Title:
Briefcase and purse system
Kind Code:
A1


Abstract:
The present invention enable businesswomen to carry business and personal items in a single carrying device that further enables her to take the personal items out of the device in a separate, carryable container that can be easily removed and then replaced when desired.



Inventors:
Golden, Joan Deborah (Chandler, AZ, US)
Application Number:
10/924008
Publication Date:
04/14/2005
Filing Date:
08/21/2004
Assignee:
GOLDEN JOAN DEBORAH
Primary Class:
International Classes:
A45C7/00; (IPC1-7): A45C11/04
View Patent Images:
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20080185250Case with compression bagsAugust, 2008Martins et al.
20080128231Dividable luggageJune, 2008Newman
20040188203Protective and non-protective carrying deviceSeptember, 2004Gold et al.



Primary Examiner:
WEAVER, SUE A
Attorney, Agent or Firm:
Joan, Deborah Golden (500 W. LINDA LANE, CHANDLER, AZ, 85225, US)
Claims:
1. A device for carrying items comprising: a) a briefcase constructed of substantially rigid material; and b) a purse constructed of substantially rigid material that fits within the briefcase and is easily removed therefrom; wherein the rigidity of the briefcase material causes the briefcase to stand upright and the rigidity of the purse material causes the purse to stand upright even when removed from the briefcase.

2. A briefcase and purse system comprising: a) a briefcase further comprising: i. four substantially rigid vertical briefcase walls forming a rectangle, each of the four briefcase vertical walls attached at one end to a substantially rigid briefcase bottom and attached at the other end to a substantially rigid briefcase top, wherein the briefcase top is moveable from an open position to a closed position; ii. at least one briefcase divider attached to at least two vertical briefcase walls; iii. a removable briefcase strap connected to at least one vertical briefcase wall; b) a purse that fits within the briefcase and is easily removed therefrom, the purse further comprising: i. four substantially rigid vertical purse walls forming a rectangle, each of the four vertical purse walls attached at one end to a substantially rigid purse bottom and attached at the other end to a substantially rigid purse top, wherein the purse top is moveable from an open position to a closed position; ii. at least one purse divider attached to at least two vertical purse walls; iii. a removable purse strap connected to at least one vertical purse wall; wherein the rigidity of the briefcase walls causes the briefcase to stand upright and the rigidity of the purse walls causes the purse to stand upright even when removed from the briefcase.

Description:

CROSS-REFERENCE TO RELATED APPLICATIONS

This application claims the benefit of co-pending U.S. Provisional Application No. 60/497,175 filed Aug. 23, 2003.

BACKGROUND

Women typically carry personal items such as lipstick, wallet, and eyeglasses in a purse. This is especially true for women who are dressed for business, because business attire typically does not have pockets. Businesswomen often carry briefcases for business papers and the like in addition to their purses. Until the advent of the present invention, both bags have been needed because frequently the businesswoman will need personal items only, such as when visiting the ladies' room, and it doesn't make sense to carry the briefcase to the bathroom. Carrying multiple bags is clumsy and inefficient. It also results in an unsightly pile of luggage at the woman's feet during meetings or while traveling.

It is desirable to enable businesswomen to carry business and personal items in a single carrying device that further enables her to take the personal items out of the device in a separate, carryable container that is easily removed and returned into the devise when desired.

BRIEF DESCRIPTION OF THE DRAWINGS

The objects and advantages of the instant invention will become apparent to those skilled in the art from the following detailed descriptions thereof, taken in conjunction with the drawings, in which:

FIG. 1 is a perspective view of the outer Briefcase (hereafter referred to as “Briefcase”) in accordance with the teachings of the instant invention.

FIG. 2 is a perspective view of the inner Purse (hereafter referred to as “Purse”) in accordance with the teachings of the instant invention.

FIG. 3 is a perspective view showing where the Purse resides within the Briefcase (indicated by the shadowed portion) and from which it may be easily removed and replaced in accordance with the teachings of the instant invention.

FIG. 4 is a perspective view showing the top of the Briefcase.

FIG. 5 is a perspective view showing the bottom of the Briefcase.

FIG. 6 is a perspective view showing one side of the Briefcase.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view showing the opposite side of the Briefcase.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view showing the front side of the Briefcase.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view showing the back side of the Briefcase.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the top of the Purse.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the bottom of the Purse.

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of one side of the Purse.

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of the opposite side of the Purse.

FIG. 14 is a perspective view of the front side of the Purse.

FIG. 15 is a perspective view of the back side of the Purse.

FIG. 16 is a blow-out view of portions of FIG. 1.

FIG. 17 is a blow-out view of portions of FIG. 1.

FIG. 18 is an Alternate embodiment showing the front side of the Briefcase with one pocket on the front side, one pocket on the side and indicates another pocket on the other side substantially similar to the side pocket in this view, although not visible in this view.

FIG. 19 is an Alternate embodiment showing the front side of the Briefcase with two pockets on the front side, one pocket on the side and indicates another pocket on the opposite side substantially similar to the side pocket in this view, although not visible in this view.

FIG. 20 is an Alternate embodiment showing the corners and the top flaps of the Briefcase being rounded.

FIG. 21 is an Alternate embodiment showing top flaps of the Briefcase (45 and 47) combined into one piece that overlaps the top onto the front side with a fastener on that front side to secure the top. It further indicates an alternative embodiment of a series of pinholes that can be positioned on either sides or on the front side or the back side (which will allow sounds from within the Purse and/or Briefcase to be heard outside the Purse and/or Briefcase.)

FIG. 22 is an Alternate embodiment showing the front side of the Purse with one pocket on that front side, another pocket on the side and indicates another pocket on the opposite side substantially similar to the side pocket in this view, although not visible in this view.

FIG. 23 is an Alternate embodiment showing the front side of the Purse with two pockets on that front side, and one pocket on the side (or possibly both sides and/or front side). It further indicates an alternative embodiment of a series of pinholes that can be positioned on either sides or on the front side or the back side (which will allow sounds from within the Purse and/or Briefcase to be heard outside the Purse and/or Briefcase.)

FIG. 24 is an Alternate embodiment showing the corners and the top flaps of the Purse being rounded.

FIG. 25 is an Alternate embodiment showing top flaps of the Purse (85 and 87) combined into one piece that overlaps the top onto the front side with a fastener on that front side to secure the top.

FIG. 26 is an Alternate embodiment showing a Purse having an altered shape, which differs from the original Purse in the preferred embodiment (FIG. 2).

FIG. 27 indicates (in the shaded area) how Alternate embodiment (FIG. 26) would fit into the Briefcase (FIG. 1).

FIG. 28 is an Alternate embodiment that indicates the Briefcase with no top (often referred to what is commonly known as a “tote”). It also indicates the dividers, which can be seen in FIG. 3.

FIG. 29 is an Alternate embodiment that indicates the Purse with no top. It also indicates the dividers, which can be seen in FIG. 3.

FIG. 30 is an Alternate embodiment that indicates the Briefcase with no top and handles that are more or less permanently attached to the front side and back side of the Briefcase. Additionally, it indicates that the outside of the Briefcase may be decorated in any manner, with any design or color desired.

FIG. 31 is an Alternate embodiment that indicates the Purse with no top and handles that are more or less permanently attached to the front side and back side of the Briefcase. Additionally, it indicates that the outside of the Briefcase may be decorated in any manner, with any design or color desired. However, it should be noted that any decoration or design on the Purse should not be raised in any manner, which would impede its removal and replacement within the Briefcase.

FIG. 32 indicates a view of looking down into an alternate Embodiment showing a possible reconfiguration of the dividers seen in FIG. 3 to allow materials in more or less the shape of a large envelope, magazine or file to be placed inside the Briefcase.

FIG. 33 indicates a view of looking down into an alternate Embodiment showing another possible reconfiguration of the dividers seen in FIG. 3.

FIG. 34 indicates a view of looking down into the preferred Embodiment of the Purse and indicates where the dividers can possibly be located so that the referenced items may be placed therein.

FIG. 35 indicates a view of an Alternate Embodiment of the back side of the Briefcase where hooks and a loop can be added so that the shoulder strap which can be seen in FIG. 1 and FIG. 2 can be adapted to slip over the user's arms to enable carrying the Briefcase on the user's back.

FIG. 36 indicates a view of an Alternate Embodiment of the back side of the Purse where hooks and a loop can be added so that the shoulder strap which can be seen in FIG. 1 and FIG. 2 can be adapted to slip over the user's arms to enable carrying the Purse on the user's back.

The essential purpose of the instant Briefcase and Purse System is to incorporate an inner and easily removable and replaceable Purse within an outer Briefcase.

The optional top flaps of the Briefcase open completely for complete and unobstructed access to the inside of the Briefcase and to the Purse.

It can be seen in the instant invention that the Purse can be easily removed from and replaced within the Briefcase by lifting it out of the section designated for it within the Briefcase. The ease of removing the Purse from the Briefcase and the ease of access to the items in the Purse is enhanced by the Briefcase and the Purse sharing one shoulder strap.

The shoulder strap is easily detached and reattached to either the Purse (when it has been removed from the Briefcase) or to the Briefcase by means of clasps that hook onto rings that are permanently attached to the sides on both the Briefcase and the Purse. The Briefcase and Purse sharing the same shoulder strap eliminates the problem that can be caused by a shoulder strap that is permanently affixed to the Purse getting tangled and impeding its removal from and replacement in the Briefcase. The Purse, unimpeded by a long shoulder strap to have to wrap around the Purse or attach in any other manner, will easily slide back into its place within the Briefcase.

The (optional) top flaps of the Purse (just like the top flaps on the Briefcase) also open completely to allow for complete and unobstructed access to the inside of the Purse.

The goal is to have easy access for the removal and return of all objects to a place within either the Purse or the Briefcase.

The Purse and the Briefcase are divided into sections so that all items stand more or less upright within either the Purse or the Briefcase. The sections would contain, for example, but not limited to, items such as a wallet, checkbook, glasses, cell phone, and/or cosmetics.

The inside of the Briefcase may be configured in any number of ways for various items, depending upon the user's needs. In the preferred embodiment, one divider inside the Briefcase will be horizontal to allow for the insertion of files, reports, books, papers, magazines and the like. The other dividers and pockets are to accommodate things such as a water bottle, toiletries, baby supplies, etc. There is an option of a zippered compartment (pocket) within any one or more of the sections. (Note: all divider sections must be more or less rigid in order to maintain the ease of removal and replacement of items within either the Briefcase or the Purse.

DETAILED DESCRIPTION OF THE PREFERRED EMBODIMENTS

Turning now to the drawings, in which like reference characters indicate corresponding elements throughout the several views. Attention is first directed to FIG. 1.

FIG. 1 indicates the Briefcase. FIG. 1, along with FIG. 2 and FIG. 3, embody the principle of the instant invention. FIG. 1 is generally indicated by reference number 40.

FIG. 1 includes reference number 41 indicating an upstanding front wall that is substantially equal to upstanding back wall 42 in height and width, reference number 43 indicating an upstanding sidewall that is substantially equal to upstanding side wall 44 in height and width. All four walls are generally the same height. Front wall, 41 and back wall 42, however, are generally wider than sidewalls 43 and 44. All four walls are attached to each other at their vertical edges (reference numbers 68, 69, 70 and 71) by sewing or with any other device or method.

Reference number 45 indicates a substantially horizontal top that is more or less equal in width, attached to, and/or part of, reference number 41 at its longest top edge (reference number 52). Reference number 45, while attached (by sewing or by any other device or method) to 41 at reference number 52, is unattached at its generally three other sides. 45 has attached to it, by sewing or by any other device or method, at reference number 46, approximately at its center, more or less, facing more or less upwards, the bottom turning mechanism for a turn-lock closure, made generally of metal or any other material, or the bottom portion of any other closure method.

Reference number 47 indicates a substantially horizontal top that is equal in width, attached to, or part of, reference number 42 at its longest top edge (reference number 53), or substantially horizontally. 47 while attached (by sewing or by any other device or method) to 42 at reference number 52, is unattached at its generally three other sides and more or less overlaps 45.

Reference number 48 is an opening in top flap 47 to accommodate the top turning portion of the turn-lock closure, number 46, made generally of metal or any other material, or the top half of any other kind of closure.

Reference number 51 is a generally u-shaped handle which can be made of almost any rigid, or semi-rigid material, that is attached to reference number 47 at reference numbers 49 and 50 by means of sewing or by any other method or device.

Reference number 52 indicates the horizontal upper front edge of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 53 indicates the horizontal upper back edge of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 54 indicates the horizontal upper side edge of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 55 indicates the opposite horizontal upper side edge of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 56 indicates the horizontal bottom front edge of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 57 indicates the horizontal bottom back edge of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 58 indicates the horizontal bottom side edge of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 59 indicates the opposite horizontal bottom side edge of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 60 indicates the upper front corner of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 61 indicates the opposite upper front corner of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 62 indicates the upper back corner of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 63 indicates the opposite upper back corner of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 64 indicates the lower back corner of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 65 indicates the lower front corner of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 66 indicates the opposite lower front corner of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 67 indicates the opposite lower back corner of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 68 indicates the vertical back edge of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 69 indicates the vertical front edge of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 70 indicates the opposite vertical front edge of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 71 indicates the opposite vertical back edge of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 72 indicates the bottom of Briefcase 40.

Reference number 73 indicates a ring on the side such as that which may be commonly known in the industry as a D ring.

Reference number 74 indicates a ring on the opposite side, although not seen in this view, such as that which may be commonly known in the industry as a D ring.

Reference number 75 indicates a releasable fastening mechanism, such as that which may be commonly known in the industry as a spring clasp, at the end of shoulder strap 79.

Reference number 76 indicates a releasable fastening mechanism on the opposite end of shoulder strap 79, although not seen in this view, such as that which may be commonly known in the industry as a spring clasp.

Reference number 77 indicates the location where reference number 79 is attached to reference number 75.

Reference number 78 indicates the location where reference number 79 is attached to reference number 76, although not seen in this view.

Reference number 79 indicates the detachable shoulder strap.

Attention is now directed to FIG. 2. FIG. 2 indicates the inner Purse. FIG. 2, along with FIG. 1 and FIG. 3, embody the principle of the instant invention. FIG. 2 is generally indicated by reference number 80.

Reference number 80 includes: reference number 81 indicating an upstanding front wall that is substantially equal to upstanding back wall 82 in height and width, reference number 83 indicating an upstanding sidewall that is substantially equal to upstanding side wall 84 in height and width.

All four walls are generally the same height. Front wall, 81 and back wall 82, however, may be generally wider than sidewalls 83 and 84. All four walls are attached to each other at their vertical edges (reference numbers 105, 106, 107 and 108) by sewing or with any other device or method.

Reference number 85 indicates a substantially horizontal top that is more or less equal in width, attached to, and/or part of, reference number 81 at its top edge (reference number 89), or horizontally. 85 while attached (by sewing or by any other device or method) to 81 at reference number 89, is unattached at its generally three other sides. 85 has attached to it, by sewing or by any other device or method, at reference number 86, approximately at its center, more or less, facing more or less upwards, the bottom turning mechanism for a turn-lock closure, made generally of metal or any other material or the bottom portion of any other closure method.

Reference number 87 indicates a substantially horizontal top that is equal in width, attached to, or part of, reference number 82 at its top edge (reference number 90), or substantially horizontally. 87 while attached (by sewing or by any other device or method) to 82 at reference number 90, is unattached at its generally three other sides and overlaps 85. 87 has, at reference number 88, approximately at the center of 87, more or less, an opening to accommodate the top turning portion of the turn-lock closure, made generally of metal or any other material, or the top portion of any other closure method.

Reference number 89 indicates the horizontal upper front edge of Purse 80.

Reference number 90 indicates the horizontal upper back edge of Purse 80.

Reference number 91 indicates the horizontal upper side edge of Purse 80.

Reference number 92 indicates the opposite horizontal upper side edge of Purse 80.

Reference number 93 indicates the horizontal bottom front edge of Purse 80.

Reference number 94 indicates the horizontal bottom back side edge of Purse 80.

Reference number 95 indicates the horizontal bottom side edge of Purse 80.

Reference number 96 indicates the opposite horizontal bottom side edge of Purse 80.

Reference number 97 indicates the upper back corner of Purse 80.

Reference number 98 indicates the opposite upper back corner of Purse 80.

Reference number 99 indicates the upper front corner of Purse 80.

Reference number 100 indicates the opposite upper front corner of Purse 80.

Reference number 101 indicates the bottom front corner of Purse 80.

Reference number 102 indicates the bottom back corner of Purse 80.

Reference number 103 indicates the opposite bottom front corner of Purse 80.

Reference number 104 indicates the opposite bottom back corner of Purse 80.

Reference number 105 indicates the vertical back edge of Purse 80.

Reference number 106 indicates the vertical front edge of Purse 80.

Reference number 107 indicates the opposite vertical front edge of Purse 80.

Reference number 108 indicates the opposite vertical back edge of Purse 80.

Reference number 109 indicates the bottom of Purse 80.

Reference number 110 indicates a ring on the side such as what is known in the industry as a D ring.

Reference number 111 indicates a ring on the opposite side, although not seen in this view, such as what is known in the industry as a D ring.

Also seen in FIG. 2 are reference numbers 75, 77 and 79 from FIG. 1.

FIG. 3 shows the top flaps of Briefcase 40 (45 and 47) opened and a view can be seen of Purse 80 inside the Briefcase (Purse 80 is indicated by the shaded area.) FIG. 3 also indicates, by Reference letter C, the broken line together with the continuous line that has arrows at each end, the movement of removing the inner Purse from and replacing the inner Purse into the outer Briefcase 40. Purse 80 slides easily into and out of place within the Briefcase 40.

FIG. 3, together with reference number 120 indicate the ability of Purse 80 to be removed from Briefcase 40 and then easily replaced within Briefcase 40.

Reference numbers 121, 122, 123, 124 and 125 indicate dividers within Briefcase 40 and Purse 80.

Reference letter A indicates the opening of flap 45, B indicates the opening of 47, C indicates the opening of flap 85, and D indicates the opening of flap 87.

FIG. 4 shows a perspective view of the top of Briefcase 40.

FIG. 5 shows a perspective view of the bottom of Briefcase 40.

FIG. 6 shows a perspective view of one side of Briefcase 40.

FIG. 7 is a perspective view showing the opposite side of Briefcase 40.

FIG. 8 is a perspective view showing the front side of Briefcase 40.

FIG. 9 is a perspective view showing the back side of Briefcase 40.

FIG. 10 is a perspective view of the top of Purse 80.

FIG. 11 is a perspective view of the bottom of Purse 80.

FIG. 12 is a perspective view of one side of Purse 80.

FIG. 13 is a perspective view of the opposite side of Purse 80.

FIG. 14 is a perspective view of the front side of Purse 80.

FIG. 15 is a perspective view of the back side of Purse 80.

FIG. 16 is a blow-out view of 73 and 75 in FIG. 1. (Note: Reference numbers 73 and 75, are substantially the same or similar to reference numbers 74 and 76 which are on the opposite side of Briefcase 40 and can not be seen in this view. Reference numbers 73 and 75 are substantially the same or similar to reference numbers 110 and 111 of Purse 80.)

FIG. 17 is a blow-out view of 46 and 48 in FIG. 1. (Note: Reference numbers 46 and 48 of Briefcase 40 are substantially the same or similar to reference numbers 86 and 88 of Purse 80.)

FIG. 18 is an Alternate embodiment showing the front side of Briefcase 40 with one pocket 131 on the front side, another pocket 132 on the side and indicates another pocket 133 on other side substantially similar to the side pocket in this view, although not visible in this view.

FIG. 19 is an Alternate embodiment showing the front side of the Briefcase with two pockets 141 and 142 on the front side, one pocket 132 on the side and indicates another pocket 133 on the opposite side substantially similar to the side pocket in this view, although not visible in this view.

FIG. 20 is an Alternate embodiment showing the corners 60, 61, 62, 63, 64, 65, 66, and 67 and the top flap 47 of the Briefcase being rounded.

FIG. 21 is an Alternate embodiment showing top flaps of the Briefcase (45 and 47) combined into one piece 151 that overlaps the top onto the front side and has its closure 46 and 48 on that front side to secure the top. It further indicates the alternative embodiment of a series of pinholes 152 that can be positioned on the front side (or may be placed on either sides or on the back side) of the Briefcase 40 (which pinholes will allow sounds from within the Purse 80 and/or Briefcase 40 to be more easily heard).

FIG. 22 is an Alternate embodiment showing the front side of the Purse 80 with one pocket 161 on the front side, one pocket 162 on the side and another pocket 163 on the opposite side substantially similar to the side pocket in this view, although not visible in this view.

FIG. 23 is an Alternate embodiment showing the front side of the Purse 80 with two pockets 171 and 172 on the front side. It further indicates the alternative embodiment of a series of pinholes 173 that can be positioned on the front side (or may be placed on either sides or on the back side) of the Purse 80 (which pinholes will allow sounds from within the Purse 80 and/or Briefcase 40 to be more easily heard).

FIG. 24 is an Alternate embodiment showing the corners 97, 98, 99, 100, 101, 102, 103 and 104, and the top flap 87 of the Purse 80 being rounded.

FIG. 25 is an Alternate embodiment showing top flaps of the Purse 80 (85 and 87) combined into one piece 181 that overlaps the top onto the front side and has a fastener on that front side (86 and 88) to secure the top.

FIG. 26 shows Reference number 190, an Alternate embodiment of the Purse having an altered shape that differs from the original Purse in the preferred embodiment (FIG. 2). This Purse is more or less flatter (more or less depth and more or less width) than the preferred embodiment.

FIG. 27 indicates how Alternate embodiment (FIG. 26) would fit (indicated by the shadowed area) into the Briefcase 40. It further indicates the substantially upright and more or less rigid divider sections 121 and 122 in the Briefcase 40 and dividers 123, 124 and 125 in Alternate Embodiment 190. Reference number 200 indicates how Alternate Embodiment 190 may be removed and reinserted within the Briefcase 40.

FIG. 28 indicates an Alternate embodiment that indicates the Briefcase 40 with no top (possibly referred to as what is commonly known as a “tote”), as reference number 210. It also indicates dividers 121 and 122, which can be seen in FIG. 3.

FIG. 29 is an Alternate embodiment that indicates the Purse 80 with no top as reference number 220. It also indicates dividers 123 and 124, which can be seen in FIG. 3.

FIG. 30 is an Alternate embodiment that indicates the Briefcase 40 with no top 210 and handles 231 and 232 that are more or less permanently attached to the top of the front side and to the top of the back side of the Briefcase 40. Additionally, it indicates that the outside of the Briefcase 40 may be decorated in any manner 233 and 234, with any design or color desired, and in a variety of different materials (while remaining rigid enough so as to accommodate the easily removable and replaceable Purse 80.

FIG. 31 is an Alternate embodiment that indicates the Purse 80 with no top 220 and handles 241 and 242 that are more or less permanently attached to the top of the front side and to the top of the back side of the Purse 80. Additionally, it indicates that the outside of the Purse 80 may be decorated in any manner 243 and 244, with any design or color desired. However, it should be noted that any decoration or design on the Purse 80 should not be raised in any manner, which would impede its removal and replacement within the Briefcase.

FIG. 32 indicates a view of looking down into Alternate Embodiment 210 which shows a possible reconfiguration of dividers 122 and 123 (seen in FIG. 3) and added divider 251, to allow materials in more or less the flat shape of a large envelope, magazine or file to be placed inside the Briefcase.

FIG. 33 indicates a view of looking down into an alternate Embodiment showing another possible reconfiguration using only dividers 121 and 123 (seen in FIG. 3.)

FIG. 34 indicates a view of looking down into Alternate Embodiment 220 of the Purse 80 and indicates where dividers 124 and 125, and additional dividers 251, 252 and 253 can possibly be located so that items such as those indicated by referenced items 254 (zippered compartment), 255 (eyeglasses and case), 256 (make up case), 257 (comb), 258 (lipstick), 259 (cell phone), 260 (holders for pens) and 261 (wallet) may be placed therein.

FIG. 35 indicates a view of an Alternate Embodiment of the back side of the Briefcase 40 where what maybe referred to as D rings 271 and 272 and a loop 273 may be added so that the shoulder strap 79 (which can be seen in FIG. 1 and FIG. 2) can be adapted to slip over the user's arms to enable carrying the Briefcase 40 on the user's back.

FIG. 36 indicates a view of an Alternate Embodiment of the back side of the Purse 80 where what may be referred to as D rings 281 and 282 and a loop 283 may be added so that the shoulder strap 79 (which can be seen in FIG. 1 and FIG. 2) can be adapted to slip over the user's arms to enable carrying the Purse 80 on the user's back.