed between the inner and outer panels of said double-panel wall structure, thereby constituting a connected-corner section of said box; wherein said another wall structure further comprises a cup-holder strap extending from said wall to said corner flap and being disposed in the connected-corner section of said box.

2. The box of claim 1 wherein: said inner panel has an offset end edge disposed adjacent said another wall structure and at least a portion of said offset end edge is disposed on an interior side of said cup-holder strap.

3. The box of claim 1 wherein: at least one of said wall and said corner flap is disposed at an oblique angle to said bottom panel.

4. The box of claim 1 wherein: said box further comprises a rear wall and a cover hingedly attached thereto, and said double-panel wall structure opposes said rear wall and is a front wall structure of said box and said wall is a side wall of said box and said connected corner section is a front connected-corner section of said box, whereby said cup-holder strap is disposed in a front connected-corner section of the box.

5. A box having a uniquely-disposed cup-holder strap having an obliquely-disposed corner-making fold line, said box comprising: a bottom panel, a wall structure comprising a wall, a corner panel attached to an end of said wall, and a cup-holder strap disposed in cup-holding position and attached at one end to said wall and at another end to said corner panel and having opposing top and bottom cup-holder edges and a corner-making fold line extending between said top and bottom cup-holder edges, wherein said corner-making fold line is disposed at an oblique angle to at least a portion of at least one of said top and bottom cup-holder edges.

6. The box of claim 5 wherein: at least one of said wall and said corner panel is disposed at an oblique angle to said bottom panel.

7. A box having a bottom panel, a wall panel disposed at an oblique angle to said bottom panel, and a cup-holder strap attached at one end to said wall panel and disposed in cup-holding position and having a top edge, wherein at least a portion of said top edge is disposed substantially parallel to said bottom panel.

8. A blank for a box having a uniquely-disposed cup-holder strap disposed adjacent a double-panel wall structure, said blank being of foldable material cut and scored to define: a bottom panel comprising adjacent first and second edges, and a plurality of wall structures including first and second wall structures; said first wall structure being a double-panel wall structure comprising an outer panel hingedly attached to said first edge at a first bottom edge fold line and an inner panel hingedly attached to a top edge of said outer panel and said inner and outer panels each have an end edge disposed adjacent said second wall structure; said second wall structure comprising a wall hingedly attached to said second edge at a second bottom edge fold line and having a corner end disposed adjacent said first wall structure and further comprising a corner flap hingedly attached to said corner end at a corner flap fold line; wherein said second wall structure further comprises a cup-holder strap partially disposed in said wall and partially disposed in said corner flap, whereby said cup-holder strap is disposed at the corner end of said wall and, thereby, adjacent said first wall structure, and wherein at least a portion of the end edge of said inner panel of said first wall structure is substantially offset in relation to the end edge of said outer panel, thereby constituting an offset end edge of said inner panel; whereby after said blank has been erected into a box and said inner panel is disposed substantially parallel to said outer panel and at least a portion of said corner flap is enclosed between said inner and outer panels and said cup-holder strap is disposed in cup-holding position the offset end edge of said inner panel is disposed on an interior side of said cup-holder strap, thereby enabling said cup-holder strap to be disposed at a corner section of the box formed by a juncture of the double-panel first wall structure with the second wall structure.

9. The blank of claim 8 wherein: said corner flap fold line is disposed at an oblique angle to said second bottom edge fold line.

10. The blank of claim 8 wherein: said cup-holder strap has opposing top and bottom cup-holder edges and a cup-holder end fold line extending between opposing ends of said top and bottom cup-holder edges, wherein said cup-holder end fold line is disposed at an oblique angle to at least one of said top and bottom cup-holder edges.

11. The blank of claim 8 wherein: said cup-holder strap has opposing top and bottom cup-holder edges, and said corner flap fold line extends through said top and bottom cup-holder edges, and at least one of the cup-holder edges comprises opposing first and second portions respectively disposed on opposing sides of said corner flap fold line and wherein said first and second portions are non-aligned.

12. The blank of claim 8 wherein: said cup-holder strap has opposing top and bottom cup-holder edges, and said corner flap fold line extends through said top and bottom cup-holder edges, and at least one of the cup-holder edges comprises opposing first and second portions respectively disposed on opposing sides of said corner flap fold line and wherein said first and second portions are disposed at an oblique angle.

13. A blank for a box having a uniquely-disposed cup-holder strap having an obliquely-disposed cup-holder end fold line, said blank being of foldable material cut and scored to define: a bottom panel, a wall structure comprising a wall hingedly attached to said bottom panel at a bottom edge fold line, a corner flap hingedly attached to an end of said wall at a corner flap fold line, and a cup-holder strap partially disposed in said wall and partially disposed in said corner flap and having opposing top and bottom cup-holder edges and a cup-holder end fold line extending between opposing end points of said top and bottom cup-holder edges, wherein said cup-holder end fold line is obliquely disposed in relation to said bottom edge fold line.

14. The blank of claim 13 wherein: said cup-holder end fold line is disposed at an oblique angle to at least one of said top and bottom cup-holder edges.

15. The blank of claim 13 wherein: said corner flap fold line is disposed at an oblique angle to said bottom edge fold line.

16. A blank for a box having a uniquely-disposed cup-holder strap having non-aligned portions of cup-holder edges, said blank being of foldable material cut and scored to define: a bottom panel, a wall structure comprising a wall hingedly attached to said bottom panel at a bottom edge fold line, a corner flap hingedly attached to an end of said wall at a corner flap fold line, and a cup-holder strap partially disposed in said wall and partially disposed in said corner flap and having opposing top and bottom cup-holder edges, said corner flap fold line extending through said top and bottom cup-holder edges; wherein at least one of the cup-holder edges comprises opposing first and second portions respectively disposed on opposing sides of said corner flap fold line and wherein said first and second portions are non-aligned.

17. The blank of claim 16 wherein: said corner flap fold line is disposed at an oblique angle to said bottom edge fold line.

18. The blank of claim 16 wherein: said cup-holder strap has a cup-holder end fold line extending between opposing ends of said top and bottom cup-holder edges, wherein said cup-holder end fold line is disposed at an oblique angle to at least one of said top and bottom cup-holder edges.

19. The blank of claim 16 wherein: said cup-holder strap has a cup-holder end fold line extending between opposing ends of said top and bottom cup-holder edges, wherein said cup-holder end fold line is obliquely disposed in relation to said bottom edge fold line.

Description:

FIELD OF THE INVENTION

This invention relates to packaging in general and in particular to boxes and box blanks that have a cup-holder strap.

DESCRIPTION OF PRIOR ART

In the food-to-go industry, and particularly the pizza segment, companies often pack a food cup along with the primary product. The food cup is typically a cup of sauce and the primary product is typically pizza, breadsticks, chicken wings, or the like.

The primary product and food cup are typically packed in a corrugated box such as a corrugated pizza box or breadstick box. These boxes are typically of the type that has a double-panel, or rollover, front wall. To secure the food cup in position during transit, the box is typically equipped with a cup-holder strap in a side wall structure of the box. This strap is disposed in a rear corner section of the box. It extends from a side wall to a rear corner flap that's attached to a rear end of the side wall. Numerous pizza companies use boxes of this type. Perhaps the most prominent example is Papa John's.

FIGS. 1 and 2 each illustrate a section of a blank 10 and a box 12, respectively, which comprise a typical structure of a prior art cup-holder strap in a corrugated box having a double-panel front wall. The blank and box each have a bottom panel 20, a rear wall 22, a cover panel 24, and a cover side flap 26 (shown in FIG. 1 only). A side wall 30 is attached to bottom panel 20 at a bottom edge fold line 32. A rear corner flap 34 is attached to a rear end of side wall 30 at a corner flap fold line 36.

In blank 10 a cup-holder strap 40a/b is shown. The strap is essentially bisected into two parts (a and b) by corner flap fold line 36. Part 40a is disposed in corner flap 34 and part 40b is disposed in side wall 30. Cup-holder strap 40a/b has top and bottom edges that are respectively labeled 42a/b and 44a/b in the drawing. Each edge of the strap is divided into two portions (a and b) corresponding with the two parts of the strap. At opposing ends of the strap are cup-holder end fold lines 46 and 48. Each line extends between the opposing end points of the two edges.

In box 12 cup-holder strap 40a/b is shown in cup-holding position, or projecting inwardly from side wall 30 and corner flap 34 into a rear corner section of the box. Strap portions 40a and 40b are disposed substantially perpendicular to one another and are joined at corner-making fold line 50 (which, in the blank format, was previously a portion of corner flap fold line 36).

Several salient structural characteristics of the prior art box and cup-holder strap are now noted. First, the cup-holder strap is disposed in a rear corner section of the box (as opposed to a front corner section). The reason for this is that the structure of the double-panel front wall of the box does not allow installation of a functional cup-holder strap in the front corners. Second, this particular corner section happens to comprise a non-connected corner (as opposed to a connected-corner). As the term is used herein, a “non-connected corner” is a corner wherein at least one of the two walls comprising the corner lays back when the cover of the box is opened up and laid back. On the other hand, a “connected corner” is a corner wherein both of the walls comprising the corner stay in upright position when the cover of the box is opened up and laid back. Third, the walls of the box (i.e., walls 22 and 30) are disposed substantially perpendicular to the bottom panel. Fourth, corner flap fold line 36 is disposed substantially perpendicular to bottom edge fold line 32. Fifth, the two portions of each edge of the cup-holder strap are substantially aligned one to another. In other words, portions 42a and 42b are aligned and portions 44a and 44b are aligned. Sixth, cup-holder end fold lines 46, 48 are each disposed substantially perpendicular to edges 42a/b and 44a/b and are also disposed non-obliquely to bottom edge fold line 32. Seventh, corner-making fold line 50 is also disposed substantially perpendicular to edges 42a/b and 44a/b. Eighth, the cup-holder strap is disposed substantially parallel to bottom panel 20 and substantially perpendicular to side wall 30 and corner flap 34.

This particular prior art cup-holder structure works acceptably well in a box that has walls that are substantially perpendicular to the bottom panel. However, it is essentially non-functional when incorporated within a box that has slanting, or obliquely-angled, walls. In this situation, the cup-holder strap assumes an abortive-looking non-level disposition within the corner section of the box or, specifically, a disposition that is non-parallel to the bottom panel. This condition, firstly, imparts a “misdesigned” look to the box and, secondly, provides a crooked holder for the food cup.

So, there has remained a problem of how to provide a proper-looking, proper-functioning cup-holder strap in a box having one or more slanting walls. This problem has not been solved by the prior art but is solved by my invention.

In addition, a prior art pizza box and breadstick box having a double-panel, or rollover, front wall requires that the cup-holder strap be positioned in a rear corner of the box as opposed to a front corner. This is because the structure of the prior art double-panel front wall does not allow a cup-holder strap in the front corner to function, or to be moved into a cup-holding position. This particular box, which is the most predominately used box in the pizza industry, is known as the “traditional pizza box.” It is used by such firms as Pizza Hut, Little Caesars, and Papa John's. Because the structure of this box precludes use of a cup-holder strap in a front corner section of the box, the traditional pizza box must incorporate the cup-holder strap in a rear corner section exclusively. This limits the food cup carrying capacity of this box to two (rear) corners only.

So, there has remained a problem of how to carry a food cup in a cup-holder strap in a front corner of a traditional box having a double-panel front wall. This problem has not been solved by the prior art but is solved by my invention.

In conclusion, it would be highly desirable to provide a cup-holder strap structure that overcomes the above-described problems and disadvantages and, thereby, performs better in a box having slanting walls and/or a double-panel wall structure.

SUMMARY OF THE INVENTION

My invention is a blank and/or box having a cup-holder strap that incorporates one or more of the following features:

    • 1) A cup-holder strap disposed in a connected-corner section of a box having a double-panel wall;
    • 2) A cup-holder strap having a corner-making fold line disposed at an oblique angle to an edge of the cup-holder strap;
    • 3) A cup-holder strap projecting from an obliquely-angled wall of a box and being disposed parallel to the bottom panel.
    • 4) A cup-holder strap disposed adjacent a double-panel wall structure having an inner panel with an offset end edge adjacent the strap;
    • 5) A cup-holder strap having a cup-holder end fold line that is disposed obliquely to a bottom edge fold line; and
    • 6) A cup-holder strap having a cup-holder edge comprising opposing first and second portions that are non-aligned.

My invention typically would be used for packaging food products such as pizza and breadsticks; however, it could take other forms for other purposes, as well.

A complete understanding of the invention can be obtained from the detailed description that follows.

OBJECT AND ADVANTAGES

The main objects of my invention are:

    • 1) To enable the installation of a functioning cup-holder strap in a connected corner section of a box comprising a double-panel wall as one of the two adjoining walls of the corner; and
    • 2) To enable the installation of a cup-holder strap in a slanting wall structure while having the strap looking and functioning properly, or disposed substantially parallel to the bottom panel.

The advantage of my invention is the opportunity to install a functioning cup-holder strap in a greater variety of box types and in a greater number of corners within a box having a double-panel wall structure.

Further objects and advantages of the invention will become apparent from consideration of the following detailed description, related drawings, and appended claims.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

FIG. 1 is a plan view of a rear corner section of a blank for a prior art box having a prior art cup-holder strap.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the section of the blank of FIG. 1 after being erected into a box.

FIG. 3 is a plan view of a front corner section of a blank having a cup-holder strap of the instant invention.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view of the section of the blank of FIG. 3 after being erected into a box.

FIG. 5 is an end elevation view of the section of box shown in FIG. 4 viewed in the direction of arrow 5.

FIG. 6 is an outside side elevation view of the section of box shown in FIG. 4 viewed in the direction of arrow 6.

FIG. 7 is a top view of a complete box having a double-panel front wall and with a cutaway cover portion exposing a cup-holder strap disposed adjacent the double-panel front wall in a front corner section of the box.

LIST OF REFERENCE NUMERALS

Within a drawing, closely related components have the same number but different alphabetic suffixes. Between drawings, like reference numerals designate corresponding parts.

  • 10 section of a blank
  • 12 section of a box
  • 14 section of a blank
  • 16 section of a box
  • 18 box
  • 20 bottom panel
  • 22 rear wall
  • 24 cover panel
  • 26 cover side flap
  • 30 side wall
  • 32 bottom edge fold line
  • 34 rear corner flap
  • 36 corner flap fold line
  • 40a/b cup-holder strap
  • 42a/b top edge of cup-holder strap
  • 44a/b bottom edge of cup-holder strap
  • 46 cup-holder end fold line
  • 48 cup-holder end fold line
  • 50 corner-making fold line
  • 58 bottom panel
  • 60 double-panel front wall structure
  • 62 outer panel
  • 64 bottom edge fold line
  • 66 inner panel
  • 68 fold line
  • 72 end edge of outer panel
  • 76 offset end edge of inner panel
  • 80 side wall structure
  • 82 side wall
  • 84 bottom edge fold line
  • 86 front corner flap
  • 88 corner flap fold line
  • 90 cup-holder strap
  • 90a first part of cup-holder strap
  • 90b second part of cup-holder strap
  • 92a/b top edge of cup-holder strap
  • 94a/b bottom edge of cup-holder strap
  • 96 cup-holder end fold line
  • 98 cup-holder end fold line
  • 102 end point of edge
  • 104 end point of edge
  • 106 end point of edge
  • 108 end point of edge
  • 110 oblique angle
  • 112 oblique angle
  • 114 oblique angle
  • 116 oblique angle
  • 118 oblique angle
  • 120 oblique angle
  • 122 oblique angle
  • 124 corner-making fold line
  • 126 oblique angle
  • 128 oblique angle
  • 130 bottom panel
  • 132 rear wall
  • 134 cover
  • 136 double-panel front wall
  • 138 side wall
  • 140 cup-holder strap

DESCRIPTION OF A PREFERRED EMBODIMENT

Referring now to the drawings, there is illustrated a preferred embodiment of the invention in the format of a partial section of a corrugated blank and box.

FIG. 3 shows a corner section of a blank 14 and FIGS. 4, 5, and 6 show a section of a box 16 created from the blank. The intended use for the embodiment is as a food carton or, specifically, a pizza box or breadstick box. However, it will be appreciated, as the description proceeds, that my invention may be realized in different embodiments and may be used in other applications.

Structure of the Embodiment

Referring in particular to FIG. 3 which shows blank 14, there is a bottom panel 58, a double-panel wall structure 60, and another wall structure 80.

Double-panel wall structure 60 comprises an outer panel 62 hingedly attached to bottom panel 58 at an outer panel bottom edge fold line 64 and an inner panel 66 hingedly attached to a top edge of outer panel 62 at a fold line 68. (Numeral 64 also indicates an edge of bottom panel 58.) Panels 62, 66 have end edges 72, 76, respectively.

Wall structure 80 comprises a wall 82 hingedly attached to bottom panel 58 at a wall bottom edge fold line 84 and a corner flap 86 hingedly attached to an end of wall 82 at a corner flap fold line 88 that extends substantially from the top edge to the bottom edge of the wall. (Numeral 84 also indicates an edge of bottom panel 58.)

Wall structure 80 further includes a cup-holder strap 90. Strap 90 is approximately bisected into two parts by corner flap fold line 88, these two parts being labeled 90a and 90b. Part 90a is disposed within and attached to corner flap 86 and part 90b is disposed within and attached to wall 82. The strap has top and bottom edges respectively labeled 92a/b and 94a/b. The top edge is bisected into portions 92a and 92b and the bottom edge is bisected into portions 94a and 94b. Finally, at each end of the strap is a cup-holder end fold line (96 or 98) that extends between the opposing ends, or end points, of the cup-holder edges. Specifically, end fold line 96 extends between end points 102 and 104 and end fold line 98 extends between end points 106 and 108.

As can be seen, cup-holder strap 90a/b has substantially the same components as prior art strap 40a/b of FIG. 1. What sets the instant inventive strap 90a/b apart from prior art strap 40a/b is (a) the angles between the components and (b) the relationship of the strap to double-panel wall structure 60.

In the prior art strap of 40a/b each angle between components is either a ninety degree angle or a one hundred eighty degree angle (i.e., aligned). However, in strap 90a/b each angle between components is an oblique angle, meaning either more than or less than ninety degrees.

Specifically, there is an oblique angle 110 between corner flap fold line 88 and bottom edge fold line 84, an oblique angle 112 between cup-holder end fold line 96 and top edge 92a, an oblique angle 114 between cup-holder end fold line 98 and top edge 92b, and an oblique angle 116 between top edges 92a and 92b, which makes edge portions 92a and 92b non-aligned. Further, cup-holder end fold line 98 is obliquely disposed to bottom edge fold line 84, meaning that if the plane of fold line 98 were extended to intersect fold line 84 the intersection of the two lines would form an oblique angle. Further, although not labeled, it can be seen that there also are oblique angles between the cup-holder end fold lines and the bottom edge of the strap, as well. And there are oblique angles between corner flap fold line 88 and the edges 92a/b and 94a/b. Lastly, it is noted that there exists an oblique angle 118 between the top edge of side wall 82 and the top edge of corner flap 86.

In the drawing of blank 14, the specific angles are as follows. Angle 110 is 70 degrees, angle 112 is 110 degrees, angle 114 is 80 degrees, and angle 116 is 170 degrees. After blank 14 is erected into box 16 shown in FIG. 4, wall 82 slants outward at approximately a 100 degree angle to bottom panel 58 (shown as angle 120 in FIG. 5) and double-panel wall structure 60 and corner flap 86 slant inward at approximately a 70 degree angle to bottom panel 58 (shown as angle 122 in FIG. 6). However, due to the particular oblique angles between the components of cup-holder strap 90, the strap is disposed substantially level, or parallel to bottom panel 58. This provides for a nice looking, proper functioning cup-holder strap. Further, it is noted that in the box format of FIG. 4 there is a corner-making fold line 124 that joins cup-holder strap parts 90a and 90b. This fold line happens to be disposed at an oblique angle (126) to top and bottom edges 92a/b, 94a/b. (It is noted that when box 16 is in the format of blank 14 that corner-making fold line 124 is part of corner flap fold line 88.) Finally, as shown in FIG. 5, it is noted that cup-holder strap top edge 92b is disposed at an oblique angle 128 to side wall 82.

In addition to the unique oblique angles of cup-holder strap 90, a further unique feature of the strap is that it is disposed in a connected corner section of the box, or in a corner formed by the intersection of wall structure 82 with double-panel wall structure 60. This result is achieved by the special end edge configuration of inner panel 66. Specifically, end edge 76 of inner panel 66 is offset in relation to end edge 72 of outer panel 62. We refer to this as an “offset end edge.” This offset end edge 72 is disposed interior to cup-holder strap 90 and, thereby, allows strap 90 to “swing clear” of inner panel 66 when the strap is moved into cup-holding position, or moved to an inward-projecting disposition. This result cannot be achieved with the prior art double-panel wall structures that lack an offset end edge on the inner panel, which is why prior art cup-holder straps are disposed in non-connected corners, or corners lacking a juncture with a double-panel wall.

FIG. 7 shows a whole box 18 with a cut-away cover and comprising a bottom panel 130, a rear wall 132, a cover 134, an inward-slating double-panel front wall structure 136, an outward-slanting side wall 138, and a cup-holder strap 140 disposed in a connected front corner section of the box.

The particular angles used in the preferred embodiment are for illustrative purposes and do not constitute a recommendation. The general design process involving this invention is, first, to decide what degree of slant, or angle, is desired for each wall of the box and, following that, calculate the degrees that are needed in the various oblique angles of the cup-holder strap to result in a level strap after the blank has been erected into a box. This can either be done mathematically (via plane geometry) or by trial-and-error, meaning by designing and cutting a sample, eye-balling the resulting box, and then making adjustments in the various oblique angles of the cup-holder strap to bring the strap into desired position.

Within the drawing of the blank, a fold line between component parts of the invention is depicted with a dashed line. The type of fold lines shown in the drawings are presently preferred but it will be appreciated that other methods known to those skilled in the art may be used. Within the context of this invention, a fold line can be created by a number of means such as, for example, by a crease or score in the board, by a series of aligned spaced short slits in the board, and by a combination of aligned spaced short and long slits. In some cases, when a longer slit is bounded on the ends by a series of shorter slits or a score, the longer slit may be slightly offset in alignment from the shorter slits or score for the purpose of creating a slot along the fold line when the blank is set up into a box. Such an offset slit may be referred to herein as a “slot-forming slit.” Nonetheless, the entire combination of long and short slits is considered to constitute a single fold line unless otherwise indicated.

In addition, to create a fold line where one panel is folded 180° to lay parallel on another panel, the fold line may constitute two narrowly-spaced parallel scores or series of aligned slits. In this case, the two narrowly-spaced parallel scores or series of aligned slits constitute a single fold line unless otherwise indicated.

In conclusion, as referred to herein, a fold line is any line, either real or imaginary, between two points on the blank or box along which the board is intended to be folded when the blank is being erected into a box or when the box is being manipulated as described herein.

Operation of the Embodiment

Blank 14 is erected into box 16 by the same method that has been used for erecting double-panel wall structures for the past fifty years or so. Regarding the “strap-erecting process,” or the process of putting cup-holder strap 90 into cup-holding position, this can be accomplished either prior to erecting the box or afterwards. If done prior to erecting the box, it is accomplished by pushing the strap inward and away from wall 82 while simultaneously folding corner flap 86 inward. If done after erecting the box, it is accomplished by pushing part 90b inward until the entire strap “pops” inward and into cup-holding position. This action can cause part 90b to bend or buckle in the middle. However this does not diminish the cup-carrying performance of the strap. If it is deemed undesirable to have a bend in part 90b, then the first strap-erecting process should be used.

CONCLUSION, RAMIFICATIONS, AND SCOPE

I have disclosed a unique box and cup-holder strap whereby the strap can be disposed in a connected corner of the box and the box can have one more slanting walls with the strap being disposed in a level disposition.

Within the foregoing discussion of the invention, the labeling of any components by a numerical adjective (i.e., “first,” “second,” etc.) is for reference purposes only and does not denote any particular location of the components within the blank or box. Further, the term “hingedly attached” refers to two panels (or a panel and a flap) joined together at a fold line, and does not imply any degree of movability of the panels in the erected box format.

The illustrated number, size, shape, type, and placement of components represent one possible embodiment. Many other combinations and configurations are possible within the scope of the invention.

The foregoing discussion has pertained mainly to packaging food products such as pizza and breadsticks. However, it should be realized that my invention could be used for other purposes, as well. In conclusion, it is understood that the invention is not to be limited to the disclosed embodiments but, on the contrary, is intended to cover various modifications and equivalent arrangements included within the spirit and scope of the appended claims, which scope is to be accorded the broadest interpretation so as to encompass all such modifications and equivalent structures as is permitted under the law.